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Daily press. [volume] (Newport News, Va.) 1896-current, January 27, 1907, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045830/1907-01-27/ed-1/seq-4/

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, THOMAS PLATT
WANTS 816 DAMAGES
Begins Action Against the Wash?
ington Post for $300,000 and
the Times (or $200,000. I
SUE DENIES "COHCIIMW" STORIES.
Brande as False Story Told of Western
Trip and Says Good Name Is Hurt,
and That She Has Been Subjected
to Public Ridicule and Hat?
red.
? WASHINGTON, D. C., .Ian. 20.?
Mi's. Ulllun T. IMatt. wife of Senator|
Thomas ('. I'lnlt. of Now York,
through hoi* attorney, II. Winship
Win-alley, has begun u libel suit In
Jhe *mi?ywv .f>trt of tlje- restrict of
Columbia against the Washington
Post Company and the Washington
Times Company Tor $300.000 and $200,
000 daninges, respectively;
She reelles in her declaration that
"she Is and always has been absolute?
ly honorable and was a person of
good nature, credit and reputation and
deservedly enjoyed the esteem 'nipl
good opinion of the community
general and enjoyed a good reputa?
tion among a large circle of friends
and acquaintances and wits and Is the
wife of Thomas i C. Plutt, a member
of the United States Senate, and was
and Is wholly free from the matters
hereinafter complained of." Mrs.
Plat I then sols forth the articles as
ptlblished.
She brings suit on three counts |
against Iho PoBt and Iwo counts
against the Times. The suits against
the Post are based on stories con?
necting the name of .1. K. Hedges, the
Plutt. family coachman, with that of
Mrs. Platt.
Mrs. PI.-.;; also reviews the publish?
ed stories of her alleged Intimate re?
lations with Hedges on a trip made
br her, Senator Plait and others In
the West, and declares that "each
und every charge, statement and In?
nuendo made and Implied in and about
'any part of hucIi matter published
against plaintiff by the defendants]
afpi'usuld. except that part alleged as |
true horeln. Is absolutely und unqual?
ifiedly false."
The parts admitted lo be true re?
late simply to the fact that Hedges was
employed, that he did go on the Cali?
fornia trip, etc.
By reason of the stores complained
' of Sirs. Platt alleges that she has
been greatly Injured In her good
nnmo, credit, fame und reputation,
and bus been exposed to public rid?
icule, haired ami contempt and cans- |
ed to suffer great anxloty of mind.
She denies the allegations that she
forced a marriage between Senator
Plait, and herself.
The suit ugttliiht the Washington]
Times Is also bused on the publication
of stories In which the family conch
mun figured.
Sight of Eye Destroyed by Disease?
.Tried Five Doctors but Grew
Worse ?In Agony Eight Months
? Parents Discouraged, Until
They Tried Cuticura Remedies
IN ONE WEEK ALL
SORES DISAPPEARED
"Our little girl, one year and a half
old, was taken with eczema or that was
what the doctor said it was. Wo called
. In the family doctor and he gave some
tablets and said she would bo all right
in a fow days. The eczema grow worso
and wo called in doctor No. 2. Ho
said aho was teething, as soon as tho
teeth wore through sho would bo all
right. Rut sho still grew worse. Doe
tor No. 3 said it was etv.ema. ? By this
timo sho was nothing but a yellow,
greenish sore. Well, lie said he could
help her, so wo lot him try it about
n week. Ono morning wo discovered
a littio yollow pimple on ono of her
eye(? Of course wo phoned for doctor
3. Ho came over and looked her
,wver and said that lie could not do any
8 thing moro for her, that wejiad bettor
:; take her to some oyo b|>eclnfi.st, since, it
?was an ulcer. ? So wo wont to Oswogo
to doctor No. -I, and ho said tho eye?
sight Was gone,but that he'could holp it.
We thought we would try doctor No. 5.
Well, that proved tho same, only ho
charged $10 more than doctor No. 4.
We were nearly discouraged. I saw
ono of the Cuticura advertisements in
. . tho paper and thought wo would try
tho Cuticura Treatment, so I went and
purchased a sot of Cuticura Remedies,
?which cost mo $1, and In three days
V our daughter, who had been sick alx>ut
\ eight months, showed great improve?
ment, and in one week all sores had dis?
appeared. Of course It could not re?
store tho eyesight, but if we had used
Cuticura in timo I am ennfldent that
it. would have saved the eye. We think
thero Is no remedy so good for any skin
trouble or impurity pf tho blood as
C'utioura. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Abbott,
R. F. D. No. 0, Fulton, Oswego Co.,
.N. Y., August 17, 1000."
complete External and Interns! Treatment, for
Every Humor ol tnfantf. Children, nnil Adults
ronr.lst? of C'ullciira Soar. <25e.) lo Cleanae the
Hk;n. Cultcur* Ointnicni (.'Or.) lo Ural tr.o Skin,
and OMIriirn Resolvent (SflO. (in II?, term olCliorn
lalfl Calcrt Pill?. 2."?\ per vlnl of Ml) to IMirlfv the
Blood. Sold Hiii.iKhoirs Hie world Totter mug
A Ch-m. Corp.. Roto P.i)[*t., iio.ion. 5l.t?s.
?T Mailed free. Oa million ol Skin and Scalp.
THEATRICAL TEMPESTS.
Tlir H'ny n llnliiatorm Is Produced
??I Hie -Hum-.
Probably not utoro tbau one person
In n hundred stops to consider bow a
rainstorm Is produced on the stage.
Few perhaps liavc' ever given the sub?
ject any serious thought.
During the coming up of tho storm
there is seen vast clouds of dust, the
wind blows n gale, and suddenly the
rain comes down In torrents. It Is an
effect so natural that ouo almost Im?
agines tho elements arc genuinely on
the warpath. Vet, though the rain is
real water, not a person Is actually
drenched, because the water comes
'down nt the very front of the stage,
while the players are well back and
not at all exposed to Its moisture. [
It might bo thought that to produce a
Storni many Intricate hits of machinery
would bo necessary, yet such is not tho
case, for the simplest devices produce
the effect desired. These are some gns
pipes punctured by myriads of holes,
through which the water runs from
small barrels, each about half full, at
either end. The sound of the wind Is
made by a revolving barrel which
touches a heavy piece of canvas In Its
rounds. The thunder effect Is caused
by the artistic manner in which a man
boats a bass drum, and the gusts of
dust are blown across the .stage.by .un
electric fan. 'The Hashes or lightning
"come from an electric battery connect-'
cd by wires which when placed In con-'
tact throw out the da?illng flashes. A
metal plate, which had been specially
prepared by lirst being heated to white
heat and then scratched |>y a knife, Is
placed in a calcium light machine and
gives the effect or lightning In the ills-1
tauce.?New York Mall.
POETICAL DEATHS.
Welcoming (hp Clriui Urn per With n
OrectlMK I" Vor??-.
There have been numerous Instance*
of poetical deaths, TIM Khiporor Adrl
nn made a poetical address to Ids own
soul as death was casting the seal of
final silence over his lips, mid Marga?
ret of Austria while almost within the
grasp or death In a (erriilc storm at
sen calmly sat down and Composed her
epitaph In verse. The ship weathered
the gule. however, and the epitaph was
not needed.
Philip Stro/./.l when imprisoned und
awaiting death on the gallo\.s resolved
to commit suicide. Before be killed
himself he carved with the sword upon
Which a few minutes Inter he Impnhil
himself the following verse from Vir?
gil on the wall: "Rise some avenger
from my blond."
The Miirijuifl or Mont rose when he
was condemned to have his limbs nail?
ed to (lie gates of four cities said that
he was sorry that he did not have
enough limbs to nail to all the cities
In Europe, und this he put into beauti?
ful verse as ho was walklug to his ex?
ecution.
Patrls. a poet 'of 'Cuen, (hiding him?
self nt the door of death, composed a
poem, and Do Rnrroaux. it Is said,
wrote while on his deathbed a well
known sonnet which was soon after?
ward translated into Kngllsh. ? New
York Trlbuhe.
II In IIornc.;m Finish.
"Dear me. cabby." said an old lady
08 she alighted from a four wheeler nt
Liverpool street station, "your horse's
knees are bail."
"Don't you go and think it's; bocos
'e's got Into a silly 'nblt of tr.vln' to
stand on 'is '.end in the street, ma'am,
'cos It ain't," was the reply. "That
there 'oss Is a serious thinkln' 'oss,.'e
Is, ma'am. A worry prayerful anlmilc
'e Is too. 'F/s been prayln' thin last
six year as 'qw 'is pore old utaster'll
one o' these days come across a kind
'carted parly whut'll give 'Im n copper
or two over 'is barb fare. Intl. Lor'
bless yer. ma'am," he added as he look?
ed at the shilling the old lady had
handed him. "'e's losin' faith fast, and
unless smucthink soon 'Appens 'e'll die
a bloomin' hinntlel."?London Tit-Bits.
Why Wo ?Jet ItHllKmtlon. I
Recently a medical man gnve It as
his opinion that the oven was respon?
sible for more dyspepsia than any oth?
er household contrivance. 'The modern
cook tlnds It much easier to bake than
to roast. Tho spit dog has almost gone }
out or existence, and there Is seldom j
any one in the kitchen to take its place.
It follows very reasonably' that any ,
food cooked within a confined space'
will not be so digestible us Hint done j
before an open lire, whore all gases |
Uhivi freedom to escnpe.-1 Country Life, j
V .Inlt.
"Did you tell your teacher that I
helped you with yoiir Kreuch exercise,
Kidney V"
"Yes. rather."
"And what did he say?"
"He said he wouldn't keep nie in to?
day, 'cos It didn't seem fair that I
?honld suffer for your Ignorance."
How We l>o ChmtKc!
"Aha'." exclaimed Mr. .Icllus. "Been
treasuring another man's picture all
these years, hey?"
"Not exactly," answered his belter
half. "That's a photo taken of yon,
dear, when Jon had hair."?Washington
Herald.
nroaccht Home to lllm. .
Crusht?After nil, right doesn't al?
ways make might, does It? Frnnkmau
?I don't know about that. The mntri
inonlnl rite neoius to have made a mite
3f you.?Richmond Dispatch. ' a
* Henr,'Henri
"Pa."
"Well'.'"
"What's women's rights':"
"Everything the.r want; Run nway."
-Cleveland Leader.
. _xsm^acAH^k.
CAPITAL. DRY GOODS HOUSE
WASHINGTON AVlF. AT 30TH ST.
THE STORE THAT SAVES YOU MONEY.
A Silk Sale for One
Day
MONDAY WE WILL PLACE ON
sale 500 yards of regular fifty
cent China Silk, In white, black
and all good colors at, 39C
NEW WHITE DRESS FABRICS
AND WAISTINQS.
25c
The new sprint; weaves are now
on sale, clean crisp and fresh from
the manufacturers.
OA I NT Y E MBROI DE It ED
Swisses, yurd .
IMPORTED E M R R O I D E R E D
Swisses, very choice En**
styles, yard . ?Ub
FINK DOTTED SWISS. itigt
Dress styles, yard ....... I Ob
P HETTY DOTTED SWISS. Ifl,
r ?yard.. ,.??/::.?. lUb
CHECK MUSLINS. GOOD 0*?
quality, yard. Ub
CHECKED MUSLINS. FINE
grade, 10'fi
yard..
HANDSOME STYLES IN FINE
Mercerized Madras. OE-?
yard . ttlb
40-lNCH INDIA LINONS; EXTRA
special bargain; very sheer 1 1 ?
and fine, yard . lib
NEAT EFFECTS IN MERCERIZED
Madras; special value, 10I-?
yard . I?.2b
36-INCH FINE WHITE LINEN,
for Sulls or Waisls; spe- OP-?
clal. ynrd . C \J U
EXTRA SPECIAL.
E N O L IS1I LONGCLOTH. 40
Inches wide; worth 20c yard. We
will sell a full 12-yard fl? 1 OO
piece for . %P I iUU
FINE WHITE CROCHET 00-?
Quilts, each . UOb
WHITE SPREADS; REGULAR
$1.08 value special
at .
cm po
Si i iuu
PILLOW CASES, MADE OF EX
Ira good nienched Cotton, 1 f)^
each . IUb
GOOD HLEACHED SHEETS. ?0-?
72x00, each . OUb
SALEM HLEACHED BOLSTER
Cases, size 12x72, 91*??
each . OOb
CRESCENT CAMBRIC. YARD
wlde, flue finish, IOC
A Big Sale of New Dress Goods
ADVANCE SHOWING OF THE POPULAR FABRICS FOR THE
COMING SEASON?ALL AT 8PECIAL PRICES FOR MONDAY'S
SALE.
WOOL FABRICS.
NEW SPRING STYLES. DOUBLE
fold. Half-Wool Novelties, Plaids
and Checks, light nnd
medium shades of greys
and tuns. OP-?
yard . i.sJKj
CHECKED MOHAIRS. ALL EO/?
colors, yard ., OUb
PLAIN MOHAIRS. NEW ?0-?
Spring colors, yard .
NEW BPR1NG WEAVES IN PLAID
und Checked Wool Suit- PO-?
Ings, yard . O?O
3C-INCH BEIGES. IN ALL THE
New Spring shades ol* ? Q ^
grey, yard . OUb
.{8-INCH PLAID WOOL TAFFE
tas: repihrkahly handsome "711?
styles, yard . I ub
CHECKED VOILES. 40-lNCHES
wide; new effects,
yard .
NEW SPUING STYLES. IN WOOL
Plaids; 52-lnt-hcs wide, fl? 1 OO
yard . S? I iUU
CHECKED PANAMA; 52-INCHES
wide, white grounds, with color?
ed woven checks, fl> 1 Op
yard . %p I i?.0
$1.00
WASH FABRICS.
IMPORTED SILK GINGHAMS:
English make. In lnrge and small
plaids; all colors; beauti- OE-?
fnl effects, yard . <LOb
THE POPULAR HENLY SERGES:
thirty different patterns to se?
lect from. i Q<?
yard. I Ob
NEW ORGANDIES: COPIES OF
the French designs, lOl.
yard . It 2 b
ONE LOT MORE THAN 500
yards of regular 12 V-2c Flowered
Organdies; on special sale Mon?
day at, 7'-?
yard .*. I 2b
SILK NOVELTIES. IN ALL COL
ors: white grounds, with colored
cords In cheeks and stripes; all
evening shades; greys and Cham?
pagne, with embroidered figures
and corded checks. The hand?
somest line ever shown In this
city at, OP-?
yard . ?Ob
IMPORTED ORGANDIES. FROU
Frou Silk Fabrics; all col- PO-?
ors. yard . OVb
SPECIAL FOR MONDAY ONLY
Lawti, yard .
45-INCH WHITE
PERSIAN 10-,
. I UO
EXTRA SPECIAL.
FANCY WEAVES,
10-INCH COLORED TAFFETA SILK, IN
at yard .^
As the quantity is limited, you h'.ul better come in
These Silks formerly sold nt 50c to 75t: yard.
25c
morning.
PRINTS AND GINGHAMS?SPE?
CIALS FOR MONDAY.
YARD-WIDE PERCALES: 0*?
light grounds yard . Ob
YARD-WIDE PRINTED. AND
corded Madras; 12 l-2c 10-?
gerade, yard .,. IWb
DRESS AND APRON GINGHAMS:
good styles and regular 8 l-3c
values. C1,?
yard . U2b
WE WILL GIVE A SPECIAL
DISCOUNT OF 10 PER CENT.
OFF THE PRICE OF ANY
BLANKET OR COMFORT IN
OUR HOUSE.
MONDAY WE WILL SELL WHITE
Figured Curtain Swisses 10-?
at. vard. IWb
FIGURED CRETONNES O .?
at. yard . ?b
BEST YARD-WIDE SILK- tOJU
olines at, yard . I ?>2b
OUTING FLANNELS.
LIGHT COLORED GROUNDS, IN
stripes and checks; good weights
for gowns or skirts. 10*?
ynrd . IWb
FLANNELETTES. LIGHT AND
dark colors, pretty styles for
Wrappers and Dressing 0?,
Sacques. yard . Ob
TRICOT FLANNELS.
IN LIGHT AND DARK COLORS.
All-Woo); reduced from 10-?
25c to, yard . I Ob
COLORED MOIRES.
FOR PETTICOATS, WAISTS OR
Coat Linings; formerly sold nt
35c: ? reduced to, 10-?
yard . I Ob
New, 2-Clasp, Silk
Gloves
IN WHITE AND BLACK; BEST
Glove ever offered at the Eft?
price, pair . 3UC
NEW LACES AND EMBROID?
ERIES.
POPULAR VEILINGS.
ALL THE NEW EFFECTS. IN
Chiffon; dotted and plain 9P?,
mesh, at yard . OOb
I'HE GRANDEST COLLECTION
of these goods ever shown in this
city. Beautiful embroidered Skirt
patterns; very wide embroidery,
full 5 yard pat?
tern.
$3.75
FLOUNCINGS OF EVERY DE
scription, from the finest to the
cheapest. The handsomest pat?
terns wo have ever shown. One
lot especially effective styles;
Worth 98c. at
yard .
DAINTY CORSET COVER EM
broideries; 35c value, 2Q"
75c
yard .
44-INCH DRESS NETS; B9c
value, yard .
b
50c
SWISS EMBROIDERIES. EDO
lugs and Insertions; special val?
ues in matched Sets; 1 9lr?
some at, yard . ? fc2b
Others up to, yard.75c
LACES.
ORIENTAL ALLOVERS, IN
cream and white; some EO-?
at, yard . OUb
Prices range up to, yard.92.00
VENICE ALL-OVERS. CREAM
and white; very spe- tf 1 *|P
clnl nt, yard . S* i ifcO
ORIENTAL BANDS, CREAM AND
white, all grades; some 101-?
styles at, yard . I fc2b
GERMAN AND FRENCH VALS.;
prices range from ynrd, 0P-?
$1.00 to . ?.Ob
Special discounts by the pleco.
MEDALLIONS.
ORIENTAL AND VENICE. BEAU
tlful styles; 12 l-2c and 25C
up, each
BABY IRISH LACE EDGINGS
and Insertions to match; all
grades; some pretty A O*/?
styles, at yard . Ifc2b
ORIENTAL EDGEo. IN BUTTER
and white, wide nnd narrow; all
styles; some at, If)/*
yard. l??
I LOCOMOTIVE 0
Kor more Khan a year the New
York Central Railroad Company hns
been making tests on the experi?
mental tracks near this city of the
electric locomotive as a means of
handling trunk-line traffic. From
time to time some inkling of the'
result has become public, but not '
in sufficient detail to sat ini'y public j
curiosity or give a fair idea of Its ;
probable hearing on the future of;
railroad traction powerfl There now
?come, however, official statements of
what bus been done and the details
are of surpassing Interest since
they seem to point the way toward
n radical change In tlho means of J
railroad power in the no distant ,
future.
It appears from the reports of
the experts hi charge of the experf
Imehts, that the new electric loco?
motive can hold {la own in drawing
a ten-car passenger train with
?host team engines. Iii the matter of
economy of operation and at higher
speed. The latest of the new ina- j
chines has n normal rating of 2,
200 horsepower, whld'.i is capable
of being increased to 4.000 hoi
power, when exigencies demand Its
extreme output. During the long
trial this- locomotive has been run i
over 50,000 miles, in all sorts of
weather and consequent varying ;
conditions. At one time It was!
run continuously for eighteen hours,
In a drhing snowstorm, und under
conditions which would have put a
steam locomotive out of commis?
sion. On this occasion the train-!
ton load was 335 tons or approxi- j
mately that of the Empire State.
Expreb-s or the Black Diamond Ex- ?
press.
Under lighter loads the eicctrlc
locomotive easily maintained a speed
of elghty-fltve miles an hour; and
at . this hlgih rate of speed proved I
to be easily controllable. In com-;
iterative tests, tests with the same
weight of train and the same weight
Oji the driving whecl? the electric ;
locomotive is sa'd t?\ thave demon?
strated its superiority over the steam
locomotive to the satisfaction of the
experts'.
Another feature of the tests Is In
the matter of cost of maintenance
of the electric locomotive, in coin
varlsou with its older foster-brother.
F THE FUTURE \
A careful record was kept for the
entire period, and It was- found thut
the cost of maintenance of the clec-1
trie locomotive was less than 2
cents per locomotive miles, as
against from ~> to 7 cents per loco?
motive mile for steam locomotives .
in similar service.
Incidentally several other advan?
tages have been credited to the \
electric locomotive, as Ithe result ot ;
the exhaustive tests to which Jt lins
been subjected. Its construction Is
such that the center of gravity is
comparative low, thus eliminating
several factors of danger incident to
hlgjh speed. Then again, the ability
for controlling, and if need be, stop?
ping a train suddenly is- one of the
most prominent features of tho
electrical machine. The entire ab?
sence of smoke, while being perhaps
a minor merit, is one which will
commend itself generally.
That the electric locomotive will
finally supersede the steam motor,
fur passenger traffic at least, on
through trunk railways, is the 'be?
lief of many experts. However this
may be, the results; of the tests .
made Indicate that a pronounced
step has been taken in tlhat direc?
tion?Schcnectady Evening Star.
Straight 6 per cent, money to lend In
/mall or large amounts, on approved
city rcul estate. See us before you
arrange elsewhere C. B. NELMS,
President, Clarence O. Nelms, Secre?
tary; Wi E. Kitchen, Treasurer; W. j
Howard Bowen. Directors. H. E. i
Parker. L. P. Stoaraes, Albert Howe.
No. 2517 Washington Avenue, ftenl i
Estate, Insurance, Rents, Loans, etc.
1-22-6L
Loudest Whistle in World.
East St. Louis now has the biggest
steam wfliistlo in the wordl. It is
a remarkable triple machine, with
three voices?a three-cbime whistler,
whose capacity for the annihilation
of pace is extraordinary. This whls-j
tie blows a 10 mile blast at half;
steam, and with favorable wind has J
a disturbing power of *50 miles. It '?
costs $1 every time It is blown. But
this great whistle Is not all noise.
It i.s an Idea in economy, a whistle
trust. ? noise combine. Almost all
the little noises, yelps, toots and
whines of smaller mechanical throats
in East St. Louis arc now dumb
The giant whistle trust whistles for
them. The independent whistles
have to whistle off time to be heard
Within the range of this whistle
are said to be one hundred thousand
people who tell time toy it.-Fron
the New York Tribune.
Adam and Eve.
(Stuart Maclean in the Milwaukee
Journal.)
What was- It Adam got from Eve?
An apple?
That's not what scientists believe
Who grapple
With learning deep and ore pro?
found,
Who everything thus expond
And wear strange buttons aljUround
Their lapel.
Not to he out of date, or worse,
Was Eden's,
For there's tihlngs happened which
you'd scarce
Give credence;
And so those learned men declare
With gesture deft an debonair,
The story that we used to hear
Is pretense.
The ancient tale is one to ban
Both them on,
And one that we should any man
Condemn on;
For, if the truth you would receivo
The fruit' that Adam got from Eve
Was only, these wise men believe, '<
A lemon.
Telephone to The Shah!
Adispatch from Teheran to the
Dally Mall states that, Persians
having complained that the Shah's j
entourage prevented them from ap?
proaching His Majesty with grlov- j
ancos the Shah has ordered that j
a telephone communicating with t'lio j
palace be fixed In the public square '
and has invited the people to con- j
verse with him direct.
Long Live me King! i
is the popular cry throughout Euro-,
pean countries; while in America, the
cry of the present day is "I.ong live
Dr. King's Now Discovery, King of
Throat and Lung Remedies!" of
which Mrs. Jnlln Ryder Paine, Truro.;
Mass., says: "It never falls to give
immediate relief and to quickly cure
a cough or cold." Mrs. Paine's opin?
ion Is shared by a majority of the in?
habitants of this country. New Dis?
covery cures weak lungs and sore
throats after all other remedies have
fnlled; and for coughs and colds it's
the only sure cure, Guaranteed by
the Ideal Pharmacy. 50c and $1.00.
* Social-Personal &
The indies of the public library
I committee will bold a meeting tomnr
I row afternoon at the Focahontas ho?
tel. All interested are invited to at
j tend. I
1 Rehearsals for the oratorio '"The
I Crucifixion" will be held at Trinity
I Methodist church Wednesday even
I Ing at 8:30 o'clock.
Miss Helen Lcylandcr, a student -
at the Woman's College, Richmond,
is the guest of ha- aunt, Mrs ,T.
Kennedy Coras, on Wc-st aenue
Mr. William Roth is II! fat Ms
i home on Huntington avenuu v.Hh
grip.
! Mr. C. E. York is in ChiOago on
j a business trip.
BE MY SWEETHEART.
Sweet heat, be my sweetheart
Wien the birds are on the wing,
When bee and bud and babbling
flood.
Bespeak the birth of spring;
'Come, sweetheart, be my sweetheart
And wear this pony ring.
i
Sweetheart, he my sweetheart
j In the golden summer glow
i Of the earth aflush with the grac?
ious hlush
Whidh the ripening fields fore?
show;
Dear sweetheart be my sweetheart.
As into the noon wc go.
Sweetheart, be my sweetheart
When falls the bounteous year,
When the fruit and wluc of tree and
vine
Give us their (harvest cheer;
O, sweetheart, ho my sweetheart,
For winter it draweth near.
Sweetheart, be my sweetheart
Win en tho year Is white and old,
When the firo of youth is spent, for
soot.1i,
And the hand of age Is cold;.
Ycl- sweetheart, be my sweetheart,
Till the year of our love ho told.
?By Eugene Field.
In the Garden of Eden.
Adam?I'm afraid you'll find your
paue'ly of clothing a bit trying
when winter comes.
Eve?At all events, 1m Well fixed
for tho opera!?From the Bohcmlac.

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