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Daily press. [volume] (Newport News, Va.) 1896-current, February 24, 1907, Image 7

Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045830/1907-02-24/ed-1/seq-7/

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The things that matter happen in I
CHo heart. Luhister was conscious of
Horaething akin to the old thrill, the,
old indefinable souse of completeness,
us he looked across the room and saw
lier, and ho rather despised himself
for the weakness of It.
It seemed so paltry, so trivial, this
revival of dead Issues, this quickening
of dulled pulses at the mere Bight of
' :i women's face. And of all women's
faees?hers! It was ns though n war?
rior, who had Tared through the bat
tie's <lln and havoc, had come, scarred
and maimed, from the cannon's mouth
into the pleasant places of the world;
was. nevertheless, weak enough, fool
enough, to be moved by the bursting
or n squib and the scent of a spoon?
ful of powder. 1
And yet?How well she* looked! How
lightly Time had tried her! Not that
three years ought to make any per?
ceptible difference In a woman of
five and twenty, but It rather hurt
his sense of self love to find that the
separation had told us little outward
ly upon her ns It had upon him. Not
:i change in her; not a flaw In her!
It was as though Time had reversed
the rolling of the scroll and brought,
bei- back to the springtime and the
days or her rose white girlhood. The
same sweetly smiling mouth, the same
brightly flashing eyes, the same pret?
ty, birdlike trick of the never quiet
bead. It would have been Irritating
in any* other woman, that constant
fluttering disquiet, but in her?Ion?
isier hesitated for u moment, und
then swung nwny from lite throng
about, him and made his way across
the room to where she stood. Some
time he must meet her. he told him?
self?that was Inevitable?so, why
not now ns well ns any other?
Within a yard of where she stood,
and now so near that lie could have
'stretched forth his hand and touched
?ier, his hostess burred the way. She
w"as one of those amiable social Idiots
who label nil their guests at Intro?
duction as though the glory of their
attainments shed some reflected
greatness on themselves.
"Mr. Lnnister, permit, me to dot ?in
you for n moment." she Interposed.
'T want, to have the pleasure of In?
troducing n relative. My nephew, Mr.
Fawdrey. Mr. Lanlster. You must
bave heard or Mr. Ijinlster even In
the West. Philip?Mr. George Lanls?
ter. who wrote 'Don Scarpla' nnd 'The
Sands of Pactolus.' Everybody has
read them1 and talked of them?every?
body."
Lanlster knew from the sudden ces?
sation of sound that she too had
heard, and the consciousness Hint she
had turned her head nnd was looking
at. him brought another vague, Inde?
finable thrill. He got through the In?
troduction somehow, then lifted his
.?jros nnd let them find their way to
'Ircrs.
Always, since first he heard of her
success, am) knew that the laurel, of
attained desire had come to her at
last, ho had known that somo day,
somewhere, somehow, they two must
meet again?that, was inevitable?and
always he had wondered what form
the words of -greeting would take.
Now that the moment bad come.?
"Er?How do you do?" she replied
with one of her joyous lnughs. "You
know 1 always did Doady?it's a way
or mine."
Doady. The old pet name fell from
her lips ns naturally as though it.was
only yesterday she used it last, and
although the mention of it brought a
faint gust, of color to Minister's face,
no chnngo came over the smiling love?
liness or hers.
"T hair fancied 1 should meet you?
one meets everybody of importance at
Mrs. Montrossor's sometime, you
know." she went on in a slightly low?
ered voice. . "It Is the tax that. Art
has to pay to Commercialism?when
Commercialism isin a position to write
its check for millions. After all. the
call of Mammon pejietrales oven the
Temple of the Must's, Doady, nnd a
millionairess can lure even Melpo?
mene, if she serves strawberries and
peaches in midwinter. Yes, I rather
thought 1 should meet you here."
"Did that influence you at all?"
"Influence me?" She gave one. of
her sweet, rippling laughs and twitch?
ed her bared shoulder in the way Min?
ister remembered so wrell. "My
dear Doady, why should it?"
"Yes, that's it?why should It?" said
Lautster a tririe moodily. "We each
chose our own path, each cut adrift,
and, ns you say. why should a mere
meeting again Influence us? ? I. read
a great, deal about you In the papers
lust winter. That chap tfho writes
the 'Musical Matters' In 'The Era'
spoke highly of your succosb In Milan
and Rome; likened your voice to Pat
ti's in her prime, nnd nil that sort of
thing."
"Yes. they were very kind to nie?
public and critics alike. I could have
sung nil this winter at La Scala If
I chose. They offered me tho engage?
ment on my own terms; but 1 pre?
ferred to come home."
"Why?"
"Good gracious! you ask a woman
'Why?' And of nil women?me! The
fancy look me. that's all. I never in?
dulge in self analysis. It Is too much
like performing a surgical operation
on a butterfly. You know,' looking at,
him archly, "I am a butterfly: Yon j
used to say so often, when--when tho
honeymoon began to wane."
"I said so many things then?
things that I meant nnd?things that
I didn't."
"Yes, I know. It's the way with
men and husbands."
"And women and wives," ho added
a trifle resentfully.
? "And women and wives." she admit?
ted sweetly. "One as well he just.
. flow droll it seems to think that we
were ever that!" *
".lust, do you mean?"
"No?husband and wire. We wero
always just, you know. It was that
that made us part. Suoh sillies as
we were!"
"To part?" a thin note eagerness
In his voice.
"Oh. mercy, no! To marry. It wii.s
the maddest of our many mad mis
-1 -r
JLSUUUJLttJLPJUJLOJL^^
takes. Fancy two such devotees to
Art?ana Art with a capital A. please]
?as you and I. being absurd enough
to think that wo could live n hum?
drum life together and give up the
roses and lilies for a bundle of dried
herbs. Do you remember how I used'
to madden you with my practice
when you wanted to write? And do
you remember how you used to make
I me cry?sometimes with remorse add
sometimes with?with other feelings
?when I spent tho whole day with
Madam ' Lfarge and forgot to order;
anything for dinner?"
"7es." admitted Lanlster gloomily;
"I'm afraid I wasn't very pleuHnnt at
those times. And they happened along
very frequently. That was the worst
of It. You see. It?It's Impossible for
Art to be everything In life."
"Especially when it isn't one's own
particular branch of Art. There's so
much in the question of viewpoint.
Doady. No wonder we bored each
other: ( know you tried honestly, and
1 know that I did. too: but It was all
a mistake?nil a wretched; blundering
uncomfortable mistake, and there was
only one way to right It. and that
was to do as we did. Don't you think
so?"
"I don't know." snid I.aiilster gloom?
ily, looking down and toying with his
watch chain. "Perhaps, if?if the
baby had lived?"
She put up her and suddenly, and
all the light went out from her spark-1
ling eyes. "Don't!" she said in a
whisper. "I can't bear to talk of It
even yet. One may treat Marriage as
an epigram and Lire as a jest; but
Motherhood?Don't speak of It: There
are chords which only dend hands
may play upon and that even Memo?
ry shrinks from touching."
There was a moment of silence be?
fore Lahister could trust himself to
look tip. When he did so. she had
recovered her composure. Her Hps
were again smiling and her eyes again
bright?brighter than over, for the
light that, came from them came
through a glaze of nndropped tears.
"Can't, we go somewhere and get
away from this beastly crowd?" said
Lanlster. wrinkling his brows and
studying his fingernails. "It seems so
absurd to be talking like this In n
ball room."
''Bverythng we have ever done has
been absurd." she nnswered. with a
laugh. "Whv shouldn't we continue
the practice?"
"Does that, mean that you had rath?
er remnln Where yon are?"
"No; that I had rather do what you
suggest. It seems, so dellclously ri?
diculous for two sensibly separated
persons to sit down and enjoy a quiet
tete-a-tete. But?there is so much I
want to hear from your own lips."
"Is there? Do you really enre?"
"About your literary success? Oh.
yes!" she Interjected smilingly. 'Af?
ter-all, there is something In reflect?
ed greatness, ajid one can't hell) feel?
ing a little pride In being the wife
of a .great literary genius?especially
when she remembers that she contri?
buted, to that greatness, and, indeed,
made It possible, by removing her?
self from his march to the Temple
of Fame. I want to talk to you about
'The Sands of Pactolus.' It was sim?
ply superb?the novel of the yonr.
But you must be tired of hearing
that."
"I am?a little," admitted Lanlster.
"I've changed a bit. you see. Onco
upon a time?But let that pass- t
went to talk of other things tonight.
Can't we go somewhere and be alone
together for a little while, Peggy-?"
She laughed and gave her head an?
other bird-like little twitch. "What,
here?" she said gaily. "Was ever any?
thing so absurd? Who could be alone
eyen for one poor instant when Mrs.
Montressor holds forth for the bene?
fit of her 'dear five hundred'? F.very
nook and corner overflows with the
ingredients of the 'rich jam.' "
"Then somewhere else?"
"Somewhere else is indefinite. Un?
less?"
''Unless what?"
The momentary lull was broken by
the band striking up again. She
glanced at her program and then out
over the filled room.
"I am down on the card for Pds
with Mr. Halliday," she said, "and
bore he comes to claim it. Do you
mind if I leave you?"
"Have I any right to a choice? But
won't you go on with what you were
saying? 'Somewhere else is indefi?
nite, unless?' "
"Unless you care to find out where
'Madame Peggy Lanlsterl' lives, and
to play Lochinvar?and carry her off
there?to Arcadia?arter this dance is
done." she said, with a laugli and a
faint rise of color, as she walked by
him and went to meet her advancing
partner. And ir more was said. I^an
Ister lost It In the gush ot the music
and the swish of her skirt as she
went, circling down the long light
room with a coat sleeve around her
waist and her eyes shining out over
the curve of it man's shoulder.
I It was after twelve o'clock, and she
had danced five dances without catch?
ing any further glimpse of him, al?
though she had looked searchlngly
'about the crowded rooms, when she
came upon him next. He was stand?
ing at the foot of the stairs in the big
entrance hall with his hat in his hand
and a long white opera cloak over his
arm. "Doady!" sho began with a lit?
tle surprised laugh. "I had given you
up: I?"
The cloak was round her shoulders
heforo she could finish the sentence
and Lanlster was pulliug her hand
through his arm. "Come!" he said.
"I've been waiting for you for ages.
I reit like rushing in and throttling
that fellow you were dancing with
last."
"Whv didn't you? It would have'
expediated matters, and I think that
I should have, relished It a little." ... \
"Oh don't talk nonsense! As If
V hadSdie right?as if I hadn't tor-'
felted that! For Cod's sake. Peggy! I
what have we two being doing with
our lives?"
"What we always wauled In do
with them, of course; devoting them
4
s
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l.o Axt and crowning them with the
lanrol of Success)."
"Success! You call it success? Isn't
there something better?bette?- anil
nobler than just that?"
Her only answer was a laugh. They ,
were out In the frosty, star pierced
darkness by this lime, making their
way down the steps to where u puff-!
ing nnto waited. Lindster lifted her
lightly and placed her in it and in an?
other moment the great dark hulk
swung away from tho curb and went
chugging off into the quiet ot the
night.
"You haven't answered my last
finestlon," said Lanlster. breaking the
Silence wmch had fallen between -
them.
She laid a deprecating Viand upon '
his sleeve and looked up at him with
troubled eyes.
can't just, yet." she. said. "Don't
ask mo anything for a time; don't ask
mo anything here. I want to bo sure."
"Of what? Or whom?"
She looked away without answer?
ing, and sat for a long time with hands1
loosely folded in her lap. And so
she was still sitting when the auto,
slowed down and stopped.
She looked up at the house before
her and then round at Lanlster, and he
could see in the faint light that her,
face was very pale. "It is my own '
home?tho home of?of the opera
singer," she said In a voice out of
which all the snap and timbre seem?
ed to have gone. "Yon took me at
my word, then? And after I mention?
ed l/ocldnvnr! You carry nie off and
?bring me to mv own home?"
"Because I have none of my own,"
he nnsworod. "I live at a hotel. I,
couldn't respect you and take, you
there."
She flung him a laugh, wholly
sweet, utterly joyous, and, rising,
jumped out of the auto before, hej
dould help her. "How like a man?
how very like a man!" she sa' l. her I
faco breaking into smiles, und the
wet light in her eyes again. "Come! .
It is our own Arcadia again."
And how much more like Arcadia |
than she Imagined, she realized when j
she ran with him to her own bow-er
and flung open the door; for all the
room was filled with flowers. White
roses, white lilies?whole sheaves of
them?in vases and urns and lying in
drifts of creamy fragrance every?
where. And in the midst of the floral
confusion stood her maid with arms
brimful of blossoms.
"Ah. mndanie. whnt shall I do wi/.
zom?" she cried, perplexed and des
pnirful. as her mistress appeared,
"Figure to yourself ze ovtromo diffi?
culty. They shall come, not. twenty
minutes since, wiz ze compliment, zn
commissionaire say, of one Monsieur
Lanistalre?and zero is not room for
ze half. What shall I do v.lz ssdni
nil?"
"Throw them down?anywhere?anil
go. Kelicie. go!" said her mistress, with
a laugh in which the hysteria of hap?
piness was clonrlv iraceable. "Oil,
yon may listen at the door if you like
?it in uil mio to mo. ho Hint you no.
And tliin is why you did not conic
for mo at tho end of tlint first dance?1'
Blic added, turning to Lanlster as tho:
Insulted maid went out and hanged
the door behind her. "How nice of
you?how tender of you! Yon remem?
bered what 1 said all those miserable
yours auo?'A successful singer's path
should be strewn with flowers, and
you shall live to see that happen to
nie.' And you still 'remembered!"
"It?it was only a little thin-;. Peg?
gy."
"Only a little thing!V She hud
thrown aside her clonk and was rtin?
ning her bared arms through the fra?
grant heap, piling the things up
against her fare and laughing like .1
happy child; then with sudden aban?
donment bhe dropped them all and.
seating herself, pill her elbows upon
the table, made a bridge of her two
hands and rested her chin upon
them. -Only a little thing! As If all
earth, and heaven?yes, and even bell
itself?were not made up of little
things! Such little things as this
mean victory, mean redemption,
Oeorge."
"Then, if it Is so. may I ask again,
Pe.Rgy, What have wo two boon doing
with our lives? 1 know yon snld that
we had made successes of them; but
there's a rue leaf in orrery laurel
! crown, dear, and a rose In every do
I feat. Can't we go back, Peggy?hack
j to Arcadia and the days Unit were?"
He came round the. table and took
her hand in his. "We both hnve
tasted of the wine of the Victor, but
; to mo Hie lees are bitter," he said
gently. "Cnn't wo two go back and
begin our real life all over again?"
She drew her hand from his and
stood off. looking at him with bright,
searching eyes. "Let me look at you
a moment?let me be sure," she said,
a thrill of eager longing In her voice.
"To go back! To go back! And you
once said. 'There is never any going
back in the canons of Art.'"
"Hut Isn't there something higher
than Art? Isn't there something more
to be desired?"
"Yes." she answered In a sort of
whisper. "Do you think I should
have conio back here?to Aniorion?
if there had not been? No, don't
speak, don't, stop me?let . me go on
to tho end. And let me look Into
your eyes while I say It. Art! You
know how I worshiped It; you know
what a slave I was to it. Well. I
served my term of serfdom, and I
won its glittering reward. The World
came to me with a rose in its mouth
and hands that dripped with gold. I
climbed, as you climbed, to the very
pinnacle of Success, the very a pox of
Victory. Anil then?" her voice wav?
ered for a moment and sank Into si?
lence. She came a step nearer and
laid a shaking touch on Lnnlster'ti
arm.
"Then n little dead hand reached
out and tool; the scnles from riiy
eyes, and?I was!" she went on soft?
ly. "AH nt once tbc glamour seemed
to depart from everything. The scent
went out of lh<> ('.?Kfs, tilg shine fad?
ed from the gold, and 1 knew at last
that there was something bolter,
stronger, nobler, anil that wo two had
thing It from ns! George," her fin?
gers slipped softly up his arm to his
shoulder and rested there caressingly
?"George, you asked me tonight what
all the world was at my feet ami all
that. I had sighed lor, worked for.
longed for, was mine to have and to
hold f?rovor If I wished. It was a
little dead hand?a little crumpled
dead hiiud that rest od on my bosom
,for only one short day and yet left i
Its Impress there for all eternity."
"All. that's right. Mold me fast,
held me tight, nud never lei me stray
again!" she said ns she raised her
face, "near, the cry of the Woman
Is sweeter than the laughter of Suc?
cess! for Loyc Is in it, and, alter all.
Ldve is Immortal."
Minister mode no reply. He sim?
ply pent and laid his lips on hers
and lei the little (lend hand pick up
I the rnvele;| threads and weave them
together again.
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j Many a Nev/port News Citizen Finds
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; anything which brought permanent
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I store for Doan's Kidney Fills.' In n
i very short time considering the na?
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Fo. n limited tlinn wo will
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This Is dono only to introduce
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DR. W. E. DOR8ET, Mgr.
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DU. W. 10. DORSET,
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with perfect ease nnd comfort.
Yourr. truly, F. D. Git RUN,
819 N. 7th street, Richmond, Va.
DR. W. ? DORSET,
City:
I take pleasure in stating that
your Rim Teeth that 1 have
worn for tho last 6 years have
proved perfectly satisfactory,
and I can recommend them to
any one wishing to lay asldo
tho old for the new.
JAS. E. STANSBURY,
C30 N. 6th street, Richmond, Va.
DE A It DR:
1 am a graduate since ixks. I
havo worked in nearly every
large city from New York to
San Francisco. 1 havo found
no full Plato iO give as univer?
sal satisfaction as Dr. Dorset's
Patent Rim.
J. C. DANA, D. D. B..
No. 12 Rondel Park, flochester,
N. Y.
48
FOR MEN
Prlrati Df ?isi$
Checks in how
Cur? the most .MC, nit cusrs in three d? i 1 -id ',?
kcXpltftti ?litt clinics. Sohl hy
GORSi;CH'S DRUG STORC B
3?4 U*in l>?IT, NoftroLH. V>
?Ol. ?m4iii11i? ?<inoi. ?r?,poi?t Nt*,, ?*
?.< M -j n.i^; a, r.oe In 3 1

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