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Daily press. [volume] (Newport News, Va.) 1896-current, November 16, 1909, Image 5

Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045830/1909-11-16/ed-1/seq-5/

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HASKEi
m
MURRER
BY COUBT
Former Gt
?klaliom
pear foi
nd Six Other
red to Ap
iturday,
Illy As
CHICKASA,
il'-?iuinr tiled
N. ilasxt II and
tu indictments
lruuiluli'iitly ??'>
HUMl title ti
lOWl lots it: Mm
day overruled l*y
A Marshall.
The d> fciidanti
pear for trial S
t'chickusa. Judg
was that the sti
-ess.)
>v. 15?The
ior Charles
Iklahi.uiatu
them with
i the gov- i
nimiher Of
a., was to- j
udge Jo' mm
ed to ap- J
anlag at I
's ruling
mitu'ioas i
did not enter into the case because
the conspiracy to defraud alleged in j
Hie indictnu nts wa^ continuous and'
was tin rcfore punishable at any time, j
Judge Marshall, in his opinion, con- |
tended that the alleged conspirators
t< tided to practice' a fraud on the
^overturn nt. He said that the law j
ptorldjci that all Indian land trans?
act OBI must be approved by the 6cc- |
retary of the luterior of the I'nited
Slates and is an official undertook to
ait without this authority his act
would not ba legal.
NEGRO MUST GO BACK
TO MISSISSIPPI FOR TRIAL
M ssouri Federal Court Refuses *o
Recognize Race Prejudice
Plea.
fBj Associated Press t .
WASHINGTON, D. C, Nov. 15.?
The habeas corpus case of Albert, j
Marbles, coming from the United
Slat..* Circuit Court for the Eastern
district of Missouri, was decided to?
day by the Supreme Court of the
United States against Marbles
Marbles, a negro, sought to resist
extradition from St. Louis. Mo., to
Warren county, M!ss., where he wa?
charged with assault with intent to
kill.
Marbles contended that ' the race
feeling and race prejudice bj so bit?
ter in the S'ate of Mississippi against
negroes that he is now in danger, if
removed to that ?t?te, cf assassina?
tion and that he cannot have a fair
trial in any of the courts of that
state.
CHANGE FOR THE WORSE.
Condition of John G. Carlisle As?
sumes Serious Aspect.
{By Associated Press,i
NEW YORK., Nov. 15 ?There was a
change for the worse today in the
condition of former Secretary of the
Treasury John G. Carlisle, who is un?
der treatment for serious intestinal
disorders at St. Vincent's hospital.
The attending physician said tonight
that bis condition "had assumed a
more serious aspect." He declined
to make any further statement.
Leather-Molded Shapes.
Circasalan and Georgian girla 1?
tended for sale to harems have a five
Inch wide zone or circlet of wet, plia?
ble leather sewn around them in their
tenth year. This hardens and conflg
ures itself to the waist. The girl thua
grows into a waist line without injuri?
ous lacing and squeezing of her liver,
lungs, heart and bosom. It is cut off
at marriage by the husband. Many
American women have perfect waists
without whalebone.
Affords Purest Water.
But the greatest advantage of fruit,
perhaps. Is that It offers us pure ws
ter. for which we do not need a filter, j
to the amount of from nearly 50 per i
rent, in berries to over 92 per cent.
In watermelons. T:ie food v.-'tise?tbat
Is, the nutritive force of fruit?d*
pends chiefly in its carbohydrates,
which, in the main, are sugar.-Pure
Food.
A Chump.
"He is an swfal chump, lan't be?"
"Tes. he bought a ticket in an automo?
bile raffle and then built a garage be?
fore tbe drawing came off." "Well,
what do you know about that! Was
be disappointed when Hk drawing
came off?" "Not so you could notice
It; be won the auto.' ?Houston Poet
Industrial Educatio*.
For training tbe workman the tech?
nical school can never supplant the
workshop. The system tbat is like
ly to give U>e best lesultt Is a com
hinstioa of part Mm* apprenticeship
snd compulsory stteodaace at tech?
nical schools.?LoeCos Electrical Ke
view.
S*"C Mjtsst HjJfJ Ef*0U{JrV
At the I'eltarlaa church In Berer
?y. e sweet little miss wss st the serv?
ice with her mother recently The lit
tie one didn't eeem to comprehend the
sermon s little bit. although the pas?
tor wss her grandfather, and after a
restless bslf hour she tented to her
mamma sod said la aa audible wbee?
per: "Why dont grandpa stop talk
iegr? Ma JeoraaL
SOUVENIR COLLECTORS.
Among the habits which have
grown apace among Aiuerieaus of re?
cent years has beeu that of souvenir
hunting. Souvenir spoons, knives,
forks, plates, photographs, postal
cards and what not have been a per?
fect passion with the uiultidude The
? hing seemed to have been carried a
little too far when somebody at a re?
ception tu Mr. Wu, the Chinese am
bubsadur, bume years ago tried to
snip off a piece of that eminent hum?
orist's pigtail with a pair of pocket
scissors; but even that waa surpassed
by a certain Chicago woman of great
personal attractiveness, who seems to
bave reached the ultimate.
A stranger apeaking of her to an?
other woman, and not being familiar
with certain facts in the family his?
tory of the lady to whom she waa
talking, observed that she had heard
that she was a couflriued souvenir
hunter.
"Not really a kleptomaniac, yov
4now," she said.
"Oh, not at all." waa the reply "She
Is Just the ultra of souvenir hunting I
happen to know her, too. You see.
some years ago she paid a week end
visit at our country place, and w hen
It was over?"
"You missed your silverware?"
"No. Indeed," was the answer. "My
husband!'"?l.lppincotfs.
Well Placed.
Hacon?That office-seeking friend of
yours has landed a Job at las*.
Kgbert- -Hood! What his he land
ad?
"He's keeper at the pest house."
"Well, he's the right man in the
right, place. He's the greatest pest
I ever knew!"?Yonkers Statesman.
As Compared.
Mrs. Wtggs?It must have been a
horrible sight.
Mrs. Spriggs?Oh, it was something
awful! It was like one of those mov?
ing borrorsocpes you see at the five
cent theaters.
A NOBODY.
"Say, dad; what is a nobody?"
"A nobody man. is a prominent
woman's husband."
Enough to Make Him Mad.
I saw ;* mad dog yesterday?
How'd I know he was niad?
Another dog came by that way
And stole the bone he hud.
Marks of Conservatism.
"Why are you reading that old-fash?
ioned book?" asked Maude.
"How can you tell at a glance that
it is old-fashioned?" rejoined Mayinie.
"Because it uses an Initial and a
dash to Indicate a swear word instead
of spelling it out in big type."
Strict Qualifications.
"So you want a position to take
charge of my bills. Well, for that job
I want a man who is cool, calm and
collected. Are you all three?"
"No. sir. but I think I will suit. I
am cool and calm, but not collected.
The bills are."
Suspicious Trade.
"That man yonder has a shady rec?
ord. You can tell as soon as you see
him at work that he has something
to screen in his life."
"What do you think It is he has to
screen?"
"Mostly, suburban porches*
Typical Decoration.
"How appropriate for the Comeups
to have 'heir ballroom decorated with
growing vines."
"Appropriate in what way?"
"Becauje vines, you know, are
climbers, too."
Sure Indication.
Anxious Mother?How do you know
young Cashletgh Is In lore with you?
Has he told you so?
Pretty Daughter ? N-no; but you
sbouid see bow he looks at me when
I am not looking at him."
Egotism.
"Simplicity." he said Just for the
pt'rpoee of breaking tbe long silence,
"is tbe s'srsst sign of grentnoaa."
"Dear r..-. what an egotist you are."
she pleasantly replied.
Net as Lucky at He Might Be
The man who doesn't rare enough
for bis wife u> think it necessary to
have an excuse when he stays owt
late at nicht may be envied by his
friends, but be is really to he pitied.
Stumped.
' What are you going to any her
for n Wedding preaeat?"
"O. I dor t know You see she wo?
s pickle dish at a rsrd party only
last week *
- \
Saving.
"That yowng man of yours far a
?wander Isnt be?
"I guess be must be be hasn't pro?
posed retr
YOU NEVER
CAN TELL
(Two rather mature yuuun women
are seated together on one Kid** of the
street car Opposite them la a well
dree?ed. plump, amiable looking, rath?
er beaming man )
drat Young Woman?ta my hat on
straight, Glace? That mail over there
keepa looking at me In such a strange
way.
Si ? .md Young Woman ?Oh. yen. you
look all right I'robabl.v be Is traclug
a resemblance to a long lost sister in
law or wondering what sort of animal
you were in some previous aisle of
existence ?
First Young Woman?Well. I wish
he wouldn't do It. He's making me
desperately uncomfortable. Haven't
I a speck of soot on the side of my
nose?
Second Young Woman?No. you
haven't. Do get your mind off tbe
man it's only a question of mental
attitude. Now, I want your opinion us
to whether you think my gray dress
would look better with little touches
of white or very pale pink You aee.
I've got to make up my mind If I get
a light thing like?"
Hirst Young Woman?Why, yes. or
talnly. I thluk that \ould be the best
thing to do. I mean that would be the
best way to trim lt. 1 always did like
pink and white.
Second Young Woman? Hut this Is
gray and what 1 want to get your opin?
ion on is whether I'd better pipe It
with white or make folds of tbe pink
and lay them on?
First Y'oung Woman?That would
be lovely. 1 hope you'll make up
your mind to do it that way. Grace,
that man Is simply gluiug his eyes to
my feet. Could you lean over Just a
little and see If my shoestring is un?
tied or the binding on my skirt is com?
ing off?
Second Young Woman?Yes, I'll do
It in a minute. You just pretend to
be examining these samples so that f
can look down in an airy, unconscious
way.
thirst young woman takes samples
and pretends to be looking at them.
Second Y'oung Woman? No. there's
nothing wrong that I ran see. He's
Just a goose. Don't let him bother
you.
First Young Woman (heroically* ?
Well, I'll try. Now. what was it you
were saying about your new hat? You
said you were going to have a light
blue one, didn't you?
Second Young Woman?No, I didn't
mention hats. I was talking about my
new gown. I've Just got to have some?
thing to wear to the Singleton's recep?
tion, but I hate to get anything that
I will do only for a reception dress. I
go to so few places, you know, that
j anything like that would be a perfect
ly siuful waste of money, so I thought
If I got this gray?It isn't so very
light, you knew, and trimmed It with
something darker, or perhaps lighter
?but then I don't look well In gray
anyway.
First Y'oung Woman (appearing to
be rather surprised!?But it isn't gray.
It's rather a dark brown and he has
on a dark hat.
Second Y'oung Woman (in consider?
able exasperation)?Well, if you
aren't the?the?worst I ever heard.
You're still thinking of that man, I
suppose. I wouldn't if I were you. I
can tell by bis looks that he has a
wife at home to whom he ie perfectly
devoted, and three children, and I
don't doubt for an instant that he
i has candy in his pocket for the cbil
| dren. If you want me to I'll go over
I and ssk.
First Y'oung Woman?It s all very
well for you to talk, but that man cer?
tainly is trying to flirt with one or
both of us. !.<.. k at bim. He's smil?
ing. Y'ou needn't tel! me that was ac?
cidental.
Second Young Woman?What if he
i does smile at us? If. after sitting op
I posite us for 20 minutes and getting
a thorough view of our mature
charms, he can look upon a flirtation
with you and me In the light of an
amusing experience his ch!ldi?h die
position ought to be encouraged, aot
snubbed. I'm going to smile back at
him. Maybe he'll give us some of tbe
children s candy "
First Young Woman?Well. I don't
think It's funny. Now look at blm. He
' thinks you're encouraging biro and
there's no telling bow unpleasant be
rosy make It for us (She assumes
an Icy manner, which grows colder as
the flirts' Sous one rises and advances,
hat In hand, a deprecating smile on
bis race.)
Flirtatious Man?Pardon me. ladies,
but I'm sfrsid I'll have to ask you to
move a little My traveling bag is
under the seat. I'm very sorry fa
disturb you. but?
(Tbe first young woman jumps up
as If she had been shot, while the
second young woman, smiling almost
audibly, moves aaide to let tbe flirta?
tious man get bis belongings i
Flirtstious Msn ireappearng from
under tbe aest I ? Thank you very
mach. I'm sorry to have beea obliged
to trouble you
First Young Woman ? Well, if he
didn't want to ret up an acquaintance
be certainly bebared in a very pe?
culiar aaanaer Of course. It did ae?m
silly for him to want to speak to too
persons like us. but mea are silly
-You never csa tell
Second Young Womaa?No dear,
roe caa't. I thiah myself It Is rstber
risky for two faertaatiag young things
like aa to be going around ahme
Whenever we go oat well take Katb?
eetes?, my ?wiegest sister She a oaly
It. bet she is aa authority on all mat
Urs of etiquette.
GREAT LOVE
?STORIES?
of HISTORY
By Atbvri Pay son Ter hurt*
PARIS AND HELEN and
THE SIEGE OK TROY
The Stealing of
Helen.
(Osfgr'??*?. If I
Gloriously beautiful red hair, d
Greek princes*. Helen of Argue,
was islled upon, about .i.lOo years ago.
to choose a busbsnd She was tbe fair
cut women in ail Greet i Near!) eeory
Greek king and nobleman was suitor
for her band.
Greece in those dayi whs cut up
luto many small sates, em h with u
king of Its own. It needed little to
set these states at war ?Ith one an?
other So Ulysses, wisest of all the
petty monarch*, suggested that each
suitor not only pledge himself to sub
mit to Helen's choice, but vow also
to defend ber (and the husbaud ehe
might i housei sgainst any feeo This
plan was meant to ward off war. It
had Just the opposite effect
Helen's choice (ell u|Min Menelsus.
king of Sparta. The other suitors
went back to their homes In anger,
but kept their oath not to molest the
lucky man. A short time later a royal
visitor came to the tourt of Mono
laua. This waa I'arls. one of the 21
sons of old King Priam of Tray Mem
laue was a rough soldier 1'aria was
handsome, graceful and what would
now be called a ' woman's man.'' He
and Helen fell In love with each other
at sight. In those da>s there wero
several ways In which a man might
legally win a wife He might ask the
hand of an unmarried girl, he might'
marry another man's wife by cbal
lenglng her husband and killing him
In fair fight. Or i
he might carry off
such a wife, mar ;
ry her and defend her and bims df
against her pursuing husband. Paris
chose the last named course. Fight
lng was not his strong point.
He kidnaped Helen and took her
by sea to his father's great walled .
city of Troy, In northwestern Asia '
Minor, at the mouth of the Hellespont.
He knew that tbe warlike Trojans
could easily protect him from any
Spartan army. But he did not reckon :
upon the oath sworn by Helen's suit?
ors. By the'terms of this oath nearly i
every monarch in Greece joined Mene- 1
laus In avenging the theft of the lat
ter'a wife. Tbe cotnblued Grecian ,
armies, under command of Menelaus'
brother Agamemnon, King of Myce?
nae, sailed for Asia Minor and laid
siege to Troy. The debt Incurred by ,
Paris In stealing Helen was destined
to be paid In the blood of thousands ,
of innocent men.
Helen, meanwhile, had been cor?
dially welcomed at Troy. She and
Paris were married there with splen?
did ceremonies. They embarked on a '
life or Oriental luxury that delighted
the frivolous girl, who had hitherto
known nothing more gay than the '
meagre, rigorous plainness of the
Spartan court. Hut their dream of
bliss was short lived. An array of
160,000 Greeks encamped outside the
Trojan walls about 1184 D. C. and
laid siege to the city. The Trojans' 1
admiration for their prince's pretty .
Oreek bride suddenly changed to I
wrath. For they saw she had brought '
upon them a deadly war. N'everthe- '
less, they loyally refused to give up j
Helen at Menelaus' demand, and pre- I
pared to defend their city against tbe i
lavaders.
For ten long yeara Ute war dragged |
on with varying fortunes. (To while
away the time between conflicts the
game of checkers is said to have been
invented during the siege by one Pa!
amedea. a Greek.) Menelaus more
than once urged Paris to end tbe use
less bloodshed by coming forth and
fighting him. man to man. It was far
pleasanter to stay at home with his
beautiful wife than face the man he '
had wronged. At last, urged by bis
elder brother. Hector. Paris consented '
to the duel. He and Menelaus fought '
in the presence of both armies. Helen
looking on from the city wall Parla
was overcome and barely escaped
death at the bands of his foe.
Not long afterward while hovering
In the rear ranks of battle Paris was
struck and slain by an arrow. His
brother Delphobus then married Helen. .
who does not seem to have gri; v. |
greatly over Paris death The Greeks. |
falling to carry Troy by aasault. re
agreed to tragedy They pretended to i
call away, leaving on tbe seashore a
huge wooden horse. The Trojsns. '
thinking this horse an idol, bore It in?
to the town Withlng the wooden an
Imal several
T Greeks were hid
The Sack ef
den That night
they crept out and opened the gates
of Troy to their returning comrades
The city was sacked -and utterly de
atreyed by fire The inhabitants were
acred, men. women and children
alike
Helea was rescued and carried back
to Sparta by Menelaus who freely for?
gave her desert loa But the other ?
Spartas were less merciful to the worn j
aa who bad brought such misfortunes
kg their country When Menelaus died !
they drove her sway She fled to
Rhodes for refuge The queej, of that
Island, leadens ef Helen a loveliness
and fame, murdered b?r
Thus end*d the strange career of a
woman wheee beauty had destroyed
owe ant Ion and nearly ruined another
Seek Trade In Turkey
Germs ay. Austria aad Hungary
have established museums in Con
a*nntinopie for the display of samples
of various manufactures Hat Iti-real
the T?rke
COPY MEN'S ATTIRE
WOMEN AFFECT APPAREL OP THE
STERNER 6EX.
Severe Simplicity I* the Keynote of
the Modern Fashion*?Cavalier
Cape and Hat Make a Dis?
tinctive Feature.
In all the whirl uf new fashions,
have you hud time tu uutlce that tho
dominant uum ure copied trotu men a
? im lies'' Kun tbeen over in your mind
and you can check off a number of
them, more tbau 1 may be able to re?
member at the moment
First, the return of the aevere man?
like coat with Its straight buck, single
breasted Iron!a. stiff revers. small
sleeves put in without plaits or gath?
ers, iiud finished with braid and but?
tons above tbe wrist. One might also
add to the comparison the man like
skirt, for its slinky, narrow, close to
the knee dimensions It comes perilous?
ly near to being trouserlike.
Plalta are here, as everyone knows,
and they spell fullness, but It is such
adroitly munnged fullness that tbe
last result Is very slim Indeed.
The bloomers or knickers worn be?
neath these skirts are borrowed direct
from the wardrobe of the sterner aex.
The lingerie shirt that Is consld
ered smart this year, and the only one
to which Paris has uiven approval,
has a knife plaited Isn-om. t center
box plait, a small sleeve, und a turn
over negligee cuff. This Is mude of
sheer linen and has neither lace, em?
broidery nor net on Its surface. Shirt
waists are to be worn only in tbe
morning with man-like suits, and they
must be made according to the man?
nish cut.
In addition to this shirt Is the new
stock which smart men have copied
from tbe porfrslts of their unceators
This Is worn with lingerie waists,
and Is of black satin wrapped twice
about a blub liuen collar with points
slightly turned out by the hand The
satin stock Is finished In a single
throw-over and fastened with a scarf
pin. These bl'.s of Jewelry, by the
way. are now fashioned for women,
und the ties are confined with them.
They are made of precious and semi?
precious stones.
Theu there is the waistcoat. This
is another fashion of the moment
These are worn with coat suits and
ate bought in the mens department
or at the haberdasher's They are ot
lamb's wool bound with silk braid, of
striped corduroy and fancy vesting*
Even the watcb and coin pockets are
not omitted.
In the region of fancier clothes
(here Is (he cavalier cape, which Is
variously called for the names of
brigand, pirate, burnous and toga; all
apparel for men. These are loose and
voluminous, graceful and comforta?
ble. They are made ol satin cloth and
panne velvet, and Borne even get so
opera bouffe as to be of black cloth
lined with scarlet satin.
To top this brilliant cape there is a
cavalier hat. This Is a sweeping af?
fair worn under merry English kings.
It has all the grace of a reckless day.
and Is even more becoming to a wom?
an's face than It was to that of a man.
In footgear there have been whole
sale pilferings. The Spanish heel waa
always tbe mark of a Spanish gentle?
man's boot, and It has become the
dominant feature of a woman's shoe.
The patent leather bouse pump, with
its flat bow, has been so universally:
adopted by women that they haven
probably forgotten that It belonged to 1
man for generations before the theft.
Use of Fishnet.
. When fishnet Is woven in heavy
silks for the draping of evening gowns
its best manipulation is shown by Its
use on tho bias. All net tunica and
shoulder graperies are more elastic
and appear more graceful when thus
draped.
There is a swlah and swing given
them by this treatment which is for?
eign to even the most sheer fabrics
"on the straight" of the goods.
Try filling a stocking with hot salt
and use in place of a bot-water bag.
It is said the common red pepper
broken up end put In s pitcher filled
with cider and let stand until the
strength is extracted is an excellent
remedy for liver complaint. Drink
a teacupful three times a day.
Mix two tsbiespoonfuLs of grated or
scraped magnesia with the same bulk
of orris root and one teaspoonful of
aalt. Rub this m'.xtore through the
hair, brusb thoroughly and it will
leave the acalp clean and hair light
snd fluffy.
When a very hot cloth Is wsated
for use In sickness, do not wet tbe
whole cloth: take bold of the ends
one In each hand, then drop the cen
ter la boiliag water, twist the riot!,
quickly, sad the result will be a very
hot cloth without wetting tbe hands.
If you cat the tip of your fing? t
when yen! are busy In the kitchen. d<
act stop to tie a clumsy bandage on
It but put s small piece of clean linen
over the cut and then put on your
thimble until your work Is done and
you can gi-.e the matter better attea
mm
With all oae'a reducing exercises do
not forget to dash < old wster night
and morning over neck cbcjt and
throat This acta ae a tonic to tbe
muscles and keeps the skin from So?
las koose asd "wabbly " Incidentally
it Is a greet protect loo sea last tea
daaclee te cold.
Begin' Your
Everything indicates an unprecedented
\ rush of business during the Holidays.
We advise you to purchase now; we can
give you better service, better engraving and
*no disappointments. A small deposit wil
secure your, selection now.
FLORY-ROVALL CO., k
2711 Washington
Ave. ~*
DID YOU EVER
STOP 10 THINK
REASON THIS OUT FOR YOURSELF: SUPPOSE YOU ARE PAY?
ING ?20.00 A MONTH RENT; IN FIVE YEARS YOU PAY THB
LANLORD $1,200. HAD YOU APPLIED THIS AMOUNT TO THB
PURCHA8E OF A HOUSE, YOU WOULD TODAY BE THE OWN?
ER OF A NICE HOME INSTEAD OF THE RENT RECEIPT8 YOU
HOLD. IF YOU P." A HIGHER RENT, YOUR HOME WOULD BE
JUST SO MUCH NICER WITHOUT ANY ADDITIONAL EXPENOI?
T?RE. IF YOU ARE INTER 8TED IN OWNING YOUR OWN
HOME, WE WOULD BE GLAD TO TALK THE MATTER OVIR
WITH YOU.
TERMS TO SUIT. 3 ,.
OldDominion
Land Company
NOI'BL WARWICK ? ? ILUIiNO.
It Is Utfless to Save Money
Unlust you keep It In a Bare ptace. Lett at home, carried upon the
I person, or loaned without proper security, R Is not aafe. You DMT
' lose it or be robbed if your cany It about with you: and there hat
; probably been more money lost by making unsecured loans and la
I speculation than in any other manner. There is. however, cne plane
j where your money will be abs Mutely safe, and that la with
SCHMELZ BROTHERS, Bankers
' THE LARGEST AND STRONGEST BANK IN THE CITY. 4 PER
CENT ON SAVINGS ACCOUNTS.
JVmpIe (Guarantee
The resources of the Fimt Notional Hunk, of New
port Newi?, are ample guarantee of its Financia
streog'h. Yonr accouut and hanking busines
invited.
TU E FI RST NATIONAL BANK
United State* depositary. Newport News, V?.
Capital, $100.000; Surplus, $100,000
IF YOU DO NOT DEPOSIT WITH
CITIZENS & MARINE BANK
You ar? missing some of the things to which you are entitled.
We invite those wishing to establish relations with a aafe, streaoj
bank to do busineas with u?, knowing our service will prove satto
factory.
DIRECTORS:
T. M. Bensen, D. S- Jones. H. E. Parker, L. P. Steamea,
A c. Garrett, A. B. Mallett. Elisa Peyser. W. B. Vest,
E. T. Ivy. J. A. Maeaie. Edwin Phillipe Geo. B. Waat,
No Money Is No Excuse*
WE WILL TRUST YOU FOR ANYTHING IN iCMe FURNISHINO
LINE IF YOU WANT THE B2ST GOODS. BEST BARGAINS AND
EASIEST TERMS. YOU SHOULD BUY FROM OUR STORE. LA SO?
EST LINE IN THE CITY TO SELECT FROM.
Newport News Furniture COe,
MKT/-a Washington Awe. f | f j I JffanV

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