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Centre Democrat. [volume] (Bellefonte, Pa.) 1848-1989, December 13, 1860, Image 1

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% Jfamilii gWrrspajtr—--stboltb to politics, Stmpcrantt, literature, Science, ®Jjt g,rts, glecjranies, ®jie Itarhefs, (gkcatiim, Amusement, General Intcllijcncr, etc.,
J. S. & J. J. BRISBIN,
VOLUME 26,
®|jc Centre gtmocrat.
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY BY
J. S. & J. J. BRISBIN.
Office in the Arcade Building, Second Floor.
TERMS. —$1,50 if paid in advance or within six
months after subscribing,otherwise $2 will invari
ably be charged. No subscriptions received for
a shorter period than six months and none dis
jontinued, unless at the option of the editor, until
all arrearages are naid.
Business cards.
M'AKKISTER & BE A V Ell
ATTORN t¥sS-AT-LA\V, BELLTFOSTK, i"A
Ulrico on Allegheny Street. Feb. 10 59
17 M. BKAXCHARD- ATTORNEY
_I_J - AT-LAVV, BKL-LKUNTE, PKNNA. OfEco
ioruirly occupied by the lion. James Burnside.
Jan. 19, 't-0.-tf.
UT W BROWX-ATTORNEY-AT
TF • LAW-BKLLEFONTK, PENNA.YV ill attend to
ad legal business entrusted to him, with prompt
ness. May, 5 '59.
T AS. LA. RANKIX, ATTOKNEYAT-
LiAVV, ILTLLLEONTE. PA. u : ll attend prompt
ly to ail legal business entrusted to hiin. Office
next door to too Post Office. [Sspt. 20, '6O, tf
WM.P. WILSOX-ATTORNEY-AT
5Y -LAW BELLFONTK, PA , wi'l promptly at*
tend to all legal business entrusted to him ffice
three doors North of the diamond. jan.l2'6o
P Jo HOCKMAN , SURVEYOR AND
J-J, CONVEYANCER, BBI.LRFONTK, PA., will
attend to and correctly execute all businesi en
trusted to him. [.June 14,-'6O, — tf
P laSVINGSTON PATRICK,
AT- A 110ITNEV - AX-LAW, BELLEFONTE, PA.,
Will attend promptly to all legal business entrus
ted to him. Office on Northwest oorner of the
Diamond. [Nov. 15, 1860.—tf.
CLEU. L. POTTER. M. D.
OFFICE ou High street, (oldoffice.) Bellefonte
Pa. Will atlend to professional calls as
heretofore, and respectfully offers his professional
services his friends and tho pubiic. (>ct.26'sS
C A. FAinLAJIB. M. I). JAS. A. DOBBINS, M D
FAIRLAMB & DOBBINS,
DR. FAIRLAMB has associated with him DR
J. 11. DOBBIN "-'.in the practice of medicine
atiiee as heretofore on aishop street, opposite the
Temrierance Hotel. March 19.57.
DS. JAS. P. GlifiGG, rope ctfully offers
his professional services to tho people of
Milesburg and vicinity. Residence, Daniel R.
Boiieua's National Hotel.
Refer to Dr. J. al. McCoy. Dr. G. L. Potter. Dr.
J. B. Mitchell. [Nov. S, IB6o.—tf.
WM. REISER, SURGEON AND
PiIYbICIAiS, having permanently located
offers his Professional services to the citizens of
Pine Grove Mills and vicinity, and respectfully
oslicits a liberal portion of the public patronaire.
[Feb. If., '6o.—ly.
j. J' LINGLE. Operative
AUC * LMCL-IJUIUCUI JJcnuat, will prac
tiee all the various branches of his
profession in the most approved manner. Office
and resideuce on Spring St,Bellefonte ( Pa,
[Mar. f.'6". tf.
TAMESYLLDDKE. ATTORNEY-AT
O EAYV, bs.LLiiFo.VRIS PA. Will attteud to all
t,uc in ess entrusted to him with care and prompt
ness. Refer to Gov. Pullouk, Milton Pa. and
Hpn. A. G. Curtin, Bellefonte Pa. Office with
John il. Stover jan. 5, '6O.
JR. MUFFI/i, AKNT F " B ™
, WBST.bHAJiCH iNoUUANOE COMPANY. lOr
sons wishing to sccuro themselves from losses by
fire, will do Well to call upon him at the store of J.
R, iUuffiy A Co., N. E. corner of the Diamond,
three doors above Allegheny stivei, Bellefonte,
Cent.e co , Pa. Mar, 15, 60. ly.
WW. WHITE, TEA' bi n p ! r ~
# niuiiently located in Loalsburg, Centre
County Pa. Office on main st„ next door to the
fctore of Johnston A Keller, where be puiposes
practising Irs profession in tho most scientific
manner and at moderate charges. mar.
IUA C. MLTCHKLL. CYUIIS T. A LEX AN unit.
MITCHELL S: ALEXANDER.
ATTORNEY S-AT-LAW, IIELLBFONTB PFNSA.
Raving associated themselves in the practice
of law, will a'tcn I promptly to all business en
trusted to their care
Office in the Arcado. [NO7.' 1, *6o.—tf.
CONVEYANCING.
DEEDS BONDS, MORTGAGES, AND AR
TICLES OF AGREEMENT neatly and cor
rectly executed. Also, attention will be given to
the adjustment of Book Accounts, and accounts
f Auminstratior s aid Executors prepared for filing,
office next door to the Post Office.
Oct., 19th, 'SB, WM. J. KEALSIi.
fe* sz&h <3". JOE A/X7" m^ato
RESIDEIfT DENTIST.
Office and residence on the North
jastern corner of tho Public Square, near the
Jourt House.
Will be found at his office, except two weeks in
acb month, commencing on the first Monday of
*jch month, when ho will be filling professional
B ngagements elsewhere. Oct. 22. '57 4jj tt.
JOHN XL STOVER
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW
BELLEFONTE, PA., will practice his pro
fession in the several courts of Centre county.—
All business entrusted to him will be carefully at
tended to. Collections made and all monies
■promptly remitted. Office, on High st. formerly
opcuped by Judge Bnmside, and D. C. Boal, Esq.
wherehe can be consulted both in the English and
inthe german language. May 6,'58 —22 ly.
JAS. lIACMANUS. W. P. MA CM ANU
J: & WW, P. MACMANUS.
ATTORNEY'S-AT-LAW, BKLLEFONTE, PA.,
Office in the rooms formerly occupied by
Linn A Wilson, Allegheny street. Jas. Macman
us has associated with W. P. Mac manus, Esq., in
the practice of law. Professional business intrus
tedt o their care will receive prompt attention.
They will attehd the several Courts in the Coun
ties of Centre, Clinton and Clearfield.
J Hne 21, '6O, tf.
HAKE & HOY. ATTORNEY,-A I
LAW, wilt attend prunptly to all business
entru stedto their care. Office in the building
formerly occupied by Hon, Jas. T. Hale.
A CARD.
Messrs. Hale A Hoy will attend to my-business
during uiv absence in Congress, and will be as
sisted by me in the trial of all caqsqs entrustedto
them. J. T HALE. jans'lß6o
CURTIN & BL AN CHARD.
A TTOKN EY"i5-AT-LAW, BELLEFONTE, PKNNA
The undersigned having associated them
selves in the practise of Law, will faithfqlly at
tend to all professional business entrusted to them
in Centre, Clintion and Clearfield counties. All
collections placed in their hinds, will receive
their promt attention. Office in Blanchard s new
building on Allegheny street.
Nov. 30 '58 CURTIN A BLANCHARD.
HOUSE OF
iVM. P.. REYNOLDS d? CO.
BELLEFONTE, CENTRE CO., PENN'A.
Bills cf Exchange and Notes discounted ; Collec
tions made and Funds promptly remitted. Inter*
est paid on Special Deposits, Exchange on the
Hasten cities constantly on hand and for sule.
Deposits received. April 7 'SB
ST. LAWRENCEHOTEt,
CHESTNUT STREET,
PHILADELPHIA;
wm. b. Campbell., proprietor
Apr oth'GO—tf.
no iwjEjlmj & ssourkeT
MANUFACTUREBSAND I\l POESEIIS
OF PAPER HANGINGS,
N. E. Cor. of fourth Jfc Market Streets,
PHILADELPHIA.
Oct, 4, 'CO, 3m. [R. G. 0.
J. THORP FLAHERTY,
Importer of -
Jlavana Scgars,
No. 837 CHESTNUT STREET,
(Adjoining Girard House,)
And Opposite CONTINENTAL HOTEL,
PHIUDELPIin, PFWSYLVAMA.
Ar d.20,-'6O, —1 y.
BOMGARDNER. HOUSE
CO RNEIi OF SIXTH AND R. R, STREETS
OPPOSITE
L. V. AND PENNA. R. R. DEPOTS,
HARRICBURG, PA
J.W. STONE. PROPRIETOR
Mar. 15tb,.1560, ly.
MADAME SI 11 WEED'S
INFALLIABLE POWDERS,
K the speedy and effectual Cure of all Infla
motions, Fevers, Rheumatism, D yspepsia and
Liver Complaint, Riles. Gravel , and all Acute and
Chronic Diseases of Adults and Children. —Send 3
cent Stamp to her Ayent, G. 11. .JONES,
Hundreds of testimonials.] T>ox 2070 Phila, P. 0.
Agency , S. \V. cor. Third <fc Arch Sts.
Oct. 4, 1300. lOt. J. Web.
J.PAEMER& CO.,
MARKET ST., WHARF, PHILADELPHIA
Dealer in FISII CFIEESE and Provisions,
Have constantly on assortment of
DRIED St PICKLED FISH, Ac., viz:
Mackerel, Sbad, Salmon, Blue Fish,
Herrings, Codfish, Beef, Pork, Lard, Shoulders,
Hams, Sides, Cheese, Beans, Riee, Ac.,
ct. 4, 'CO. —3m [J. Web.
UNITED STATES HOTEL,
BY
2Lm. T33STEJYCIS.
OPPOSiTF PENNSYLVANIA It. R. REPOT
H AFLFUSBURG PA,
E. HARTSHORN Superin tend en L
]VT O pains have been spared to make tl e abvoe
[I the first hotel in Harrnbnrg. The taJile i
always spread with the best the market affords
and the accommodations are suprior to any found
elsewhere in the city. March Ist ISBU.s
HUGH B. BRI3BEN,
grtigsisi,
MANUFACTUREK OF
EXTRA LIQUOR COLORING,
N, W. Cor. Third &' Poplar streets,
#
Terms Cash.] Philadelphia,
Oci. 3, 1800, —ly.
~ klEMM!T¥rother,
IMPORTERS, MANUFACTURERS k DEALER* IN
Iflusital- Instalments,
GERMAN, FRENCH
AND
Italian SStrlxigjs*
No. 705 Market Street,
PHILADELPHIA.
Sept. 13,-
KOUIS V; Ell UEl'l,
IMPORTER AND MANUFACTURER VF
i?As:cT fuhs.
For Ladies', Gentlemen's and Children's Wear,
NO. 234, ARCH ST., PHIL'A,
All kinds of Furs Dressed, Cleaned and Repaired.
Furs made to order at the shortest notice.
Full value paid for Shipping Furs,
Furs taken care of during
the Summer
Oct. 4, '6o.—ly.
W. A. ARNOLD. JOBS w. WILSON
ARNOLD & WILSON
WARMING & VENTILATING WAREHOUSE,
No. 1010 Chestnut Street, P hilade'ph ia
CMZLSQN's Paten Cone and Ventilating
FURNACES. Cooking" Ranges,
Baih Boilers,
ENAMSLSP STATE MANTELS
Common and Low Down Parlor Grates,
Warm Air Registers and Ventilating, Ac. Ac.
Particular attention given to warming and Ven
tilating Buildings of every discription.
li EN J. M. FELT WELL, Sup't.
Apr. 26,—1860. ly.
TOWXSE YD & COc, "
(Successors to Sam'l Townsend <fc Son,)
No. 39 South Second Street, above Chestnut,
IG V J ELPIIIA.
IMPORTERS & DEALERS IN
Velvet, Brussels, Tapestries, Three ply, In
grain and Venitiau CARHfc-TS of the
best English A American make.
MAI TIEGS. OILCLOTHS, Tc., tlx., &c.
Wo solicit an inspection of our assortment be
fore purchasing elsewhere.
Oct. 4, 3m. [R. G. 0.
HAINES & DOCK.
WHOLESALE GROCERS,
No. 35 North Water Street,
PHILADELPHIA.
GROCERIES, GROCERIES, GROCERIES,
GROCERIES, GROCERIES, GROCERIES,
Merchants of Central Pennsylvania
LOOK TO YOUR INTERESTS ! !
If you wish to buy chewp go to Haines A D oc^i
They keep on hand the best articles to be h a( j
in the City, irv their line of business.
Call and examine their goods.
Remember their Firm is at
No. 35 North Water Street,
PHILADELPHIA
Apr. 26, '6o.—ly.
["WE STAND UPON THE INI MUTABLE PRINCIPLES OF JUSTICE- -NQ EARTHLY POWER SHALL DRIVE US FROM OUR POSITION
BELLEFONTE, PA., THURSDAY MORNING. DEC., 13 1860
NEW TOPOGRAPHICAL MAP
DIRECTORY
CENTRE CO. PENNSYLVANIA,
BY S. D. TILDEN,
From actual Measurement by Instrumen
tal Surveys throughout the County.
By 11. f. WALUSO, Civil Engineer.
FIMIE undersigned proposes to publish by orde r
A a large and accurate Popographical Maj of
Centre county, from thorough and careful sur
veys, by H. F. Walling, Civil Engineer.
Every road has been oarefulty surveyed by
course ar.d distance, anil the location noted of all
the public roads, Dwellings, Chunhcs, Post Offi
ces, Hotels, Stores; School Houses, Factories,
Mills. Shops, Mountains, Ponds Streams, <£c.—
The names of Property Holders generally—care
fully including those vho order the work—will
he engraved upon the Map, showing the exact lo
cation of each.
Extra Maps of the Principal Villages 'will be
engraved upon the margin o e the Map ; also a
Table of Distances, showing the number of miles
from ' aeh Post office to every other throughout
the county, together with tho latest statistical in*
formation. An ornamental border will surround
the Map
Tho Map will be engraved by the m st skillful
Artists in the country, handsomely colored and
inonnted, and will be delivered to those who or
der for Five dollars per copy.
We are now actively engaged in forwarding the
work, and shall endeavor to give every property
holder an opportunity of ordering a copy, and al
so of examining the work before its final com
pletion; in order tc make it entirely satislactory
as to accnrac3', AC.
The map will contain all the information usual- J
ly fouud in Town maps, tor each of the towifs in
the county, and it is obvious that the most liberal
patronage is needed to sustain us in produoing a
work of so great magnitude and expense. As it
is evidently of such practical utility and inteiest
to business men and citizens genTully, present
ing so minute and distinct a representation of the
county, that even the child may readily acquire a
correct idea of each town, village, Ac., and their
trne directions, distances from each other, we con
fidently solicit and expect the heart v co-operation
of the intelligent and enterprising citizens of (Jeu
(re county.
S. D. TILDEN. Publisher.
These maps are said exclusively by the
Publisher, and no variation in price. No more
maps are printed than what are actually ordered.
We the undersigned, having sxamined the re
cent surveys and drafts of L'enire counry, also
Topographical Maps of other counties, pulishod
by Mr. S. D. Tildon, take pleasure in recommend
ing a Topographscal Map o f this county, which s
very much needtd, being of great practical value
to business men and citizens generally, and from
he united testimonials and recommendations tho_
ave from distinguished gentlemen wh-re they
ave made surveys arid published county maps.—
We feel confident ihey will furnish an accurate,
reliable and useful Map and Directory well wjr
ty of liberal patronage,
W c hope the citizens of this cfinnty will interest
themselves sufficiently in this enterprise, so that
the Publisher may engraye upon the margin of
the map, extra plans uf the villages in tjie county
upon an enlarged scale.
Considering the expense of such a survey of the
whole popnty, and being entirely a local work we
think it is offered to the citizens on very reason
able terms.
Win. F. Reynolds, James T. Hale, John Iloffer,
Adam Hoy, Win. A. Thomas, E. C. Humes Ira C.
Mitchell. H, N. McAllister, J- S. Barnhart, as,
A. Beaver, Cyrus T. Alexander, Ed. Blw'hard,
If. Brobkerhoff, AVm. P. Wilson, Geo. L. Potter,
Geo. Livingston, Jacob V. Thomas, Geo A. Fair
lamb. Jas. 11. Rankin, James F. Riddle, John
Tonner, Jesse L- Test, George W. Tate, John T.
Hoover, P. B. Wilson, James Li'in, J. B. Mitch
ell. E. Greene, .J. H. Stover, R. G. Durham, Sam'l
Linn, 11. P. Harris, A, S. Valentine.
Aug. 23, 1860. tf.
BCERHAVE'S
HOLLAND BITTERS
TIIE CELEBRATED HOLLAND REMEDY FQR
BTSPEPSIA,
DISEASE OF THE KIDNEYS,
LIVER
WEAKNESS OF ANY KIND,
FEVER AND AGUE,
Anu the various affections consequent upon a disordered
STOMACH OR LITER,
Such as Indigestion, Acidity of ttie Stomach, Colicky Pains,
Heartburn, Loss of Appetite, Despondency, Costivenoss,
Blind and Bleeding Piles. In all Nervous, Rheumatic, and
Neuralgic Affections, it has in numerous instances proved
highly beneficial, and in others effected a decided cure.
This is a purely vegetable compound, prepared on strictly
scientific principles, after the manner of the celebrated
Holland Professor, Bcerhave. Its reputation at home pro
duced its introduction here, the "demand commencing with
those of the Fatherland scattered over the face of this
mighty copntry, tnany of whom brought with them and
handed down the tradition of its value. It is now offered
to the American public, knowing that its truly wonder/id
medicinal virtues must be acknowledged.
It is particularly recommended to those persons whose
constitutions may have been impaired by the continuous use
of ardent spirits, or other forms of dissipation, Generally
instantaneous in effect, it finds its way directly to the scat
of life, thrilling and quickening every nerve, raising up tho
drooping spirit, anil, in tact, infusing new health and vigor
in the system.
NOTlCE.—"Whoever expects to find this a beverage tvid
be disappointed; but to the sick, weak and low spirited, it
will prove a grateful aromatic cordial, nossessed of singular
remedial properties.
READ CAREFULLY!
The Genuine highly concentrated Boerhave's Holland
Bitters is put up in half-pint bottles only, and retailed at
ONE DOLLAR per bottle, or six bottles for FIVE DOLLARS. The
great demand for this truly celebrated Medicine has induced
many imitaifions, which the public should guard against
purchasing.
/Kg- Beware of Imposition. See that our name is ou the
label of every bottle you buy.
Bold by Druggists generally. It oan be.forwarded
by Express to most points.
SOLE PROPRIETORS,
BENJAMIN PAGE, JR. & CO.
MANUFACTURING
pharmaceutists and (UhemistS;
PITTSBURGH, PA,
FOR SALE AT tha ng named plages in
Centre county :
J. Harris A Co., Bellefonte; D. Honser A Son;
Plumville Mills ; Geo Jack A Co., Boalsburg ,
Adam F. Shnfi'er, Madisonburg; Samuel Pomius,
Zion ; Balscr Weber, Howard; H. Brown, IJu
blereburg; C. G. Ryman AT, M. Hall, Miles
burg; A. T. Schnell St Co., Port Matilda; Rhule
St Keestnan, Millheim; Sam-Frank, Rebersburg;
T. Wolf St Son, Wolf's Store; W. Wolf, Centre
Hall; R. H. Duncan, Spring Mills; T. Jack,
Potters' Mills ; Peter Kerlin, Churchville ; J. H,
Hahn, Springfield ; Rankin A Bolinger, Bai
loysville; J. Q. Wi/fiams, Eagtevi/fe ; Nixon St
Co., MiUHaZJ; Joseph Bing, UnionvHle; Gross
A YeAriek, Aaronsburg; J. O. Brj Pine Grove
Mitfs; Jacob Dauie's, Stormetow j and by deal
ers generally.
Prom the Pittsburg Dispatch.
Shall we support a Standing Army or a
Malitia Organization.
WRITTEN BV GEN. J. 8. NEG',EV•
There is no subject of greater rational im
portance and better entitled to our respect
and uuvrearried watchfulness, than the mil- j
itary defences of our Country. It should be
spoken of in the lessons of youth, and not bo
forgotten in the counsels of the aged. If our
land did not teem with' the prodigal gifts of
Providence—if we had no liberties or free iu j
stitutions to defend—no enjoyment of reli- ;
giuus opinions—a free prtss and free expres
sion of thought —no debt of gratitude to pay j
—no c ildren's happiness to perpetuate — j
then, and only then, might we look with in- i
difference upon the provisions of safety. But j
quiet reflection startles us with the value of
our interests at stake, and the little regard
devo'ed to their defenae. Millions are squan
dered in useless expenditure— the burdensot
our Government are annually increased by
fresh territory—the Indians are driven to the
shoreaof the Pacific for their hqnting grounds
—the claims of Europe are looked upon wi h
envy the Executive arm stretches forth to
grasp the jewels of Spain—commerce lias
been foreed upon China and Japan, and our
internal progress travels upon the wings of
lightning and steam ; yet our government
seems to be heedle-s of the necessities of war,
and overlooks the increasing dangers of in
sult from abroad, and the liability of civil
commotion at home. Occasionally a shadow
of war flits across our horrizon. Should it
burst into a storm, where are our prepara
tions f< r a vigotous defence ? It is true we
have ships of war rotting in port, and mas
sive cannon rusting by the road sides—a
large number of useless muskets—State ar
senals without arms -a broken down ma
litia, and a system of tactics suited to march
ing along tho streets, and a s'anding army
of some 12,000 men, scattered along our
Irontiers and in government arsenals; but
hojv are we to meet the shock of the grand
armies of Europe, should they take up the
challenges flung at them almost every day ?
Tutth will answer, nowhere but in the pa
triotic citizen soldier, the'tiardy son of toil,
win breath the fresh air of sunrise—he who
is the first to hear tbs call of danger, and of
(er his life a sacrifice upon the alrer of his
country-*- in whose bosom ever burns bright
the spirit of enthusiastic devotion even in
spite of the neglect of his government. But
is this all that is necessary ? No. If we
would avail oursevlea of this powerful ele
ment, in which our independence was crea
ted, w° must encourage the citizen soldier,
provide him with suitable arms, discipline
him in the art of war that teaches endurance
of fatigue, activity of motion, accuracy of
aim, reliance upon himself in battle, the
ability to find a defence in every tree and
stone, and last, pot least, reward bis skill
with respect aud a remuneration for his sac
rifices. Follow this humble advice, and you
will have a resistless aruiy at your tire sides.
1 can already imagine the, objections that
j will be raised against these suggestions.—
\ The thoughtless will call preparations tor war
in peace a waste of time and money ; a temp
tation to immorality, & dangerous policy, ar.d
an idle ambition. The egotistical "Hvill as
sert, that because we achieved our indepen
i dence we can conquer the world. Those who
are awed by religious views will iepict the
horrors of war, and bid the sword be turned
into a pEw share, whiie others will advocate
a standing army. Eah of these objection!
may have a plausible argument, but where
are their teachings when ws listen to the les
sons of the past, or turn over the pages of
every nation's history? I would say-to those
who would stamp the volunteer s\stein with
infamy, to come with me to the New Eng
land graveyards, and let thick coining fan
cies crowd upon the mind and bring forth in
shadowy oonoiave the long procession of
martyrs, who taught the world the meaning
of the term, Militia. Ask them if there was
no piety in the labors of Quicceys, llan
| looks, Adams and Warrens, and whether
j they did not sbed blooa as pure as ever flow
ed, with a contempt ot pe;il, for sake of
I conscience and principle? Was it ambition
i that kept tne hearts of Washington's men
warm while blood trickled from their frozen
feet? Was it ambition that fi.led the gal
lant souls that fell in undistinguished ranks
from Lexington to Concord ? Was it ambi
tion that moved the sinews of theyoutli who
made forced marches through Mexico, with
| the bright beams of a tropical sun dancing
j on their bayonets, parehiDg their throats for
water, and drying up iheir bioed with fever ?
If it was ambitiou, cruel has been the re
ward. Those who live, inherit 'he hardships
and privations of camp-lifo. Thousands
found a shallow resting-place, far, far from
the hom*B of kindred, whiie the bones of a
few were gathered up by comrades, who
knew their virtue and heroism, and brought
them home to slumber in unmarked graves,
beneath the shadow of tall monuments that
reeord the titles of those who died in the lap
of luxury. To those who imagine that our
nation's destiny is peace, or that we would
be able to cope with the nations schooled in
war, without a moment's warning, I would
say, how limited the view of our dangers
both at home and abroad. Ilow futile to
suppose that our emblems of peace will al
ways be respected by the military nations of
Europe ; and bow weak the judgment in say-
ing that an aroiy of raw recruits, even with
hearts and frames of giants, and however ho
ly the cause, would be equal to the modern
trained and efficiently armed troops of the
old world. Are we not linking our interests
with every people on the globe, and will we
be always able to secure ourselves against
foreign violence or civil destruction ? Egypt
was once the Queen of the East, but her
greatness could not save her from the hordes
ef Cambysses. Greece became the cradle ot
science and the birthplace of teachers for all
ages, yet the refinement, learning and all the
grand conceptions of the human mind, were
stopped, and the haDds of progress turned
back on the dial plate of time. May there
not be again a Ghengis Khan, Cesars, CKar
lemagnes and Alexanders, to found new em
pires and check tho tide of civilization ? It
has been but a few months since Rusia shook
the political frame of Europe, and the tribes
of India blofted out the most remarkable
commercial enterprise in the world; and
who can say that America will not ba qrres
ted in her flight of ambition, and have the
same periods of light and darkness as the na
tions before us? Is aot her political future
now obscured by a cloud that is seen by all
the world.
In reply to religious objections, I regret to j
find so little encouragement; for the adyocate
of uon-resistancs, and so little harmony be
tweeen the advice and facts. The gleam of |
the sword has ever lighted up the pathway
of civilization. The Cross arid Bible have
been carried on the point of the bayonet ev
er sinGe Cortiz landed OD the shores of the
Western Hemisphere. The first beacon of
alarm shown from the lanterns in the Old
North Church at Lexington, and the most el
oquent appeals for the Revolution, came from
the lips of the Ilev, Jonas Clark. Bid the
constant expression of ' GMcs wille set ge
than" save the Dunkards' families from be
ing massacred in the Juniata Valley, and
their scalps being carried to Detroit? Not
a man of tbem would shoulder a rifle, or pay
a cent towards the protection of tbeir homes,
and when their wives or children were ta
ken captives, the fearless and noble Penn
sylvania volunteer would shoulder his rifle
and alone follow the ti uil of the savages, with
tho cunning of the v.clf, over rugged moun
tains and icy rivers, into the depths of the
pathless wilderness, until he rescind the cap
tives or avenged their deaths, often losing
his own life. It is not my wish to weave
fresh laurels for the hero's wreath, or award
a tribute of praise to the conqueror, or re
kindle the angry passions of war, but I
would fearlessly stir up the ashes of the past
to do justice to those who knew no sacrifice
too great when liberty was the reward. And
to save from disgrace the militia system of
my country, the same feeling encourages the
remark that tho man who would embarrass
the only means of our defense, or ridicule the
volunteer system, or refuse it the respect of
our community, does not deserve to enjoy
the precious fruits of liberty and indepen
dence, which have grown rank on soil that
has been enriched by patriots' blood. Per
haps I can best enforce ray plea in the lan
guage of one of the greatest statesmen and
orators of the age : "If this cloud of mani
fold war should burst suddenly, it would find
that time honored institution, the rniliiia of
the country, almost broken down. Yes, the
broad shield which then covered the land at
the commencement of hostilities, is broken
and cast away ! Yes, tho rpiljtia, the once
honored, and now derided militia, to which
we owe the undying memory of Lexington,
Concord, Eunker llill. Bennington and Sar
atoga—is sinking under an unmerited weight
of opprobrium and ridicule into the dust, I
pray Heaven, sir, if the dark days must
overshadow the country, we may not in this
have cause to regret that we qro BQ very
much wiser than our lathers,"
Although my article haa already been ex
tended beyond newspaper limits, I cannot
avoid referring briefly to the character of the
arms distributed to the militia, and the sys
tem of tactics in generttl practice. It seems
unaccountable to me why Government should
sparingly issue arms, (niaDy ef them unfit
for use,) and encourage the organization of
heavy Infantry, so little adapted to the char
acteristic features of our country, and so
contrary to the economical principles ef war
fare. Frederick the Great discovered this er
ror when obliged to employ riflemen to meet
the Austrians on equal terms. The English
acknowledged the same facts in 1794, when
they employed riflemen from Ilesse, Den
mark and Hanover, and organized the well
remembered COth Battalion of Rifles, called
the Royal Regiment, The same
thiDg occurred to General Cgthcart at the
Cape of Good Hope, when he wrote home for
5,000 rifles, so that they could hit what they
shot at. The late war in Ilajy demopsti&ted
the practical use of light Infantry. What
solid body of men could withstand the dead
ly aim and terrific charges of the Algiers ri
fle regiments ? Experience justifies the re
mark that the mqskets we used in Mexico
were the worst in the world, requiring the
heaviest ball, the greatest charge of powder,
the most windage, the shortest range, and
the least accuracy. As an instance of this,
when the troops under General Santa Anna
charged down the Calia Real in Puebla, they
were received from the Quarlel by the balls
and buckshot from upwards of 200 tuuskets.
I was informed afterwards by a Mexican of
ficer that they only lost ten men killed in
this charge. Compare this wi.h a charge
made by a company of native civalry upon
a company of English rifles, in fawn pore,
India—at the first fire sixty-nine out of the
sevecty cavalry were ki!l°d, and the other
one was shot by a rifleman when 200 yards
distant. This I would call saving time and
powder. England is so well satisfied with
the advantages of the rifle and light Infantry
drill, that she has encouraged the organiza
tion cf 200,000 volunteer riflemen in six
months. There is not a town in England
that does not possess a fine rifle company.—
These men are taught rifle practice at the ex
pcuse of the government, and they become so
proficient with the Enfield and Whitfield ri
fle, that the marksmen can make IS points
out of 20, at 900 yards. Both <he Swiss and
Enfield rifle have a lower trajectory than
ours. The advantage cf extended range is
in the narrow bcre. A large bore and heavy
charges cause recoil, which entirely prevents
accuracy of aim. The weight of a gun and
ammunition is of serious importance to tha
soldier who mikes long marches; at tho
same time it prevents him from meeting the
active savage and mountan hunter on
terms. Equal defects are to bo found in the
clashing eciuipments of our cavalry. A well
organized and properly armeu militia in each
Sta'e, would in a great measure prevent the
tedious and expensive transportation of men
and arms from distant points to another, as
in tbe Salt Lake Expedition. More money
was foolishly spent in this way than would
have equipped every militarj' company in tho
Union. This was never tbe polioy of the
country until within a few administrations.
We have another example in the Florida
war, wheie it took a longer time to drive out
the Indians, han it took the volunteers of
Massachusetts to conquer the thirty tribes,
and 'he hunters of Pennsylvania to drive liit*
Six Nations beyond the Alleghenies.
If Braddock had accepted the proffered
services of Cnpt. Jack's hunters, it is proba
ble his aripy Would have escaped defeat ; but
he relied upon his muskets asd b'4 heavy
Infantry. I venture the remark that if Gen.
Scott had landed at Vera Cruz wiib 10,000
efficiently armed light Infantry, he would
hav6 conquered Mexico in sis months. It
must be the conviction of every sensible man
that the arms, equipments, and system of
warfare, should be adapted to tbe peculiari
ties of the country.
The Capita s of the World
We subjoin some information relative to
the chief cities of the world, commencing
with the numbers ef their inhabitants :
London, 0,470,000
Paris, 2,000,000
New York, 900,000
Philadelphia, 000,000
Constantinople, 840,000
St. Petersburg, 000,000
Vienna, 500,000
Benin, 480.000
Roma, 198,000
L)ubliq, 308,000
Mexico, 218,000
Palermo, 193,000
Cincinnati, 158,000
Leeds, 158.000
Hamburg, 150,000
Turin, 100,000
Genoa, 125,000
Frankfort, 103,000
Naples, 510 000
Liverpool, 400,000
Glasgow, 380.000
Boston, 178 000
Moscow, 370,000
Manchester, 304,000
Madrid, 280,000
Ryoos, 300,000
Lisbon, 204,000
Amsterdam, 225,000
Havana, 240,000
Marseilles, 200,000
Milan, 153,000
Brussels, 132,000
Copehngen, 130 000
Biistol, 120,000
Florence, 107,000
Second Class American Cities.
St. Rouis, 101,000
Milwaukee, 40.000
Detroit, 47,000
Cleveland, 43,000
Zanesville, 9,212
Columbus, 18,628
Dayton, 40,000
Washington, 01,400
Providence, 49,000
Rochester, 48,000
There are 57 cities in the world which con
tains from 100,000 to 200,000 inhabitants, 23
from 200,000 to 500,000, and 12 which con
tain above 500,000.
Slander
Against slander there is no defence. Ilell
eannot boast so foul a tieud ; nor man deplore
so fell a foe; it stamps with a word—with a
nod —with a shrug—with a look—with a
smile. It is the pestilense walking in dark
ness, spriadingcontagion far and wide, which
the most wary traveller can't avoid it is the
heart searching dagger of the dark assassin ;
it is the poisoned arrow whose wound U in
curable ; it is the mortal sting of the deadly
adder; murder is its employment; innocence
its prey—and ruin its sport. Its foundation
is in envj, jealousy, and disappoiuted ambi
tion. Its heralds are found in all sects, in
every community, The slanderer is vindic
tive, malicious, a cowardly insinuating
demon—worse than a murderer.
EDITORS & PROPRIETORS.
NUMBER 49
Tlje Dead Wifcj
In comparison with the loss, ail o.tber be
reavements are trifles. The wife, she who.
fills an, large a space in the domestic heaven;
she who is busied, so unwearied; bitter, bitter
is the tear that falls upon her clay, Yon
stand 1 esitle her grave and think of the past;
it seems an ainber colored pathway where the
sun shone upon the beautiful flowers, or thq
stars hunjj'glitter ng over haad. Fain would
the soul linger there. No thorns are remem
bered above the sweet clay, save those your,
own hands have unwitting'y planted. Her.
noble, r?ndf heart lies open to your inmost
sight, lou think of her as all gentleness,
all beauty and purity. But ghe ig d.ad.—
The dear head that has often lain upon your,
bosom, now rests upon a billow of clay. Tha
hands that administered so untiringly aro
faded white and cold beneath the gloomy
portals. The heart whose every beat meas
ured an eternity of love, lies under your feet.
And there is no white arm over joqr should
er now—no speaking faco to look up in the
eye of love—no trembling lips ta murmur.
'•Oh it is to sad!" There is a strange husfl
in every room! No smile to meet you at
the clock ticks, and ticks, and
ticks! It was sweet music when she could
bear it. Now it seems to knel' only tbo
hours through which you watch the shadows
of death gathering upon the sweet face. Bqt
many a tale it ttdleth of joys past, sorrows
shared, and boautiful words registered abovo-
Y"U know the grave cannot keep her. Yoq
know that she is often by your side, sn an
gel presence. Cherish these emotions, they
will make you happier. Let her holy pres
ence be as a charm to keep you from evil.—
In all new and pleasant conceptions give her
a place in your heart. Never forget what
tho has bsen to you—that she has loved you.
Be tender to ber memory.
Eaply Vice
Acote observes cf American life have tes
tified that the riots and mobs which have
disgraced our principal cities were composed
largely of tpere hoys and half grown men.—
The same class of youthful criminals com
mit a large part of tbe larcenies and other
petty offences which occupy the attention of
our criminal courts. Lord Shaftsbury, in a
thorough personal investigation of criminal
life in London has discovered, the same
alarming fact in English society. lie says
"that of all the adult male criminals in Lon
don, not two in a hundred who live an hon
est life up to the age of twenty, ever enter
on e, course of crime,'' and that "almost all
who enter upon such a course, do so between
the ages of eight and sixteen."
These facts should stimulate all engaged
in mission Sunday schools to renewed vigor
and diligence in their noble work. As chil
dren and youth, who receive a large part of
their education in the streets and are forming
habits of immorality and vice, can be kept
from evil by mission schools, and imbued
with strong religious principles, wo shall see
the effect in a deminution of criminals in tbt>
next generation.
facts.
True repentance is followed by a coruect
walk and holy conversation.
The fruits cf the spirits are love meekness,
gentleness, goodness, kindness, and so on.
Humility is an evidence of regeneration
and piety. Without it we caunot be Christ
ians.
Parents should always accompany good
precepts with good examples.
Never make light of men's misfortunes
but always sympathise with them.
Children who have BO regard for their pa*
rents generally become bad men and wo
man.
The beggar has a heart as well as the
Prince, and the two ara brothers.
Spring is the emblem of youth ; Winter is
: the emblem of death.
Put your trust in Providence, and yon will
always enj >y contentment.
God so loved the world that he gave his
: son as a ransom for u<.
Jlappy Women.
A happy woman! Is not she tbe sparkle
; and 'iunshine of life ? A woman who is hap
! py because she can't help it— whose smile
; even the coldest sprinkle of misfortune can
! not dampen. Men make a terrible mistake
; when they marry for beauty, for talent, or
for style ; tho sweetest wives arc those who
possess the magic secret of being contented
| under any circumstanpes, Rich or poor,
| high or low, it makes uo dlSurenoe; the
bright little fountain of joy bubbles up just
as musically in their hearts, I)o they live
in a Jog cabin ? The fire light that leap? up
on its humble hearth stones becomes bright
er than the gilded chandeliers in an Aladdin
| palace. Was ever the stream of life so dark
and unpropitious that the aunsbino of a hap
py face falling across its turpid tide, would
not awaken an answering gleam ? Why,
these joyous tempered people don'tknaw half
the goo J they do,
SHaf A moral man need not tell tbe world
that he is such ; it will be known without.—
Just as a wicked man is known by his evil
deeds, is a good man known by his righteous
acts, and it will be known without being
lold.

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