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Centre Democrat. [volume] (Bellefonte, Pa.) 1848-1989, January 31, 1861, Image 1

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J. S. & J. J. BRI3BIN,
VOLUME 27,
®|t Centre gcmocrat.
IS. PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY, BY
J. BRISBIN.
ojgu* iu (A* Arcade BKilling, Second Floor.
Tsaxs. $1,50. if paid in advance or within sis
Months after subscribing,otherwise $2 will invari
ably be charged. No subscriptions received for
* shorter period than six months and none dis
jontinued, unless at the option of the editor, until
all arrearages are paid. .
BUSINESS CARDS.
TVf'ALLISTEIt & BEAVER
I>l AlxOKNi.Ys Al'-IiAW, uai.n-.vo.NTri, u
Uui ce on Allegheny Street. Feb. 10 69
I? M. BEANCHARB- ATTORN EY
2i, -sl'-biW, BKLLEOMTK, faNN A. Offico
foruirly occurded by the lion. James Burr.sido.
Jan. 19, 'fO.-lf.
WW BROWN-^TOMEY-AT-
LAW beuLbi-oNTK, I'e.NNA. Will attend to
all legal business entrusted to him, with prompt
ness. May, 6 'a3_
TAS. H. RANKIX, ATTOHNEY^T
LAW, UKLUKKONTK, I*A. WLL attend prompt
ly to all legal business entrusted to bim. Office
next door to tne Post Office. [Sspt. 20, '6O, tf
U J. IIOCKM AN , SURVEYOR AND
111, CONVbYANijEIf, BtLLF.roNTg, PA., will
attend to and coirectly execute all businesi en
trusted te him. [June 14,—'60, — tf.
wfiO. L. POTTER. M. D.
OFFICE on High (oldoffice.) Bellefonte
Pa. Will attend to calls as
heretofore, and respectfully offers his professional
services his friends and the public. 1 'cf.2s'sS
• A. PAIRLAMR. M. T>. JAN. A. DoBHINs. Up
FAIULAMHtDoHBINS.
DU. I'AlHliAs.li has associated with him OR
J. 11. DUBBIN "-'.in the practice of unidicine
>&ce as heretofore on bishop street, opposite the
Xetnpersnce Hotel. March 19,67.
R. JAS. r. respe. ctiul'y offer
his professional servioss to the people o_
Mileshurg and vicinity. Residence, liauiol K
Bureau's National Hotel.
Itef or te Dr. J. el. McCoy, Dr. O. L. Potter. Dr.
i. B. Mitchell. [Nor. S, IS6o. —tf.
WM. REIBER, BURTON AND
* PIIY&iCIAN, caving per manoutiv located
effers his Professional services to the citixens of
PiDe Grove Mills and vicinity, and respectfully
•slicils a liberal portion of the public patronage.
[Feb. 15, '6o.—ly.
J- ?• LINGLE, Operative
i " n 'i Mecbaniein Deiiunt, will prac
ties ail the various tranches of his
profession in the u>ct approved manner. Office
•ad rasidenc# ou Spring St-Bollofnnie' Fa.
[iM.tr. £■ 'CO. tf.
TAS F. KIDDLE ATTOKNET-AT
J uAW,*aL?"frrt'!r win amend u
ausiuess entrusted to him with care and prompt-
Refer to Gov. l'ollook, Milton i'a. and
Jlon. A. G. Curtin, Bellefonte Pa. oS.ce with
Juhn 11. Stover jan. 6, '6O.
RT MOTLI, Aoasr r..R tn
, YV KST liKaNe'll i.NMJIUNi.B COMPANY. I
Sons wishing to secure themselves from losses-by
fre, will do well to call upon biui at the store of J.
R. MutUy A Co., N. E. corner of tho Diamond,
three doors above Allegheny sin e , Bellefonte,
Cent e co,. Pa.. *'*• Mar. 16. 'flst. li.
WW. WHITE, D KXTIST, has per
. manently located in Boalsburg, Centre
County Pa. Office on ijjuiu st., negt tp the
store of Johnston A KelU.r, where bp purposes
practising h : protee.iun in the ihost scientific
manner mid st moderate charger. mtr.
4an. 0. MIICUKI.L. CTRUK T. AUXISKBS
MITCHELL A A L EX A NDER.
ATTORNEYS- AT LAW, HELLKFONTIS PFNNA.
having associated themselves iu the practice
•t law, will a'ten 1 promptly to all business en-
Vusted to their cars
Office in the A.rj4?- [No". '• 1. '6O-—tf.
CONVEYANCING.
I~\EEDS BONDS. MORTGAGES, AND AR
JLfTiCLES OF AGREEMENT neatly and cor
rectly executed. Also, attention will be given to
Ibe adjustment of Book Aocounts, and accounts
f Adminstratiyr s and Executors prepared fotfiling.
• ffice next door to lii.e Post Office.
Oct., 19tn, '6B, YYM. J. KEALSH..
~ hen?: a. STOVER
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW
bKLLEFONTE, PA., wili practice his pro
fession in the several courts of Centre county.—
All business entrusted to him will be carefully at
tended to. Collections made and all monies
promptly remitted. Office, on High st. formerly
epcuped by Judge Burntdde, and D. C. Boal, Esq.
■ herehe can be consulted both in the Engiishand
iiitbe gcrsap language. May 6,'68 —22 ly.
JAS. MAfWISnS. W. P MACIIANU
J; & WM. P. MA CM ANUS.
A TTOKNEY'S-AT-LAW, BELLKf 9STB, PA.,
Office iu the rooms formerly occupied -by
Linn A Wilson, Allegheny street. Jas. Macman
as has associated with W. P. Mucmanus. Esq., in
the practice of law. Professional business intrus
ted; o their eare will" receive prompt attention.
They will attebd the several Courts in the Coun
ties of Centre, Clinton and Clearfield.
June 21, '6O, tf.
& HOY. ATTORNEYS-AT
JLi. JLaW, ui.t attend pro nptly to all business
entru stedto their care. Office in the building
flemerly occupied by Hon, Jas. T. Hale.
A CARD.
Messrs. Hale & Hoy will attend to my business
luring mv absence in Congress, and will be as
listed by me in the trial of all causes entrustedto
t hem. J. T HALE. jano'lß6o
CURTIN & BX. AN CHARD.
ATTOKNIJY'6-AT-LAW,BELLEFO!ITI{,Pknna
The undersigned having associated theio
•elves in the of Law, will faithfully at
tend to ail professional entrusted to them
In Centre, Clintion and Ckorfiold counties. All
•ollections placed in their hi nds, will receive
their promt attention. Office in Blanchard's new
building on Allegheny street.
Nov. 30 '6B CURTIN & BLANC IIARD.
BJVATvBSf HOUSE OF
WM. F.. REYNOLDS & CO.
BELLEFONTE, CENTRE CO., PENN'A.
Bills cf Exchange and Notes discounted ; Collec
tions made and Funds promptly remitted. Inter
est paid on Special Deposits, Exchange on the
Satt***n cities constantly on hand and for sale.
Deposits received. T 'SB "
WM HARDING, FASBIOKABUB BARBER ARD
HAIR DRESSER, Bpw.Bjro.NTE, PA., Has
epened a Barber Shop one door above the Frank
lin House, where he can be found at all times.—
Good Razors, keen and sharp, kept constantly on
band. Hair Dressing, Nhampoonißg, AQ., atten
ded to in the most workman like manner. He
hopes by strict attention to business to receive a
liberal share of public patronage.
Uvfojite June 38, 1860-—tL
Ayw's CJwrry PeotoraL
% Jfamilg fUfospptr —$cbo£& tg pities, ®smsenw, literature, Science, Sjjt mechanics, Agriculture, Cjje Cbucatinv ® mra l #c.,
ST. LA¥RENCEHOTEL,
CHESTNUT STREET,
PHILADELPHIA.
WM. B. CAMPBELL, rr op riet
Apr sth'6o—tf.
J. THORP FLAHERTY,
Importer of
Havana Segars,
o. $37 CHESTNUT STREET,
(Adjoining Girnrtl Huu=e.)
And Opposite CONTINENTAL HOTEL,
PHILftUKLi'Un, PENNSYLVANIA.
Ar d.26,-'CU, —ly.
BOMGARDNER HPUSE
CO RNEK OF SIXTH AND R, R. STREETS
OPPOSITE
L. V< ANQ PEKNA. ft. ft. DEPOTS,
HAHKISBURG, PA.
J.W. STONE. PROPRIETOR
Mar. 15th, 186(1, ly.
CHARLES McERXDE,
HAS JUST RECEIVED
A LARGE AND SPLENDID STOCK OF
- Dry
READY-MADE CLOTHING,
GROCERIES, HARDWARE, QUEENSWARE.
ALL of tiUichhe is selling at very reduced
price!.
tiiiodt given in Exchange for Country Produce.
The public are invited to call and examine hi*
stock before purchasing elsewhere.
Bellefonte, 2iov. 3, '69. tf.
HOTEL,
BY
JLm. W. T33N EYCK
OPPOSITF PENNSYLVANIA R. R. DEPOT
HARFUSBUfIQ PA.
p. HARTSHORN Superintendent.
N'O pains have been spared to make the abvoe
the first hote' in linrrishnrg. The table i
eiweya spread with the beat the market affords
and the accommodations tire suprior to any found
elsewhere in the city. Murch let 186H.i>
HUGH S. BFUSBEN,
grtiggisi,
MANUFACTURER OF
EXTRA LIQUOR COLORIXQ,
H. IV. Cor. Third ic Poplar ttret rs,
Term* Cath ] Philadelphia.
Oct. 3. IS6U,—ly.
E. C. BfXRS, 411. T. HAL*
a. N. M'ALI.tSTSr., A. O. CUETia
BANKING HOUSE.
Interest paid on Special Deposit.
HUMES, H'ALUSTER HALE <fr CO,,
LELLEFONTE, PA.
DEPOSITS received. Bills of exchange and
>!otc. Discounted. Collections muds and
proceeds remitted promptly. Interest paid on
special deposits for Ninety days, and under six
months nt the rate of foui per cent, per an-.nm.
t'.,r six montfcs and upwards, at the r,.tc f' five
per cent, per nuuuui. Exchnnge on, th? l£;m con
stunt. v on Inn i. JjuiUMty, 3td- I?6L
BELLEFONTE DISPENSARY
Persons in want of PAINTS, OILS, VAR
NISHES, or anything of the kind, will do
oil to purchase thcmiit the Drug Store ot J, A J.
HARRIS, Erockerhoff'. Row, Rellyfoute. Also,
IINUOS, *' MEDICINES,
POCKET KNIVES, FANCY ARTICLES,
I'jcRYUM BRY. TOBACCO,
SECARS, Lrqnons,
And ail tho Parent Medicines made.
(Surgeon'* and Physician'* Instrument
onnsta-tly on band. Cull and leo them, cea.-ij
opposil itbe Conrad House.
Janunrv. 3rd 1861.
A. Guokvaueimer. ci. \Y lifiuiuio,.. B Wertheimor .
A. G. & BRO'S ,
IMPORTERS AND IHCALCRS I.M
Foreign and Domestic Liquors.
ntSTy.I.FRS OF
MONON G A HEL A RYE WHISKEY,
Also, Rectifiers of the
IRON CITY WHISKEY,
And Munufftcturers of tbe Celebrated
GERMAN STOMACH BITTERS
No. 25 Market Street,
Nov 15--6". —1 ] PITTSBURGII PA.
LOUIS GERBEU,
TMTOF.TER AND MANUFACTURER OT
FANCY PTJn S.
For Ladies', Qentlem # A's and Children's Wear,
NO. 234 AItCH ST., PHIL'A.
All kinds of Furs Dressed, Cleaned and Repaired.
Furs made to order at the shortest notice.
Fall value paid for Shipping Fur*.
Furs taken care of during
the Summey
Oct. 4, '6O —ly.
W. A. ARNOLD. JOHN tf. WILSON
ARNOLD & WILSON
WARMING & VENTILATING WAREHOUSE,
No. 101K Chestnut Street, P hilade'ph in
CntlZiSON'sPatoa Gaus aad Veatiiating
FURNACES, dooking Ranges,
Balk Boilers,
ENAMELED STATE MANTELS
Oomino.A and Low "Down Parlor Grater,
AVarm Air Registers and Ventilating, Ac. Ac.
Particular attention given tu warming and Ven
tilating Buildings of every dieription.
ItEXJ. M. FELT\YSIL, Sup't.
Apr. 26,'—18<>. ly.
HAINES & HOCK.
WHOLESALE GROCERS,
No. 35 North Water Btr3et,
PHILADELPHIA.
GROCERIES, GROCERIES, GROCERIES,
GROCERIES, GROCERIES, GROCERIES,
Merchants of Central Pennsylvania
LOOK TQ YD JH INrEftESTS ! !
If you wish to buy cheap go to Haines Al) oek, 0 ek,
They keep on hand tbe best articles to be ad
in the < ity, in their line of business.
Cull and examine their goods.
Remember tbeir Firm is at
No. 35 North Water Street.
Q C PHILADELPHIA" Wj
Apr. tf.'W—ly. -
A^"!-siKr
[••WE STAND UPQN THE IMMUTABLE PRINCIPLES OF JUSTICE—NO EARTHLY POWER SHALL DRIVE US FROM OUR POSITION-
BELLEFONTE, PA., THURSDAY MORNING, JAN., 81 1861
Incident, of the Battle of Trenton.
CT EDWARD B. ELLIS. ,
It was the tlight before the battle—the
darkest night of the Revolution. The town
of Trenton was lit up as if for u carnival,
and gay forms could be seen flitting by the
wjndows. and their boisterous voices often
reached the shivering sentinels outside.
Every one abandoned himself to revelry,
and harbored no thought of danger. Now
and then an officer reflected for a moment,
that perhaps a disciplined army might afford
them.considerable trouble, but what was to
be feared from the poor, ragged, half-starved
Continental soldiers ? They were far away ;
and even should they dare to make a dem
onstration, the Hessians would
raily at tha call to arms, and annihilate them
in an instant. No, danger was not worth
tha thought.
In a small unpretending house, close to
where the "State Bank" building now standi,
lived an elderly lady and her only daughter.
Tbey were both patriots, and the mother's
darling son was then serving in the Conti
nental army.
Upon entering the tovjn, three of the Hes
sian officers took up their quarters with this
Mrs. without the formality of
invitation. It was out of her power to re
fuse thena, even if she wished ; but it was
not her. disposition to deny shelrer to even
her enemies, and consequently she made no
objection to their prot<ence.
The officers were all young, swearing dis
sipated men, who immediately took posses
sion of the best room, on the second fi tor,
which fronted the street. Ilere, on the af
ternoon of the day before tbs battle, they
commenced drinking. Not drinking as tbey
usually did, in moderation, but with the de
termination of gettjpg dead drunk and cele
brating Christmas eve in a manner that
would be long remembered. By nightfall
they were only slightly —just
enough to sing songs, and talk boisterously,
and swear terribly. Several times those who
wero passing along the streets paused and
looked [up at tbe revelers, aDd then with a
knowing smile pasted on.
Late in the orenrng, just as one had fin
ished a song, another asked ;
''•l wcndei where the girl is?"
"Whim do you mean?"
" Why, Ruth, the old woman's dsughter,
if cr ureo. Let us bavs her in here to siDg a
song"
" Good —agreed ; but euppoae ehe has re
tired ?''
" Hang the difference 1 we will have her.
for all that."
" Who will bring her?"
" I will, of course," volunteered the one
who had made rhe proposition.
" Go. then, and bring the rebol maiden
hither!" cried the o'hers iu chorus.
The mnn arose to leave the apartment, hut
suddenly paused and looked at. his compan
ions, as be heard the low tones af what ap
peared to be a conversation.
" Ha! she is praying " he cried.
" One of their number slipped to the door
and opened it. Then they listened, and the
low, earnest, pleading tor.es of Ruth were
heard Sie prayed that her brother might
be preserved in the danger which now en
compassed him, that God would aid the fee
ble in their holy struggles and open
the eyes of those who were in their house tu
the injustice of their oppressive course.—
While still engaged in supDlicatinn, Ruth was
startled hy a footstep, and looking up, dis
cerned, in tbe gloom of the chamber, the out*
lines of the figure of a span standing before
her.
'• What do you wish here?" she said
" We want a eung, my little charmer."
"Leave the room, sir! no gentleman
would thus invado tho sanctity A domestic
privssy I"'
' Come, my girl, there is qo, use of bandy
ing words.
lie seised her arm as he spoke, and drag
ged her by main force from the room, Ruth
Would not scream, for she feared no real in
jury at their Lund*, nnd did no,t wish to
alarm beT toother, who wae asleep in the
chamber beneath her own.
" What means thia insult?" she demand
ed, qs she stood before tho three intoxicated
officer*.
" A song, my birdie,"
'• I will not sing." * -
" Suppose we compel you !"'
*' You may kill me, but I vyill pot utter
ope single note upon compulsion."
" Tbe spirit of rebellion courses eyen thro'
tba veins ot their women," said one. "Do
not fear, Ruth ; vye are not going to barm
you ; you know we are gentleman."
" Have you proved it by coming into my
obamher and draggipg me here by force ?''
'• Well, say no mote about that. Let us
change tbe subject. Pray tell us something
about that brother of yours. Who is he? a
commander ?"
Ruth perceive! the sneer, and made no re
ply.
" Who is ho? an officer?"
*' You way learn hefore ibia war is over."
" Eh ! do yoq threaten my beauty ? Stay!"
he added, as she started away.
Sb sprang forward, but be caught her be
fore b reached tbe door, and rudely oom-
" Sinp, I tell you !"
" Not to-night," said Ruth firmly.
•' Take that, then.*'
lie aent, her reeling with a blow, and ad
ded, with a snser; Now go, and next time
learn to obey when you receive an order."
Ruth, half.craxed with pain, groped her
way back to her room,^and fastsning the
door, sunk down upon her knees and prayed
—not for vengeance, but for mercy upon her
insulters.
Refors it was yet light, the officers were
awakened by the discharge of musketry.—
Tbev knew well enough what it meant, and
two of their number instantly sprung out of
bed, and hastened into the street. But the
third, he wha so grossly insulted Ruth, re
mained still, half stupefied by the dissipa
tion of the previous day.
L-vuder and louder, neArer and neare;.
(;me the sounds of confiiot. The shouts of
officers and the cries of the wounded were
heard, while now and then the faint cheer
ing of the Americans in the distance reached
his ears.
At last our officer arose from his bed, half
dressed himself, went to the window aud,
looked out. He saw tho whole Hessian force
slowly retreating before the Continental ar'
my, which was resolutely pressing onward.
Insteend of passing out and joining bis own
men, the officer bung a small miror upon
the side of the window, and commenced sha
ving 1
While he was thus engaged, the following
words wero exchanged between two soldiers
in Washington's army. One of the speaker*
was youog Manton, and the, other, a friend
of his about the same age.
" We have tkem at last 1" exclaimed the
latter, exultingly.
" Yes, thank Ileaven 1 they are in full re
treat."
" Are they not near your bouse, Manton ?"
" Y'es, and my dear mother and sister are
no doubt thanking Sod for what is now go
ing on around thfcin," said young Manton,
proudly.
The American forces wero now at the head
of Warren -Street, and the British retreating
before them. When the latter reached the
houao of Manton, they turned off to the right,
through a by-street, and continued their re
treat through Greene, toward the Assnnpink
Creek. Washington observing this, execu
ted a m,aneuvre that placed vioto,ry at once
iu his hands. Dividing his force, ha dis
patched one portion of it down Warren stieet,
while bis own body continued his pursuit
through Greene. Tbe former division was to
cross the Assanpinic as qqickly as possible,
and attack the enemy in the rear.
Manton was in this body : and as they
hastened forward to obey tbeir orders, he
glanced up, while passing, at the windows
of his home. What was his astonishment to
see an officer deliberately shaving himself in
full view from the street!
Impulsively he raised his musket and fired.
The ball went through the window pane,
struck the officer in the face, and he fell and
died in less than ten minutes!
The result of the battle of Trenton is well
known. It was the turning point of the Rev
olution ; and the dark clouds which bad so
lond hurg over our destiny as a nation were
there dissipated, and tba bright sun of hope
once more beamed upon our laad.
After the battle, Manton and his friends
visited tbe house of the former. Then he
leqrued that he had slain the ineulter of his
sister, and it is needless tq add that it occa
sioned him but little regret.
The window-pane through which the lies*
sian officer was shot is still preserved in
Trenton, and is in the possession of a Mr.
Wilson. It is still regarded aa a curiosity.
Tbe bullst made a clean hole, perfectly cir
cular, and did not crack any other part of
the glass. Bat time and storms have ren
dered it fragile and weak, and it is now
guarded with jealous care. The building
from which it was taken was known, until
about eight years eince, as the " Phcqnix Tav
ern," when it was torn down and a more
'astcful edefice erected in its" stead. But
there are other houses arounc[ it, ip which
the bullet marks of this battle are yet visi
ble, and almost any one can show you the
spot where tbe Hessian officer was shot as he
stood shaving a; the — From Ben
nett's Dollar Monthly.
An Original.
There is out in Arkansas, at Fort Smith,
a funny fellow by the usme of Bright, over
whose droll advertisements we haye enjoyed
a laugh.
Fundamental Principles—Baoon, beans,
corn, rice, meal, fOgar, coffee, molasses, and
strap iron, now on hand. De Oderiged Cod
fish—and beautiful unsophisticated macker
el, taken during their kittenbood, and, of
course, very tender, fat, and good.
Dum Vivimus Vivimos!— Signifies treat
yourself to Cnespeak Bay oysters, highfalu
tin clams, and lobsters, and
keep them led with ketchup, pickles, scuuee,
fresh peaches, raisins, prunes, figs, and Ep
som salts.
Lubricatives I—Lard oil, linseed oil,
oil, heays oil; tanner's oil, and the oil'of
gladness.
Plows—A very Peoria root-ripping, sod
ripping and ground-tearing plow, warrented
to upset tbe bolder over a sig feet rail fence
about dinner time, thus saving the expense
of a wateh.
WSf The Critendsn resolution have been
approved by (be Senate of New Jersey, by a
vote of eleven to six.
A Scrap Qf History
Inhere have been ten specific attempts to
defy, the authority of the Federal Govern
ment since its formation.
The first was in 1782, and vrs a conspir
acy of some of the officers of the Federal
army to consolidate the thirteen States into
one, and confer the supreme power on Wash
ington.
The second was in 178 C, called " Shay's
In-urrection," in Massachusetts,
The third was in 1794, popularly called
" the Whiskey Insurrectien of Pennsylva
nia."
The fourth instance was in 1799<. by the
opponents of the Sedition lawß, known in
Berks county as the " Schreckenzeiten," or
•• Reign of Terror." The federal troops took
one of the editors of the Adler, Judge Snyder,
to the market place and horse-whipped him,
which ended the insurrection.
The fifth instance was in 1814, by the
Qobvention of the Federalists.
The sixth, on which occasion the diffrren
sections of the Union came into collision!
wa&in 1820, under the administration of
President Monroe, and occurred on the ques
tion of the admission of Missouri into the
Union.
The seventh was a collision between the
Legislature f Georgia nnd the Federal Gov
ernment, in regard to certain lands given by
the latter to the Creek Indians.
The eighth was in 1820 with the Chero
kees in Georg'a.
People We caa Dispenca With.
Dies any enterprising individual wish to
forip, a polony at the North Pole, or Central
Africa, or any such fai-off place, where the
voyagers will bs warrented never to come
back again? If so, we san point out quite
u cargo whose export would never bo lamen
ted over by their native land. We are no;
sure but that government would pay their
entire expenses, to get rid of them finally nnd
forever. Here is a list of the most prom
ising.
The man who " cao't live within bis sala
ry," and is always wanting to borrow mon
ey, but who wears as fine broadcloth and ex
pensive sleeve-buttons as his millionaire em
ployer.
The woman who brings up her daughters
on a diet of curl-papers and dancing school,
and who " can not account for Anna Maria's
conduct''when she •[opes with % paouiless
drygoods clerk !
The mnn who would rather buy a new
coat (on credit!) and cheat tbe tailor, than
to bo degraded by a neat patch on his al
lows.
The woman whose stocking-tees resemble
a cullender in their ventilating conveniences,
but who considers a nicely executed darn in
the skirt of a dress to be vulgar beyond en
durance !
The man who is always " making up bis
mind," who answers every qu-stion with,
" Wal I don't kiow exactly 1" aad etvnds
with bis hands in his pockets until it is too
late to do anything else with them I
Tho. wotqan who always has to stop and
sew on ber bonnet-strings when she is going
anywhere—who is universally behindhand
who is too late at churc.fi, too l>vta at caa ket,
too late to get bcr railroad ticket, and inva
riably arrives at the steamboat landing just
these seconds after tbe plank has been tak
en up.
The man who never can subscribe for the
CZSILRB DEMOCRAT, but who always sends lit
tle Zekiel over to bis neighbor's house to
borrow it, twenty minutes after the mail
comes in.
The young lady never can remeiub.ev
tie misiiter'n text at church, but who makes
the hair of her dear particular friends stand
upright with a repetition of ;he horrors ehe
has devoured in her last yellow-coverod ro
mance.
Tbe msn who " has no faculty fc work,"
but has ar amazing facul j in attending po
litical meetings, standing on street corners,
and running after firu companies.
The woman who cao't get a minute's time
to the girls' aproqs an<[ tbp boys'jack
ets, and who spends iir leasure in leaning
out of the window, on her elbows, and hearing
about "that dreadful murder" from her
next-door neighbor, while the children are
paddling in the wash-tub, and the soup
burning in the dinner-pot.
Wo could mention a good mary others—
but th-se will serve as a pretty fair sample.
We can spare them just as well as not—in
fact, we would offer a reasonable premium to
anyone who would warrant their non-re
turn. Perhaps tbey might become useful
members of society in tfiu Ft-jee Islands.—
They certainly never will here!
An immense peak of alum stone,
from which the purest alum is obtained by a
very simple and cheap process, is discovered
in Amaden county, California.
The whom Gov.
Slade of sent out to Oregon, were
to pay a finq of SSOO if they married under
one year. Most of tbe girls paid the fine im
posed.
tS?" The bill admitting Kansas into the
Uoiun as a State, passed the Senate on last
Tuesday, by a vote of 36 to 16. Those who
voted against the admission wsrs tfeuthern
Senators.
Centre County Teachers'*lnstitnte
•'Were half the power, that fills the world with
terror,
Were half the wealth, bestowed on camps ar.d
courts,
Given to redeem the human mind froii error
There were no need of areeutls and forts."
Pursuant to adjournment, aud a call of
the President.tha Teachers met at Boalsburg
on Tue-dy, December 2oth, 1860, at 1J o'-
clock, RM. The President, Mr. Thos.ilol
lahao, took the chair, cad called the Insti—
stute . order. A prayer was then oflsred by
the Rev. Mr. Grow.
Oo motion of tha. Secretary, S. Brugger,
the President appointed the following per
s ins a board of critics -. Messrs. 11. G. Styiz
er, John T. P.cr.d, nnd John F. Hollahan.—
J. Llollaban wished to be excused, and sug
gested that the President should appoint a
lady member in his place- By a vote of the
Institute" he was rxcused, and Miss E. Tate
was appointed by the President.
The Rev. Mr, fßnke, of Aaronsburg, was
then introduced by the Pres'l., who deliver
ed a very able and interesting address on
the studies of theecbcol room; discarding
the mere use of the text book, end insisting
that the teacher be thoroughly verssd in ev
erything hs pretends to teach.
On potion a vote of thanks was tendered
to Mr. Blak? for bis able aud interesting ad
dtesi.
On motion, the Prcs't. appointed the fol
lowing persons a Committee to prepare h'j.si
ness for the institute; Messrs. T, G. Ebr
hart, Wm. P. Dale, M. R. Reck, Dr. It. Weir,
F. W. Iless, Alfred Sitae, and Miss Jennie
F. Mobride.
On motion, the hours for opening and clos
ing the Institute were fixed as follows-. 9 to
12 A. M., 1} to 44 P. M., 64 in tba evening
and adjourn when through evening session ;
President Ilollahao. iq, tha chair ; prayer by
W. Galbraith ; roll called, tie members re
sponding with sentiments -. music by the
band, anij. read aod approved. Let
ters wera then read, by tbe Secretary from
Thos. Burrows, Siate Superintendent, aud A.
Smith, Sup't. of Mifiiiu county, both stating
that they were prevented, by prior engage
ments, from attending the Institute.
The fVesidect then delivered his Inaugu
ral address, iD a clear, distinct and able
manner, and was listened to with marked at.
tention by a large and appreciating audi
ence.
Music again by tfie ban a.
Essay on Physical Geography, by R. C
Weir.
Musio. *
Essay. Subject—ths ' Present Ags"
Musis,
Practical questions being next in order
Dr. Weir proposed tbe following question :
How many and what branches should bs
taught in common schools ?
He opened tha discussion nnd maintained,
tbat in small country schools of not over 30
scholars, only the branches required by law
should be taught.
He was followed hy M. R. Beck, E, P.
Fi-raeman, J. F. Hollahan, Alfred Shaw, J.
T. Read, D. 11. Chesebro, 11. G. Stitzer and
Frank W. Iless. Tbe majority were in fa
vor of a more exrended course of study,main
taining that such was the design of tbe law.
On motion tho subject was closed.
A motion was made to reconsider the vote
but was lost.
Mr. Hcllahan then suggested die following
topio for discussion : What effect has the
constant chqoge of teachers upon the common
schools ?
On mctii,n. the question was postponed un
til the following morning.
On motion, Mr. Keller, Daniel Musser, P.
Shenneberger, Rev. Mr. Grow, Mr. David
Keller, and all tbe members of the Band
were elected Honary members of the Insti
tute.
Report of the critics.
On motion, tbe following resolution was
adopted and incorporated as one of the by
laws :
Resolved, That no member apeak more
thon tvyic.e op the same subject, ncr longer
than ten minutes at one time unless by tho
permission of tbe Institute.
Adjourned.
WEDNESDAY MORNING SESSION.
President Hollahan in the chair; prayer
by Mr, D. Mathias; roll oslIed; minutes
read and approved.
On motion of F. Hees, the Secretary
read the Constitution and By-laws. After
the reading it number of the tqaohtra came
forward and signed them.
The question, "What effect has the con
stant change of teachers on the common
schools," then opened bv J. F. Ilollabaq,
who waq decidedly
change in teachers. He was followed by 11.
G Stitzer, who took the opposite side, main
taining that change is beneficial in keeping
up the interest of both scholars and teachtrs.
The di-cusion was continued by Messrs. T.
G. Rhrhart, G. W. Rumbarger, R. C. Weir,
Frank IV. Iless, J. W. Meffl'y, W. W. Weav
er and DL 11. Young.
Tbe subject, " the best method of teaching
Arithmetic," was then taken up, Mr. A-
Musser having been appointed to open tha
subject, declined doing so, aod Mr. Galbraith
took bis plaoe, followed by D. Keller, 11, G.
Stitzer and others.
On motion, th nubjeot wu postponed so?
til Thnrtday mmniofc.
EDITORS & PROPRIETORS.
A eong then cunj by Mia A Keller'#
class ia a very pleasing manner,
li.enest question, "are nusrit registers
proper, iji schools," was opened by R. C.
Weir, who maintained tbey are not proper,
and that he does not approve of creiit marks.
Lie was followed by J. Campbell, who op
proved of merit Tiarks, also by Messrs. D.
IT. Young, E. P. Foresman, T. Q. Ebrhort,
W. Weaver and others.
Miscellaneous business.
Adji urnsd.
Loiujfclluw
ARRSRXOEN SKSRIOX. President Ilollahan
ia the obair. Prayer by W. R. Dale. litoll
called. Minutes read and approved. Mr.
M. IV Beak, member of business commutes
reported that he had waited upon the Rev.
Mr. Ilamill, and that he could not address
the Institute. A song was then sung by.
Miss A. Kellers pupils. " Should schools be
graded in rural divtrists," was the subject
next taken up by F. W. Hjss.s, who was de
cidedly in favor of graded sahools. lie was
followed .by Messrs. Young, Musser, Reuben,
J. S Neff, and others. The majority being,
in favor of graded school. A vote of the in
stitute was taken on the subject, aod stood
Yeas 25, Nays 9. Recess of 20 minutes.—-
The subject " should vocal music be taught
in our oomuico schools," was then taken up
and discunsed by 11. G. Stitzor, E. P. Fores
man, and other#. By request of the Insti
tute. Mr. J. G. Meyer, and other experien
ced teacher of vocal music addressed them.
lie spoke decidedly iD favor of teaching mu
sic to all tne children in our schools. He il
lustrated his method of teaching music by
forming a class. 11. G. otitzer offered the
following resolution which was read aod
adopted :
licsoh'td, That vocal music should ba
taught in all our common schools.
Miscelaneous business.
Chairman of the Finance committee then
made a report.
On motion the subject was posponed.
Adjourned.
Evening session. Pies. Huilahan in tha
cbair ; prayer by the Rev. Mr. Grow; mu
eic by Mr. Meyers' class ; roll called- min
utes read and approved ; music by the class.
Essay by Mr. J. T. Reed, subject, anger,
was then read. Music by the class. Miss.
Jennie F. Mcßrido then read a very able and
interesting essay on "Incentives to. study/',
which was very attentively listened to. Mu
sic by the class. Mr. D. 11. Chesebro, theu
delivered ar. address on the subject of ''The
Teachers Aspirations music by the choir.
The Rev, Mr, Grow was then introduced by
the President, and addressed tha Institute
on the subject of "Common School EJuea-r
t'mu," especially in favor of religious educa
tion. Music by thp class. The subject,
"Should parents be compelled, by law, tqi
rsad their children to School." Mr. T. G.
Eb'bart opened the discussion, maintaining
that DO lew should be passed to that effect.
J. 11. Stover, Esq., being called upon, re
sponded in a brief address, in opposition to
tbe passage of any such law. Dr. R. 0.
Weir followed, advocating the passage of a
law, compelling those persons to seed their
children to school, who will not do it other
wise. The discussion was continued by
Messrs. D. 11. Young, J.. H. Stover, E- V"
Forestuan, vid others. On motion of Dr.
Hunter, the resolution was laid on the table.
The President appointed, the fu,lloyyipg
persons a Committee to draft resolutions, 11.
Y. Stits;er, Ij. 0. Weir, and f. V/. Hess.
On motioD, the Pres. eppointed the fol
lowing persons a Committee to nominate of
£-c-rs for tlo ensuing year; Messrs. Gal
braitb, W. S. McFeaters, and W. Dale.
The chairman of the Finance Committer
made his report.
The Librarian, J. IT. Stover, then repor
tad.
On motion of W. Galbraith, it was ordered
that tbe sei vices of J. H. Stover Esq., be
procured, to deliver a series of lectures the
ecmiag winter, the proceeds of which be ap
plied to defray the expenses of the Cenrtre
Co., Teachers Library. The report of tho
critics was then read and elicited considers
ble discussion.
Music by the choir,
Adjourned.
THURSDAY MORNING SESSION.
Institute called to order ; prayer by Pres
ident Ilullahan ; roll called ; minutes read
and approved. After some discussion the
critic* were constiucted to criticise none but
regular members,
A drill in mental Arithmetic was next in
ordjr. Class conducted by W. W. Weaver.
Miss A- Keller's class was next examined
in Geography, and acquitted themselyes very
well. She then conducted a class in read
ing; tbey acquitted themselves very credita
bly. They also recited a piece with good ef
fect.
On motion, the Institute proceeded to fleol
officers for the ensuing year-
On motion, W. W. Weaver and J. F. IIoW
lihan wera appointed tellers to hold tbe eko*
tion.
Adjourned.
AFTERXOOX SESSIOX. President Hollahap
in the chair /prayer by Rer. Mr. Grow; roll
called ; minutes read and approved.
The tellers then Reported the following
person* as elected to the different offices :~
President —S. Brugger.
Vice PretidenU —Misses E Tata and Kate
Rsess.-
i Conrtudcd next trtdt
NUMBER a>

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