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Centre Democrat. [volume] (Bellefonte, Pa.) 1848-1989, February 17, 1881, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84009409/1881-02-17/ed-1/seq-7/

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Wilson, Mc Far lane f Co., Hardware Dealers.
HARDWARE!
WILSON, McFARLANE cSo CO.
DKALKKS IN
STOVES, RANGES =HEATERS.
ALSO
Paints, Oils, Glass and Varnishes,
AND
IBITIILIDIEIR/S' HABDWABE.
ALLEtiIIEN V STREET, .... IIVMKS' BLOCK. .... BELLEFONTE, PA.
11 It si II CM* I'll I'll*.
nA IIX ESS MA X V FACTOKY
Its Garmao't Nw Ulock,
BKLLKPONTK, PA 1-ly
W? P.BLAIR,
1 • JEWELER,
w ATCIIM. CLoris, JKWRLBV, Ac.
All work ti rally exactstw!. Ou Allrghrny ilrttl,
Ikdii Brw kM bun KI*HIM. 4*lf
DKALKKS IX PUKE DRUGS ONLY,
j I ZELLER& SOX, a
R tit DHL'UUIHTS,
•J ' No 6. Urockerhoff Row. 5
C I All TLl'* Standard Potent Miiliilnp# Pre- *
U -rl|>tione and Family Reel pee accurately) g
prepared. TNIWI. Shoulder Bracee, Ac., Ac. 5
-t 4-lf I
T GUIS DOLL,
FASHIONABLE BOOT A SHOEMAKER,
Brockerhoff Row, Allegheny atrial,
Bellefonte, Pe.
c. Heme, Pros't. j r,ui,Ciib'r.
THIRST NATIONAL HANK OF
1 BELLEFONTE.
Allegheny Street. Bellefonte, P*.
/CENTRE COUNTY BANKING
V7 COMPANY.
Rmrfitp RepoalU
And Allow Int#rl,
Dtucouoi Noli*;
Buy mi ! Ml
Gov. S#crltlr,
Gold and Coupons. ?
JAVCA A. BIAVM, Pr*altl*nt.
J. 1). BNoakßr.Cahl*r. *" lf
TRAVELER S GUIDE.
BELLEFONTE a SXOW SHOE
R. R.—Tirne. Table In effect on UJ after May
1 issi):
Leave* Snow Shoe 7.20 4. ..arriee In Bellefonte
•.10. a. .
LEVEE. Ilellefonte 10.2,5 . ■ „ arrive, at Snow Shoe
mi. m
Leave. Snew Shoe 2.00 R. M., arrive. In. Bellefonte
3 41 p. a.
Leave# Bellefonte 5.18 P * . arrive. *t Snow Shoe
6.17 p. a. DANIEL RIIOA 1)8,
tlenerel Superintendent.
T> ALD EAGLE VALLEY RAIL-
J > ROAD—TUN--Table, April |B*>;
KXP Mail, wtetw.NN. ATW*O. EIP Mel)
A. A P a. • *
IN 7 <ri Arrlee et Tyrone Leere 7 32 * 4*
A :t FL 86 Leave East tyrune Leave... 7 39 8 88
7 H 481 •• Veil " ... 742 "I
785 647 " Held Eagle " -7 47 9 <72
74H 636 .. " Fowler " ... 762 909
7,2 6lt " lleiineh " ... 785 18
738 *25 " Port Melllda " 800 919
727 617 " Merltm " ... 807 9 1".
7 LE 6LO ...... " Julian " . *lB 9 .72
7 &57 " L'manellle " ... *S I 9t
700 54A ..... " Sn..w Shoe In " ... 8 .72 945
656 545 " Mlleabwrg " ... 8 .74 94*
6 TI 835 M Bellefonte " ... 843 967
( k 125 ...... '• Mtleeliurf " ... 88410 L*
6 '25 818 ...... " Curtln " ... 9"610 I#
6ls 810 " Mount Eagle " ... 91210 25
6 9 501 " Howard " ... 92010 37
4 8". 460 " Eogleville " ... 9 .78 10 49
8V) 448 ....„ " Reerh Creek " ... 940 111 54
831 433 ...... " Mill Hall " ... 98411 18
529 430 ...... " Flamlngtoa " ... 98711 30
825 425 ...... " Lock llaren " -.10 01 II 25
PEX XSYLV A XIA It AILROA I).
I — I Philadelphia end Erie Dtrtalon.)—On and
after December 12, 1*77 :
WESTWARD.
ERIE 51 AIL |eara Philadelphia 11 88 p M
" " llarrlsburg ................. 4 25 a m
e " 44llllamaport... 8.75 am
M " L/S K ItareQ 9 40 e m
•• " Renoeo - 10 58 a m
•' arrlree at Erie 7 .18 p 111
NIAFLARA EXPRESS leasee Philadelphia-. 7 I a M
•• " Harris!.org ... LO ,Vl a NI
'• '* Wllllemeport. 2 .SI p m
•' arrlree at Renoro. . 4 4o p m
Paaeengere by thle train arr.ie In Belle
fonte at 4 75 p m
FAST LINE learee Philedelphla 11 41 e m
" " llarrlskurg 3 35PM
M " Wllllemsleirt7 3u p m
" arrlree at lea k lleren e4 40 p m
EASTWARD.
PACIEir EXPRESS learee Lock Keren. 6 40 e a>
" •' Wllllemeport... 788a n>
" arrlree at Harriabnrg 11 88 AM
" " Philadelphia... 345 PM
DAY EXPRESS learee Renoro 10 10 a m
•• " Lock llaren. II 2" am
" " Wllllemeport— 12 40am
- arrlrea at llarTteborg 4 10pm
•* " Philadelphia. 720 pa
ERIE MAIL learee Renoro 8 .75 p m
" '* I>* k Karen 945p n.
S H Wllllemeport 11 08 p M
" arrlree at llerrtebnrg. 2 45 am
" Philadelphia 7no am
FAST LINE learee Wllllemeport 12 35 am
" arrlree at Hsrrlebnrg. —3 58 a m
" " Philadelphia..—..—.. 735 a m
Erie Mall Weet. Niagara P.ipreea Meet, Lork Keren
Arcommodetlon Weet end Day Kipreee Eaat, makr
rloee rannectiona at with LARK
R tralne for Wllkeekarre and Screnton
Erie Mail Weet. Niagara P.ipreea Weet, and Erie
Eipreee Went, and Lock llaren Arrommodhtian Weat
make rlnae connection at Wllllameport wlta NCR
W. tralna north,
Erie Mall Wee!, Nlacara Eipreee Wewt, end Daj
Eipreee Eeet. make rlnae connection at Lock llaren
Willi B. E. 3'. R R. trelne.
Erie Mall Reel and Weet connect et Erie with train#
on I. S A M. S. R R. at Corr? with OCA A V. R
R . at Emporium with R. N. T. A P. R. R., an I at
Driftwood with A. 3*. R R
Parlor ran will rnn between Philadelphia and
Wllllameport on Nlacara Eipreaa Weat. Erie Eipreo
Weet, Philadelphia Eipreee Eael and Day Eiprae-
Eaei.and Sunday Eipreaa Eaat. Slaeptnc carina al>
night tralne. 34 u. A. Rilbwi*.
flen'l Sapor) ntendent.
|>IBARD HOUBN,
\I CORNER CHESTNUT AND NINTH STREETS,
rnnaMAPnta.
Thle henae prominent la a rttp famed for Ite com
fortable hotel*. Il kept In eeery resp-rl equal to any
Bret claee hotele In the country Owing to the etrln
gencyof the tlmea. tha price of board h• ■ leen reduced
te rnnai nottaaa per day. J. M KIIIHIN,
144' Manager
• •
BUSH HOUSE,
BELLEFONTE. PA..
I a OPEN.
p-.ln D P. PETERS, Proprietor.
4 ... —4
U A Y Fi Y To at fi per Ct.
iUV/43 1J I nr THK MUTUAL LIFE IKSUR
ANCE CO. OF NEW YORK, on Int morigace, on
ImpToeed farm property. In enme not lews than B.UWI,
end not exceeding one-third of the preeent ralne of
the property. Any portion of the priorijl can le
paid off at any time and II haa lep the ruetom of the
company to permit the prl -clpel In remain ae long ae
the borrower wUbea. If the Internet la promptly paid
Apply to
CHARLES P. SHERMAN. Alforney aMaw.
477 Court etreel Reading, Pa.,
or to DAVID T. KLINE Co.'e Appraleer.
2~tf Bellefonte. Pe
r±ARMAN'S HOTEL,
V I OppositeOoart llonee, BELLEFONTE, FA
TERMS 11X8 PER DAT.
A good Ldrery ettacbe-l. 1-1
I'ro/'cssionat Curtis.
UA. MiKEK,
e ATTORNEY AT 1..33 V
42-tf lilßce np|solta Court Ib-ue *. Ilellef-nte Pe.
'
FIELDIXO,
! I 1.314 AND COLLECTION OFFICE
I 12-ly ' i LKAKg I kl.li, PA.
\\T A. MOHHISOX,
r e ATTORNKY-AT-LAW
8K1.1.F.F0N7 K, I'A
Office in 74 lelrllic's llbs-k,op|solte lll#Court House.
Coniiiltuliiui in English or Herman. '2-ly
I C. T. e a.loell.
1 LEX A XI) EH A BOW EH,
■ 4 M, ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Ib'llefonlo, Pe , mey l.e runrultid In Eiiglltli or Her
,j man. Offl* * in liarniEH f IlulMiiig. 1- jy
JiMU I. lIVtR. i WULIT QlfiUIT.
HEAVEH A GEI-IIAUT,
ATTORNEYS AT LA 34*.
' Office on Allegheny street, north of High llolle.
I finite. Pa. ,-ly
UF. FORTXEY,
a ATTORNEY AT-LAW,
IIEI.I.EKI.NTK, PA.
I<u( d'Mr It* fh* 1fl In th Court Iltn#. 'i-ly
i lOHN BLAIK LIXX,
T P* ATTORNEY AT LAW,
BELLEFONTE, PA
tHßcv Allrßhriiy o*>r P< t uflL •• Zl-ly
I L. SFAXGLKR,
*' a ATTORNEY 4T 1.4 34.
BELLEFONTE. CENTRE I'nl NTY. P. 3
[ Spreial a I ten Hun to Caller i inns; pm Dree in nil the
Conrte; Coneullalbuie In Oertuan or E giub. l-ly
08. KELLER,
• ATTORNEY AT LAW.
iMß<f on Allegheny t<tr*rt HuuOi EI ic of Lynn'*
, | Rtfirc. Ild>iifbiit*-, |' |.|y
V ■ MriiiT. rtkM uoktKiii,
VfURRAY A GORDON,
L'L ATTORNEYS 3T I AW,
CLEARFIELD PA
Will attsin'l th* Oium bp& ipr< ully
! *mpl<>v4 1 ly
r r C. II IP I'LL,
1 a ATTORNEY AT LAW.
LOCK IIA 4 EN. PA
All promptly atUodMl to I ly
\\'.M. P. MITCHELL,
" ' PRACTICAL SI RVKVOR,
|J K HAVEN. PA,
Will all wirk In rntr* and
Clint' n roiiiitN,
Dfllrp o|i)NMlts Idirk llarsn Natk*nal B-ink 20-1;
\\ T C. HEINLE,
" a ATTORNEV 4T LAW.
BF.I.LKFONTR, PA
Ofllf"# in Tcifirad llouss, Allpfh'tii
Bparlal attention to th ct>||f<rtkn> "f rlaima
All IHUIDPM sltPDtJnl to promptly '1 ly
w, 4. VAIUCL k L. tttmc.
\VALLACK A KKEBS,
*' ATTORNEYS 3T LAW, •
CLEARFIELD. PA
Will attend and try camel al BelleS.nte when •(
! dally retained. |.,y
I IVILLIAM M< ( CLIeOUOH,
' * ATTORNEV AT LAW,
CLEARFIELD. PA.
All promptly ttm4wdt to My
nil. J AS. H. DOBBINB, M. D.,
rilYSiriAN AND SI-RORfIN,
O(Br# AlUgh'ny At.. owr X#igl-r • Ikng <ttor,
*-*1 HKI.LKPONTK, VK.
DR. J. W. RHONE, Dentist, can
be found et his olßee and reeidenee on N.nh
aide of High street three diein Eeet of Allegheny
Bellefonte, Pe lAty
CANCER REMOVED,
\V f ITHOUT KNIFE, and in most
V V rRR vilhont pain. Applt to
C. W. P. PIAIIKR RniliNri,
It-elm* Cefitr PonntT. I'a
ißOtal
A TRUE TONIC
A PERFECT 3TRENCTHENER.A SURE REVIVER.
IRON BITTERS are highly recommended for all diaeanca IT
quiring a certain and efficient tonic ; especially Indignlion, I>yrprjia, Inter
mitlrnt Freer*, H 'ant of Appeltle La* of Strength,' Lack of Energy, etc. Knrichca
the blood, strengthen* the muaciea, and given new life to the nirTc*. They act
like a charm on the digentivc org ana, removing all dyapeptic svmptoms, "such
a* TxMint) (he Food, lUUJting, Ileal in the Stnmaeh, Heartburn, He. TilC only
Iron Preparation tliut will not hluckcn tlio tort It or give
licntlnchc. Mold by all draggiata. Write for the AB C Book, 32 pp. of
tieelul and amuaing muling—aoU /me.
BROWN CHEMICAL CO., Baltimore, Md.
BITTERS
AGENTS WANTED
To tab* *ab*ertput>a far lb*
INTERNATIONAL REVIEW,
thr lain! and lt| Amrrlran pnldlratlno. of lb*
blfhnt rhua. olth original molrlhnllona front lb*
<l ratal irat*d onion In fj roanlrj Kdlt*d bf
J.T. Wotaa. Jr, and llrnrjr Cabal I. alga, g*nllrm*a
of ih* hlghm allalnmnit, and rallm*. and aha.*
nam*, ar* ohm* iulß'i*nt guaranty of lb* rain* of
lb* Rnrign.
A loan l-rlibl, i.adahl* and Inairm-li**; mamnpnll
taa In Itlara'nr* pingimlr* In **l*uro, nnaarinrlu
In raligliiO nnd lnd*p*nd*nl In |*dlll**.
Prtr*. VI ranla a nnmlmr; <*> a Tim. A romnlrta
Agrnl , OnlAl mil on rrrrllit of fl OU, A aporlmao
copy aonl la any add ran, for IA rani,.
A.. BAItMC* A 00., Pnldlohara,
111 A lit William at, Mn Tort. I
AVI/l Allvcrtim'imut*.
TH* %I'U
ArnlmbiMtlon of Hops, Buohu, Man*
drnkla sn<i Dandelion, *"!• mi i„..• t ,.■!
uraUt* proper! Ua f all O!)MT Hilltra,
ii>'tkr\tiiftirr*i-t BioocJ Purifier, Liver
Wo%u |\ntoff *"'l I Jf** aiii i.at<>iiii|^
Ajfrnt
l <nv eilrt whr# Ilop
iLttersure 4wil 1144,1 pvifw* I at u their
Th; £i? wi *lfWt: * &• 1 allsflrm.
To all vhoM
ity of tDo bow* lor% urinary organs. or who r*-
<|Uire an Ap|M Tout'' Mil mill! Htlmulaiit,
II >pDUl*r art* Without Intox
icating.
No matter what yiHirf(!m< Hnira r aymptoma
are wh at the tlt*H-ar or allWßout la ua© Ilop liii-
Uira. Don't wait until you a%>* "I' l * hut If y IJ
only fe I l>ud or ntlarrahla.BU** them at our*.
It inay wave your life. It hanS* • * * i bundrmla.
f SOO vill tw pal'l for a raW they will not
I cut* or help. |>o not atiffrrB 0 *"'! yotir fro mi*
•ulTer.bul UN ami urff* tliiu\^ ,u "' Mop B
Krmrmtirr. flop llittrm la rtruifife.|
drunken noatrum but the n J Ileal
Mel< in© ever iiuuto th©
and Mori" and no i* raoti or
aliould U> witiioUt tlx
D I.C.K an ahaolute an<l IrrrwlatiMn rurvM^^Ei.
rirUfunkemi'-a.■* of obdim, toiiaeeo
narx'otlci All *< Mbv urutrtrM*. ; N ui]
for t'trrular llp ItlMrr. Mfj. t., M
H.wt-t-i *V andT. ■•■ S
IB
Battle Crook, Michigan,
UANL'rAUTUUKIUI or Tltß ONLY UKXt'tm
PililftWiljl
THRESHERS,
Traction and Plain Engines
and Horse-Powers.
llMt (oMplrir ThMhrr fvtorj / E.tnbH.hed
In th© World. I 1848
A A Vr A PC "/ n)||*wvi qii arrroifMl fciul,
■C B I tHnO •, without fharurr .? nainn,
Va JSm mktuwiMtoL or local lon. fo "heo-A up" IK4
■"■ fr/ood k-irrurry gtrem %m all wwr jfourfe.
' f
••TKA M . POWFII SRP tIUTORH *n<l
I oitiplrtr Outfit*' / wairAlrwaM/iftM.
/W#f Trnrliun linnitir* an <i I'lulu l.nlnr*
etnr enrri in the Am*rn an mark'*
A mohitmi* of rp'r% ./ /,<t'utet n*'t fwirsroeeariewig
f- r NPl.trvi'tlfr a Itll quaint" in rrNoirs/.
to- an,t mntrttal* n>A tffNMned <if lV "tlx V inak- ra.
Four of He|*arau r- fmu, 0 to 12 boree
capacity, /•** *r Anr pawner
Tw< t> Uw ff " M tint-l ** lh rw> lvwsn>
7 son nnn * rrt of r* i .mcr
f OVV,UUU , fr **! .** ydfisir fr ,#Mf)
crT'atar.t V on ban-1, fr< rn which • t'ullt the ID
ooiiiiaratl wml-W4rk < f our marhlnrn*
TRACTION ENGINES
f*r*>*.giK t rimrahl* an-l t* *■/
N, 10, 13 llorw I'sMrr. :■/
Ftrmrri nod Thri-brrmrn r Indtod M
U... •yt'-ki... ri,f-bi!Mr M*rb;r*T7.
OAuisr* <* lit Ir A ' I-,-..
NICHOLS, SHEPARO A CO.
Bntt't Crnek, Nnohla®"
r rlIK CKNTIU: DEMOCRAT
BOOK and JOB OFFICE
HUSH HOUSE HEOCK,
ItKLLKKONTK, lA. (
1* sow orrr.niso
c; uE A T INIH'C E M ENTb
TO TIIONB WIAIIISO rtK!T-<'LAM
Plain or Fancy Printing.
AN o hnvo untiu*l fsriliiio* for printing
LAW HOOKS,
PAMPHLETS,
CATALi K2UKS,
PROGRAM MKS,
ST/ TKMKNTS,
CIRCULARS,
HILL HEADS.
NOTE HEADS,
III'M. NESS CARDS,
INVITATION CARDS.
CARTES DK VISIT*.
CARDS ON ENVELOPES
AND ALL KINDS OK BLANKS
tkSf. >rd>r by mnil will prompt
AttPiilion.
09^Printing dons in tho b-t (tyln, on
-hort sotirp and at lb* lown*t raUw.
rjILMOKE A CO.,
i > „ VIW ANI ' COI.I.KTTION HOimiL
!fll V Wahbikoto!*. I> C.
Maka r..llr*lkni, k'fnllalf l>an and arlntid la all
b.ln~a r. nfl.|H 1.. 11...in I,l*ll t>Cßll, mdd.ar't
Addlip.nal |..n.nanad Bl*hla and I.AMi AUKANTB
lihl and a Id 4,
ST. XATIBR'g ACADEMY,
I NEAR LATROHE, PA.,
IibII a (Vnttiry old, from
whlrh iha moat pr atilnant ami raltltalnl vna*a
ta I'ann.j Itaala ha. a ( a.lllatad, l.ia mal thomuab
ado. ,11'ual alda and hi.hnat au.dard f faflhlnaTa.
Swancta I'njdla adiHll .1 an, Mma. Y.arl, a
I paa • alnai fell.
J Addraaa, BIATKIUI or MM OT,
I M> Mtll'l P. 0., * aaUauffrlaad Mil,, ra
She Cmtrf
IIKLLEF ONT K , PA.
-dV O- I c T7l-T T7 1-..
NEWH, FACTS AN!) HUOOESTIONR.
rut no or TUI HATIOKAL WTIRAKI I* T* IRNUI
AMD riiOrUITT or IHK rAK MIR.
hJrrry farmer in tin annual trjitnenci
turnover/! unmeth tin/ of value. Write it am
ienit it to the "A'/rirultiiritl Kititor of t/o
DKMOI HAT, Hellefonte, I'enn'a," that ot/iri
farmern may hare the benejlt of if. t,r
xrmmiimratujnii be timely, anil be mire thai
they are brief anil irell pointed.
MKKHKH. DAVID LA.NDHKTII A SONS.
tin; well known I'liiladi-lpliia secds
llH-11, liave placed us under obliga
tions lor a copy of tlicir Hegialerr ana
Almanac for 1881. Aside from iti
being it complete catalogue of as
good seeds as can be pr'sluced, it con
tains much matter of value to every
farmer and gardener, and is well
wortb preserving as a book of refer
ence.
FA KM teams that are not worked
for some mouths during winter will
do better if turned into an open yard
I where there is good shelter against
i storms, limn when kept in stable and
! fed highly. Exercise and a change
of feed is promotive of health, and
I when thus wintered on coarse feed
till aliout four weeks before spring
I wMrk Is gins—when they should bo
j taken in and well fed, getting them
1 in condition for work—they will Is
; in In-tter health and more active in
i limb and spirit, than when kept in
confined stables, and at considerable
less expense and care.
IN purchasing fruit trees, it is of
the first importance that they shall
is- true to name, and second, that the
trees IK? healthful and well grown.
We place accuracy first: a poor tree
by care may be grown to make a
gofsl one, but if one who intended to
set an orchard of Northern Spy or
Newtown I'ippin, finds after wailing
1 six or eight years that he has only
Karly Harvest or Pumpkin Sweets,
lie has no remedy. A good share of
his life, so far as orchard culture
goes, lias been wasted. Hence our
frequent advice not to buy of tree
|>cddlera, but to always deal directly
with a nursery of known reputation.
THE Lancaster AVtr Era publishes
an "extract from 'Squire Trou'a Di
ary," dated in April, 18f,2, giving an
account of a visit made upon lhat
day to the farm of a Mr. I.intncr, in
Lancaster township. The 'Squire was
privileged to examine the books of
the farm, and states the "profits" for
the year ending April 1, I 8. r f>, to U
-53,351.57. As the farm contained
but 2Hi acres this amounts to some
thing more than 8 jier cent, upon a
valuation of S2OO per acre. This
was before the days of tobacco in
Lancaster county, and this amount
was all derived from ordinary farm
products, justify ing the 'Squire'* as
sertion that "Mr. Lintncr is the owner
of one of the most valuable farms in
Lancaster county." We have just a
suspicion that the 'Squire inadvert
ently fell into error in using the word
"profits," and that the sum named
represents the total income from the
farm, from which the should
be deducted to find the true profits.
A I. ATE decision in a Chicago
court, in a case concerning the pat
ents on the barbed wire fencing is to
the effect that not only manufacturers
and dealers, but the purchasers and
users—the farmers who have bought
the wire, and made fences of it on
their property—arc limbic for dam
ages to the parties who gained the
suit. If this decision be in accord
ance with the existing patent laws—
and we presume it is—then the exist
ing pstcnt laws arc very oppressive,
and very ridiculous, and should be
abrogated at the earliest possible
moment. That manufacturers and
sellers should be indictable and pun
ishable for infringements of patents
is perfectly right ami proper; but it
is manifestly wrong and improper
that the innocent purchaser and user
—in very many cases a plain farmer
who baa no opportunity for ascer
taining who may be the rigbtfbl
owner of the patented article be ie
urged by the plausible "agent" to
purchase—should be held in the
same way. A very large proportion
of the patents obtained every year
arc for articles for the cxclueive use
of farmera—(the article in question '
is a fair illustration), and therefor*
farmers have n direct interest in tin
ri-|H-al of this feature of the patent
laws, and should move in the mattei
at once. When a farmer lias pur
chased and puid for the right to uu
a patent plow, or patent gate, 01
patent fence, he should be protected
in that right. Possibly the "agent'
-if whom he purchased was not Un
lawful owner of the patent, and had
no right to sell; but this the pur
chaser had no mentis of ascertaining,
and whatever may have been done to
the rightful owner, should In; made
good by the pretender who derived
the pecuniary benefit from the trans
action.
THE long, hard winter continues,
and if the belief of those who pin
their faith to the venerable ground
bog theory is well founded, it is likely
to continue for some time yet. Con
sidering the shortness of last season's
bay crop it is altogether probable
that on many farms—good ones, t*>o
—in Centre county, the "bottom of
the mow" will ap|>ear in sight long
before the pasture will carry the
stock, and compel the purchase of
some kind of "ail interim" provender.
To such of the DEMOCRAT'S readers
as may find themselves in this un
pleasant predicament we venture to
suggest the wisdom of spending their
money for some of the concentrated
foods, such as bran, corn rneal and
cotton seed meal. These are always
"on the market," easily to be bad, easy
to handle and feed, and besides fur
nishing more feed for the same mon
ey than bay or fodder will. Hy their
richness they will add to the manure
heap, and return to the farm the
greater portion of their cost.
Clippings and Comments.
What can I apply to render solid clay
soil les tenacious? I can get spent
tsrihark and coal ashes for the hauling :
wood ashes, leached, 'J', cent* per t*o
horse load; unleached, It cents per
bushel ; manuie Irom the horse stables.
25 cents |>er load, ail one mile ditanl
Also swamp muck at a small expense.
What can I use most profitably?— l or.
of A. J. Tribune.
That is very much as though he
should say, "What can I do to get
rich ? I can get greenbacks for the
asking, gold and silver at twenty-five
cents on the dollar, and real estate at
onc-fiftb of ita value. What can 1
use most profitably ?" Quoting from
a friend of ours, of eminent legal
attainments and agricultural appe
tite, when asked by the polite hotel
waiter, "Will you hare beefsteak,
veal cutlet, mutton chop or baked
trout?" we should answer "Yes"
That's about the easiest agricultural
conundrum that we remember to have
met.
"n* gallon of neat'* fool oil mixed
• iih four ounces of lampblack makes a
good hsrnes* oil.— Record,
And the comparative leisure of the
present severe weather it an excellent
time to apply it. Wash your harness
with w arm—not hot— water, and then
apply the oil before it gets quite dry.
A simple and effective remedy for bee
on cattle it to give them a thorough
•lusting over with wo >d ashes ever
other day, brushing them clean the
tollowing day. Erchavgt,
Do not let the cattle get wet in the
meantime, or the hair will be "reme
died," as well ss the lice.
Feed the Dry Cows Well.
The DEMOCRAT has uniformly held
that in feeding the dry cows well,
and having them accumulate fat, the
owner is simply tnsking deposits of
milk and butter, which will Ire re
turned with interest when the cows
shsll have again come in profit. We
find in one of our contemporaries a
paragraph credited to the corres
pondence of the Country Gentleman,
which we quote in support of our
position:
A neighbor has s grade Jersey cow.
In June her milk MM exceedingly rich,
testing by the cream gauge upward of
24 per cent.; the middle of October it
tested only 18 |-er cent. The general
nbaervation of dairymen la that quality
increases with the lengthening of the
period of milking. Thi# cow waa in
perfect health throughout the season,
and her food waa unchanged. What ia
the cause of this exceptional action!
No cause baa been discovered except it
le this : In June she waa fat; In Octo
her she waa poor in flesh from exoemtve
milk production. Tbexbeory based on
this is that in June she started with an
accumulated store of material which
went to add quantity and quality to the
milk she naturally would have produced
from her food. Rut that store being
exhausted the quantity and quality
were both neceeaarily reduced. 1
Tttt United Bla tea and Canada ex
ported last season up to December 21,
976,000 barrels of apples. '
How Shall W Treat a Crop of Clover in
OrJer to Derive the Greatest Benefit
From It?
At a recent meeting of the fiun- r
powder Farmer*' Club, one of the
best sustained club*, and conqmed
of HO rue of the best farmer* in Mary
land, the above question wan the sul.
ject for the regular discussion. We
have not the apace to give the name*
nor all the remark* of the gentlemen
who participated in the diacuaaion,
but quote from the detailed proceed
ing*, as published in the Amrrimn
Farmer , the pith of the sentiment of
each speaker:
Mow first crop and leave the sec
ond to shade the ground ; mowing,
the second year, the first crop and
leave the second crop stand and plow
for wheat, or for corn.
The first difficulty is to get the
clover. If fortunate enough to se
cure a set, mow the first crop the first
year and let the second lie on the
ground. The second year, cut off
first crop and leave second. Then
plow for corn.
Bow, in connection with other
i grasses, timothy mainly. The first
year mow the first crop and put it no
for feed, and if the seed is go*>d take
it off. The second year—looking to
i meadows—mow the first crop and
j pasture some afterwards.
Mow it the first year and let the
1 after crop remain on the ground, pas
'< turing lightly only. The second year
pasture, leaving the alter crop on the
land. Then plow for wheat, or for
corn. Feed to sheep and cattle ami
| not sell clover, and feed at home,
] even if the price was $20.00 a ton.
Pasture the first year, but not too
close. The second year mow the first
crop and let second crop remain and
turn it under for wheat. Stubble
again and calculate to get a good set
|of clover from second crop. To get
the greatest benefit from the one crop
; feed it.
Mow the first crop the first year.
The benefit of a crop of clover is in
feeding cattle ami getting manure.
\V ould not mow the second crop, ami
never did nntil this season when he
I cut it for seed. The second year,
would mow the first crop and sell the
hay, returning the amount in fertil
izer, and sow in fall on wheat.
LI The roots have much more strength
. to let it remain over second year.
| Never mow close, and the second
! crop, unless wry rank, neither mow
t nor pasture. The shade and mulch
I furnished are among the great bene
! fits of clover, and another is the deep,
penetrating roots. The feeding of
clover to cattle is among the sources
of profit in clover, 9. Is it worth
I more to let second crop remain on
I ground than to feed it ? n. Yes.
H
I'ature first crop light when in
head, and second crop would not pas-
I ture at all. 1 lie second year mow
, first crop and plow down the second.
Where he has followed this plan a
good crop the second year has always
I been the result, ami it improver! that
( land more than manure. 9. What
would it cut to the acre ? o. From
, two to two and a half tons per aero.
9. Didn't it smother out the second
year? a. No; it caroc up thicker the
1 next year.
! _
What was the result in former days
of plowing down green crops of clov
, or ? a. The early results were good.
, For several years after liming, bow
ever, in plowing down clover we in
variably lost our wheat crops. 9. How
do you account for it? a. Too much
1 vegetable matter, which made too
. luxuriant a growth of straw. 9. What
was the effect on the land ? a. Its
fertility was increasing all the time
after we commenced liming. My
father turned down a rank growth of
clover, to rank it bad to lie harrowed,
but got no crop; whilst his next
' neighbor pastured as close as he
could get a bite, and had a good crop.
Mow the first crop* ol both years,
if clover hay was worth nny thing
like $20.00 per ton, at which price it
would pay as well to sell as to feed.
I/ct second crop grow up, am! turn
under for wheal or leave it for corn.
Would get ground then well seeded
from the two crops. Doesn't see
where, by feeding, you can make
$20.00 per ton from it. 9. At what
price can you afford to feed clover
hay? a. At any time when under
SIB.OO. 9. Would it pay to buy
cattle to feed hay at $12.00 per ton ?
a. That depends upon price of stock
cattle. Don't put a* high a value on
clover hay as some people do. Find
cattle do much better on fodder.
Ir the American farmer would
make hog raising profitable, be must
make the hog product palatable.
Blubber and lard cannot he made to
take the place of meat except as a
matter of necessity. There is a con
stant clamor, alike in hotels, board
ing houses and bomcs, for lean pork.
The lean meat of a hog it muscle,
and this can be produced by giving
the animal an abundance of exercise
instead of closely confining him with
the avowed purpose of transforming
1 him into a living lump of lard,
/ lM

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