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Centre Democrat. [volume] (Bellefonte, Pa.) 1848-1989, May 15, 1884, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84009409/1884-05-15/ed-1/seq-7/

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1 H. OK VIS,
l • ATTJUNKTATIAW.
RalUfonte, Fa.
% Otflc# opiMtaite Ilia Cjurt Ibma#, 011 fliat floor of
* Woodring'a block.
I >i. KEICHLINE,
f tl • ATTORNEY ATLAW,
lU*|lafonl'\ Fn.
Orricß in 'UhkaVh Niw Hi iluino.
Pr>tnpl attention to collM liuli claim*. 39-tf
HA. MoKEE,
• ATTOKNKY AT LAW.
Ofttc# North High itr##t, opp#all# court houa#,
Fa
HHA Its if BERQER, i Sooceaaor
• to Yucuiit A li.rihborg.ri ATTORNICY-AT.
LAW Oftlc# In Conrad llout#, llollcfontc, l*a. 6 24-1
f L.SPANGLER,
*9 • ATTOHNKY-AT-LA W,
BEI.LEPoNTK, I'KNTHKCOUNTY, I'A
Hpacial attention to Collactloua; j>r* tlcea in ail the
arte; Consultation# m Gorman or It.glUh. 1-i J
DF. FORTNEY,
• ATTOHNKY AT I.AW,
IIKi.LKPcNTK, J-A
In Conrad Hon##, Allegheny atrnct
Special attention given to the collection of claim*
All l>uaiu#a att*ndd to promptly. 2-1J
pHAS. I'. HEWES,
VV ATTORN EY-AT-L AW .
UKLI.KPONTK, P \
frantic. In *ll th CnurU. Offlc. oppo.lt. Court
ut to P u rtl'a building. [miyiW
I (i. LOVE,
1 1 •
ATTOHN KY ATI. AW.
IW lleL.nte. pa.
Offl-'eln the roonia formerly occupied hy the late 1
w. i\ * ||* m • t!
_ 'pHOMAS .1. McCULLOUGH,
V X ATTOIINKY AT I.AW,
I'll 11 IIMBL KCi, PA.
OUIr. In Alb.rt Own> building, li. tli. r.- in Wiu
>ery occupied by th. fbtllpabuig Hanking Company.
41 -1 -1 y
t.a nutiJin.
1 I ASTINGS A HEEDEK,
1 I ATTOKNEV." AT I. VW
lIKLI.KKONTK, I'A.
dtfl- ton Alleghany atr* •. t w door* #H#t 1 tln> •I
flco occupied hy late firm of Ycum A Mating* Pv-
WILLUM A. WAILACB DITIDL tltll,
MANRTr.WAI.LACr WILLIAM B ALLACB.
WALLACE A KitKUS,
v ' LAW AND COLLECTION OFPICK.
January 1,1S1. CLKAHPIELD, PA.
17LLIS L. OH VIS,
\j ATTOKNKT AT LAW.
OFFICE opposite the Court llouae, on the Id flo>r
A. 0. Purat'a building 3-5
c.f. iUlAt;t. C. i. 10W1I.
A LEXANDER A BOWEK,
I\. ATTOBNKYB AT LAW.
Bellofont*, Pa . may b conaulted lu Etigli.h or 0r
Bun. Office In Kantian'. Building. 1-1 y
luaLitim. i laniiiiiii
t I>EAVEH vt GEPHAHT,
' 1> ATTORNEY" AT LAW,
OIB': no Allegheny tr<-t, north of Ulgb, Boll*
font,P. l-iy
* W 0~ HEINLE,
M , ATTORNEY AT LAW,
HKI.I.KroNTK, PA
Loot door to tb. loft Ist th. Court llouao. "11
pLEMENT DALE,
V/ ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
R.|l.fout., P
N W. o>rn*r IMatnond, too door, from flrot
national b*ok. A-lfly.
m c. HIPPLE,
X o attorney atlaw,
LOCK IIA VEN. PA.
All toaineaapromptly attended to. l*ly
U M P. MITCHELL,
IV PRACTICAL SURVEYOR,
LOCh iIATEN. PA ,
Will attend to oil work lo Clearfield, Centre nd
Clintoa oountle.. . ,
out - opp#.tl# Lock Ha.en National Bnk. 20-ly
W WILLIAM McCULIXMJGH,
>1 ATTORNEY AT LAW
CLEABHELD. PA
All bualneaa promptly attended to. lly
* || K. IIOY, M. I>..
11.
Law MM, RELLEEOIITE, PA. i
Bpe. ial tt.ntl n gl'en to Operatl.. Burgery an I
Chronic ' ""'1
1 \U. JAS. 11. DOBBINS, M. D-,
\f PHYSICIAN AND BL'ROKoN.
i,flic* Allegheny 8t,.0.r
# .,f IIELLEEONTE, PA.
| \lt. J. W. RHONE, Dentist,can
I ' bf found t hi. oltlr. nd r<< l.nco • n North
Id. of High itmot thro. 4<.r tu.t of Allegheny,
B.llofjuto. P. '*•'
1/ P.BLAIR,
I . JEWELER.
Ail *.>rk r.Mitly ■ otd On \;l'"!.-ny itroof,
• niter Brockcrhr-IT ll"W. *'ll
Jtiitinrss ('arils*
i * EM BARBER SHOP.
II Cnd.r fir.! Noll "l lUnk.
HKLLEEoNT Po..
11. A. Ilrrft, ®y.Tu l'rupr.
( lENTRK COUNTY BANKING
V> CtiUPAM .
H#ctrbep
And \1l"W I 'ereat,
I>t#c -"lot Notaa;
. buy and Sell
Jk (Jo v. Safari Ilea,
dnld au I (V.u|-ifia
jr<M A Ba*va, Pre#ldant.
J D. inn l*T.(%Mhler.
r ' , aciM.PrM'l. j. r. **■.Caah'r.
171RST NATIONAL BANK OF
1 BELLEroNTE.
Allegheny 8lr~. B.l|.fnnlo, Po. t-lf
in/.w/i MrFnrlanr if C'., Ilarthrnrr Itrnlrrn.
HARDWARE I
WILSON, MoFARLANE & CO.
DEALERS IN
STOVES, RANGES HATERS.
I
ALSO

Paints, Oils, Glass and Varnishes,
|P AND
IDEAS' HARDWARE
iIOMIt 'ILOOK MLtBIORTK.
MlscrllanrouH.
no*i VAi,i:\Ti\i;,
GENEIIAL INH. anil COMMIHHIOM Agt.,
Bollofoute, PU.
(Ifflce In liiiah AR<'udn, 2nd .
The following companieh reprewnted :
—o—
UNION I'hilnile.pbiii.
AMERICAN do.
(IUAKMAN London.
Sl'N do.
WKKTERN Toronto.
CONNECT I CUT Hartford.
Hint othttrA,
—0
LIFE.
TRAVELER." LIKE & Acci'U Hartford!
and olhcrn.
—o—
rommi'.ion branch o( niv buninesi
i" receiving apot.ial attention, i'roperlio
"old TO good advantage, A. I have facili
' tie< lor diiporing of hou. EN, land", etc., on
"liort notice and favorable term*,
DL-FIM BOND VALKNTINK.
| IENNSYLV A M.\
STATE COLLEGE.
Winter term begins January 4, 1884.
This institution I# located In one of the mmt heu*
IITII I ai.l ••••alt H ftil a|Mta(il llieeiitir* Alleghr>tiy RK> 11
1 I la OPEN t ttil utio| 1-tU ■• *e, and ofTM LH-fol
lowing COURSE# of HUJ |J :
I A full Claaakal uourw >f Four Yara.
A I. th* SEIENTLFH con ran.
I. A Knll 8 ientltti ('"tirae of Four Yean
4. The followririg I'OURflKd.cf two ye*ra
••ch following the f\rt two y. *ra of the Sciruti
fie Couraw (•) AtJKICCLTIKK. (b) NATURAL
HISTORY: ( (TIKMtSTRY AND Fll YSK'S j (d;
di it mom ki Etno
5 A short SJ'K lALCvH ILnKIII Agrlctilture
A abort SRKCTALCOI HSR in chemistry.
7. A Claaatral nnd srleatiflc l*rejarab ry I im
a. SFKCI AL COURSES are arrange*) t. n ♦ t tfe
want* of lU'livldual atodrliU
Military drill Is required, KLPBHMT f r 1-Nr.| and
irt.bmUla very low. Ttntn n fre. Y oing lilies un
• ler rhat GE f a competent 1* !Y I'RIFI' IJ^L.
for Cataloguea, or other lnformßtloii,addrea
(I KG W ATUKKTON, PriiiMxr,
StateCollios. Cirtre Co , Fa.
\ tf
'IMIE OF.NTKK DKMOCRA'L
BOOK and JOB OFFICE
ALLEGHENY STREET,
BELLEFONTE, I'A.,
is NOW orrKHiNo
GRE A T IN I) UC: EME NT S
TO THE-H WI-HISO FLRST-CLASS
Flaiu or Fancy Printing.
WO have UNIPUSL faeilitiej for printire
LAM* BOOKS,
PAM I'D LETS,
CATALf KITES,
PKOT.KAM Y ES,
STATEMENTS
CIRCULARS,
BILL HEADS,
NOTE HEADS,
BUSINESS CARDS
INVITATION CARDS,
CARTES DK VISITS,
CARDS ON ENVELOPES
AND ALL KINDS OF BLANK'S
BAY-ORDER, by mail wili ro> oive prompt
attention.
MR Printing done in the be.t.tyln, on
nhort notice and at the iowo.T rate •
Itching Piles— SymptonH anrlCure
The ..yniptocn* are inoilure, like per-
Rpiration, iniente itching, INCREASED BY
"cralching. very 'li*tre.*ing, particular
ly at night, iceni* a* if pin worm* were
crawling in and about the rectum; THE
private part* are .ometime* atleclcl,
I fallowed to continue very *eriou* re
sult* follow. "SWA V N E'SI INTMI NT"
i* a I>lea*ant. *ure cure. Al*o for Tetter,
Itch, Salt lttieum. Scald Head, Ery.ipe
I*., Barber* Itch, Blothchea, all *caly
cruty Skin Dl.ease*. Sent by mail for
50 cent*; -I bo*e* $1.25, (in .tamp*
Ad Ire*., Dr. SWAYNE A SON, Phila
delphia. Pa. Sold b? Druggi.t*. 5-K-ly
EXTRAORDINARY
ft r.in crto.w
HIE WEEKLY POST, i
A firat n# FOR ft. YRR. in |
etelM TIM wm t*M will Iwcim* UM MOTI tlrHg !
and *ant*. v#r j lili#ly. •f th# o< % * t
ually cwll#d tli- Fr*aid#if*Yi)hing Coagr***. hl*h
will ri , Int" the rtnv in - th j *rtl
fbr th* fhtKkmttil BOBiMhon; th# pro ##*ling f
lh# fTßft!.Nation*l CoAVCAlkxtt 1., mlnat# CMfli*
date* . th# *<tling Frr# t#ntial r*?uM, rrtaln •
f •w . th# #|##ti.'t. 4t .1 it* fault, whi *')4l lM *
will Iho th# an ' #•• of lh# |#n> -%ti audi lat* #
YY# hat# mA'l# thla tr#%i fd L nln lh' j n #of
Tut Wpirit F ? WITH a vi* w T.. |t i F . F , > # RV| .FT i
#ury in th# l'r##id* t.ttal raoiau. K#ry iba- ri'#r
rn add on# or mor# nam## hy a ItttU #ff 't Tn i
Wrrti.T F *f ii una „n .f tl.# l*rg#t, I##t aid
rh##(•#( pa;#ra in th# reuntry.
It Contains All the News.
Pall tl**RF>T ,-r .n I M*rk*T R*E rl*,*l| LH. | ML
ral nici.l tin* MIM in' T *,• ANN.. Hot
ntcllany "t.I • I |,-I N..< ~(
reeling m.tt.r F'.fll IC In ClnU. |L Mnl- •>-
•' rtf.Ll n. | rrymid fl'I.N rlnh. ft.. ,
|. lG. I rnpO'l. B.ND for ..M|>L. pu. A;.
• Ir. th. ptibfi.b. R.,
JAMK" P BIRR k CO.
1O H'l*t 81, rilt.bnrgli. I'A.
tiotcllf.
\ ' \M>I i;ui/r HOVBE,
▼ llonraty, civilly,and k -. M MI whiskey
la what RWRY tfUMt will Una at tli VAXVK naiI T IIOUNR,
situated two in ,|.s *"* th w rf of Nnow Shot- City, I'a.
"W.lf. J J. DKI.ANKY. Pru.
I > ASSMOKE HOUBK,
Jl Comxr front n<l H|,ru. Btrxi,
I'll I 1.1 l'r< IITIKI. I-A.
floral M.l and l-ralelug t uwlrrM* rtx. Sum
clxni ah,tiling nttarhxd.
37 tf. JAMKH PASHMOUK. Prop.
gWAN HOTEL,
Unrnnj Cottle's
NKWI.Y KKMODKLKIi IIOTKL,
PIIIUI'HIIUIIO, PA.
A flul rUaa Ilotiai* N-iwrly fiirniahixl, st-sLIIng
good and price* mini r rale .'l7 tf.
/ v A K.MAN'S IIOTKL,
" I Oppo.il. Court llonto, IIKI.I.KVONTK, PA
TKBMSll.iti Ktt IAV
A god I.IT/ altarlipi) .|j
RUSH HOUSE,
I y IIKI.I.KfONTK, PA.,
P" 4%fi> 111 •nd a 111 p* 1• KPltiiamrii.M HI Ma thgn*
cral traveling public and <<rtim*r< ml i r, are Invited
to til I a HraH'Uaa llolrl. wharm tlia> will |J|d hum*
comfort* at rttional'la rata.
Literal radu tl n t> Juryman and otliart attending
Court W It Trial.KK Pruj.'r
Bi rrs iiorsK,
(t'ornar Allegheny A Itial*. p street*,)
BKI.LKFONTK, I'A.,
r J. J\ Lehman, Propr.
TliD |" I nt.r t• I uti Irr rii. rn.iit of tin
praaiat propria tor, to tiHßr ftttad Umm •• f r Um
rnlxrlalnroant • jural. >Ut~. rra. •.! |. ni, ;-1
\ 1 lI.IaIIKIM HOTEL,
. J MIIAUI IM. CRATES COUNTY, PKNN'A
W. S Ml SSKIt, I*r<.llriota.r.
Tla town f Millhftim la titrated In |Vntr* V allay
about tw mi IMI fr HI . ) urn Htatu.n,n lha I*ewi*
bnrg. t'antra and *|rti*e Crr*k Railroad. with aui
raundiuga that make It a
PLEASANT SUMMER RESORT.
!#• d tr ut n-1.1r.„' lr> H*• ti- inlty A cat
runa t. tttrf trail At Uia ftlfllbatm llutll a- • m
atodntlo— will bt f IrebclflM and tcrau notler
at* "" J una J I. l#7t-ly*
New Brockerhoff House.
I >KOCKKHIIOFF HOUSE,
I > A1.1.H.11K.M ItT . KKI.LKPONTC, PA
C. ( MoM I I.LKN, I'roj-'r.
Good Sample tn on A iraf Floor,
A#-Fr Hub# t and fr m ail Train* Hj* tal rat**
to witti*a*>a and jurora. 4-1
/ CENTRAL IIOTKL,
V_/' ("i[| • I- It.- IUIIr--< I NUtla,)
MIbMBI Hit. CKBTKf. >'"! NTV, PA
A. A. KoilLiiKCK Kit, Proprietor.
THROCOH THATri.KHB on ih- railr*4 will Snd
Ihia Bolai ao i •llMlt { I*, a 1., ii.o- l>. ■ r |m,|, ,
tnaai will TRAINS at i alout "ib nun 47
CM RSI NATIONAL HOTEL.
1 VII.!. IIJ PM,' t.STKK < <l NTV. PA
S. J r Jrain, Proprietor.
HA TKS—il 00 I'KH PAY.
Ilt'N RUNS TO nri'OT MCr.TINO AM. TH A !N a
A GOOD LIVEBY ATTACHED.
Th\M Hotel hn Intel)/ been ren%><lelr<{ ntiti
refurnished not! the traveling public
trill tiwl are nuuiafiortM fir at
\n every re*j>rct. ijur
one < f the brtf
Eciqsar*.er: izr S'.xhiti.-.Tt.
flt inr rflti H rn 11.
Swayno'n Pills Comfortinir to thr
Sick.
Th">tfcr.'! ill. from tKK ■ I t. projarly
tr<'At I inl ll r ■ ll" • if. <' n.li| r. I' . -
|i. Mt i'it. A| ; .ty Lit r . k .vi
H. ,rt Ik- K.'., !• .• 1 K n.i m
But t" lb d< bUlulM I .r lent : ariUi hh b '
a• rI .11 a airlini*-. I'll ■ f ... fr. I
Winm.nJ • >WAVNK > 1'11.1,-. *hi< 1 |
contain m<-! mm ,r. ; rt i j ••• -Ih
no oth-r fmr .y. N'lil bv 1 . .11 ! r ;
cnnU, b>i f | lik '1 1' .. . sl. it. j
.tarnj- A• 1•1c ■ -. I'll SWA V N K A
. s 'iN. Phllid.lpkii, Pi 8 bj Diug
i*itU. 5-" I?.
MSALKKS IN" IT UK lU'.t nM.V
r I ZKI.LKK A SON,
a I 0
1 S A Its U ; a
~ All tf'%t* , ' M-l r -
wrij t> n* and I'arnili ;*• * rat*!y
js{ar d, TinMc* - a!Ii Hitc*l,At t
- * tf
017LY$20.
PHILADELPHIA
SINGER
! Ih* BEST BUILT.
FINEST FINISHED.
EASIEST RUNNING
SINGER MACHINE rvfr offer*d the public.
p Th# a I * - Ml rail ' r
tha f-x jla wht hV - r( J I f r t). > wry l< ■j a
"11. |*vn*mW. w# i. t ak r uto ywi until y
hat# w#n 11.• mm blni Alb I
If It la *■! !l ** fj-fw it rrturn It t .a at •• r
hicmo I •. M, :
1
t HAM.I $ A W- Mifi,
N-. K N Truth *' . MtllaOalfdtU, I'a
* *'F>r NattrmlirU In thw I m
. hrraat, • h'i r
!• aiuMbf" w. l' MI v
"N (fxtrtt f If'* "l
rX r f \ In.ar'' a,or \ >, c ®
I 'T'I.V. v ?
Hh' t'i,.-si'f | **|| . UtP I'll ' >4 p
5 Ira N*M f %rTh. I r nt
3 . a ai. M r a |Lr al t*Aa I'ehi N a
m
♦S •
■| • • | - r im \* | tr.n |wMit ai |wt|iar, turret x
j ' nMMMMraMMHMHMMMM '
P ' H ) '-n K
g worrhd r>Kital.). tad* rnt ma." ■■■
* hut htii*mi*f (ha ra.t lroj->rtcit .f W
-3 nil la that I'nit n a will < urw hr nl Na O
aal atarrh. |trlght> aar. and IHa g
'wtr ttio k i !.• *'■MHHHIHHHHI •
A If your riniggf *t I* <•'! i.f 'r |ai> nhi.-t* ,w
rn lit* "lu ..? | if... ••.r If f 'X| it* fa*-.r m
iif HMbr 1 dlMb*a n<>t m* nilefinl In II or &
3 In adirrtl*.rnrtttA, ttiw pn*- A
Klftiffi, M. It. Ilarlutast.% (u..oiU ru, U. <5
For Cknbtl)iall<Mi and FlVra, taka
immmmii
PATENTS
IfTTfrw A 00. of llw Brmmnr Ainirt., .
CflOa Iflixt ua. 11x11,aa fi. I'Mxnto, I '.VOUL Tmto
< *pfrthij fur (IM I'niixi IHotM. ChniMU,
rr'wf. fVyOXO. Uinmif, Ma. 11a.4 H> i about
Mr* u .T: frM rxax.' •
PMwtU oMolnwl Ibr'noh Mt-'lfff A lX).*emm<.lU*4
Slit Cfuttf
BKLLKFONTB, PA.
iiaBICTJIiTUBA.!..
MKWH, FAtrre ANI> HUOdPXTIONH.
Every farmer in An annual experience
Ui,cover, manethiny of value. ll'rite it and
eend it to the " Agricultural Editor of the
lilClf ocßAT, Ucllefonte, I'enn'a," that other
farmer, may hare the benefit of it. Eet
eommumration, be timely, and be ture that
ihey are brief and well pointed.
Fruit Growing
A practical farmer and fruit grow
er has been giving the Chnml*ersburg
I alley Spirit home hints on fruitgrow
ing. He says:
"On taking a young tree from the
j nursery it is generally divested of
! nearly nil its fibrous roots, through i
which the tree has been drawing its
j nourishment from the noil. In such
cases we find it profitable to cut back i
the branches to insiue the life and
growth of the young tree. We do
. this In compliance with nature's law
l of correspondence. Nature true to
| this law, preserves the proportion of
quantity between root and top:
her.ee, after cutting away a large por
tion of the roof, we must uiake a
corresponding reduction of the top
by cutting back the branches,other,
wise there would be a lack of nutri
ment from beneath and the excessive
verdure could not be maintained, but
must languish or die."-
"From this experience," he contin
ued, "some are ltd to the conclusion
that much and continued pruning
strengthens the growth and vitality
of the tree, than which there is no
more fatal error. Continued pruning
dwarfs and kills. The f isage orange
in its native state grows to the size
of tolerable tree, so large that the
trunks arc used for building houHK
hut wuen used for fencing and cut
back every year it becomes more
dwarfed and loses vitality at every
cropping until it dies. All this fol
lows strictly in accordance with na
ture's law, that the roots will die in '
proportion as the branches are cut ■
off. Many orchards arc |>crmanent)y !
injured by the severing of large limb,
from the trunk and divesting the tree 1
, of a large part of it# verdure, or
more projicrly its life."
In reply to the question .- "Are not
many trees killed by unskilled bands
■i-. '.;:> d in pruning rather than the
act of tlx pruning itself ?" he said :
j "The folly of employing unskilled
uid inexperienced hands to trim fruit
; tt.es is wed illustrated by the
uf the farrm r, who on leaving one
nornir.g m early spring told
m a bad liven blred the day before,
• > trim up bis apple trees. On his
: tui. ir. the evening he inquired ol
s w • .man li s many tiiis In had
iiimnie i. To his surprise he was
iniukly told I•> the man that he wa*
not quite d'Oic willi the cutting down
! the trii-i- and that the trimming !
w■ rn 1-1 ! dom on the morrow The/ j
• < may not encounter the ignorano .
'.hat w ul l result in such whole-ale j
k.ll '_• ul .the tin is a f;n t '
that the i.an i of destruction is too
(dtui at work, sloughing oil luige
limbs near the trunk and thus en
dangeiing the life of the trie
"Kit let it not be mf.rnd that
I runing is unnecessary, *' said he.
t'From the first cutting back at plant- :
ing the attendant should examine his ,
trees every spring with reference t<-
the foi malion of their tops and take
out such branches as would be au in
U ifireiicc, allowing no more limbs
than the future tree should have, so 1
that there will be no need for crop
ping limbs in after years. Sap shoots
should he carefully taken off. And
let it be borne in mind that nothing I
so much encourages the growth of '
tap shoots as the cutting out of large
limbs, the sap intended to nourish j
the blanches that are separated spend- '
ing itself in the production of wild
shoots."
When ask. d to what extent prutiing !
should lie indulged in. he replied:
"Let pruning lie studied with refer
ence to the formation of the top when
the tiec is young and the branches
small, when only slight wounds will
be effected, and to keep the tree uir I
encumbered with sap shoots, hearing
| in mind always that excessive prun
ing will kill the tree. Let the owners '
> of orchard* apply more lime and
, ashes with a plentiful supply of bsrn
yard manure to nourish and invigor.
ste the trees and there will be an im
provement in the quantity and qual
ity of the fruit."
♦ m - -
The ÜBO of Potash Halts.
Kainit, or German potash salt, is
now being used extensively in all
parts of the country, and, as a rule,
with very satisfactory results- The
majority of our farmers, however, are
not as familiar with its adaptation to
special crops as they are with super
phosphate. Some valuable informa
tion regarding kainit is found in a
letter written by Mr. E. Wenig, of
Sclio-nlanke, Prussia, to the A mrrican
Firmer. Mr. Wenig says that as soon
as one kind of plant food is deficient
in the soil the crops fall short. To
produce 200 pounds of clover hay
the so'il on which it grows ought to
| hold fbeside other material; thirty
1 pounds of available potash and ten
pounds of phosphoric acid in an
available state. Suppose within the
HOII there is at hand, instead of ten
pounds of phosphoric acid, only four
pounds, then only 800 pounds of
I clover hay could be expected. Or.
if instead of thirty pounds of potash
only twenty pounds are at hand, no
more than I,pounds of clover hay
could IK: expected, and the surplus of
the other sub-stance would appear a"
dead capital within the soil.
.Many soils, although rich in phos
phates, are lacking in potash, and
consequently do not give a full crop
I'eaty or swampy ground, after be
ing freed from water, receives the
most benefit fioin potash. Next to
peaty soils the light sandy soil is
most licncfltcd by applying potash
salts, as both soils are, as a rule, very
deficient in potash. Soils consisting
most of weather-licaten basalt, or
fieldspar, are seldom iu need of pol
ash, unless potatoes, sugar beets or
tobacco raises! uninterruptedly have
taken away the soluble potash within
the soil. Even for more loamy land
the reports from experiment stations
assert that potash salts are in lispcn
| able in consequence of their indirect
influence. FxjK-rimcnts have shown
that an application of 100 p >unds of
' phosphates, with fiO pounds of pot
1 ash, had a lietUT effect than 200
pounds of phosphates used alone
Thi- fact shows that jiotash salt not
only acts as direct food for plants'
but its indirect ii flumce—its solvent
action on other substances, csjiccially
on phosphate—is of the greatest im
portance, sometimes morf than as a
direct food. This indirect influence
appears again by applying potash
salts either to |>otatoes, sugar lieets
or to bailey and - at*. The first
named roots are great consumers of
I j-ot.-isli . the grains want but little,
still the grains are generally, as cx
periments sliow, !>. i* filed in greater
degree by applying {Kitash salts than
the | otash ( iDSumirs potato. and
beets.
An indin.'t by using (Kitash
alt~ is that a soil well manured with
' potash suits r< tains more moisture,
i which is \.rv important for light,
sandy soils. .Most rUI soiis deficient
in potash are IIM wise- in need of plios
piiales; therefore, whether as direct
'fodor s as Kent agent, it is adxis
able to apply both at once -say 10b
pounds of phosphates to 50 pounds
| of kainit (sulphate e>f potash.) Fitlier
list d alone lias no effect. Only the
lupines are satisfied with kainit alone.
I without any ad.li ional manure, and
another condition in applying it is
that the land should contain lime.
The rule to apply potash salt is to
I spre ad it long before sow ing or plant'
i ing, preferably in the fall. Plow it in
and mix it with the sod intimately,
as there is no need to fear its sinking
into the subsoil, washing away or
j evaporating.
Frequent Miiktntrs
The influence of the frequency with
which milking is practiced during a
a period of twenty-four bonis, both
ii|Kin the animal and upon the milk,
has been extensively discussed, and:
still remains far from lcing settled.
Whatever may throw light open it,
or furnish facts that may find prac
tical application on the latins, must
be- received |by gratification on every
j hand. Th results of the experiments
of Krlenmeyer will, therefore, be con.
sidercd with no little interest by
' those engaged in the dairy business.
This able investigator made a series
of experiments and observations with
rniiking und feeding to d tannine,
first, the influence of the feed and*
second, the influence of the frequen
cy of milking or the time intervening
between the several.milking* upon
[the quality of the product. Con
trary to an opinion accepted to no
small extent he conclude* froin the
first part of hi* work that the quan*
tity of milk produced depend* not
only upon the activity of the gland
hut upon the quantity and quality of
food administered as well. When
the animal* are subjected to ttiee
daily milking*, that drawn in the
morning i* greater in volume hut
poorer in the valuable constituents,
especially fat, than that drawn at
■other times. This is accounted f r
by the longer time ,'intervening ie
tween tire milking*. '1 lie milk drawn
at midday i* richest in fat, and i*
therefore preferable to that drawn at
other limes. The whole subject ,
worthy of further and more thorough
| examination than it ha* already rr
ceivcd, nr.d there will doublb-** P.-
found in it much of interest and VllK
for dairymen of every class.
Liht nnd Heavy Manuring.
A question ofti n ocur* us to ihe
amount of manuring which i- ncct
profitable to apply to land. A light
drev-ing. over a wide suifacr, i* by
Home believo-d to be Is-st. while other*
insist on heavy manuring on a mint
ed scale The question i* an vwrni
by the manner in which the tnannie
is applied. If merely spread on tin
surface and plowed in, a wide anil
thin coat woul i be. most profitable.
A large mass would not bee nn<* in
termixed with the soil, and n • dr\
*eaon might f>e worse tiian u. •••,-
Five thin coats, plowed und<- n•
many ears, would h< much
better than one coal five t m. . a *
thick, simply turned under v. ot.
operation. A large amount may b.
applied in a single season, provme .
it is first finely broken and pnlvtr.y
ed, and then intimately Intermix..!
with the soil by repeated plowing .1 >i
harrowing, or on a small scale with
the spade, hoe and steel tske.
Country Crnllntian.
Quack Grans
A Massachusetts correspondent of
the Kir ira Fatmers'Club, destroys
quack gra by the following process :
He plows the land just before planting
n! any cmp, nine inches deep, which
puts all the qua k roots, four iodic*
underground, the n spreads plenty ol
manure, harrow* thoroughly with on
of the efficient n< w harrows, making
the surface a* mellow as |w*-
sible for the nt w seed l*d. Thecroj
is cultivated very thoroughly til! it
completely shades the ground. Cab
bage or corn fodder answer well. The
roots plowed under, having nobrtalh
ing, will r >'. nrd enrich the soil.
Isaac Mekct l, of Cayuga county, X.
V., stated nt the late ('anc Grower*
convention, at Geneva, that by | I*nt
ing a ten acre field every year with
ambtr cane, lie I a 1 entirely cradic.it
ed all tLe quack grass. lie c.inw*
hack to th fi. Id all the bagaaae to
enrich it.
Canada Ihistloa
Mr. 11. <*-n tell* the Vi- /uyo*
Far rr of It: w *ucce*ful treatment of
numerous pairhes of Canada thistle*
during t lie last ten years: "I keep, on
an avirage, about sheep, and
whenever I discover a patch I manage
to salt the abcep there, putting a
small handful of silt in each thistle
at the root Itcsidcs the action of
the salt which i.-i d* to destroy them,
the thistles -ir. . ah 11 by the shccpcloiw
to the grouiel, and after one or two
saving* :he yrsss among the thistles,
ss well a* everytbig clac that hide
them fr>m view, has been eaten off
so tlnit each thistle is easy to he seen
and to receive its handful of salt.
Afiei t hi* treatment it is seldom that
any tlusibs are-een the second y ear.''
SKKK corn may he msde safe from
wire- worm- and other vermin by soak
ing it .otfon planting in a mixture
consisting of one pound of blue
vitriol or sulphate of copper in a gal
lon of water. The solution should
IK; lukewarm and the *eed may soak
a day or a day and a baif. The poison
will not only kill thg worms but it
will also destroy any injurious fungus
germs that may OB Ui® grain*,
('are should be taken not to get any
of the solution on the hi mis, as it
will make sores.

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