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The daily worker. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1924-1958, November 21, 1924, Image 5

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Friday, November 21, 1924
[j j^fe^fV 1 Industry |j
BLOODY RULE OF
BRITISH IN EGYPT
ROUSESNAMS
Nationalists in Attack
on Major Stack
(Special to The Daily Worker)
CAIRO, Egypt, Nov. 20.
Major General Sir Lee Stack
was seriously wounded yester*
day by Egyptian nationalists
who threw a bomb and than
opened fire with revolvers.
The attempt upon this emis
sary of British imperialism
‘ arises from the continued occu
pation of Egypt by British
troops without other right than
superior force. .
Dictatorship Alias Protectorates.
It occurred outside the ministry of
war, when three or four meh attack
■ ed the automobile in which the' gen
eral, bis bodyguard and a policeman
-ware riding. All were Wounded. The
assailants escaped.
England promised years ago to give
up its “protectorate,” which is the po
* lite name for dictatorship in colonial
capitalism, over Egypt. In 1922, when
the time expired. Great Britain tv.eiely
changed the name of the dictatorship
and held on to it under the excuse that
it had to "defend” the Egyptians.
Maybe the Swlse Navy.
From whom or from what the
Egyptians needed defense, other than
from the British themselves, even the
“labor” government of MacDonald
would not say. But Britain maintains
a large army in Egypt of whfch (Ten-,
era! Stack is the head. Recently, in
a Strike of conscripted labor battal
ions, many were shot down by order
of Stack. It became plain then that
the Egyptians need defending, certain
ly, but from England and not by her.
Bnt Britain is not expected to give
up without mast revolution her con
trol over Egypt, because of its strate
gic control of the Sues Canal.
Portuguese Pilots Strike.
LONDON, Nov. 20.—Pilots of Portu
guese vessels are on strike demanding
higher pay than generals or judges,
according to despatches to the Daily
Mail. Stokers who have Joined the
pilots in their demands are asking as
much as admirals receive.
OUR DAILY PATTERNS
A PLEASING HOUSE DRESS
Q 927 j£f
niv‘l ■
' W I
Pi
4927. Comfort and good 11ms are
'expressed In this charming "morning"
tfcess. Percale or aeereucker, glng
hata or wool crepe would be gool
for k drees of this kind. The width
at the foot la 2'4 yards, with plaits ex
tended. This Is a flno model for wo
men of nature flguro.
The Pattern is cut In 8 sizes: 36,
38, 40, 42, 44, 46, 48 and 60 Inches
bust measure. A3B Inch size requires
6 yards of 86 Inch material. If oollar
and cuffs are made of contrasting
material, Vs yard Is required.
Pattern mailed to any address on
* reoelpt of 120 In silver or stamps.
' IN ORDERING YOUR PATTERN
\ HE SURE TO MENTION THE SIZE
YOU WANT IT IN.
Bend 12c in silver or stamps tor
our UP- TO-DATE FALL A WINTER
1924-1986 BOOK OF FASHIONS.
Subscribe for “Your Daily,"
the DAILY WORKER.
Negro Problem Cannot be
Solved Under Capitalism
By GORDON W. OWENS.
Negroes rejoice and sing "Hosanna
Unto the Highest.” The Negro prob
lem of the United States is about to
be solved. Henceforth all people will
be equal, or, at least well on the road
to equality. Lynching and burning,
Jim-crowism and segregation, are
doomed. Negroes will no longer be
the victims of discrimination and pre
judice. No longer need Negroes’ voices
roll across the country in empty
warnings and fruitless protests. No
more will Arkansas judges address a
cultured Negro young lady, "Miss Nig
ger." The day of universal brother
hood is about to dawn. Silent Calvin
Coolidge, the president of the country,
will even publicly denounce the Ku
Klux Klan.
Negroes, raise your voices and loud
ly sing,
"Soiind the loud timbrels o’er land
and o’er sea,
“A Negro has been elected judge and
all Negroes are free!”
All the above is going to happen
because a Negro, Albert George, has
been elected judge in Chicago on the
republican ticket. If there be any
doubting Thomases among the Negroes
they may easily dispel their gloom by
reading last week’s issues of the four
leading capitalists’ newspapers in Chi
cago. The Chicago Tribune, the Chi
cago Daily News, the Herald and Ex
aminer and the Evening American
tried to outdo one another in pub
lishing the picture of this Negro Judge
elect, and writing eulogies about him
and writing articles telling of the
glorious opportunities in store for the
Negro race under American democ
racy.
Another Tool of Capitalists.
But iq all seriousness how the elec
tion of a Negro tp the bench of a capi
talist court of Justice will materially
benefit the mats of underpaid, over
worked and erploltefi Negro workers
to me seems a Chinese puzzle. White
men have been judges from time im
memorial and the condition of white
workers were not improved one iota
on account of same. In fact, the white
judges have issued injunctions pro
hibiting white workers on strike from
peacefully picketing shops and factor
ies and have assessed fines and jail
sentences on white workers for doing
same. This Negro Judge will be the
same as his white fellow Judges,
namely, a servile tool of the employ
ers and capitalists and ho will will
ingly do their bidding.
All this praisp in the capitalists’
newspapers, which are the chief in
stigators of prejudices, discriminations
and riots against. Negroes, of a Negro
[ NEW AND POPULAR FOR THE
GROWING GIRL
4914. Fashions latest expression
“the tunic” Is here portrayed. This
model may be finished with short or
long sleeves. The skirt is separate,
It may be joined to an underbody.
The blouse may be worn over any
skirt.
This Pattern Is eat ta 4 Sizes: 8,
10, 12, and 14 years. A 10 year size
requires 3V4 yards of 40 inch mater
ial If made with long sleeves. With
short sleeves 244 yards are required.
Pattern mailed to any address on re
ceipt of 12c In silver or stamps.
IN ORDERING YOUR PATTERN
BE SURE TO MENTION THE SIZE
YOU WANT IT IN.
Send 12c In silver or stamps tor our
UP-TO-DATE FALL AND WINTER
1924-1926 BOOK OF FASHIONS.
AOOreu: The DAILY WOHKIB, 1118
W. Washington eivs., Chioea*, 111.
NOTICE TO PATTERN Rl:rEßß—The
pattern* being *ui<l thru the DAILY
WORKER pattern department are fur*
Dished by a New York Arm of pattern
srsatreoaß? is
eelved, end they are mailed by the msa*
Bfarturer direct to the ouetomer. The
DAILY WORKER does not keep a stock
es patterns ea hand Delivery of pat*
lerna ordinarily will take at least 10 days
rom the date of mailing the order. Do
not beoeoM impatient it rear pattern ta
Atnysil.
who has been elected judge is plain
sophistry and buncome Intended to
fool and humbug the mass of Negro
workers.
Negro Workers Will Be No Better Off.
The political economical and social
condition of the Negroes of the Unit
ed States will not be bettered one iota
by a Negro being elected to any of
fice on the capitalist political parties.
It is a known fact that the most ab
ject slave, when given power, makes
the worst tyrant and Negroes are no
exception to this rule. Irish people
and Negroes who are both badly op
pressed when placed in a position of
authority, become the worst oppres
sors. Irish and Negro policemen are
the worst bullies in uniform. Negro
workers must learn that the only pos
sible way which they can do away with
the evils under which they suffer is
by joining hands and uniting with the
white revolutionary and class con
scious workers, to destroy and do
away with the present lniquitious capi
talist system of wage slavery which
contains germs of all the evils under
which Negroes suffer.
This will be the aane and sensible
way for the Negro workers to better
their lot and not by electing some
Negro politician to office in order that
the Negro politician, along with the
white ones, may draw a big salary and
smoke fat cigars, while the mass of
Negro workers are mercilessly ex
ploited. *
FARMERS OWE
MUCH DOUGH, SAY
GRANGELEADERS
Fourteen Billions Their
Modest Estimate
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., Nov. 20.
The farmers of this country are in
debt to the extent of $14,000,000,000,
according to a statement issued to
day by the national grange, In con
vention here.
The atatement alto declared that
agriculture muit be made as remun
erative as any other industry and
that many injustices are forced on
the farmer in the way of special privi
leges given to certain other indus
trials.
For Wage Inoreaae*.
The grange advocates a thoro in
vestigation of post office system, an
increase in the salaries of the postal
employes, and a faster handling of
mail, the statement said. It added
that the grange will conduct a na
tional movement to obtain electrical
power for rural communities at rea
sonable rates.
Kuzbas Industrial
Colony Doubles Its
Working Territory
NEW YORK. —Kusbas, the indus
trial colony in Siberia technically man
ned by the Americans, has been given
control of more than twice the ter
ritory now being developed In the
Kuznetsky basin. Southern coal de
posits in Kuznetsky basin amount to
over 170,000,000,000 measured tons,
nearly as much as total reserves in
Great Britain. In Prokopevsky, coal
seams are 60 to 76 feet thick. Guriev
steel plant produces at full capacity
30 tons of pig iron a day. All this
goes to Kuzbas.
Tom Barker, head of the New York
office, states that the enlarged oper
ations of Kusbas may require more
American engineers and skilled work
ers during 1926, but so far Russians
have done most of the work at Keme
rovo very well with a few American
technicians directing and organizing.
Post Cards in Colors
Something New and Different.
Use them for your regular cor
respondence. Have a set for
your album.
No. I—Lenin, directing the revolution
No. 2—Lenin, when 16 years eld
No. 2—The Red Flag of the Union of
Socialist Soviet Republlos
No. 4—The Russian atate seal and
emblem
No. s—-Trotsky, commander of the
Soviet Red Army
ONE CARD 5 CENTS
In lots of 10 or more, 2o per card.
1H In lots of 100 or more.
Send money order, oheck or post
age to
Literature Department
WORKERS PARTY OF AMERICA
1113 W. Washington Blvd.,
Chicago, 111.
THE DAILY WORKER
[SELF-RULE FOR
MIS SOUGHT
BY COMMUNISTS
Call for Speedy End of
Capitalist System
(Special to Tha Daily Worker)
CAWNPORE, India, Nov. 20.
—The Communist Party of India
demands complete self-govern
ment, and a speedy termination
of a system which deprives the
workers of the fruits of their
labor, in their declaration of
principles just issued.
“The Indian Communist Party
enters the field of political action
determined to supersede or en
velope all capitalist parties, and
calls upon all members of the
working class of India to muster un
der its banner to the end that a
speedy termination of the capitalist
system may be wrought,” say 3 the
statement.
For Overthrow of Capitalism.
“Our party holds that the workers
of all countries are suffering from the
same injustices at the hands of the
capitalists and that their interests
are one and the same. It is therefore
necessary for our salvation to unite
and act internationally.
“Our party holds that as the ma
chinery of the government including
the armed forces of the nation ex
ists only to conserve Mu* monopoly
by the capitalist class of the wealth
of the workers, the workers must or
ganize consciously and politically for
the conquest of the powers of gov
ernment, national, provincial and
local, in order that this machinery,
including these forces, may be con
verted from an instrument of oppres
sion into the agent of emancipation
and the overthrow of bureaucratic and
capitalist privileges.
“Our party holds that the present
Zamtndari (land-tenure) system is the
sole cause of all the miseries of the
Indian peag*irtp-maxHeo hrag ae It ex
ists there is no hope of improving
their condition. Therefore the Zamin
darl system must be abolished at
once, and peasants should be deemed
as the rightful masters of, the fruits
of their labor.
Oppose Foreign Rule
“Our party holds it is unnatural
and unjust for any nation or country
to rule over another nation or coun
try, and therefore, it is the birthright
and the foremost duty of Indians to
gain complete Swarajya (self-govern
ment) at the earliest possible time.
"Our party holds that Indian so
ciety as at present constituted, is
based upon the ownership of the
means of living (that is, land, fac
tories, and means of transportation)
by the capitalist or the master class
and the consequent enslavement of
the working class by whose labor
alone wealth is produced.
“Our party holds that in society,
therefore, there is an antagonism of
interests manifesting itself as a class
struggle between those who possess
but do not produce and those who
produce but do not possess.
"Our party holds that this antag
onism can be abolished only by the
emancipation of the working class
from the domination of the master
class by the conversion of the means
of production and distribution into
common property of society, and the
control thereof by the whole com
munity.
“(Bigned) S. SATYA BLAKTO,
"Secretary Indian Communist Party.”
State Rests in Fraud Case.
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind., Nov. 20.—Fol
lowing cross examination today of the
government's final group of witnesses
United States District Attorney Holner
Elliott was ready to rest his cast
against 16 former officers of the Haw
kins Mortgage company and its sub
sldlarles, charged with complicity In
an alleged mail fraud case involving
losses of millions of dollars to invest
ors.
UNCLE WIGGILY’S TRICKS A LAUGH FOR THE CHILDREN
* Ok, lire found i "TW TTwaytaymt /ff \ ft * Ar<i ***?**?* II " Hert you arc !
.- --. —' ~' »-
LABELLING WORKERS BY LOOKING
INTO THEIR EYES IS THE BUNK,
SAYS RUSSELL SAGE FOUNDATION
i;t . :
NEW YORK, Nov. 20. —The Russell Sage Foundation has issued an
exhaustive report on “Public Employment Offices—Their Purpose, Structure,
and Methods” that knocks the bottom out of the science in the technique of
selecting applicants for employment.
"No system or method of character analysis has yet produced results
which justify its adoption or even sug-'
gest its trial in a public employment
office,” says the foundation’s state
ment.
Labelling Not so Bimple.
“The human mind has been grouped
by some persons interested in employ
ment questions into types that are pre
sumably mutually exclusive as fol
lows: The executive type, the detail
type; the promotiou type, the account
ing type; the clerical type; the selling
type; the mechanical type, and so on.
These adjectives do describe attri
butes of the mind, but that people can
be so tagged and labeled fairly is
doubtful. The temptation to label
people is very great, but the science
and art of successfully doing It have
not as yet been discovered.”
The report, which is based on a
five-year study extending into almost
every state in the union and into Cana
da and England, was prepared by
Shelby M. Harrison, director depart
ment of surveys ted exhibits of the
Russell Save Foundation, in roilabora
tion with Mary LaDamo, Bradley
Buell, Leslie K Woodcoca, and Fred
erick A. King, all of whom have been
closely Identified with public and pri
vate employment work. Several hun
dred pages in the report are devoted
to methods of organizing and admin
istering a national employirriut serv
ice.
Poultry Growers Go
Broke and Join the
Ranks of Unemployed
LANGLEY PRARIE, B. C„ Nov. 20.
—Many small poultry men with flocks
of from 100 to 300 chickens are being
forced to the wall by the high feed
prices and are crowding onto the al
ready flooded labor market in British
Columbia. Wheat during October in
creased $lO and now sells at S6O a
ton, while oats advanced $4 and is sell
ing at $42 a ton. Bran and shorts
have also gone up and feed dealers
expect further increases before the
winter is over.
In the fruit growing districts of the
province conditions are no better and
as the returns from the bulk of the
fruit crop have not been received yet
it is only a matter of time until many
fruit growers will join the poultrymen
in quest of the elusive job. In man:
cases the crop returns have been mort
gaged to pay for irrigation assess
monts and outstanding grocery bills.
In both cases the victims are havini
the necessity of genuine co-operalior
Impressed upon them. The Japanese
and Chinese operate large garden
tracts in the province with much sue
cess because they adhere to the prin
ciples of co-operation.
Fire Hits Pleasure Resort.
ATLANTIC CITY. N. J., Nov. 20.-
One life was lost and property damage
in excess of $600,000 was done by flr<
which destroyed two hotels, damaged
the Hotel Wiltshire and the casin<
on the Steen pier here, and threatenei
the entire board walk, a check up to
day showed.
. y Be M a T ?Wgii ii M w* r wiizk.
MY NEW LOCATION
Work.ra
ESTABLISH,.., i, I EARS.
My Examination: la Free
My Prlcee Are Reasonable
My Work le Guaranteed
Extracting Specialist
DELAY MEANS DECAY
Your Union Meeting
THIRD FRIDAY, NOV. 21, 1924.
Name of Local and Place
NO. of Meeting.
237 Bakers and Cons., 34Z0 W. Roose
velt.
8 Bookbinders, 175 W. Washington
St., S p. m.
29 Broom Makers, 810 W. Harrison St.
:r,j Carpenters, 178 W, Washington.
70 Carpenters, 2705 W. 35th St.
Building Trades Council, 180 W.
Washington.
Carpenters’ Dlt. Counoil, 505 S.
State St.
2200 Carpenters, 4339 S. Helsted St.
s Electricians, 2901 W. Monroe St.
214 Electricians, 4141 W. Lake St.
779 Electricians, R. R„ 5324 S. Halstcd
564 Firemen and Englnemen, 5438 S.
Haleted St.
St.
84 Oiass Workers, Emily and Marsh
field.
225 Hod Carriers, Monroe and Peoria
Ste.
Ladles' Garment Workers, Joint
Board, 328 W Van Buren St.
S 3 Machinists, 113 S. Ashland Bivd.
113 Machinists. 113 S. Ashland Blvd.
273 Painters. 2345 80. Kedlie Avs.
•37 Painters, Sehool end ShefleJd Ave.
863 Painters, 3140 Indiana Ave.
1332 Painters, 3140 Indiana Ave.
Pattern Makers, 119 S. Throop St.
112 Plumbers, 9251 S. Chicago Ave.
346 Railway Carmen, Village Hall, Kol
xle, Til.
378 Railway Carmen, Village Hall, Kol
ale. 111.
998 Railway Carmen, 5446 S. Ashland
Ave.
328 Railway Clarke, 20 W. Randolph St.
678 Railway Clerk*. 9 6. Clinton St.
1356 Railway Clerks, Ft. Dearborn Hotel.
4 Railroad Trainmen, 1636 B. 64th St.
119 Railroad Trainmen, 3349 North
Ave.
198 Railroad Trainmen, 9120 Commer
cial Ave.
3(7 Sheet Metal Workers, Ashland and
Van Buren.
South Chicago Trades and Labor
Assembly. 9139 Commercial Ave.
2 Stage Hands, 412 Capitol Bldg.
12 Stove Mounters, 3609 Wolfram Avo.
3 Teachers (Women), Women’s City
Club Rooms, 4:30 p. m.
Telegraphers (Com.) 812 S. Clark
St.
484 Waitresses, 19 W. Adams St.,
3 p. m.
Women’s Union Label Leagu* 880
S. Ashland ,Btvd.
(Note--Unless otherwise stated all
meetings are at 8 p. m.)
Claim Railroads Good Spenders.
NEW YORK, Nov. 20—Since April
1923, the railroads of ths Unitod
States have authorised the expendi
ture of more than $2,900,009,000 for
locomotives, cars and other additions
to equipment and actually have spent
$1,690,063,426, leaving about half a
billion to be expended in betterments
in the next few months, according to
a statement issued today by the
American Railway Association in an
nuual meeting here.
READ THE DAILY WORKER.
PITTSBURGH, PA.
DR. RASNICK
DENTIST
Rendering Expert Dental Service
fsr 10 Years.
946 SMITHFICLD ST.. Near Tth Ave.
1637 CBNTSR AVE., Cor. Arthur SL
Are You Clever?
Then solve this! If one Booster, realizing that articles
obtained for the Bazaar are Weapons against Capitalist
Tyranny, got ten dollars worth of stuff donated by store
keepers in 15 minute* — how long will it take you to get one
or more articles? Or sell a few tickets? Try it and find out!
TALK BAZAARI FIGHT CAPITALISM!
-
Bring, send er report all articles you oolleot or donate
to Room 207, 186 West Washington Street—AT ONCEI
DAILY WORKER LABOR DEFENSE
Bazaar and Dance
At Folkete Hut, 2733 Hirsch Blvd.
NOVEMBER 26-30
Auspices, Workers Party, Local Chicago.
i Notice to Delegates, Branches and All Bazaar Boosters!
J Special final meeting Saturday, November 22, 3:15 p. m„ at 722
< Blue Island Avenue. All Party and League Branches, nee that you are
' represented and make a complete report. You bunt do your share of
1 the work Involved.
' we'vwdW'wev»»WvWvvvvv»»ri WYWY’FFWY'F TYt V' I ’* IMFlieiiSi.
?RIME MINISTER
Os CANADA WAS
TOOL OFIOHN D/
Training Helps Him to
Fight for Capitalism
By SYDNEY WARREN
(Federated Press Staff Correspondent
VANCOUVER, B. C„ Nov. 20.
—The prime minister of Can
ada, William Lyon Mackenzie
King, on his recent tour thru
out British Columbia and the
prairie provinces, made it plain
that the government has com
mitted itself frankly to the in
terests of big business.
Canada's prime minister was
a former paid industrial propa
gandist for the Rockefeller in
terests and was associated with
the notorious capitalist press
agent, Ivy Lee.
His training, therefore, has pecu
liarly fitted him to become ths chief
spokesman for the vested financial
interests of this country.
With amazing frankness ths pre
mier revealed the fact that every eent
of Canada’s war debt is still unpaid
and that nothing was being paid but
the Interest. The Canadian people are
today indebted to domeatio and for
eign bond holders to the extent of
$2,347,000,000 and pay interest on this
Bum amounting annually to $137,000,-
000, or over sls per capita.
The prime minister admitted that
the wartime coalition government had
permitted Canada’s war profiteers to
salt their wartime profits in long term
government bonds bearing sft per
cent interest and exempt from ail tax
ation, whereas the bonds could have
been made redeemable in shorter time
and at a saving in interest charges.
The premier predicted an era of
intensive exploitation by foreign
(principally American) capital and
stated that the government Intended
to encourage such enterprise by carry
ing on an aggressive immigration pol
icy, which means ths supplying of an
abundance of cheap labor.
Open Forum, Sunday Night, Lodge
Room, Ashland Auditorium.
RUBBER STAMPS ffi
AND SEALS
IN ENGLISH AND IN ALL
FOREIGN LANGUAGES
INK. FADS. DATERS. RUBBER TYrE.Ew.
NOBLER STAMP & SEAL CO,
~x, 624 So. Dearborn
fik Phone Wabash 8680
CHICAGO
mail ORDERS PBOMWIY
ATTENDED TO
Page Five

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