OCR Interpretation


The St. Louis Republic. [volume] (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, September 04, 1901, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020274/1901-09-04/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

T. LOUIS REPUBLIC.
WOBLD'S'
1Q03
PAIR,
JL JnLJjj
2sTIXETY-P0UETH YEAR
ST. LOUIS, MO., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1901.
rin St. Louis. O;
JTiVXUiJ0ll Tratn. Th
In St. Louis. One Ceat.
Three Cents.
INITIAL STEP IN BUILDING THE WORLD'S FAIR MARKED BY JOYOUS DEMONSTRATION.
QtnlMsiaoi
ayvoy'j wmHwO
WW
MARK RENNITT.
WWWnaaaaaaaWyM
W
I iMavaassssssastL.iJaMssssssWsWsss!sa IB lRV,HMBBKfrfaf4fBBK -V -
WEDDING HASTENED BY ' i lllllBijH WSHmML
I JaaaWHaWaWaaalaaaM. ?giMt8K LM BIBBgMilK? f
BRIDE'S FATHER'S ILLNESS. MHiTlnff IcmKf
I aaaataaaaPlSBaaaaaaak laaV. A-HIRwBaaH'-l V" 7rf5kk NSjfiaaKaaBWaBwIBBrJr II (fo'
SECRETARY STEVENS.
ROB A TRAIN AND
STEAL AN ENGINE,
Bandits Hold Up Cotton Belt Pas
senger Train and Get
Big Bootr.
DYNAMITE EXPRESS SAFE.
iA.fter Completing Their Work the
. Bobbers Boarded the En
gine and Rode Safel j4
Away.
Charles II. Flanagan of St Louis and Miss Julia Forsyth of Wood-"
lawn Married at the Bedside of Her Dying Parent Bride
Had Only One Day to Prepare for the Ceremony.
Texarkana. Ark., Sept. 4 The Cotton
Belt passenger train leaving Texarkana at
8.13 p. m.. In charge cf Conductor Arm
strong and Engineer Henderson, was held
up and robbed near Eylau, four miles south
of Texarkana, last night.
Engineer Surrendered.
The train was flagged by one or tho rob
bers, who forced the fireman to go bade and
cut off tho mall and baggage cars, and. re
turning, forced tho engineer to give up the
management of his engine.
One of tho robbers, who. It appears. Is an
expert engineer, ran the engine, mall and
express cars about a mile from the point
whero the first stop wag made and forced
tho express messenger tho oren his car.
The robbers then blew open the safo with
dynamite, securing, it Is said, a very large
amount of booty. The- exact amount Is
withheld by the Cotton Belt Railroad, and
tho express people, but It Is known that a
very large shipment -a as made to-night on
this train.
Stole the Engine.
The robbers, after becurlng tho loot, cut
oft tho engine from the mall and express
tare, and, forcing Engineer Henderson to
get oft. they took the engine. In chargo of
the robber engineer, and went south at full
speed. At 1:30 o'clock thl3 morning tho en
gine had not been found.
No passengers w ere molested. They were,
howeier, very badly frightened and hid
their valuables. Tho robbers wero evidently
In possession of all facts concerning this
particular shipment of money, together
with a schedulo of the train, as their
scheme was successful In every respect.
Work of RaUroad Men.
A auspicious character was seen to board
the head end of the train leaving Texar
kana. Railroad emplojes here seem to bo
confident that tho robbery was committed
by railroad men, from the manner In which
they superintended the cutting off of the
cars and the handling of the engine.
The spot selected for the robbery was well
adapted for this kind of work, and Is very
wild and heavily Umbered. Tho con
ductor and several passengers walked
tack to Texarkana, a distance ot four
miles. Tho Sheriff and posse have been
summoned to go In pursuit of the robbers.
At this hour the passenger train stands In
two pieces, with tho engine's whereabouts
unknown. So far as known, no one was In
jured, There wero flvo men In the gang.
I
GENERAL DE WET ISSUES
IRONICAL MANIFESTO.
London, Sept. 4. "Do Wet has Is-
s sued a proclamation," sajs a dis- s
s patch to tho Daily Mall from Cape s
s Town, "that he will shoot all
British troops found In Orango
River Colony after September 13."
laaaaaaaaBf" ' "'' t''C 5 tsssBssssssjf
aaaaaaaaaaaa&S&A t J ijC' tfh ", 'VVf?V'sjsssssBSSsfl ''
AMERICA WILL NOT BROOK
FIGHTING ON THE ISTHMUS.
.United States Have Formally Notified Venezuela and Colombia That
They Must Not Figure in Military Plans Which Might Men
ace the Security of Transit Across Panama Threat
ened Disturbance Is Deplored and an Appeal for
Peace Is Made by tbe Secretary of State.
-Br a. Republic FhotatniBatw I
WILLIAM H. THOMPSON DRIVING FIRST STAKE OF THE LOTJISIANJI
rURCHASE EXPOSITION ON THE FAIR SITE.
GREAT CROWD SEES ' "
FIRST STAKE DRIVEN.
VEILED THREAT AT INTERVENTION EVOKES SOFT RESPONSES.
MES. OHAItLES HENRY FLANAGAN,
Who was Miss Julia Forsyth. At the request of her father, who is
seriousty ill, she was married at his bedside.
LEAVES GOVERNOR'S STAFF.
Chicago Man Objects to Yates's
Political Absociatious.
RBFTJBL1C SPECIAL.
Springfield, 111., Sept. 3. William D.Waih
burn of Chicago has resigned bis place on
Governor Yates's personal staff. The res
ignation came to Adjutant General Reeco
this morning and was promptly accepted.
Ostensibly Colonel Washburn's law pi no
tice will not permit his giving the oeceasiry
attentlon to hlB military duties. Neverthe
less It Is claimed that ho some dais ago
announced to friends in Chicago that lie
would nslgn because Governor Yates
was too closely Identified with William
Lorimer.
. The resignation of Captain Ernest II.
Etlres as chaplain of tho First Cavalry was
also accepted.
4 LI HUNG CHANG IS
4 BECOMING VEKV FEEBLE.
Pekln, Sept. S ti Hung Chang is
Incoming more and more feeble, and
4 It is apparent to all his visitors that
4) It Is not probable that he will ever 4
be able to 'act as Chairman ot the
Council of State.
IXCIDENTS OF THE WEDDING.
Another hurried society wedding. 4
Dangerous Illness o the bride's s
father Is responsible.
4 Tho youthful bride, aged 13 years,
had ono day to make ready. s
Sho wears the gown In which she s
mado hor debut three months ago.
Her married brother nnd her
sister-in-law, bride and bridegroom s
of two weeks, lend assistance.
The bride'.s father Is carrleJ down
to the parlor and witnesses tho cere-
mony.
There wero unusual Incidents in the wed
ding last night of Miss Julia Forsyth of
Woodlawn and Charles Henry FJ-inagan of
St. Louis. In deference to the wish of her
father, William Forsyth, the bride hastened
her marriage, which was expected to take
place lato li the autumn, and Instead was
wedded last night to Mr. Flanagan, to
whom she has been engaged for several
months.
Two dajs only has the bride been allotted
for preparation. She lias been ill for sev
eral weeks, nnd was about to take a short
trip for purposes of recuperation, when, a
week ago, her father, William rorsyth,
was seized with an attack of heart trouble.
He has been subject to similar attacks, but
.none have hitherto been so serious or so
lasting. "Realizing his dangerous condition,
he called the young people to his bedside
on Monday, and taking each of their hands
I In his, told them that nothing would give him
so much relief and pleasure as to sco them
man and wife. They determined to act In
nccordanco with his desires, and plans
were accordingly perfected for tho nuptials
of last nlcht.
bridal gowx was
dress used at her dehut.
The pretty parlor of the suburban resi
dence was decked with bridal Cowers and
trailing vines, as Mr. Forsith Insisted that
everything should bo as conventional as
posMble at such short notice. In the bay
window, with a background of tall pilms
and asparagus tendrlN, the vouthful brldo
stood last night with Mr. Flanagan, and
was married, the service being read by the
Reverend Father Stcmpkir of the Klrkwood
Parish. The bridesmaid was Miss Frances
Flanagan, the bridegroom's sister, who hur
riedly came home from the country on
Monday night, and the best man. the bride's
brother, Robert C. Forsyth.
New and splendid wedding gowns and
finery take much time for their construc
tion, and so were quite out of the question
in thlse cae, even If the bride had so de
sired. So she chose to bo married In simple
white Instead, arid came down tho stair
case with her brother at the appointed
hour C o'clock wearing the same mull and
lace frock in which she made her debut
three months ago at the large and elaborate
garden party given by Mrs. Forsyth In
early June, when all suburban society and
many town people came out to greet tho
debutante. It was one ot the most success
ful debuts ever made by a St. Louis slri,
f
Washington, Sept S It Is ascertained
that on August 21. during Secretary Hay's
recent visit to Washington, a telegraphic
message was sent to tho Ministers at Cara
cas and Bogota, directing them to Inform
the Foreign Secretaries of Venezuela and
Colombia of the distress with which tho
President had heard of the likelihood of a
dlsturbtnco of the relations between those
two Republics.
Adverting to tho possibility of tho Influ
ence of the United States being exerted to
compose tho pending questions, tho minis
ters wero directed to Eay that, while the
relations of this Government with both na
tions are equally mtlmato and friendly, and
every opportunity Is taken to show the good
will we bear them, an offer of tho Presi
dent's kindly offices to arrange any difficul
ties which may exist between Colombia and
Venezuela would bo Ineffective without the
acquiescence of both.
Would Deplore War.
Nevertheless, Inspired by the sentiments
which aro common to all the Governments
of tho American Republics, the United
Slates would sincerely deplore a breach of
tho amicable relations that at this time
happily exist between the sister nations of
the Western world, and would especlally
rcgrct any action by either of them which
might menace the security of transit across
the isthmus or tho neutrality of Its terri
tory and thereby constrain the Government
of the United States to consider It3 respon
sibilities and functions under oxistlng
treaty engagements with Colombia.
Vencznelnn IlenpoDsc.
Tho text of Mr. Haj's telegram has not
been made public It is understood that an
acknowledgment of Its receipt has been
made by tho Venezuelan Govcrnnunt, but
its purport has not been made known, al
though It 13 said to be friendly In tone,
and. while charging invasion by Colombian
forces en tho Venezuelan border and re
ferring to the temporary suspension of
diplomatic intercourse which has occurred,
tho way appears to be open for explana
tions. Venezuela has not declared war against
Colombia. ,
Colomliirt Conciliatory.
Colombia also, it Is said to-night, has
made response to the note of Secretary Hay.
While Its contents aro not obtainable, the
statement Is made that It Is conciliatory In
character and evpres3 an earnest wish
that war with Venezuela may be avoided.
Such a result, it is stated, would bo a
cause of genuine regret to the pcoplo of Co
lombia. Colombia, It Is stated, stands ready to
acctpt the friendly Intervention ot the Uni
ted States to avert war and reposes full con
fidence In the latter country.
Castro onc.w roR war.
Caracas. Venezuela, Sept 3.-(Vla Haytlen
Cable.) The Republlca. semiofficial . organ
of tho Government, published to-day an in
rpired article ending 33 follows:
"The hour for notes has passed and the
timo ror action has arrived. Diplomacy has
laid before the world tho Just reasons
which It has had and has for asking com
pensation for the grievances it has suffered.
It bas exhausted all the means at Its dis
posal for settling the treater.Ing questions
between nation nnd nation. We have wait
ed long enough. Now is tho time for reprisals."
Spontaneous Outburst of Enthusiasm Marks the Beginning of Phyak.
cal Work in the Construction of the Louisiana Purchase Exposi
tion Treasurer. Thompson Leads in the Ceremony Near the ,
Geographical Center of World's Fair Grounds and Each
Director Present Lends a Hand. The Speeches, '
HISTORY COMMITTEE. AT WORK FOR A PERMANENT MUSEUM
J lading Topics li May's Republic I
THE SUN RISES THIS MORNING AT
531 AND SETS THIS EVENING AT 0:26.
For St. Lout and Vicinity Con
tinued fair weather, nllli a alfcht
Hit In temperature.
For lUlisonrl Fair Wcilncadny and
Thursday; cant to nonth wind.
For Illinois Fair Wcdnmday and
Thuradny; lleht eaaterly wind.
Page.
1. Initial Step in Building World's Fair.
Wedding Hastened by Father's Illness.
America Will Not Rrook Fighting on
the Isthmus.
2. Dowieltes to Use Second Raptlst Church
Building.
Sajs Odell Will Win In New York.
Prince Chun Is Guest ot Kaiser.
Forced Her Way to Son's liler.
3. Bailey on Roosevelt.
The Railroads.
Bears Ruled In Cotton Exchange.
John Drew Shelves Carvel.
i. Attendance at St. Louis Public Schools.
To Issue Injunction Against Strikers.
Council Rejects Fender Amendments.
5. German Methodists in Annual Confer
ence.
.Vaccination Made Compulsory.
6. Entries and Results at the Tracks.
7. Baseball Scores.
Sporting News.
6. Editorial.
Wallace's Senatorial Candidacy.
Society Notts.
9. Sudden Death of F. B. Aglar.
Will Test Koch's Theory.
Fresh Air Mission Ends Active Season.
Youths Arrested on Woman's Complaint.
10. Republic Want Advertisements.
Record of Births, Marriages, Deaths.
11. Republic Want and Real Estate Adver
tisements.
12. Groin and Produce Markets.
Sales of Live Slock.
12. Financial News.
River Telegrams.
11. Brokers Establish a Stock "Curb."
- Cupid Active In a Restaurant.
Methodists Meet at SL Joseph.
but nobody dreamed then that the pretty
white frock which won for Its wearer so
many compliments that afternoon would, a
few months later, wrvc as her wedding
drc39. Mr. Flanagan Insisted that she wear
a bridal veil, and to please him the nlry
tulle was fastened to her bonny brown
hair and draped about her slender form.
Them was little ot festivity and much of
solemnity In the ceremony. Mr. Forsjth
rallied sufficiently vesterday afternoon to
. .1 .i.A.i . . . '
become conscious, aim asum j oe carriea
downstairs and propped up with pillows In
a big armchair during the ceremony. He
stood the excitement fairly well, congratu- J
lated the bride and bridegroom, and wished
them all happiness.
Mr. uml Mrs. Wilson Forsyth, who were
married two weeks ago In Nashville, Tenn.,
arrived a few dais ago at the rorsyth resi
dence, on their honeymoon trip, and were
present at the ceremony.
Tho bride became engaged to Mr. Flan
agan late last spring, though their ac
quaintance dales from a much earlier pe
riod. They had In mind a large and fash
ionable fall v.vdding, but the fates decreed
otherwise. Mr. Flanagan, who Is as well
known In St. Louis society as the bride Is
In the suburbs. Is the eldest son of Mr. and
Mrs. G. M. Flanagan of No. SU1 Pine
street.
Late last night the couple took their de
parture for a snort bridal trip. They will I
live for the present with. Jlr. and Mrs. For
syth at Woodlawn.
At high neon yesterday, In the presence
of more than 2,009 persons who had come
spontaneously to tho scene, the fiMt stake
of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition was
driven tinder a big white oak near the geo
graphical center of the Fair site In Forest
Park by the officers and directors of the
Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company.
The ceremony had been planned to be of
the mo3t unostentatious character possible.
No Invitation had been Issued either to the
directors or to the public. In spite of this.
almost every director In the city and a
great concourso of St. Louisans attended,
and the greatest enthusiasm prevailed.
When tho start for the scene ot tho stake
driving was made a dust-shrouded. Indis
criminate, helter-skelter rush of wagons,
surreys, buggies, barouches, traps, tally
hos, horses, bicycles and footmen occurred
that recalled the opening of a new reserva
tion In ante-lottery days.
Chairman Thompson of the Committee on
Ground3 and Buildings drove home the
stake of polished 01k with a big ax the
complimentary offering of tho Simmons
Hardware Company and then with a
hatchet, similarly supplied, drove Into its
top a silver nail, produced by Architect
Taylor, inscribed "September 3. 190L Lou
isiana Purchase Exposition, 1303."
Each director present, led by President
Francis, struck one blow on the head of
the nail. President Francis mentioning aloud
In Introduction the name of each director
as he stepped forward.
The nail was then extracted with a claw
hammer, and the stake was pulled up by
Mr. Thompson himself. Hammer, ar,
hatchet, htako and nail were carefully pre
served and a rough, ordinary oak stake was
slipped Into the hole made by the first slake.
CROWD MAKES AX
EAGER Rl'Sn FOR RELICS.
Scores of persons reached over the shoul
der of Secretary Stevens to touch piously,
as though It were a holy thing the first
stake, which he held In his hand, and scores
fell with pockctknlves upon the rough oak
Btake that had replaced the first stake, to
sllco off splinters and shavings as relics.
"The occasion was a grand, spontaneous
success, that augured well for the formal
celebration that will signalize the breaking
of ground and the commencement of con
struction work on the Exposition buildings,"
said one of the directors later In the day.
Eleven o'clock and the LIndell pavilion
had been agreed on for the meeting of those
who wished to participate In the ceremo
nies. By 10:3) a. m. the LIndell pavilion was
crowded, and each car brought accessions
to the numbers, until at 11:15, when the start
was made, fully 2.CCO persons filled the pa
vilion and occupied vehicles In tho adjacent
driveways, ready to take part In the rush
for the scene. Some haziness existed as to
the location of the first stake, and all
stayed close to the pavilion, keeping a close
watch on William H. Thompson, who was
recognized as the projected central figure
in tbe event. Among those present In tho
pavilion were the following:
Directors President Frncls. Treasurer Thomp
son. Secretary Stevens. John Schroers. J. J.
Werthelnier, C. P. Walbrldge. Geo. L. Edwards,
John Sculltn, Charles II. lluttlr. Murray Carle-
ton, Nathan frank Charles F. VVenneker. Jamea J
F. Coyle, Alex. N. De ilenll. J. J. Schotten, c
F. Blanke. II. W. Stelnbisi. J. C Van Blarcom.
J. VV. McDonald. James Campbell. R. II. Etoct
lon. Spectators II. P. Rucker of Chicago, Georg
F. Parker, Mark Bennltt, Caplaln Perry Bartho
low, C. M. Selph. K. H. Seiton. L. c. Irvine,
Jesse McDonald. Frank R. Gerhart. John C.
Wands. Captain Isaac M. Masqn, Senator Cliarles
tthwelckardt. I'arkkceper W. S. Lunar, Gen
eral Superintendent of I'arkg Fred TV. Pape.
Major C J. Osborne. S. C Cabanne. Richard
Waton. Henry Mott. Peter O. Gerhart, Census
Supervisor Jerome Hlxgins. Louis Cohen, Phil
If ..fim former Comptroller Isaac S. Sturgeon
HOW TO REACH THE SPOT
WHERE STAKE WAS DRIVaOr.
The "first stake" Is located under
a big white oak tree three-fourth: of
a mile southwest of the Linden
Hallway pavilion. To reach the s
spot from the pavilion take the road
that leads to the Moorish mualo
stand; thence skirt the Peninsular
Lake by the drive along Its southern
side the East drive; cross Washing- '
ton bridge, the new structure at the
western end of the lake, followlnr
the road Washington drive that
leads to Fnlrvlew Hill, on ot &
the famous "lookout points"; at the
first fork of tho road follow the left
fork "Linden dr!ve"-for about HO
feet. Tho stake Is 23) feet cross conn- sfc
try due south In a grove of whits
oaks
This point Is tbe center of the Mr
Exposition picture the architectural
center of the Louisiana Purchase Ez-
position.
C. D. Gerhart and Surveyor ot the Port Charlaa
II. Smith.
"The stake will be driven about three
fourths of a mile southwest of here," re
marked Isaac S. Taylor, as ho clambered
Into a vehicle with Treasurer Thompson.
CAVALCADE STARTS FROM
THE LnDCLL PAVILION.
The entire cavalcade was off at the won!,
pushing along through the dense dust, wh'of-
ly regardless of scrapings and collisions,
the vehicle carrying Chairman Thompson
and Architect Tailor leading the way.
Through tho dust suddenly appeared a
large party of surveyors, who had wlrton.
ly spent the morning In fixing the point for
the stake an'd running lines from known
bench marks. Richard H. Phillips, brother
of Hiram Phillirs of the Board of Publto
Improvements, headed the party. It com
prised Curtis Hill and R. P. Garrett, Instru
ment men; T. J. Drayer and James O'NelU.
cbalnmen; E. T. Gillespie, rodman; C. Coch
ran, S. B. Grover and 51. F. Bain, axmenj
W. Foutz and Paul Phillips, flagmen.
Mounted police with difficulty cleared a
path along which the chalnmen ran the
steel measuring tape over tho final stretch
to the point where the stake waa to be
placed.
President Francis stepped to the center of
the circle and, removing his hat, which act
was followed by the entire assemblage, pre
sented Chairman Thompson and announced
that he would drive the stake.
Mr. Thompson set the stoke at the desig
nated point and. holding the az close to the
blade, pounded the stake down with fre
quent short blow.
"Hit her a good soak, you grand old Ro.
man." suygestod a voice, whose owner evi
dently had visions of stake-driving for cir
cus tcnta. Mr. Thompson looked up from
his work quizzically, and the spectators
lapsed Into alienee.
EACH DIRECTOR HITS
SILVER SAIL OXCE.
Mr. Thompson next with a hatchet drove
tho silver nail, produced by Isaac Taylor
from a satin-lined Jewel case. Into the top
Of tho stake, and each of the directors
struck one blow on the nail with the
hatchet.
Then President Trancls called, on Chair
man Isaac S. Taylor, and the latter spoke
briefly.
Cyrus P. Walbrldgc. as the representative
of the Committee on Ceremonies, spoke
next, as follows:
"Jlr. President Those who have been In
clined to complain of slow progress In the
Exposition should remember that only four
months ago yesterday the World's Fair-was
still In embryo. In the hands of a volunteer
committee of promoters; that since that
time a great corporation has been formed,
with a capital of 115,000,000: Its various de
partments have been organized; a site has
been selected amidst the keenest competi
tion of numerous eligible sites; tbe general
Coatlaoed om'Pma; Tir,
4
.A
-tn'
-!- '

xml | txt