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The St. Louis Republic. (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, June 02, 1902, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020274/1902-06-02/ed-1/seq-1/

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REPUBLIC.
JL
WOBLD'S
1 904 & aib.
ST. LOUIS. MO.. MONDAY. JUXE 2, 1902.
PEIOEJo;;
St. Luuli One Cenl
NINETYFOUiiTH YEAE.
Train, Three Cents
utile St. Lnals Ttto Cents
TELEPHONE LINEMAN
PLUNGED TO DEATH
.William McCoy Foil Thirty Feel
at Xiuth Street :unl Cass
Avenue.
HIS LEG-IRON SPUR SLIPPED.
,Vain Endeavor to Hold to
Smooth Pole Father of
Three Small Chil
dren. the
The spur of hW leg Irons slipping, Wil
liam McCoy. .1 lineman for the Kinloch Tel
ephone Company, fell thirty feet to
the pavement from a pole at Ninth street
and Cass avenue yesterday morning. Ho
was picked up unconscious and pent to the
City Hospital, where he died five hours
later. Ho leates a ElstT and threo small
children ot his home. No. 1C South Seven
teenth street.
McCoy was sent to Ninth street and Cass
avenue to repair wires. Ho climbed about
half way up the pole and, seating himself
on a (anall platform fastened against the
Bide, as a seat for those at work, mended
the -wires and then started down the pole.
He drove the spur of hla leg Irons Into
tho side of tho polo. nnJ. bearing all his
weight an one foot, released his hold on
tho platfnrm and tried to find a. place for
the spur on his other leg Iron. Either the
pole was rotten or he had not driven tho
spur Into tho -wood far enough, for with a
wrench the spur camo out of tho wood and
he found himself slipping.
Ha endeavored to catch tho side of tho
polo, but Its smooth surface afforded no
hold, and with a cry he fell to tho pave
ment, thirty feet below, striking on hla
head. He was picked up unconscious by
spectators and an ambulance summoned. He
reached tha City Hospital at 10 o'clock. Ho
died at Z o'clock In tho afternoon.
McCoy had been In the employ of the Kin
loch company several months, and was con
sidered one of Its best linemen. About three
months ago his wlfo died and he was left
with the care of threa small children. Since
then a sister has kept houso for hlra.
MISSOURI UNIVERSITY
BACCALAUREATE OAY
Sermon to Students Is Preached by
the Reverend Henry Van
Dyke, D. D.
Columbia, Mo., Juno L The attendance at
tha baccalaureate services of tho sixteenth
annual commencement of the Unlvcrjjty "
aitseouii 'to-day was the largest for years.
The exercises wero opened with the Ions
meter doxology and the Raver, nd V7, W.
Elwang, pastor of tho First Presbyterian
Church of Columbia, offered the Invocation.
Tho Bermon was preached by tha Reverend
Henry Van Dyke, D. D LL. V., of Prince
ton University. Ho took for his text the first
verse of tha third chapter of Collosslans:
"If ye, then, be risen of Christ, seek those
things which are above where Christ slt
Uth at tho right hand of God."
There Is nobla rnuslo which, lifts tha
heart like a tide from tha sea. sweeping
away all things that are low and base, fill
ing It with high thoughts and generous de
sires," said tho minister. There Is mean
muslo that plays upon tha strings of sen
sual passion and vulgar mirth, strumming
and tinkling an accompaniment to the reck
less dance of ephemeral souls above the
cataract of fatal folly, or beating a brutal
much for tha parade of pride and cruelty
towards tho pit of death.
There, are pictures that Immortalize tha
Kreat moments of history, the flno asp(fa
tlona of humanity, tha fair scenes of na
ture. There are pictures that lavish all the
resources of the most consummate art to
perpetuate tha trivial and vile. There are
dramas that speak of heroism and virtue
and purify our hearts with pity, fear and
love. There are plays that present life as
a coarse and tedious farco or glorify in
decency and unfaithfulness, or make a bit
ter Jest of tho lmpotenoe of all goodness
and tha tragic failure of all high aim.
"There are books which storo the mem
ory with beautiful Images, and gentle pleas
ures and fine Ideals. There are books which
leave a had taste In the mind and weaken
every fiber of spiritual courage and poison
the eprlngs of Imagination at the fountain
head.
"It Is for us to choose In which of these
two paths of art we wUl walk. It Is for us
to choose whether wo will have for our
companions the writers llko Shakespeare
end Milton and Tennyson, who reveal hu
man nature in the light of duty and cour
age and hope, or the poets like Byron,
Beaudelalre, De Mussot, who flatter sensual
passions and darken spiritual fates. The
choice determines our destiny. Our intel
lectual nature Is llko the chameleon It
takes color from that on which It feeds.
Tell me what muslo you love, what dramas
are your favorites, what books you read
when you are alone, and I will tell you
which way you are moving, upward or
downward.
"Yes, my friends, this, division between the
things that are above and tho things that
are beneath runs through our whole life.
Even In religion there Is a higher and a
lower side, and upon our choice between
these twti sides depends tho Influence which
religion Is to have upon our destiny. There
Is a kind of religion so called which con
sists chiefly of abstract doctrines embodied
In a system, and outward ceremonies ar
ranged In a rituaL All Its stress Is laid on
the correct statement of these doctrines
end the punctual performance of these cere
monies. "Far be it from me to say that creeds are
useless. They are an essential to theology
as grammars nre to literature. Nor do I
dream that there can ever bo a church
without some forms of worship. They are
as needful as tactics are to an army. But
when we mistake these things for the real
ity of religion, when wo rest In them and
repose upon them as sufficient to Insure our
personal salvation, then wo forget to seek
the things that are above.
"Inevitably such a religion roust became a
sensuous, relflsh, sinking religion. Far
Wove It shines that blessed state of dnlly
?J?n ence, uP5n God and Intercourse with
nun, of real fellowship with Christ, and Hke--SH
r? hlm'. it constat" service and sacri
iiMrtSn ?ur. 'eI1jw;men a, which alone pure
5?I??.Bnd undented consists: That Is what
tv n?."J.fe.k' J.ust ecau it is above us.
iif?t JSnS.. 'P be Visaed with our poor
Xvi-?????' or our vain little heresies.
?v,vrlnu t?make PUDPea of ourselves In
n A? i2r5?d contAnt our soul3 w"h ho
smell of Incense or the singing of psalm-.
lit 5Srte?L.ifKltle down comfortably In
2?.? J. thi111 ?e arc to be aved aid
SfS SS & SSS aVstruKpwarl
ffif&rSi nowRtowaPnl Si
TTHE circulation statement of The Republic for the
month of May is subjoined. It is the best month's
record The Republic has ever shown and has never been
matched by any St Louis newspaper, or by any news
paper west of the Mississippi River.
Every month increases The Republic's lead in the
St. Louis circulation field. Its daily average for the
month of May, after deducting all unsold copies, con
siderably exceeded that of any other St. Louis news
paper, morning or evening. j
The bona-fide paid circulation of The Republic is
first in every particular. ,
First in Carrier Delivery to St. Louis Homes.
First in Totai St. Louis Circulation, Carrier and Newsboy.
First in Aggregate Circulation. Including City and Country.
a
Over
54,000
by...
St. Louis
Carriers.
HI
Nearly
Four Times
As Many
As Any
Other
Morning
Newspaper.
Less all
filed
MARK TWAIN'S BUSY
SUNDAY IN HANNIBAL.
attends Morning Services at Bap
tist Church and Makes Ten
Minute Address.
DRIVES IN THE AFTERNOON.
Accompanied by an Old School
mate, He Visits Familiar Scenes
of His Boyhood Retires to
His Hoom Worn Out.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL
Hannibal, Mo., June L When Mark
Twain retired to his room to-night he was
tired more tired, he admitted, than he has
neen in a lomr time, it wn n nimnimn.
day for Mark Twain, also for Samuel lJ
K...udS. iui me siriuai auinor-traveler
is living; a dual existence during his last
visit to his old home no one who Is fa
miliar with his doings, his comings and go
ings In Hannibal will question.
As Mark Twain, world-famous, world-beloved,
this gray-haired man of letters can
not escape paying the penalty of his suc
cess. He must be seen nnd greeted and
lauded and he must play his part as one of
the world-honored, even though he may bo
a bit tired of it all and very much inclined
to be Just plain Sam Clemens once more
for a few days.
In so far as his visit to Hannibal has
made him forget the years that have e!U
vcred his hair and have taken him back to
boyhood days, this visit has been to Mark
Twain one of the keenest pleasures he has
known. He says so himself.
To-night I saw him in his room at the
hotel. He had assumed his favorite reading
positlon-a reclining one In bed-and with
one 'of his big black cigars In his mouth
(tho world knows that Mark Twain is an
inveterate smoker) and a book in his hand
ho was, as he expressed It, "relaxing" for
a night's rest.
Mark Tirnln's "Sermon."
As Mark Twain, Mr. Clemens atiended
services at the Baptist Church this morn
ing. Needless to sar the rhumh -- .
ed. Most Hannibal people go to church I
eery. Sunday, but to-day all went. Some
THE MAY FIGURES
Charles W. Knapp, General Manager of The St Louis
Republic being duly sworn, says that the actual number of
full and complete copies' ot the dally and Sunday Republic
printed during the montti of May, 1S02 all In regular
editions, was as per schedule below:
Data. Copies.
1 111,990
2 112,590
3 114,940
4 Sunday 116,270
5 111,770
6 111.760
7 112,000
8 111,910
9 112,600
10 115,170
11 Sunday 118,310
12... 113,510
17 I Iwt 3UU
14 112,500
15 112,740
16 114,810
Total for the month .
Data,
17
18 Sunday
19
20
21
22
23
24
25 Sunday
26
27
28
29
30
31
.3,547,350
copies .polled in printing, left over or
Nut number distributed 3,479,240
Averge d.ily distribution 112,233
And said Charles W. Knapp further rays that the num
ber of copies returned and reported unsold during the
month of May was 6 83 per cent.
CHAS. W. KNAPP.
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 31st day of
May, 1502.
"J. F. FARISII.
Notary Public, City of Jt. Louis, Mo.
My term expires April 26, 1905.
5j,jj..,,,,,,,j,,,,,,.
papers said this morning that Mr. Clemens
would "preach." That was an error. Mr.
Clemens never preaches verbally, that is.
Sometimes when he takes up his facile pen
to write about "appetite cures" and such
things. Mr. Clemens preaches tiptop, com-mon-senso
sermons with ink but never
with spoken words.
At tho conclusion of the regular services
at the Baptist Church this morning, Mr.
Clemens or Mark Twain, It is hard to dif
ferentiate right here made a ten minutes'
address to the friends of earlier days and
their children and grand children. It was
one of those simple, earnest, touching talks
which tho humorist can make on occasions
as few men can make straightforward,
without flip or frill or pretense to embroider;-.
In cverj' w-ord that he uttered could be
guessed n, dozen, unexpressed. At times,
his voice showed the emotion ho felt. Ills
face, grave and kindly, spoke more than his
tongue. It was his leave taking of the old
home, the old folks and the thousand nnd
one dear memories of the past. He ex
pressed his thankfulness for the warmth of
the reception given him by the people of
his boj hood's home and his wish for tha
happiness and prosperity of them all.
ViSlTED "OLD TOWN" OF SCIPIO.
When he had finished, there were many
who came to grasp his hand once more
and, fearing they would be unable to bee
him to-morrow his last day in Hannibal
to bid him farewell. There was real pathos
In the scene. Not to Hannibal may be ap
plied that old proverb: "A prophet Is not
without honor, save In his own country."
This afternoon Mark Twain as Sam
Clemens drove over .Hannibal and for out
into the country, visiting many spots
eer green In his memory because of youth
ful associations. He was accompanied by
one bf his old schoolmates, John B. Brlggs.
ueveral times, Mark Twain no, Sam
CIemen-got out of the buggy and walked
again over a piece of turf or touched a
stalwart, defiant forest tree, or tosed a
stone into a brook, which he remembered
as landmarks of his boyhood.
With Mr. Brlggs, he paid a, brief visit to
the "Old Town" of Eclplo that was, but is J
uoi a town mat was founded, but never
materialized. Here Sam Clemens spent
many days when he was a boy.
HI Lost Dar In Ilunnlbnl.
The drive terminated late In the even
ing. After dinner, Mr. Clemens retired to
his room. His programme for to-morrow
Is a varied one. In tho morning he will
drive out to the suburban home of Colonel
and Mrs. Hatch, where he will dine. In the
evening he will attend a reception at the
Handsome home of Mr. and Mrs. John 3.
Crulkshank. Early Tuesday morning hs will
take his last farewell of Hannibal from the
window of a Pullman as he leaves the city
for Columbia, where tha degreo of LL. D.
Over
54,000
...by
St. Louis
Carriers.
Coplts.
114,i20
119,340
113.430
113,950
115.290
114,140
114,420
115,700
120,280
114,170
114,990
114.610
114,140
114,580
116.720
More Than
Double
Any Other
Morning
...or
Fvening
Newspaper
63.110
.LEADING TOPICS
IN
TO-DAY'S REPUBLIC
THE SUN RISES THIS MOnNING AT
4:37 AND SETS THIS EVENING AT 7:19
THE MOON RISES TO-MOnHOW
MOHNING AT 2:33.
"WEATHER IMJICATIOXS.
h'nr Mliunnrl Fair Minulm- ...!
Tocsdny, except nlioivcrs In north:
cooler TneKdny In northiveat.
For Illinois Shovrcrx Mnniln- anil
TaeMiIny, except In extreme 'sontli;
cooler .Monday n centrnl portion.
Tor Arknnsns r.-tlr Mnnilny and
Tuesday.
For En.tern Texas Fnlr Monday anil
Tuemlny.
For Western Texas Fair .Monday t
fnlr In sonth shovrer and cooler In
north.
1. Telephone Lineman Plunged to Death.
Missouri University Baccalaureate Day.
2. Police of Two Continents Look for Lost
Alem.
3. Worshipers Renew Baptismal Pledges.
Employes Honor W. M. Bell.
i. Editorial.
At the Summer Gardens.
Engaged in Bitterly Denouncing Them
selves. 0. War Claim of Methodist
Ho-jpe Settled.
Publlshlng-
6. Republic
"Want" Advertisements.
7. Republic
'Want'
Advertisements.
East Side News.
8. Race Entries.
Baseball.
Pugilistic Gossip.
9. Wheat Closes Flm. After Early De
cline.
Produce.
Cotton.
Live Stock.
10. Growth of St. Louis Attracts Attention.
Catholic Knights In Parade and Picnic.
Charity Carnival to Begin To-NlghL
Crucial Period Politically.
will be conferred upon him by the Uni
versity of Missouri.
Killed by Accidental Discharge.
.REPUBLIC SPEC1A L
Vlnita. I. T., June L Burrel Trenary was
instantly killed by the accidental dlreharce
of a gun to-day. The right arm of the un
fortunate man was torn completely off.
iOERS ACCEPT BRITISH
Lord Kitchener Cables English War Department That All of the Boer
Representatives Signed the Treaty of Peace News First Broken
to King Edward and His Cabinet ani Then Announced to the
People, WI10 Celebrated the End of War Deliriously.
"W '
sfr Haumm- X
y $ HAftriSWrM ) i
(1, a ' 11 1 1 1 u
kCp S.-. $
"V. vurcwc-D, r ticMSt i . - -
&EVEI7AL UZVET
? SJ
Tlif :ieeoinianying Illustration shows tlie districts In South Africa 'which have been convnNcd by one of
the most remarkable end picturesque wars In the world's history. Lords Mlluer nnd Kitchener and
Generals Re Larey and De Wet figured prominently In the pence negotiations.
London, June 1. Peace has been declared
after netrly two years and eight months
of war, which tried the British Empire to
Its uttermon and wiped the Boers from
the lin of nations.
Tho war has come to and with Lard
Kitchener's innouncpment from Preetcria
that he. Lord MUner and Boer delejates had
signed terms of surrender.
This announcement had beet anticipated
for several days, and It was definitely fore
casted in these dispatches, but its receipt
Sunday afternoon took the nation by sur
prise, as everyboly had confidently blievM
tint tho Houe of Commons would hear the
first now p to- !a:
KIN! EIJWARIJ ISSVES
.MESSAGC TO HIS PEOPLE.
The rdKo of the anticipation w.th which
Great Erllnln awaited the promised state
ment In the House of Common" from Mr.
Balfour, the Government leads-, ws still
further dull'd by the follow lrg mcs'aic
from King Edward to hli people, wlch cai
Issued after m'dnlsht:
"The King has received the welcome news
of the cessation of hostilities In South Afri
ca with Infinite satIfactlon and his Majes
ty's truet that peace may speedily bo fol
lowed by the retoratlon of prjspriy In
his new dominions, and that the feeling
necessarily engendered by war will give
place to earnest co-operation on the part of
his Majesty's South African subjects in
promoting the welfare of their common
country.
KIXG W.iMni) PEACE
nEFonE coHo.t.vrin.v.
How greatly King Edward's insistence
that peace In South Africa be secured prior
to hl coronation Influenced the present
agreement will probably not be known un
til the private memoirs of the present
regime are given to thepubllc.
The news which Great Britain was so
anxiously awaiting came, characteristically,
on on entirely pac'flc and uninteresting Sun
day afternoon, when London presents a de
serted appearance. Very late Saturday
nlght a dispatch was received from Lord
Kitchener in which he said the Boer dele
gate' were coming to Pretolrla; that thjy
had accepted Great Britain's terms, and
that they were prepared to sign terms of
surrender.
At about 1 o'clock yesterday afternoon
the War Office received the following dis
patch from Lord Kitchener, dated Pretoria,
Saturday, May 31, 11:13 p. m.
a uocumEni concerning terms or Mirren-
der was signed here this evening at halt-
past 10 o'clock by all the Boer representa- I
tlves. as well as by Lord Milner and my- I
Eet. ,
ijio ciem on uuiy at me War Office
transmitted thft message to Buckingham
Palace, where King Edward was lunching.
GOVEnXSIEXT GIAKDED
xews or suirtExnErt.
Mr. Broderick, the War Secretary, person-
.,.. , ,. ...- . .. 1
any cuuiuiunii-atcu uus message to King
Edward, who was at Buckingham Palace,
ti. , .. .., 1
NGLISH JOY OVER
Bl
? IflRn KITHHFNFR
LORD KITCHENER
ANNOUNCES PEACE.
London. June 1. An official cable
gram from Lord Kitchener, dated
Pretoria. Saturday. May 31. 11:13 p.
m.. sajs:
"A document containing term" of
surrendir was signed here this even
ing at half past 10 o'clock by all the
Eor representatives, as well as by
L-rd Mllncr. the British High com
missioner in South Africa, and my
self."
35
.$$
1 But the Government declined to tnke any
chances. nnd nothing concerning the receipt
of this mesng was allowed to leak out.
PIHMCATIOX OF XEWS
Fivu.iiv rnniiiTTEn.
At about 0 o'clock word was received per-
mlttinn the publication ot this message. 1
Hnd the mall notice which was stuck up
outside the War Ofllce consisted of a ccpy
of Lord Kitchener's cablegram. A elmllir 1
notice was put cutslde of the Colonial Of- j
lice.
Beond thee two skimpy Ut of p p'r !
London knew nothing of the great event.
In the clubs, the hotels and the rewjpj-
i per offices, which were almost de'e-ted. th
momentous news was ticke cut en lh
tap. Then, like wilCflre. at about 6 o'clock.
London awakened to the fact that th
South African war was over.
SPECIAL BY CAtlLE TO THE NEW TOUK
HfaKALD AND ST LOUIS ItEl'UnLlf
London. June 1. (Copyright. IDS.) Var
Is over and all London Is In the street to
night shouting "Peace!" and slnjlng 'God
I Save the King."
The news of peace In South Africa con
tained In the dispatch from I-ord Kitch
ener was not expected In London to
day. Soon after the receipt of the dispatch,
however, the news spread to the cIuds and
hotels, and was received with much enthu
siasm. The church bells were rung to ac
claim the good news. A crowd gathered at
the Mansion House and the Lord Major of
London, Sir Joseph C. Dlmsdale, announced
from the balcony that terms of siurrealer
had tefn signed in South Africa.
M:V.1 COM.1ICXICATED
TO KIXG EDWAJtD.
Lord Kitchener's definite announcement
of peace was received at the War Ofllce"
at 1 o'clock In the afternoon and was com-
municated to King Edward and all the
members of the Cabinet before It was
given to the public.
To-night the Sunday evening calm or
Tyjnilnn streets was broken bv pnthunlnsfl..
---
singing, shouting and horn blowing.. The
hoiels. the clubs, the public houses and the
streets were not the only places where the.
people were actively demonstrating theic
Joy. The peace news was announced In the
churches to-day, an;l by some congrega-
tlons It
an tho
was received with applause. In
churches of London prayers cf
TERMS;
WAR'S END:
&EHERAI Z?ELAl?Y
thanksgiving were offered and
offered and rp;cUl
"
mns were sung.
Lord Kitchener's dispatch was given at
the War Office shortly before 5 o'clock in
the afternoon, and was rapidly flashed all
over the Kingdom.
EATIHK .WTIOXJ'I.rXGED
i.mo Avn.n cni.EiinvHox.
The effect was marvelous. The feeling ot
rurene. even of doubt, suddenly gava
place to. a great wave of Joy. and the en
tire nation plunged Into a wild cclebratlo.
The scenes in London to-nlaht surpass
I even the wild enthusiasm of Mafeklng OS
the night of universal rejoicing after the
re!,e ot Ladysmi h. At night the streets
were Jammed with shouting and singing
men. women ard children. Almost every
other peron was waving a small union
Jack at the end of a cane or umbrella.
TIIOfSMS OF FLAGS
AI'I'R'.IIED OX STI1EET,
It is remarkable where these flags cams
from. Before 5 o'clock not one was to bo
seen- In half an hour's time thousands were
waving In the hands ot trie King's subjects.
It being Sunday there were, of course, not
so many opportunities for celebrating thes.
Joyful news. It was first known In the
Wc3t End. shortly before 5 o'clock. J fcap
pcrtd to be nt Mrs. Ronald's in Cadegaa
place, when. In the midst of some delight'
ful music, the hof-teis suddenly rose and
announced the news. It was brouEht, I
heard, by Lady Lister Kaye. "
smn. .NonnicA saxg
"GOD SAVE THE KIXG."
AH arore to their feet. Mme. Vordic.
who happened to be present, was led to the
piano and, amidt very great excitement,
sang a vrse of " God Save the King."
I have never seen people so genuinely
pleased. There seemed to be a sort of gen
eral handshaking. When I left the house
It was quite evident that the people In tha
streets were aware of the good news. There
was a general sense of happiness In the sir.
The usual storm, of rain that comes at
about 3 o'clock every afternoon did Its best
to darrpen the ardor and enthusiasm of the
people, but failed ignomlnlously. On every
corner knots of people stood eagerly dls
cusrlng the Joyful tidings. In the hotels
there was an air of excitement In marked
contrast to the usual placidity of a London
Sunday.
SHOLTED THEIR GLEE
THROUGH THE STREETS.
With the approach of evening the streets
became more and more congested. Every
'bus had a top load of shouting people, who
were cheered vociferously by those on foot.
Thousands and thousands of little flags
were waved by surging crowds, while from
the hotels and office buildings large flats
were flung- to the wind.
When darkness fell many gas and elec
tric light Illuminations.' which were In
place for the coronation days, flashed out
In beautiful designs. .
I
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