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The St. Louis Republic. [volume] (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, November 05, 1903, Image 5

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020274/1903-11-05/ed-1/seq-5/

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THE BEPUBLIC: THTJESD'ST. JJOVEMBEB 5. 1003.
g
K
L
a
eat, mm
AND BE MERRY
Cures Dyspepsia, Indiges
tion, Catarrh, Nervous
ness and Sleeplessness.
Hake old folks feel young.
And young folks feel strong.
' Repairs the stomach.
Feeds the nerves.
Vitalizes the blood.
It makes you eat heartily.
It digests all you do cat.
It puts color Into pale checks.
And makes one glad to live.
You can't have the blues.
You can't have indigestion.
You can't have Sleepless nights.
You can't be a failure.
If you take Paw Paw.
Druggists will tell you they never
bandied an article that sold so rapidly
and made such remarkable cures.
Price $1.00 large bottles.
Paw Paw Pills 25c a bottle.
At all Druggists.
NEW YORK WILL
BUILD GREAT CANAL
Proposition Authorizing Expen
diture of 101,000,000 Was
Adopted at Tuesday's
Election.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL '
AlbJanv. N. Y., Nov. 4. The adoption or
the proposition authorizing the expendi
ture of $101,000,000 in tho construction of
a 1.000-ton bargo canal has caused the
Ftate officers charged to carry out this en
terprise to begin the preparation of plans
for the preliminary work.
The Initiative Is to be taten by the com
missioners of the canal fund, who are
Lieutenant Governor Hlgglns, State Treas
urer WIckzer, Attorney General Cunnecn,
Comptroller Miller and' Secretary of State
O'Brien.
They are vested with authority lo super-
vise the issue of $10,000,000 bonds, which are
to be sold to cover the cost of surveys,
plans and other work .that may be neces
sary during the first two years. i
Tho plans are to be prepared by the
State Engineer and approved by a com
mission of five, to be appointed by the
Governor.
The Improvement cannot be begun until
this board has approved of the speclfica
tlons. The plans. It Is understood, contemplate
carrying on the work during the winter
as well as summer.
If tho work Is under way next year the
rearon of navigation on tho present Erie
Canal will be considerably shorter than
usual, as it la proposed to open the water
way one month earlier and close it three
weeks earlier than is customary, so as to
facilitate the work.
Dividing the work Into sections, as is
being done in the construction of the rapid
transit tunnel In New York. Is contem
plated. There Is no need of further legis
lation. The improvement act approved by
the people fully covers all matters and
gives full authorization to carry on the
work.
Mnthnm'a Plurality SC.',O30.
Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 5. Complete re
turns from all but eleven counties of the
State Indicate a plurality for William L.
MaHiocs-. Republican candidate for State
Treasurer, approximating 33,000.
A FRIEND'S ADVICE.
,' ,VI11 Often Help Yon Greatly. Read
What a St. Louis Citizen Sbjk.
You may hesitate to listen to the advice
of strangers, but the testimony of friends
or residents of St. Louis Is worth your
jnost careful attention. It is an easy mat
ter to investigate such proof as this. The
evidence must be conclusive. Head the
following:
Mr. Charles Kauffman, box-nailer at F.
C Kiddle & Bros. Casket Co., living at
4238 Easton avenue, says: "For some un
known cause an attack of backache and
urinary weakness annoyed me for four or
five months. At first It was not very se
vere, but after .x while It bothered me con
tinually, not only during the day, but at
night. A friend, knowing my condiUon,
procured a box of Doan's Kidney Pills at
Wolff-Wilson's, corner Sixth street and
Washington avenue. The treatment
cured."
For sale by all dealers. Price 50 cents.
Foster-Mllburn Co., Buffalo, N. Y.. sole
agents for the United States.
Remember the name Doan's and take
HO substitute.
UNION PACIFIC
Shortest Line to
OREGON
iand
WASHINGTON
September 15 to November
"3a Colonist rates to all
points in these states, from
St. Louis $30.00
Trains handsomely equipped.
Tourist sleeping cars a
specialty. Fast tunc smooth
roadbed.
103 OLIVE ST., ST. LOUIS.
J. H. L0THR0P, General Agent.
BBBl 1 f i- . .
TAMMANY'S VICTORY
AMAZES NEW YORK,
Wigwam Restored to Goroplcte
Sovereignty by Tremendous
Overturn of Votes.
CONTROL EVERY DEPARTMENT
To Astonishment of Every One
Grout and Fouies Kan Ahead
of McClellan and Balance of
Ticket Brooklyn's Slump
From Low. -
REPUBLIC SPKCIAL.
New York. Nov. !. The Tammany tidal
wave that overwhelmed the fusion ticket
ami lifted the tiger buck into power, gave
victory to Charles F. Murphy's candidates
in all borough?, save little Richmond. It
was a crushing defeat for the fusionisls
and, as the details are examined, the re
sults are appalling to all who fought on
tho antl-T.immany side
The hea y losses -suffered by tho allied
forces seem almost to defy explanation.
Attempts at analysis and conclusions lead
only to confusion. The number of votes
that Tammany's mavoralty candidate.
George B. McCiellan, received over Mayor
Scth Low. in the entire city Is 63.015 by
the corrected returns.
The size or this figure can best be un
derstood when it is remembered that
Lo.v's plurality over Shepard two je.irs
ago was Jl.'JS-j. In other words. Tammany
has been swept back Into power by twice
the plurality that turned it out atler It
had given the city the most notoriously
bad administration in the hlstcry of New
York.
One of tho altogether unexpected re
sults is that Edward M. Grout Is re
elected Comptroller by a figure exceeding
that given McCIcllan by 3.1b.').
It was confidently predicted during the
campaign that Grout would be cut right,
and leu by Democrats. The same pre
diction wa3 made regarding Charles V.
Fornc, Tammany's candidate for re-election
as President of tho Board of Alder
men. Both Grout and Fornes ran ahead
of their ticket, their vole being heavy all
along'the line.
The full and complete returns show that
the Tammany wave hit Brooklyn even
harder than Manhattan. It was conceded
In the campaign that McClellan would
carry Manhattan by a. comfortable figure,
and he ran up oo.!j29 over Low. It was
also estimated that Low would carry
Ercoklvn, his old-time stronghold, th.it
save him 23,767 plurality before, by a vote
easily . sufficient to discount Tammany's
work on this side of the bridge.
But Low has lost Brooklyn to McClel
lan In an adverse plurality of 1.S0S. In
fact. It was the returns from Brooklyn
that early sent dismay to the hearts of
the Fusionlsts and compelled them to
surrender.
Tho toasted great work of Hugh Mc
Laughlin against Murphy's scheme to
Tnmmanylze Brooklvn does not show up
In tho eountv. The promised Democratic
fierce slaughter in Kings County turned
out to be a Sunday-school picnic with the
Tiger the best bov In the class.
Oticcns Ttninuirh. that was conceded to
Tammany by all who had the least knowl
edge about conditions, gave McCIcllan
5.1SS over Low,
The one bright spot for Fusion in the
entire city is Staten Island, where Rich
mond Borough gave Low 218 over Mc
CIcllan and re-elected Cromwell (Rep. and
F.I, President of the Borough.
But Low. in the election two years ago,
carried Richmond by 513 more than In
this election.
TAMMANY CONTROLS EVERYTHING.
In the, new Board of Estimates and Ap
portionment, regarded as the most im
portant bedy In the city government, there
win be but one anU-Tammany.vote to fif
teen' of Tammany. In" the new Board of
Aldermen, Tammany will have everything
Its own way, having elected fifty-two
Democrats to fifty-one of Fusion.
Notable results In the aldermanlc con
tests are the election of General Daniel 11
Sickles, "Fuslonist, in the Fifth, and tho
defeat of Professor Fulton Cutting of
the Citizens' Union In the Murphy gas
houso dNtrict.
The Republicans elected eight Assembly
men In New York County, making a gain
of two members. Assembly gams were
not confined to New York County alone.
Tho total gain In the State over last year
13 sixteen, mailing the Republican ma
jority fortv-four in n body of 150 members.
The Tammany leaders have already be
run dividing the good places among them
selves. Those who went to Tammany Hall
to-day -vcrc talking about the following
slate under McClellan:
Commissioner of Immigration George
Best.
Tenement House Commissioner Mat-.
thew- F. Dcnohue.
Dock Commissioner J. Sergeant Cram.
Citv Chambei lain Patrick Keenan.
Corporation Counsel John J. Delaney.
Legal udws;r to the Mayor, Thomas C.
O'Sulllvan.
Tax Commissioners, Thomas Murphy,
Thomas L. Feltncr and Ferdinand Levy.
President of the Civil-Service Commis
sion. Charles H. Knox.
Commissioner of Water Supply, Wil
liam Dalton.
Commissioner of Accounts, William Hep
burn Russell.
Commissioner of Charities, Julius Har
burgcr.
Commissioner of Bridges, Frank J.
Goodwin.
PADUCAH DEMOCRATIC.
REPI'IIUC SPECIAL.
Paducah, Ky.. Nov. 4. The counting of
tho city precincts was not finished until 7
o'clock this morning. All precincts In the
county and city give Beckham 2.767. Bel
knap 2.117. Paducah went for Beckham by
a small majority. All Democrats on the
city ticket were elected, but M. W. John-s-on,
who was defeated by 42 votes for
City Treasurer by John Dorian (Rep.).
His defeat was the result of J. Honey
Smith (Dem.) running on the Independent
ticket. The constitutional amendment
locs in the county and city.
The Democrats celebrated to-night with
fireworks, torchlight parade and speeches.
MARRIED AT NASHVILLE.
Stanley Dodd Pearce Weds Miss
Odelien -McCarthy.
REPUPL1C SPECIAL.
Nashville. Tenn., Nov. 4. The wedding
of Miss Odelien McCarthy and Stanley
Dodd Pearce of St. Louis was a largo and
fashionably attended affair to-night In
West End Methodist Church. The bride
groom's father. Doctor Eugene S. Pearce
of Danville. Kj, officiated, -assisted by the
pastor of the church.
The bride was given away by her fa
ther, B. J. McCarthy, and her maid of
honor was her sister, Xliss Nell McCarthy.
Other attendants were: Misses Allene
Pearce of Danville. Ky.: Frances Pilcher,
Kate Ransom and Eunice Flte; Messrs.
ucorgc rrazier. 1 nomas 1'. lJUQIey of St.
Louis. Z. N. Estes. Jr., of Memphis;
Charles Caldwell of Danville, Ky., and
four ushers from Nashville.
The groom's brother served as best man.
Mr. 'and Mrs, J. H. Christopher of St.
Louis were present. After a reception the
trlde and groom left for an Eastern wed
cins trip.
The brldcgrcom la's, member of tho legal
firm of Booghcr, Pearce & Davis.
We want all
sickly men and
women to know
that goad
health will re-
tnrnif they will
only try the
Bitters. Hun
cireds have
found this true.
It always cores
InilttJfloii,
Constipation,
BMoHl.ieu,
Dypwii, er
Malaria, Fevtr
and Ague.
Try-it to-day;
felfiifeS
i CELEBRATED W
HAPPEHINGS IN EAST
PRIEST EVICTED '
f A CONSTABLE,
Father Maszotas's Goods Re
moved From Parochial llome
and Piled in Street.
RESULT OF BISHOP'S SUIT.
Silenced Clergyman at First Re
fused to Surrender Keys -and
Officer Threatened to
Use Force.
Father Jofcrh Maszotas. the suspended
rector of the Lithuanian Catholic Church
of East St. Louis, his sister-in-law. Mrs.
Pauline Maszotas. together with his
household effects and other personal prop
erty, were evicted fiom the parochial resi
lience In the rear of the church yestcrday
afternoon by Constable Ben Lautz of
Belleville.
This action resulted from a peremptory
writ of mandamus, returning the case of
the Bishop of Belleville vs. the Reverend
Joseph Maszotas to the docket of Justice
of the Peace Wangclin. The order was
made by Circuit Judge B. R. Burroughs on
belrilf of Bishop Jar.ssen, who was rcp'.e
sented by Judge James Rafter of East St.
Loiil.
It was made on the ground that the ap
peal iRind filed by the priest and his law
ers was not In confromity with the order
of Justice of the Peace Wangelln, from
whom appeal to the Circuit Court was
taken when the eviction case was decided
against tho priest.
The application for a peremptory writ
of mandamus came as a snirpri.se. Judge
Rafter stated in his application that the
bond for appeal had only been perfected
to the extent of $50, while Justice Wange
lln had Insisted on $3X bond in the case.
Constable Lauts hun led to East St.
Louis and secured two husky Tolnndcrs,
whom he induced to accompany him to
Father Maszotas' s residence.
GOODS PILED IN STREET.
The priest was at dinner, and Constable
Lautz permitted him to finish his meal.
Ho then directed his assistants in tli3
work of removing the priest's belongings
from the church and tho parochial resi
dence. The stuff was p.lcn on the side
walk In tiont of the church, und a big
crowd gathered around tnu place during
the atternoon.
After the personal property had all been
removed the Constable toid the priest
that he, too, :nut go and that he must
give to him tho kes.
Father Maszotas at first declined, but
he was informed that lorcc would be
used If necessary by the Constable, and
the priest agreed to depart. Mrs. -Maszotas
accompanied Mm.
Constable Lautz fastened all of the win
dow? In the church and the parochial resi
dence and, after locking; all of the door,
turned the keys' over to Vicar General
Cluse, rector of St. Henry Parish.
Fatner Maszotas received offers of shel
ter from members of his congregation, but
he refused the?,e offers, saying "that he
would remain with his personal property.
Mrs. Maszotas was taken In by a neigh
bor for the night.
The trouble between Father Maszotas
and Bishop Janssen of Belleville, has been
op for several months. On tho first of
last June Father Maszotas was suspended,
but ho refused to obey the order of the
Bishop, and then the Bishop silenced him.
He also ordered him to vacate the prem
ises ho occupied as rector of 'the Lithuan
ian Church.
Father Maszota3 blankly refused and
appealed the case to Washington. There
a decision in favor of the Bishop was re
turned, and the priest then appealed to
Rome. It Is said that no decision has as
yet been' received on this care.
Efforts had bc:n made by Bishop Jans
sen to Induce the nriest to 6tev his order
to vacate the premises. Finally the Blsh-
op, through
vica
General Cluse, threat
ened to Institute proceedings at law If
Father Maszotas did not vacate. Father
Maszotas Is said to have promised that ho
would, but each time he is also said to
have changed his mind and to have made
the assertion that he was an Irremovable
priest.
Proceedings were finally bosun before
Justice of the Peace Wangelln of Belle
ville. This suit, in the ordinary course of
events, would come up at the January
term of court.
Neither Father Maszotas nor his 'attor
neys was prepared to say yesterday aft
ernoon what course they would pursue in
the case. Father Maszotas refused to talk
at all on the case, saying that he would
leave the entire matter in the hands of
his lawyers.
MARRIED AT VENICE CHURCH.
Minn Elcnora Gravrc Weils Joseph n.
Turner nt St. Mark' Church.
Miss Elenora Grawe of Venice and J. B.
Turner of Brighton, III., were married yes
terday morning at Venice. Tho ceremony
was performed at St. Mark's Church by
tho Reverend Father Kcandcra. After the
f ' tl !
MRS. J. B. TURNER.
"Who was Miss Elenora 'Grawes.
wedding a reception was given at tho
homo of Mrs. Peter Stclb, the bride's sis
ter. Miss Myrtle Grawe assisted the bride,
while William Turner, the bridegroom's
brother, acted at best man. The bride
wore a gown of white French lawn
trimmed In chiffon.
The couple are well known In Venice,
where Mr. Turner has been connected with
the Big Four Railroad for several years.
SAY GIRL WAS TAKEN FROM HOME.
Charge Placed Aealnut Edvrnrd Clay
ton of En st St. Louis.
Edward Clayton. 21 years old. of Six
teenth street and Broadway, East St.
Louis, was arrcstcdYesterday morning on
a charge of enticing "Miss Clementine
Powers, 17 years old, from her home. No.
1107 Cahokia rtoad. Both tho young man
and thc-sdrl deny that he enticed her from
her home. The warrant was sworn out by
'Edward Powers, the stepfather of the
girl. He was released on J30O. bond and
will bo tried Saturday before Justice Wyr
att at Ccntcrvllle Station.
Clayton and the girl have been keeping
company for some time and have been
attending dances 'and other social events.
'''--r-'-B HS-s IH -?
-Jf .HPt T BBB V
A ' " TbBST Wri&'t'l4
BBBBBBnlHBa&WD
SIDE CITIES AND TOWNS
Last Saturday night they nttended a.
dance. Powers quarreled with Clayton
about It. He ciuscd tho lattcr's arrest
and Is now out on a. ?W bond furnished
before Justice of the Peace James M.
Beach.
HOIIHERS ASSAULT JOIIX KAGICT.
Victim f Crushed Mitill Robbed of
Clothing and Money.
John Kagict. employed by the Armour
Packing Company. East St. Louis, was as
saulted and lobbed by two negroes at
First and Exchange streets shortly before
last midnight, who almost stripped him as
ho lay unconscious.
They took his shoes, socks and coat. In
addition to a pay check drawn on the Ar
mour Packing Company for J12.CU. They
also took n gold finger ring from hl fin
ger and 10 cents hi change from his pock
ets. Kagict was taken to St. Mary's Hos
pital, East St. Louis, where It was found
that his skull was fractured and that ho
had a concussion of the brain. The in
strument used In the assault, the police
say, was a railroad spike.
:.i;x F. may
IS .MINIMI.
Cousin
Reports to Police
That 5."
DlMiipciircl.
Glenn r. May, proprietor of the May
dry goods store, on Missouri avenue. East
fit. Louis, yesteiday complained to the
East St. Louis police that his cousin,
Fr.tnk May, whom ho had employed, was
misciiig since neon and that J573 which ho
had been sent to the bank to deposit was
also missing.
Young May Is married and lives at No.
1GI0 St. Louis avenue. East St. Louis.
Conductori Robbed Iiy r.CKroes.
The East St. Louis police were notified
yesterday that George White and Edward
Brown, East St. Louis street car conduc
tors, were held up late Tuesday night near
the ear barn at the Belt Railroad. They
were relieved of a few dollars In silver.
Negroes committed the robbery.
Xmv I.IIitn on the Street.
The Citizens' Electric Light and Pow.-r
Company Is puttlrg down new poles
throughout the city and is getting ready
generally for the Installation of the new
electric street lighting service, which will
be Installed on December 1. The new
lamps are of a different sort than those
now In use. Better service Is promised to
both business and residence customcis.
AIIokciI Housebreaker Arrested.
Trenton D. Davis wanted at Webb City.
Mo., on a charge of housebreaking, was
arrested In East St. Louis late Tuesday
night by Detectives Ncvills and GUI.
When his room was searched a large
quantity of all sorts of alleged stoden
plunder was round. The St. Louis Police
Department, who want Davis, was noti
fied, and took him across the river yester
day afternoon. NovIHs and Gill were com
plimented on their capture.
Accident Ilelayn Bridge Traffic.
An empty box car, which jumped the
track at the tower at tho cast approach to
the Eads bridge. Eist St. Louis, delayed
traffic on that structure for several hours
yesteiday morning. The damage only
amounted to a few hundred dollais.
Iiuat St. I.onis Items.
Mrs. W. P. Story la visiting In Kansas.
Vv. .. Hodenberg will depart to-day for
Washington, D. C.
Mrs. 1". C. Smith will entertain tho Ladles'
Literary Circle this afternoon.
Mrs. Hard Mcrker has returned to her
home In ltellevlllo after a pleasant vls't la
Uast St. 2.ouls.
Doctor It. X. McCracken Is visiting In MIs-
30U1 1.
Judge J. 13.
Springnsld. 111.
Mcsslck has returned from
The ConconUa IJcderkranz will she their
annual hall. Noxcmber 16.
The first cf the scrK-s of six entertainments
to hn KUen i,y the Hlch School Literary So
t lety. will take plare to-morrow night in
the HiRh School auditorium.
AimCSTS IX LYACIIIXG CASE.
Snlil Tliut St-vcrnl More Indictments
Will Follow.
Wayne Dlller. a beer bottler, was arrest
ed yesterday by Deputy Sheriff Klamm of
Belleville on n charge of being Implicated
In the lynching of the negro Wyatt, Mil
ler's arrest makes the eleventh In the
lynching case. Ho was released on bond
soon after his arrest. Ho declared that he
knew nothing about the lynching other
than that he was a spectator. It is said
that there are still several Indictments
which have not yet been served.
It is believed by court officials at Belle
ville that the lynching cases i will not be
tried nt this term of court, but will be
continued by general consent to the Jan
uary term of court. There has been some
talk among the attorneys of making a test
case In ono cf the Indictments, but It Is
not thought probable that this will be
done, but. that all of the men will be tried
singly.
East Side- ncnlty Trnnufcm.
Real estate transfers tiled for record In Delle.
Mho ealerday were:
Israel U. Saper to George W. T. RenoId.
southwest 45 feet and S Inches, lot 23. block C7,
East St. l)uis; warranty deed. I3.3.
Henry Schuerman to H. D. Sexton, trustee,
aslRn of mortgage; J750.
H. D. Sexton, trustee, to w. R. Woolfolk.
lot 3. Mock 6, National place: r. d., S4C0.
P. W. ALt to E. J. Abt. lot 4. block 23. W.
Park: r. d.. fl.330.
Henry Itessel to It. X. McCracken and Chss.
Vckon. lots JC. 17 and IS. block 2. Claremont
addition: warranty deed. J2.0CO.
Mary A. Ilowman to r.dvr. Dala. lot 401.
block ;:, Illinois City: r. d., J1.000.
.1. C. McQullUn to .1. M. Chamberlain. Jr..
southwest 3o feet, lot 14, Columbia place: war
ranty deed. $T20.
Henry T. Jtenchaw to Miry Smith. lot 16.
block 4, Gertrude place: r. d.. $C00.
C n. Chambrlln to J. K. Sanders, lot 16.
block 4. Gertrude place: warranty deed. J1.0O0.
H. I). Hexton. truBtee. to J. I. Ocdney. lot 2
block 4. Lincoln plar annex: r. d.. J1.0CA
J. I. c;edney to 'inomas :. Housh. lot 3.
block 4. Lincoln place annex; warranty deed.
12.000.
Robert P. Mungcr to Annie. D. Gedney. lot. 23,
Columbia plpce: warranty deed, $1,300.
Llnle K. Jones to Robert P. Munger, lot 23,
Columbia place: r. d.. $975.
P. W. Abt to II. A. Marmadiike et at.. lot 28.
block 5. Gertrude place: warranty deed. J223. .
V. I McCasland to Donald C. Summers. Iota
1 to 11. block 1; Iota 1 to 11, block 2: all of
block 3; lots l to 13. block 4. and lots 1 to 6.
block 5. Security Park EubdlIslon; warranty
ueeu, tio.vw.
Belleville Xcvrit ZVotca.
Miss Margaret Patterson entertained the
Halcyon Club esterday afternoon.
The funeral of Mrs. A. A. Ifelnemann will
take place this afternoon to Walnut Hill Ceme
tery. Thomas Fox was sentenced to nlnetv days
In the county jail on a charge of robbery.
Otto Hartman Is seriously 111.
The St. Paul's Lidles- I.lterarv Society wll.
glc a euchre to-morrow afternoon.
Judge John D. Hay is conalescent from a
sccrc Illness.
REPUBLICAN JUDGE ELECTED.
Nebraska Democrats Concede De
feat of Their Candidates.
Omaha. Nov. 4. Judge Barnes (Rep.) Is
elected Supreme Judge over 'Judge Sulli
van, the present Incumbent, by a. plural
ity that may reach 8,000. The rest of the
Republican State ticket Is elected by 10,000,
Barnes running considerably behind the
other candidates. These figures are con
ceded by the Democrats.
In Douglass County the Democrats elect
a County Clerk and probably one other
candidate on their ticket, and the Repub
licans secure the election of the remain
der of the candidates.
DECIDED DEMOCRATIC GAINS.
Probably Will Have Thirty Mem
bers of Next Iowa Legislature.
Dcs Moines, la., Nov. 4. Returns keep
coming In very slowly, but from the com
plete and Incomplete ones at hand Gov
ernor Cummlns's plurality will be reduced
from 83,000 two years ago to 53,000.
The Democrats have made decided gains
In the legislative districts, and for the
first time In many years the number of
Democrats In the Legislature will bo over
twenty, and possibly thirty.
The vote throughout the State was ex
ceedingly light, particularly in the citle3.
"Rejected o
"loo Haw Less Til
"Silo Oisro Brouuhl H83lfl) & LifB 3o
To all appearance Mr. C. W. Hopkins
wan enjoying perfect health-when he c-anie
up for life Insurance examination. A
prominent figure in the tobacco industry
of the country, general Western agent of
large manufacturers, Mr. Hopkins is per
haps the best-known tobacco man in the
West. He applied for a policy of $10.tCO
in the Mutual Life Insurance Company of
New York, confident that it would bo
Issued to him.
He first learned that ho had kidney
trouble when the agent of the company
wroto him that he wao rejected on ac
count of Brlght's distase. It came like a
thunderclap out nt a clear .ky. "I,
Brlght's disease!" he said; "why.
I neicr even dreamed f luid kidney
trouble. There were no n!cm of It
and yet here I nm In the very Ttorst
HttiXi: It Ii:ih niisi'ily crept on, eiutu
rntliiK my lvliole syxtrm with its
deadly poison, irholly llliftiioiTn lo
ire."
Though Mr. Hopkins sought relief In
stantly, consulting the best medical au
thorities, he grew rapidly worse anil was
finally given up to die. A friend suggested
that he take Warner's Safe Cure and
nothing else.
After using It thiough several months
Mr. Hopkins was restored to perfect
health and secured a policy of JW.OIO ill
the Mutual Life Insurance Company,
which had previously rejected him.
IN HIS LETTER HE SAYS:
"In lbS4 I was refused a policy In the
Mutual Life Insurance Company of New
York, on account of kidney trouble, which
soon :'fter became so severe that I was
compelled to take to my bed. I employed
the best doctors, who diagnosed my
trouble as a case of Brlght's disease and
pronounced It Incurable, giving me but
one year to live. My sufferings were ter
rible and reduced me almost to a skeleton.
After spending over J1.SQ0 In vain at
tempts to find relief I was urged to try
Warners sate cure, incredulous, but on
the principle that drowning men dutch at
straws. I did to. and was surprised and
rejoiced to find that It was working a rad
ical cure, which hap long since been effect
ed. SAFE CURE brought health and life
Insurance to me. To-day I carry a policy
in the Mutual Life Insurance Company
and consider mvself as healthy a man as
Is to be found In the particularly healthy
country." C. W. HOPKINS. General
Western Agent S. F. Hess & Co., 405 Bat
tery Stieet. San Francisco.
Thousands of men and women have kid
ney disease and never know It until the
danger point has been reached. They go
on dying by Inches until the sudden eol-
DEMOCRATS SEE
Party Workers Jubilant Ovni' Re
sults of Tuesday's Elec
" tion.
"The result In tho New York City elec
tion puts It up to Mr. Roosevelt. He will
have to make a desperate fight, and every
Indication points .to the Republicans losing
tho President's own State."
This sentiment, expressed by Sam E.
Cook. Secretary of State, who was In St.
Louis yesterday. Is generally seconded by
St. Louis Democrats. As one Democrat
expressed It, the majority of tho Demo
cratic ticket In New York was an eye
opener that Democracy all over the
United States can profit by.
"New York will be the pivotal State In
the next election," continued Mr. Cook,
"and the Republicans. In my opinion, will
have to chloroform Mr. Murphy, the new
leader of Tammany, If they hopo to cap
ture tho electoral vote of the Empire
State."
"The result of Tuesday's election," said
Harry B. Hancs, "will Inspire new confi
dence and greater vigor In the Democratic
parts-. All Democracy needs to succeed Is
to haw a leadership less timid and moro
aggressive."
"Tom L. Anderson. City Attorney, said:
it is only a taste oi wnat we are go
ing to do to them in the next national
election, and especially In the State of
Missouri. Maryland evidently believes In
Anglo-Saxon supremacy, ns nil right
thinking people do. The Roosevelt idea
has been condemned In Maryland, as It
will bo throughout the United States."
"There Is a marked sentiment In all tho
large cities in favor of the. Democratic
Idea of municipal rule." said Gcorgo Tnn
sey. "and New York City has taken a step
In the right direction."
Arthur Lee Crandall. a stock broker,
who takes an active part In Democratic
politics, said:
"The result of the election In New York
should be food for thought on the part
of Democrats in every city in the United
States. The Democratic victory In the
metroprlls shows the effect of thorough
organization. The national working
forces ought to be organized In the same
thorough manner. It would mean the de
feat o' Roosevelt or any one elso tho Re
publicans might nominate."
CITY HALL OFFICIALS TALIC
City Hall officials were Jubilant yester
day over tho results of the election In
tho different States. Although It Is an off
year, they all thought that the results
show which way the wind is blowing.
"Gorman for President and Hawes for
Governor. looks like a winning ticket to
me." said Joseph P. Whyte, tho Harbor
and Wharf Commissioner.
"With New York. Maryland nnd Ken
tucky back whero they belong." Captain
Boyco of tho Council said, "things look
encouraging Indeed. That the people arc
far from satisfied seems quito evident to
me."
City Auditor Dlerkcs said that. In his
opinion, If the right man was put up the
Democrats had an excellent chance lo
"Well, you know what I said when I
came back from New York six weeks ago.
Nothing to It but Tammanv," " said City
Register Fitz Gibbon. "McCIcllan Is a fine
clean cut voung man. The hammer bri
gade originated when the politicians put
his father out of business for the presi
dency, but the son will be heard from."
Comptroller Player was busy signing
special tax bills when asked what he
thought the prospects are for a Democrat
ic victory next year, but he laid down his
pen long enough to say: "Great! Get to
gether on the right man. an Eastern man,
-.nd tho prospects arc rosy."
Mayor Wells spent a busy day at his of
fice, and when questioned said that he had
not read the returns farther than the
headlines, and did not care to express an
opinion.
ST. LOUIS COUNTY NOTES.
Circuit Judge McEIhlnney yesterday
remitted the lino of $100 assessed against
Albert Rosenberg, who was convicted of
shooting Emll Berns in Wellston. and he
was sentenced to ten days' Imprisonment
in Jail.
Marriage licenses were issued In Clay--
ton vestcraay to iirinur a. ionrenz of No.
1903 Park avenue and Anna K. Uslnger'of
No. 313 North Twenty-second street:
Thomas H. Walton of Fern Rldgc and
Isabell Whiteman of Creve Coeur, and to
Charles H. Wilson of Price's Branch and
Alice M. Porter of Jonesburg, Montgom
ery County. The last couplo went to Clay
ton to bo married by the Reverend Walter
M. Langtry, pastor of the Clayton Pres
byterian Church, because the brldo desired
him to perform tho ceremony, as he hart
officiated at a similar event for her sister
nnd had conducted the funeral services of
ber mother
Flag-men Blamed for Had Wreck.
Trenton, N. J.. Nov. -L The Coroner's
jury, which i Investigated the accident at
Washington Crossing on the Belvidere-dl-vlsion
of the Pennsylvania on October 17.
which resulted In the death of seventeen
men and Injuring forty more, rendercd.a'
verdict to-day placing the blame on Jacob
gaums, flagman of the wrecked work train,
for not having" gone back a sufficient dis
tance to properly warn' the second train.
VICTORY
o Account of Blight's Disease."
Wrote the- Agent of the Mutual Life Insurance Company.
m a Year to Live,55
Stated the Ablest Medical Authorities.
Sous a ".
lnps comes. The kidney ar the weak
ft orpani of the bod v. jet they have the
mon work to do. Thoy are the wa.f
Kates of the hum?n system and are thi
soonest attacked by dKeac. They are
apt to I ccome clossed at any time
CTSRME COMPANY
Richard AMturdjrPresidait
amount j fo,oiro
ON THE LIFE OF
TERM OF LIFE
TOO BROTHERS,
Frank. Charles and Josh Knight
Assault Barry Smith When
He Serves Warrant.
RnrunLic SPECIAL.
Ashley. 111., Nov. 4 A street fight oc
curred In this city this afternoon between
City Marshal Barry Smith and three
Knight brothers, Charles, Frank and Josh
Knight. Charles Knight was shqt in the
neck by Marshal Smith and will die. Josh
Knight was shot In the thigh, but the
wound Is not considered dangerous.
The trouble originated early In the day,
when Charles Knight accused J. Vaughn,
who was formerly employed by Charlis
Knight as a barkeeper, of starting the fire
that burned tho prominent business block
In this city last 'fhi.rsdav and which en
tailed a property loss of JIO.OOO. .
The accusation resulted in a fight be
tween tho Knight brothers nnd Vaughn,
In which tho latter was severely used up.
Later Vaughn swore out a warrant for
their arrest, but when Marshal Smith at
tempted to arrest them they took them
selves uuisiue ot tne city limits.
Some time afterwards the three Knights
returned to the city and were mot by
Marshal Smith on one of the prominent
business corners. He attempted to arrest
one of the Knlsht brothers and was at
tacked by the trio. A fierce fight followed,
in which the city official was getting de
cidedly the worst of It. nnd In self-defenso
drew his revolver and fired four shots,
two of them taking effect.
The Knight brothers still showed fight,
and. succeeding in wresting the revolver
and club from Marshal Smith, made an
other concentrated attack upon the latter
and felled htm to the ground.
They were again getting the advantage
of the officer when bystanders Interfered
and came to the assistance of the City
Marshal.
Charles Knight, after being fstally
wounded, again attacked Officer Smith,
but fell unconscious before he could do
him any harm. Acting Sheriff Z. P. Fnr
man and Deputy Charles Teel of Nash
ville arrived In this city shortly after the
affray, and the situation Is very quiet
now.
It was reported that several of the
Knight boys of Duquoln were coming to
this city to renew the fight, but this re
port is thought to he untrue. Brothers of
the wounded men have arrived here, but
they hne shown no tendency to renew
hostilities. 4-"'
The preliminary trial will not be held
until to-morrow.
Smith, the City Marshall, who did the
shooting. Is regarded In the highest terms
by his fellow- citizens, nnd his actions to
day are considered entirely justifiable.
The Knight brothers have always borne
an unsavory reputation.
Charles Knight, the ono who Is fatally
wounded, formerly conducted a saloon In
the opera-house, and It was In his build
ing that the disastrous fire started last
Thursday and consumed a row of build
ings before It was checked.
Found $500 in Old Clothes.
rinckneyvllle. III., Nov. 4. While ex
amining some old clothes which had been
worn by he.- deceased husband. Mrs.
Charles Miller found a $500 bill secreted In
a pocket match safe. No one was aware
that Miller had any ready cash, as he was
In very moderate circumstances. The bill
had apparently been carried in the match
box for several sears.
MUTBMliFE
OF S
Constipated ?j
Here is a
f
You have tried cills. You
a physic won't cure. Let experience show you what will cure.
Constipation is the rotting of undigested food in the all I
mentary tube.- This festering, rotting food makes bad blood, I
your suffering.
Mull's
It is not
Sold nnd recommended by EABOTEAu"
It
1 1JL
JSOo. mnd $1MO Bottle. All Dnigptota.
wow
sorance,"
Hopkins, of San Francisco
Nature's Warning cf Kidney Disease.
But nature elves certain signs of tho
presence of kidney trouble:
If there 13 a reddish-brown sediment
In your urine after It has stood for twenty-four
hours, if It Is at all cloudy, or If
particles Moat about In it. your kidney.
are diseased cnd.tittcrly unable to do their
work. There is not a moment to lose.
You should at once commence taklrg Safe
Cure, the only complete, ssfe and perma
nent cure for Brlght's disease, gravel, urio
acid poison, diabetes, rheumatism, ecze
ma, jaundice, gout, dropsv. swelling?,
tackache and all diseases of the kidneys,
bladder, liver 'and blood.
WARMER'S SAFE CURE
Is Life insurance.
It not only prolongs life, but preserves
health.
It is purely vegetable 2nd contains no
harmful drugr. this Is why doctors pre
scribe it. and hospitals ujo it exclusively.
It' is free from 3cdlmcnt and pleasant to
take. It is a most valuable and effectivn
tonic: stimulates digestion and awakens
the torpid liver.
ilafe Cure icpalrs the tissues, soothes
Inflammation and irritation, tones up and
heals the enfeebled organs, builds up tho
becy, gives It .strength and restores en
ergy. Tnousands of.meii and womn are re
fused Insurance every veek. 90 per cent
of them because of kidney trouble. If
you have ever been rejected by any In
surance company do as Mr. Hopkln3 did,
take Safe Cure, and then go back again
to the company for examination and you
will get your rollcy. But do it now. Don't
wait, as Mr. Hopkins did. until he had
thrown away a small fortune on worth
ies medicine and treatment. SAFE CURE
IS ABSOLFTELY THE ONLY COM
PLETE, SAFE AND PERMANENT
CI'HE FOR ALL DISEASES OF KID
NEYS. LIVER. BLADDER AND BLOOD.
Has stood the test for fifty years.
You can buy Safe Cure at any drug
store, or direct. It) cents and S1.C0 a bottle.
AMAI YRIQ FPFP If yu have the ""snt-
MIlflL I 010 rntt est doubt as to the de
velopment of the disease In your system,
send a sample of vour urine to the med
ical department. Warner's Safe Cure Co..
Rochester. N. J., and our doctors will
analyze It and send you a report with
advice and an interesting medical book
let, free of charge.
Dennre of xo-cnllcil Kidney Cares
rrliich are fall of sediment and of
limi odor. they are positively harm
fal anil do not care.
AVARNER'S SAFE PILLS move the
towels gently and aid a speedy cure.
SIX MEN KILLED
AT NAVAL ARSENAL
Series of Explosions Destroys
Three Massive Shell Houses
on Iona Island.
Iona Island: N. Y., -Nov. 4. Sir" nien
were killed and ten slightly Injured thls
afternoon by an explosion at the United
States Naval Arsenal, one of the largest
magazines In the United States, which IS
located here. "
Tho explosion occurred while 'men -were)
drawing the explosive charges from a
consignment of old shells recently sent
here from the battleship Massachusetts.
Threo massive shellhouses were totally
dcstiojcd. und a rain of fragments of pro
jectiles cf all sizes was scattered in every
direction.
Tho force of the explosion, or series of
expiosions. broke windows at Peeksklll.
three miles below on the opposite side of
the Hudson, and the detonation was heard
for many miles.
Adjacent buildings. Including two store
houses for sized ammunition, were riddled
with the-fragments, and the quarters of
the eleven marines composing tho garri
son were completely demolished.
The dead, nil of whom were workmen
employed by the N.ial Ordnance Depart
ment, arci Fred Ward. Stony Point:
George Morehead. Tompkins Grove; Fred
O. Locke, Peeksklll; Patrick Curran, West
Haverstraw: Fred Brown, Havcrstraw;
James Connelly, PeckskllL
The bodis were frightfully mangled,
fragments being hurled for hundreds) of
feet.
The Island, which has been used as an
arsenal for a year. Is In the Hudson River
forty miles from New York.
There were two main explosions, with
nn Interval of several minutes between,
and a succession of minor ones as Individ
ual shells went off. Fire followed, and for
several hours the marines fought the
flames In Imminent danger of the con
stantly exploding shells. Physicians and
nurses from West Point, Pcesklll and
Haverstraw hurried to tho Island and at
tended to the injured, one of whom was
seriously hurt.
NO CHANGE IN NEW JERSEY.
Republicans Retain Control of
the Legislature.
Trenton. N. J.. Nov. 4. Revised returns
from New Jersey show that the Repub
licans have carried Middlesex County for
both Senator and Assemblymen. This will
make the Senate stand fourteen .Repub
licans to seven Democrats, tho soma as
last year's representation.
The gain of three Assemblymen by tha
Democrats in Union County Is offset by,
losses In other counties. The representa
tion In the House next year will bo th
same as last year thirty-eight Repub
licans and twenty-two Democrats.
In the Paterson. N. J., mayoralty con
test Wm. H. Belcher (Rep.) Is elected over
John Johnson (Dem.). Tho present inenm
bsnt, John Hlnchllffe. Is a Democrat. Jer
sey City. Asbury Park. Brldgeton and
New Brunswick elected Republican
Mayors. In Trenton. Hoboken and Bay
onne the Democras elected" their mayor
alty candidates.
Sure Cure
know bv vour own exoerience that
which makes bad health. Constipation
causes most sickness. It probably causes 3
Graao Tonic Curmm
a physic or like anything else
you ever used. It is a tonic containing
special properties of the grape which
strengthens the digestiveorgans and enables
them to perform their functions voluntarily
and properly. No griping. If it fails your
money will be returned.
Send thin dTertnwront nil Mcenu to Urttnloe Medida
Co. 131 Third Are.. Bock bland, I1U for Urge sample boul, or
zat rsnlar alzs
ft CO. , corner Broadway (nd Local,
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