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The St. Louis Republic. [volume] (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, November 13, 1903, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020274/1903-11-13/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE ST. LOUIS REPUBLIC
The Recognized ' 'Room for Rent" medium
1,363
Houses, Flats, Stores, Etc,
wr-j nilrrf Isef3 zol
in St. Lonls 1 The Rrnnlillr.
Qcb??.ca
Store "Room for Rent"
I""" rent In The Republic
were printed in
B IIB5H E - -..- a:luuiftV Hint
8 WW month- than In any
' otlirr ht. I.onls nevrapniier.
In lit month. Every locality In the
city is represented In the "FOR
REST" column ot The Sunday
Republic
WOIRLID'S-
1QM- FAIB
NINETY-SIXTH YEAE.
ST. LOUIS. MO., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1903.
-r-i -i-k -r- s. . (In St. Lonl
PRICE OniJiIc Nl
-L "lUiJ (On TrnlDi,
LnnU, One Cent.
l.onli. Two Cent.
Three Cent.
m&pso-- -dm
m
fe
r-
1
i
&.,
SENATOR COGKRELL OUTLINES HIS POSITION
WITH REFERENCE TO THE PRESIDENCY.
,.Lo, Seua. e&Ufan46SZt;fcM&
4c Si-vGie ty &
MiAaiT?&&sMjg-ZZ &4f2scZl lfU6&Tui6''
My Dear Major Salmon Tour favor duly received. As I hare repeatedly said. I am a candidate for re-election to tho United States
Spnate. and will be content with snch re-election. I am not seeking the nomination for the presidency. Tho mov ement by the Democrats
of Missouri to present my name for that nomination to the National Democratic Convention is without my solicitation, directly or lndl-j-eetlj.
Therefore I appreciate the more Richly tho honor conferred by tho resolutions adopted bj the Democratic mass meetings at Moberly
nnu St Joseph. Mo , and the personal assurances and Indorsements of friends. These show clearly that the mo ement Is not Inimical
to my candidacy for re-election to the Senate, and come from friends and loyal Democrats, and that such apprehension Is, in fact, w lth-
out foundation. The proprieties of course forbid that I should say I am or will be a candidate for the nomination for tho presidency.
- Perhaps I so far enough when I Kay 1 am gratefully appreciative of the continued confidence and friendship of the good people of
Miso.nl. and of the great honor they do me In mentioning ms namo In connection with the highest office In the greatest nation of the
world- jet If the Democrats of Missouri deem me worthy, and desire, without my seeking, to present my name to the National Democratic
Own cntlon for the nomination for the presidency. It would be ungrateful In me to object. With best wishes, your friend.
F. M. COCKHBLL.
This facsimile Is of a letter from
Senator Cockrell to Major Salmon, re
plying to a request that tho Senator
cspre-.s to his friends his consent to
the use of his name in connection
with the presidency. Major Salmon
MANUFACTURERS ACTIVE FOR
BATTLESHIP TESTIMONIAL
A?:
resident Kingfsland of
Subcommittee to Raise Fund Round
Table Club Will Consider Dona
tion at Next Meeting.
Of all th(S o-ganl7.atIons, fcoth social and
commercial, that are taking part In the
raisins of the battleship "Missouri" testi
monial fund none Is more actively at
n ork than the Manufacturers' Association
and none got to work with greater
promptitude. Tho letter of Mayor Wells
npno'ntins President I. D. Ivingsland to
mrnbersh'p on the committee vas acted
uron within fifteen minutes after It was
rccelied.
--.. The plan followed by Mr. Klugsl-uid in
Jai pointing his subcommittee was to hpread
the committee over the various branches
JoTtl.e organization In such way llnu cv
- ery branch of the" manufacturing trades
of thc-ct would bo fully rep.cscnted.
In many- cases two members Iron cech
lii.e of tr-de were appointed. This was in
tended to Infurc clober work on tho part
of ine subcommittee and make It potsitle
foi the Manufacturcri." Association to
make a large contribution and one that Is
In ktcpliig with the character of ihi. cr
feaiitzaiiu:i. 1 ol.oning are the name3 of the sJbconWj
m.llce appointed by Mr. KlngsUcd tne
u..y ae received Major IVells lioUllca
liuu. i hey are fekcted to include the mtn
v.iu have taken gteatest Interest :n the
utumuuul il.hu oi.d uhic cJorts ill suu
iit.r v.uiit rkiu been butxisiui:
ji.ni lii-r. ui ai.mji Av-rur.ET.A
1U.UO Ooodo 1 U. Ltozur, Dozler iJKeij
0-titpu , U HjeilUt. Vk elJc-iJwt;Ucr llOKLl
Cou.iM.n.
C-u A.J3Jlacturins Comiinles W. F. Blanke.j
l . ulunke Can t.bmiiu ; 1. Wsurb2cL,
i-uluuiblu -in CD.apacj'.
, lja:tte& li. Wuou, Union Dairy Compan; J.
K tjjurjie, bt. ljls Dalr OJripan.
1 Ceaitct o-iapanin! J. C ltob nsn, tsu Louis
Vj"""Uuni ..ir.vut Ciciaiij, o. II. IsaJsett. lola
Pbitiau Ccn.t.i.t Coaiptin.
rtUiiu-r'. &cnv.eutn.ann, Marnetlte roun
do Uiaiutn), C a. Utte, bt. iju1s Mallpabte
. cuau tllan.
AiULKs A. iituer. A. Xttner nrlck Compan);
Gv-ui.v V. JcLu, Acn a. lluard iincjw
Ccmcnj.
l-XK and Cement C. W. S. Cobb. Glencoe
Ume and Cement Compjnj ; F. w. IlunlJns,
Hurkins & miliv.
Vaper A. T. Flint, American noil Paper
C-rapan: W. O- Chappeil. &L LouU I'ap-r
Coin piny.
CoIIee Robert Mejer, Jlejer Bros. CoCee and
Spite Company; A. D. Forbes, James Forbes
Ta and Coffee Company.
timber 21. C. Holfts, Dau Clalre-st. Louis
I.mter Company: T. C Whltmarsh, W. T.
VrtKUsn Lumber Company.
Chemicals T. P. Haley, Jr.. Teacock Chera
Iral Corrpany; Gerrge W. Wines, Larkln t
benetter Chemical Company.
Candles F. A. LouiT. Elanke Bros. Candy
ny: C JI. Hoke. St. Louis Candy Com-
vok. Leather Joseph Kcssler, A.
Kessler .
Gardener,
R Oak leather Compan : J. A
American Oak Leather Company.
t:r 8. Elsenstadt, ElteosUdt
Jewelry
tay.
"21Cnitc& .States Scwofc,
WASHINGTON. D C-
.z
UVx,'c&u'oz, 'jhSlufenofet&ety
fetK&uzZZ rfddjhl ZftAtlOuZ 'Hnauu-flri ZvtZzurrn-
said in his letter that these friends ap
preciated the Senator's reluctance to
appear as seeking the national Demo
cratic nomination; but urged that the
Stato Democracy sincerely believed In
tho national value of the Senator's
Local' Association Names
Co : G Klnp. Mermcd &. Jaccard Jewelry Co.
n"t-ctrlc goods II. K. Oilman. Western EI-c-trical
Supply Compani: T. M. Sleston. Emer
son Electric Manufacturing Company.
Stoves C. A. Stockstron, Quick Meal Stove
Company; It. IL Stockton, Majestic Manufac
turing Company.
Shoes J. c Itoberts. Itobcrts-Johnon-Kand
fjhoe Company: A. D Brown. Hamilton-Brown
Shoe Companj.
Glass R. II Lcis, minds Glass Company;
J. A. Lodwlck. MIsflssippI Glass Company.
Clo'hlng-J. G. Gllmore. Gllmore 4 Buhl; L.
J. bchwab, Schwab Clothing Companj.
Mining machlnerj W. C Itumsej. Rumsey
. SILemeicr; C. S. Ruwll, Parker-Russell Mln.
lug Manufacturing Company.
Drj KOtds Geo M- Wright. William Barr
Dry Goods Company: Charles SUx. Stlx. Baer
i. Fuller Dry Goods Company.
Printing W. II. Woodward Woodward &
Tleman Printing Companj: S. J. Harbough,
Greelej Prlnterj.
Butcher supplies, etc E. Volkenlng, Brecht
Butcher Supply Company; Joseph Lchnbeuter,
Cars & Lehnbeuter Manufacturing Companj'.
Produce M. C. Richmond. Shaw . Richmond
Produce Companj; W. II. Redemej-er, Ilede
neyer Holllster Commission Companj-.
Wagons. bugglcs-J. c. Moon. Moon Bros
Carriage Company; c. W. Mansur. John Deere
Plow Companj.
Coal-J. c. Brush, St. Lculs . Big Muddy
uai ucmpanj ; a c. Donk, Donk Bros. Coal 4
Coke Companj.
Cofins-R. H. Log'man. Mound Coftln Com
panj: J. XV. Tarris, Su Louis Coffin Commnv
Carbonatlng Compan'es James McCloskj, St,
LoUs Carbonatlng Company.
To each member of this subcommittee
was sent a copv of the follow Irg letter.
Inclosing Major Wells's letter appointing
Mr. Klngsland:
Dear SIr-The inclosed copy of letter from
Major Wells explains Itself, President Kings
land Is very anxious that tho Manufacturers'
AssoclaUon do Its share in raising funds for tho
batUcshlp testimonial, and has named you one
of a committee to solicit subscriptions from the
arms In jour line of business In St. Louis.
I sincerely hope jou will accept the appoint
ment, and CC everything In jour power to make
the amount raised by the Manufacturers' Asso
ciation a respectable one,
rieane report to the Manufacturers' Associa
tion not later than Saturday, tho nth last.
Tours trulj,
(Signed) CHARLES E. WARE, Secretary.
At tho mestlng of the General Com
mittee, the time for reporting on sub
scriptions was set for December 1, and
the subcommittees Tvere noUfled of the"
change.
Mr. Kirgland has urged upon each
member of the committee the need of. re
porting progress and of turning Over "the
funds as fast as received. Very few of
the manufacturers have declined 'to serve
and only vaJd excuses have been offered.
Robert H. Stockton of the Majestic
Barge Companj" was) one who could not
serve. He sent HO with his letter of
regret as an earnest of his Interest in
Continued on Pace Two.
- . ,
- .y
!iao
name to the pnrty, iIiUc too loyal to
permit the pendency of the question
to affect his re-election to the Senate.
Senator CockrelTs reply states his po
sition fully and will he appreciated by
the Democrats of Misouri.
KRATZ PAPERS
ARRIVE AT THE
CITY OF MEXICO
Ambassador Clayton Turns
Over Requisition to Trans
lator and Notifies De
partment of Foreign
Relations.
SPECIAL. TO THE REPUBLIC BY
CABLE, VIA GALVESTON.
City of Mexico. Mexico, Nov. 12. The
requisition papers in tho Kratz case, were
received at me American Embassy to
day. They were turned over immediately to a
translates
As soon as he completes the work of
writing out the request In Spanish, Am
bassador Powell Clajton will make the
formal presentation of the American
Government's request to the Department
of Foreign Relations. It Is thought that
this can be done by to-morrow.
After this is done there probably will bo
no unnecessary delay In pushing the mat
ter to a conclusion.
Mr. Calvton visited the Department of
Foreign Relations to-day to make tho for
mal announcement of the papers' arrival.
Chief of Detectives Desmond of St.
Louis, was much elated over the arrival of
the papcra For three dajs he had been
rather anxious aboutHhcir coming and
made frequent visits to the American Em
bassy. There was no attempt on his part to
day to conceal the satisfaction he felt.
When they were overdue ho feared that
they mleht be Indefinitely delayed and
the Mexican authorities might grow tired
of waiting and releaso Kratz.
In well-informed circles It Is generally
believed that Kratz was removed to the
Jalisco Penitentiary Tor safekeeping at
the suggestion of General Clayton, who
feared that the fugitive St Louis ex
Councllman might escape from the
Guadalajara Jail, which Is not a most
formidable prison.
Sheriff Dickmann of St Louis arrived
here to-day from Guadalajara.
He said that Kratz's removal to the
penitentiary had had the effect of consid
erably disheartening Kratz and his.
friends, who take the move as an 111
omen.
Dickmann says from the talk of the
Kratz crowd it would appear that he and
his friends have grabbed up the whole
state of Jalisco and own everything
worth owning
All the bluff and bluster, he saj-s, has
had no effect In Influencing the Mexican
officials and the court having the case in
charge.
fWi U4iM,
$JL&k&xZ
WILD RIOTS MARK
CHICAGO'S STREET
RAILWAY STRIKE,
One Man's Back Broken and
Many Persons, Including
Two Women, Are In
jured in Disturbances.
CARS WRECKED BY THE MOBS.
After Long and Stubborn Fight
Company Is Compelled to Sua-
pendEfforts at Operation.
TO RENEW STRUGGLE TO-DAY.
Hint That Federal Interference
May Be Asked if Mail Cars Are
Much More Dela3-ed
Crowds Pack Ele
vated Trains.
Chicago, Nov. 12 Constant scenes' ot
disorder over a district approximate!
fiftj square miles In ettent re
sulted to-day fro-n tho inaugura
tion of a strike by the emplojes of one of
tho two principal surface fcireet railway
companies in Chicago.
All along tho lines, wherever cars were
started, strikers and their sympathizers
mnde desperate onslaughts on tho crews
beginning at dawn of day and continuing
as long as cars remained on the tracks.
Tho tie-up was made complete.
Several cars were wrecked and that no
person was killed Is no fault ot the riot
era. Man's IJacIc Broken.
Ono man's back was broken and the
first shot of the strike was fired at Wcnt
worth avenue and West Sixty-ninth
street, whero a mob tried to hold up a
train.
Many persons, chiefly nonunion street
car mon, were injuied by fljlng stones or
splintered glass. Two w omen were among
those hurt.
Excepting a few dozen passengers who
had to flee from the cars, the 300,000 daily
patrons of the company were forced to
all sorts of other methods In order to get
down town and bock.
CrcivK Driven Back.
With faces and hands bleeding from the
attacks of the strikers, rnotormen, grip-
men and conductors who tried to run
trains returned to the barns and refused
to go out again, unless the trains bore
platoons of police or patrol wagons were
alongside.
Tho pullco confined their efforts to see
ing that the passage of the cars from tho
barns was unobstructed and thnt crowds
and blockades in the'streets were quickly
cleared.
This was done under orders from Major
Harrison, whoso" announced purpose was
to preservo an Impartial attitude, taking
sides neither for nor against tho strikers
or the street-car companj-, which, though
known as the Chicago City Railway, is a
private corporation, lines of whlcn extend
to tho outside of tho city.
lew Police Clilcr.
Developments regarding the municipal
administration hinge largely upon a new
Continued on Page Tiro.
LEADING TOPICS
-iff-
to-day:s republic.
THE SUN RISES THIS MORNING AT
6 39 AND SETS THIS EVENING AT 4:4J-
THE MOON RISES TO-MORROW
MORNING AT 1.3S.
GRAIN CLOSED ST. LOUIS-MAT
WHEAT. 77S77:K0 BID; MAY CORN.
S914C. CHICAGO-MAY WHEAT. 7,
7C4c; .MAY CORN, 41ic ASKED.
"WEATHER. I'V.DICATIO'NS.
For St. Louts nnd Vlclnltj Partly
cloudy and cooler to-daj ; variable
winds, mostly aonthcrly.
For Mlmonrl and Illinois Fair and
cooler I'rldnj. Sniurdaj, fair.
For Arkansas, East Texaa and West
Texas Fair Friday and Saturday.
Page.
1. Airship FIIe3 Miles in 101 Minutes at
Paris
Rathbone Will Make War on General
Leonard Wood.
2. Woman Athlete Bests Ruffian.
French Senate May Aid Monks.
To Exhibit Big Guns at Fair.
3. Missourians Have Important Places.
Active for Battleship Testimonial.
4. Young Girl In Jail at Clayton.
Turks Butchered Armenian Bands.
Trains Collide In Dense Fog. "
5. Happenings In East Side Cities.
6. Pass Book Won at 100 to 1.
C. B. C.s Expect to Defeat Qulncy.
7. River News and Personals.
S. Editorial.
Society News.
9. Matron Dismissed; Doctor Gives Bond.
Two Disposal Sj stems Indorsed.
Meetins of Apple Growers.
Child Bitten by Dogs. '
10. Republic "Want" Ads.
Birth, Marriage and Death Records.
New Corporations.
11. Rooms for Rent Ads.
13. Pennsylvania and Steel Hold Brokers'
Attention,
Transit Stock Leads Local Security
List
Market Closes Easy. .
Summary of the St. Louis Markets.
14. Fraud Cases Go to Jury.
Talk, of Using Rifles to "Purify the
Ballot" .
City Officials Appear Before Grand
Jury.
Czar Dismisses Brutal Governor.
Nurse at Poorhouse Weds.
MISS DREYER IS REMOVED
ON CHARGE OF CONSPIRACY;
.MAKES STRONG STATEMENT.
Joseph Dreyer, Samuel Kober and Miss Birdie Knott Also Affected
by Postmaster General's Older of Dismissal Asserted Thai
These Employes of the Post Office Entered Into a Conspiracy
to Secure Discharge of Baunihoff Delay in Dismissals Seems
Rather Peculiar.
MISS DREYER SAYS THAT SHE
Washington, Nov. 12. The Postmaster
General has directed Postmaster Baum
hort to removo from office Anna Drejer,
Joseph Drejer. Samuel Kober and Birdie
Knott employed in the St Louis Post Of
fice. Alleged conspiracy to secure the remova
of Postmaster Baumhoff of that city Is
the reason advanced.
These clerks were suspended March 9
and 10, and their permanent separation
from tho service Is now ordered as the re
sult of the investigations of the charges
made against Baumhoff.
The Civil Servlco Commission a week
ago requested Postmaster Baurahoft's rea
sons for mispendlng the clerks, and on his
report made a decision sustaining tho
Postmaste'r allegations of a conspiracy
agalnBt him.
COVI.MISSIOER'S REPORT
OV DIIUYEH CASE.
Civil Servlco Commissioner Cooley called
on the Postmaster General to-dny and
submitted the commission's decision. It is
as follows:
"On Friday, Nov ember C, the Commission
requested Postmaster Baumhoff of St.
Louis to state in writing his reasons for
the Indefinite suspension of Anna Dreyer,
a clerk In the St. Louis Post Olllce. Mr.
Baumhoff has replied, stating that he
suspended her, acting under instructions
from the Postmaster General.
"The Postmaster General states that
Miss Dreyer was suspended because she,
with others, entered into a conspiracy
with certain political enemies ot Mr.
Baumhoff in tho city of St Louis to fee
euro his removal from the public service.
At the request of the President, Commis
sioner Foulke Investigated this matter,
and the testimony taken by him estab
lished tho fact of the conspiracy and of
the attempt of Miss Drejer and others to
secure false testimony. Beyond the
shadow of a doubt Miss Dreyer's suspen
sion was due to this cause, and no other.
"Any statements from the Postmaster
and from anj one clsa other than that she
was engaged In tho conspiracy referred to
havo nothing to do with her suspension,
and tho commission is, of course, without
power to settle any personal disputes be
tween Miss Pf-eyer ani any other person,
whether in the public servlco or out of
it"
Tho same reasons are given for the
other removals.
REMOVAL WAS FIRST
ALTIIORIZED MONTHS AGO .
Their removal was first authorized, it is
said, some months ago, and the question
arises, naturally, why the Postmaster has
retained them after being authorized to
remove them "for cause." There is ap
parently good authority for the statement
that fully eight months ago the varying
affidavits made by these clerks were
brought to tho attention of the depart
ment, and their removal wa3 "authorized"
If not "directed." Their retention until
Mr. BaumhofC's successor has been se
lected Is one of the peculiar features con
nected with the St Louis Post-Ofllce mat
ter. In offices under the civil servlco law,
where clerks aro to be removed "for
cause" nnd removal of clerks In such
offices are assumed to be only "for oauso"
It is very unusual, even if legal, for such
an order or authority for removal to be
held in suspense for so long a period.
If this action is taken upon an order
just received In St Louis it would seem
to merely be a confirmation of a like or
der or authority to the Postmaster, given
perhaps verbally in the first place, but
after all the facts had been considered.
The question of how promptly these re
movals were made after they were first
authorized and arranged between Mr.
Baumhoff and the department ought to
bo of interest to the Civil-Service Commis
sion. At all events the department, the
AVhlte Houso and all concerned have
known for months of tho existence of the
conflicting nflldavlts from some of these
emplojes. upon which the removals finally
are made.
RETENTION OF CLERKS
SEEMS PKCIILIAR.
The retention of clerks for months after
the department has in Its possession docu
ments which make admissions of false
statements by them is unusual at least.
The Dreyer affidavit or one of them
was explained to the department by Doc
tor Bojd. He said the young woman ad
mitted to him that she had been coerced
into making the charge against the Post
master. Subsequently, it is said, the de
partment received a second affidavit, con
tradicting the first and It is said that the
action of tlie President finally was not
based upon the documents signed by any
of the clerks mentioned which were
thrown out as having no bearing upon
the case. The subsequent personal visit
of ClvlI-Servlce Commissioner Foulke to
St. Louis and his report to the White
House were for the purpose of covering
ground on which tho affidavits were value
less. But the long retention of clerks
from whom such worthless affidavits hid
been received Is an Interesting feature of
this case.
MISS ANNA DREYER
MAKES ASTOUNDING
STATEMENT OF CASE.
Miss Anna Dreyer, whose dismissal was
directed by Postmaster General Payne
from the postal service, learned of the
fact yesterday afternoon. She lives with
her mother at No. 3026 Locust street.
"The charge upon which I am dis
missed," said Miss Dreyer, last night, "Is
conspiracy to secure the removalof Post
master Baumhoff. I am not able1 to see
how my action can be so construed. I
conspired with no one for Mr. BaumhofC's
dlsmlfsal. All I did was to protect my
self as any self-respecting girl would
have done.v
"Mr. Baumhoff was repeatedly guilty of
Improprieties toward me. I did ndt for a
long time say anything about his actions,
but when they became unbearable I re
ported them with the hope of ridding my
self,of them.
"I at first overlooked the Postmaster's
conduct because I did not Wish to Jeopard
ize my position. Finally, however, I de-
HAS BEEN CRUELLY WRONGED.
termined to risk everj thing rather than
submit to Indignities any longer.
"If it Is conspiracy for a girl to report
the Improprieties of her superior toward
her, by which she Is insulted, mortified
and humiliated, then I am guilty of con-splracj-.
If this Is conspiracj', that Is pun
ishable by dismissal from anj- service,
what protection has any girl against tho
advances of those whom stie may happen
to be under?
"My testimony was taken before three
Inspectors, and It must have been seen bj
Postmaster General Paj-ne. How I could
have been dismissed from a Civll-Servlco
position for what I did I cannot see. I
have been cruelly wronged, nnd a further
investigation should be made.
"Commissioner Foulks, when he was
here, refused to see me or to hear my tes
timony. One ot those who had Joined in
the charges against Mr. Baumhoff was al
lowed to testify, but not before it was
known she would change her story.
"My character was even assailed and I
was Impersonated by a woman in the Post
Office who Is now receiving ?1C0 a month.
I am thankful, at least, that the Post
Office Department at Washington had the
decency to state that there was no ques
tion as to my reputation being above re
proach." Mr. Baumhoff said that he had first
learned of the recommendation of the dis
missal of Miss Anna Drejer, Joseph
Dryer, Samuel Kober and Birdie Knott
through tho papers.
Mr. Baumhoff said that In view of the
publlcltj- which the case had already, had
It was not necessary to say anj thing
further regarding the matter, except that
his position In tho matter had been sus
tained by tho Department at Washington
and that the incident was finally dis
posed of.
Bnjs Sixty Doxcn Dad Effga.
Sixty dozen eggs and every one of them
spoiled were sold to Mrs. D J. Gunn of
No. 1116 North Grand avenue Wednesday
afternoon for J12. Mrs. Gunn keeps a
grocery, and when a man who looked the
part came in and told her that he was a
farmer and had sixty dozen "good, fresh
egg3" to sell, she readily accepted his
offer and took them ut 20 cents a dozen.
Soon afterwards sho sold several dozen of
the fresh eggs. Mrs Gunn had not long
to wait before the trouble began. Patrol
man George J. Bock was notified and took
a description of the "farmer," his small
black horse and the old buggy In which
he rode.
WOMAN ATHLETE BESTS
RUFFIAN IN A STRUGGLE.
ipBiiiiiiiiie
Choir singer, who repulsed a midnight at
tack by a ruffian.
Miss Emma C. Cunningham of No. 2025
Kosciusko street, soprano soloist at the
Lafujette Park Presbyterian Church,
was atracked by an unidentified ruffian
shortly after 12 o'clock yesterday morning
on Russell avenue.
In thj struggle which ensued. Miss Cun
ningham succeeded, fiy her superior
physique. In freeing herself from her as
sailant, after both had fallen to. the
ground. Beaten off by Miss Cunning
ham, the man made his escape.
Miss Cunningham Is a feet 8 Inches In
height, a perfect athlete, and to .this fact
sho owes her escape.
Miss Cunningham had spent the even
ing with friends on Bell avenue. She re
turned with women companions on the
Broadway car. Refusing to accept their
escort, she left the car at Russell avenue
to walk to her home.
On the curb as she left the car she no
ticed a young man wearing a light over
coat and a fedora hat. He was accom
panied by a man wearing the uniform of
the United States Army. Thinking they
were about to take the same car she
passed on.
Then she heard footsteps behind her
and hastened her steps.- Glancing back,
she saw that she was being followed by
the man in the light coat
After pass'ng Third street she knew
there was an al'ey between Tnird and
Second street She hoped to pass tha
ANGRY
COLOMBIANS
STONE CONSULATE
OF UNITED STATES
Populace of Cartagena and
Barranquilla Are Intensely
Aroused Over Pana
ma's Secession.
BITTER AGAINST AMERICANS.
Purpose of Authorities to Send
More Troops to Colon Is Sud
denly Abandoned.
Colon, Republic of Panama, Nov. li
The Royal Mall steamer Orinoco, which
took Colonel Torres and the last of tho
Colombian troops from Colon to Carta
gena, returned here to-daj-, bringing news
that the United States Consulate was
stoned by an angry crowd after a report
of the secession of Panama had been re
ceived. On arrival of Colonel Torres and his
troops at Cartagena the news of events
on the isthmus quickly spread and caused
excitement Colonel Torres and his offi
cers were threatened with arrest as trai
tors, but the threat was not put Into ef
fect. Tho populace, greatly excited, soon
crowded the streets, crjlns "Down with
the Americans."
United States Consul Ingersoll, fearlns
violence, remained shut up in the con
sulate. TROOPS HELD BACK.
The Barranquilla authorities had in
tended sending 300 Colombian troops by
the Orinoco to Cartagena, but I learned
that that vessel had debarked Colonel Tor
res and his army and decided to keep the
troops there.
Tho excitement at Barranquilla In
creased with the spreading of the news of
the secession of the isthmus, which was
supplemented by exaggerated accounts of
the alleged part plajed by the United
States therein.
Panama's declaration of Independenca
was read from a newspaper by the Pre
fect to a crowd In the plaza and was
greeted with furious cries of "Death to
the Americans."
The Prefect followed the reading by a
speech In which he declared that the Co
lomb'an Government would not permit the
secession of the Isthmus and would win
back the lost territory. The crowd in
the plaza, lnaulged in many extravagant
threats.
United States Vice Consul Lovelace was
seated on a balcony of his house at Boran
qutlla. that night and several stones were
Continued on Page Tiro.
ley In safety, and. if necessary, she
thought she could take resort In one cf
the dwellings. Then the steps behind her
lncfeased to a run.
Suddenly she turned to confront her pur
suer. At that moment the man threw him
self upon bernd attempted to grab her
by the throat She grasped him. believing
that she could throw him aside. She had
about done this when, her feet s'lppn?
and they both fell to the curb.
By this time Miss Cunningham's out
cry had aroused several neighbors.
Philip Loesch and his family, who
live at No. 231 Russell avenue, wit
nessed the assault, and saw the man dis
appear down the thoroughfare.
Miss Cunningham carried a chatelaine
purse at ber side, but her assailant made
no attempt to seize that. Mfcs Cunning
ham was confined to her room yesterday
after having reported the assault to the
police.
She Is not only prominent In South Side
mi.se circles, but frequently contributes
her voice to th.e religious services for the
prisoners at. the Four Courts, where ths
police, who know"her weJL, trust thatsber
assailant may yet be able to hear her
voice again.
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