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The St. Louis Republic. [volume] (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, November 14, 1903, PART I, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020274/1903-11-14/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE ST. LOUIS REPUBLIC.
PART I.
8 PAGES.
WORLD'S-
1904
FAIB
NINETY-SIXTH YEAR.
ST. LOUIS. MX)., SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1903.
PRICE )S
In St. Lonli, One Cent.
IkIiIp Si. I.oal. 1, to (.eats.
Trains. Three Cent.
ROOSEVELT URGED THAT '
CANAL BE DUG IN SPITE
OF COLOMBIA'S REFUSAL
TWO JURORS DELHI
FINDING OF VERDICT,
E
ST, LOUIS WANTS
KRATZ'S FRIENDS PLANNED
TO ABDUCT HIM AND FLEE
FROM MEXICAN REPUBLIC,
TRE CHARGE- THAT
1!
MMMMarMMIMMMMMnmMMMM
TO-DAY'S REPUBUC 1
I Printed ia I
TWO PARTS.
STIGATING
C T
J
URY
Fl D
i.
Ek-
W.
.
"This Xntion Will Not Permit Any Body of Men Permanently to
Obstruct One of the Great World-Highwajs of Traffic," He
Wrote in Message to Congress Before Panama Revolution Be
ganRecounted Efforts to Be Perfectly Fair and Generous to
Smaller Country and Said They Were Xot Frankly Met
TREATY OF 1846, HE SUGGESTED, GAVE NECESSARY RIGHT.
,
"nnrninri T f mill nuin
'PRESIDENT IS INVADING
CONSTITUTIONAL PREROGATIVE."
Washington. Nov. 13 Immediately after the reading of the Journal In the
House to-day Mr. Livernash (California) arose to a question of personal privi
lege. Reading from manuscript, he began by saving:
"Indications are that In the Panama-Colombia matter the President is in
vading a constitutional prerogative of the Congress, and It seems of high im
portance to the dignity and authority of this House that doubt be dispelled
forthwith."
Mr. Payne rose to a point of order, and Insisted that the question of privi
lege be stated first.
Tho Speaker sugrested that a resolution would inform the House as to
what question the gentleman desired to present. He finally sustained the point
of order, crlea of "Regular order!" being heard on the Republican side. On mo
tion of Mr. Payne the House then adjourned.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
"Washington, Nov. 13 President Roose
velt, before the revolution began In Pan
ama, had prepared as part of his regular
x unzaaa&Kjjo congress, a virtual rccuinmeii-
4 layoff that the United States proceed to
I ullg the canal without regard to Colom-
canai treaty.
He declared that it is probable that the
RJnlted States have a right to construct
i Ihe canal under the treaty of 1S16; and
hat the' action of the Colombian uovern
nent showed that It was not disposed to
p anything but an obstruction to the
4-orld's commerce.
i REVISION NECESSARY.
fTThls part of the message was- completed
jo weeks ago, but events since that time
ve made necessary a complete revision.
in. the opening sentence of his discussion
the negotiations with Colombia, the
resident said:
i "I regret to report that, contrary to all
expectations, the Government of the Re
public of Colombia refused to ratify the
for buUdlng a canal across me
thmus of Panama."
Then, after stating that the treaty had
negotiated at the earnest request of
Government of Colombia, and subse-
,aentlr warn dlsaDoroved by the Colombian
)nate, the President Bald that the pow
ers exercised oy the United stales unaer
"V treaty of 1848 were so large In the
""' cectkra of transit across the isthmus
e It sometimes had been questioned
ther It was necessary now to obtain a
Hty for the purpose ofbuildlnK a canal.
f
atlnnlnr. he wrote:
te CAN DIG CANAL.
iaigh authorities of international law
W that the canal can be dug as an incl
Int to exercising the power to prevent
a obstruction of traffic across the lath
f is.
.'Nevertheless, In accordance with our
jettled policy of behaving with scrupulous
"fairness and iceneroslty toward our weaker
sister Republics of the South, taking no
position that can even by Implication be
..Ltttated as unfriendly, unless literally
provide for the building of tho canal by
treaty.
"In this treaty we went as far as It Is
possible for us to go in the direction of
making concessions to the United States
of Colombia. No further concessions can,
op should be, made by this Government."
"WORLD DEMANDS IT."
The President then stated that the cir
cumstances of the -canal case were pe
culiar. "The canal." said he, "must be dug. It
Is demanded by the interests of this na
tion and by those of the civilized world.
"The United States has solemnly pledged
its word that It should be free to the com
merce of the world, reserving to ourselves
xterely the right to see that it shall never
i be used to our military disadvantage.
h) "A private company, which in the past
undertook to build the canal has failed.
The events of the last year warrant us in
now
Jaot
Jfnr
now sa)ing not only that the canal shall
not be constructed by any foreign Govern
ment, but that It Is not to be constructed
iuy private company. It must, there.
fore, be dug by the Government of the
United States."
Referring, further along, to the territory
bisected by the canal, the President wrote:
OPPOSES DELAY.
"On'the one hand, the United States de
sires to, safeguard with scrupulous care
the interest and the honor of such coun
try or countries. On the other hand. In
my judgment, it Is time to declare that
the beginning of the canal cannot be much
-longer delated. This nation does not de
sire to be unreasonable or impatient, but
It cannot and will not permit any body of
men permanently to obstruct one of the
great world highways of traffic and re
fusal to permit the building' of the canal
amounts to such obstruction. Of course,
to Insist upon unreasonable terms is equiv
alent to a refusal."
Adverting to that phrase of the Spooner
law which says that the President shall
hae reasonable time to determine as be
tween the Panama and Nlcaraguan
routes, the President wrote:
4 IDEAL OP CENTURIES.
"Reasonable tune In the case of such an
Enterprise as this, an enterprise which
Na frcu uiuuui ql lur iieuriy tuur cen
turies, which has been planned in detail
and worked at for hair a century and
Men, -when completed, will endure
forv ages and wIU change the
geosrat&y of a hemisphere and the trade
routes of the world, must, of course, mean
whatever time is necessary to convince
ourselves that the course we are following
Is wise and proper.
It saems evident that in a matter such
as this we jshould, finally decide which is
the best rsute, ana it tne aavantages or
over any other possible route
ently marked, we should then
that we can no longer submit
or insincere dealing on the
those whom the accident of posi-
placed in temporary control of
ur.d through which the route must
iat If they will come to agreement
in straightforward fashion we
turn act. not only with Justice,
generosity, and that It they fall
comet sucn agreement with us we
with take the matter Inter our
4B
!
MUCH WAR TALK
AT
Reported That Large Colombian
Army Under General Reyes
Has Started to Panama.
CAPITAL IN STATE OF SIEGE.
Acting President Declares Tlmt
His Country Never Will Recog
nize Rebels' Independence
, and Predicts Bloodshed.
I
MAIUtOdUIX TELLS OF
ARMY'S DEPARTURE.
Guayaquil, Ecuador, Nov. 13.
General Plaza, President of Ecua
dor, has cabled to President Marro
quln of Colombia, sympathizing
with him In the recent events on
the Isthmus of Panama.
President Marroquin has replied,
thanking General Plaza, and add
ing that Generals Reyes, Caballa
ras, Osplna and Holguin are
marching on Panama with a largo
army to subdue the isthmians.
I
SPECIAL BY CABLE TO THE NEW YORK
HERALD AND TUB ST. LOUIS REPUBLIC.
Panama, Nov. 13 Copyright, 1903 ) Ca
ble service with Bogota has been re-established
and the following Is the first im
portant dispatch since the rebellion sent
from the Colombian capital:
Bogota, Colombia, Nov. 10 Acting Pres
ident Jorga Holquin told me to-day that
Colombia would never recognize the inde
pendence of Panama.
"My Government will exhaust its last
drop of blood and Its last cent In putting
down the rebellion," he said.
"I wish to make the announcement to
the world that we will not submit to isth
mian Independence."
General Rafael Reyes has been appoint
ed generalisslmo-in-chlef of Colombia's
fighting forces and all here are confident
that he will force the United States to
maintain the sovereignty of Colombia on
isthmian soil.
STARTS WITH ARMY.
General Reyes departs to-day for the
coast with a large and well-equipped
army. He announced that he had left
'behind a force of 100,000 men ready for
any emergency.
All departments and parties have prom
ised unconditional support and financial
aid to the Governor. The people are furi
ous over the revolution. A high official of
the Government said to-day that Colom
bia "rejected with profound Indignation
the Independence movement of the Isth
mians." SThe rebellion," he added, "ia merely
supported by the treasonable act of certain
military officials, and with the only object
of satisfying the avarlclousness of certain
individuals and foreign companies hav
ing interests connected with the canal
company."
BOGOTA IN SIEGE. 4
Bogota continues in a state of siege, but
the United States Legation is well pro
tected. The Colombian Government and the peo
ple are satisfied that Colombian patriotic
sentiments will prevail, and before long
the isthmus wul realize the error of its
course, and will return to the mother
country before Colombian blood shall flow
in torrents.
RECEPTION OF MINISTER
MARKS FORMAL RECOGNITION
REPUBLIC SPECIAL
Washington. Nov. 13. M. Phllllppe Bu-nau-Varilla
handed his letters of credence
as Minister of Panama to' the TJnlted
States to President Roosevelt In the blue
room at the White House this morning.
His presentation, which constituted
formal recognition of his new-born Gov
ernment as a sovereign state, was far
more significant than the usual presenta
tion of a new 'Minister at the "White
House.
It marked the point where there will be
no backward step in the administration's
Panama policy.
The remarks exchanged between the
President and diplomats on an ordinary
occasion of this sort are dry and uninter
esting. To-day they were attended by no
particular utterance. Indicating any
change or further development of Presi
dent Roosevelt's policy. Secretary Hay ac
companied M. Bunau-VarlUa to the White
House. " -
HEARD
BOGOTA
Ten Said toBe for Conviction of
Defendants in Naturali
zation Fraud Gases.
NO DECISION AT MIDNIGHT.
Escorted to Hotel by Marshal
Morsey and Deliberations Will
Not Be Resumed Until
This Morning.
I
FOUR CO.NVICTIOS I.N
XATCRALIZATION PIUIDS.
Nathan LeUn, convicted May 19,
serving sentence of fle jears in the
Missouri PenitentHrj. $
John Barbaglla, conlcted May 29;
serving a term of three jcirs in
the Missouri Penitentiary.
Charles Weissman, pleided gull-
ty November 2, sentenced to three
j cars in the Missouri Penitentiary
November 5
' Adolph Fein, conictcd November
5; sentenced to five jcars in the
Penitentiary and a fine of ?1,000 as"-
sessed.
4 Cases "Vow "With the Jnry.
Thomas E. Barrett, charged In
seven Indictments and nine count-!
John P. Dolan, charged In seven
Indictments and nine count'.
Frank P. Gairett, chirged In sev- t
en indictments and nine counts.
0
I I After deliberating more than seven
hours, the Jury In the case of the United
States against Thomas E. Barrett, John
P. Dolan and Frank P. Garrett, charged
with naturalization frauds, retired at
midnight.
United States Marshal Morsey was sum
moned at 11.30 o'clock and Informed that
no verdict could be reached last night
He accordingly conducted the twelve
Jurors to their hotel, where they will re
maln until -if o'clock to-day, whtn con
sideration of the case will be resumed
The Go-vernment expected a verdict o
guilty In a short time, and the exttnUeii
aeliueraUon of the jury was a surprise.
In cases of this niture in tne Unlt'd
States Court It Is onlj within the province
of the Jury to decido whether the de-
fenaants are guilty or not guilty. The
court asstsses tho punishment.
It is understood that a majority of the
jurymen are of the opinion that the Gov
ernment established its case and are for
conviction This number is said to bo ten
The other two jurjmen are of a different
opinion and have d-'laj cd the finding of a
verdict.
The case went to the Jury at 4 24 o'clock.
JUDGE ADAMS S INblitUCTlONS.
Judge Adams finished his charge to the
jury at 1 15 He began at 4 i. and for
fifty minutes, in a comprehensive and
clear statement of the Ian, outlined huvv
and in what manner the jury should con
sider the testimony, the circumstances
and facts in the caae, the wtight of evi
dence, the credibility of witnesses, and all
the matters that should go toward the dis
position of so important a case.
"The caso to which you have so patient
ly listened for das," said Judge Adams in
his opening remarks to the Jut j. ' Involves
questions and principles so vital not'only
to the community In which we live, but to
our country Itself and to the possible lib
erty of the defendants, that I deem It ad
visable to Instruct somewhat In what Is
necessary to become a citizen of the
United States "
Judge Adams then outlined the Federal
statutes as to the requirements of clUzen
shlp and showed how this privilege was
Jealously guarded and hedged about in or
der to afford protection from those who
know nothing of the institution of Amer
ica. He explained the procedure In court,
how It was necessary tor aliens to live in
this country fle jears before the rights
of citizenship could bo extended, and
called attention to the Importance which
Congress attached to the proceedings by
making It necessary for all aliens to ap
pear and make oath with two witnesses in
the courts of record ot the land
"You will perceive," said Judge Adams,
"that the proceeding Is before orte of the
important courts of the land. The pro
ceeding is a Judgment of the court, and
one to which too much cannot be at
tached, as it Imposes duties and obliga
tions of citizenship upon the new citizen.
"Such a Judgment Is vastly more Impor
tant than one authorizing the mere recov
ery of a few paltry dollars, and carries a
meaning not Included In the ordinary con
clusions of tribunals."
CONGRESS IMPOSES PENALTY.
The requirements of Congress as to nat
uralization, Judgo Adams said, were rea
sonable and necessary, and, being so, that
body had in its wisdom Imposed penalties
upon those who violated the laws regard
ing it and upon those w ho in any way as
sisted in so doing
Judge Ajdams then read to the jury
the sections of the Federal statutes relat
ing to the two counts In the Indictments
upon which the defendants were tried.
These counts, the fifth and ninth, charge,
respectively, that the defendants aided
and abetted the principals, the Italians
for whom the naturalization papers were
procured, In having in their possession for
the purposes of registering and voting
false naturalization papers, and In aiding
and abetting certain of the defendants in
using false n-iturallzatlon papers In regis
tering and voting.
Attention was then called to the reading
of tho laws of the State of Missouri relat
ing to registration and voting.
In closing the reading of the Federal
and S'ate statutes Judge Adams said he
had read diem In order that the law of
the land might be fully understood and an
intelligent appreciation of the gravity of
the chargb arrived at.
Judge xLdame then Instructed the jury
to find J. verdict of not guilty in indict
ments L2 and 4913, which charge the Ital
ians Cftstoni and Cerrlatl with having in
their possession fraudulent papers for the
reasoa that the evidence did not sustain
the allegation. Llhe instruction was given
as tJ indictment No. 4928, for the reason
thatfthe certificate was not produced In
tvldjFnce, and the corpus was accordingly
notlproved.
Instruction was given that in the other
seven'lcdictments count No. should be
considered in all, but only In two indict
ments, thoxe charging the Italians Ferra-
Continued on Page Two.
The Cole County Grand Jury
Takes Up a New Lead
in the Boodle In-
quiry.
VENIREMEN ARE WITNESSES.
Arctic Explorer Baldwin Among
Those to Give Testimony
Final Report to Be
Made To-Day.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL
Jefferson City, Mo , Nov. 13 In addition
to tho alum scandal in the Missouri As
sembly, the distribution of railway passes
and local Sabbath breaking, the Cole Coun
ty Grand Jury to-day took up a new lead
by Investigating the rumor that the Far
rls jury, which refused to convict the de
fendant last week, was "fixed "
Intimations have been made since the
rarris trial that even thing was not
straight as to the selection of the jurors,
but as no definite charge was brought and
only vague stories were told. It remains to
be seen if the Grand Jury can make an
thlng out of it. The vote of the jurj stood
8 to 4 !n favor of convictidn
TALK OF LEAK.
From the action of the Grand Jury In th
summonlng of witnesses to-day It was
plainly Indicated that annvestlgatlon ia
being made by Attorney General Crow ns
to the truth or falsity of the statement
that tho members of the special venire
were "seen" by some one in the interest
of the defense before the Jury was drawn.
The stories do not assert that the Ju
rors were "fixed" by the use of money or
that the Jurors who voted for the ac
quittal of Farrls were "fixed," but that
an attempt was made to tamper with the
Jury and that a "leak" came from the
jurj-room at midnight after the trial to
the effect that the jury was 8 to 4 and
would remain so until "hell froze over."
The Grand Jury will complete Its work
to-morrow and adjourn, as Its term must
close with the term of court. It the
charge of "fixing" the Jury Is not probed
completely. It Is possible that another
Grand Jury will be called to take up the
matter.
It Is said that the present Grand Jury,
In addition to working on the State cases,
has boon (retting down to business on lo
cal affairs and that a large stack of In
dictments was put In tho Courthouse
vault to-day to be handed. 'into court to
morrow. JURORS EXAMINED.
The following members of tho special
venire In the Farrls case were before the
Grand Jury to-day: John Ross, Ben
Prlnger, Everett Ward, Henry Andrae,
Peter Eveler, and J. W. Herkett, the
three first also being members of the trial
Jury.
Representatives J. M. Galbralth of Ce
dar County, J. W. Coy of Polk County,
R. W. Rubottom of Carter, Henry Vls
holl of Warren. E M. KIrkham of Cam
den and Henry Windier of Morgan also
were witnesses.
Arctic Explorer E B. Baldwin told his
story of his relation with William Zleg
ler, the baking powder magnate. W. J.
Underwood and T. R. Gibson were before
the jury as to the Farrls deposits in the
Steelvllle Bank, and F. A. Smith of St.
Louis also testified
Sheriff Smith left here to-day for St.
Louts to serve an attachment on a clerk
In a hotel, who refused to answer a
Grand Jury summons to testify here.
FORMER COLUMBIAN'S VISIT.
Maryland Editor Addresses Stu
dents of State University.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
Columbia, Mo , Nov. 13 Mr. Charles H
Grasly, publisher of the Baltimore News,
has been hero several days renewing old
friendships. Ho saw the growth of Co
lumbia and the development of tho uni
versity under the guidance of Mr. Curtis
B Rollins. Mr. Grasty's father, the late
Reverend John S. Grasty, D. D, was one
of tho most prominent Presbyterian min
isters of this section Mr. Grasty was ed
ucated at the Missouri University, but
this is his first visit since he left. In 1873
Mr. Grasty was Invited to address the
students at the chapel meeting this morn
ing He congratulated the faculty and
students on the prosperous condition of
tho institution and tho liberal support
now accorded by the State His allusions
to the services of the late Major James
S Rollins were warmly received.
!
WOMEN TRY TO QUELL UPROAR
AT W. C, T. U, CONVENTION.
hurch Filled With "Much Talking" Femininity Leads 1o Ap
pointment of Sergeant at-Arms and Assistants Flag to Be
Used for Salute in Place of Germ-Sprpading, Unhygienic Ker
. chief, Which Has Formerly Been Used.
Cincinnati. O, Nov. 13. On account of
"much talking In the audience," it be
came necessary to appoint a sergeant-at-arms
at the thirtieth annual convention
of the W. C T. U., which met. here to
day. Mrs. Forbes of Connecticut was ap
pointed Jointly vvlth Mrs. De Merest of
New Jersey, but the work of preserving
order was finally left to the latter with
authority to appoint assistants.
The opening session of the six days con
vention opened with a large and d!orderly
attendance, the BOO delegates constituting
only a small part of tho visitors which
packed the Ninth Street Baptist Church
when President Stevens called the conven
tion to order at 9.30 a. m.
After the crusade psalm and hymn
prayer was ottered by Doctor William J.
McSurely of Oxford.
The roll was called "by Mrs. Clara C.
Hoffman of Missouri, the reports of the
Executive and other committees were pre
sented, addresses of welcome and re
sponses were made, and telegrams'1 and
' letters read. Then Mrs," Lillian M. n.
Delegation From Business Men's
League Will Push City's
Claims.
WIRES TO ENGAGE ROOMS.
Committee Will Stop at Arling
ton Hotel, Where the Repub
lican National Organiza
tion Will Hold Its
Sessions.
Washington, Nov. 13. Senator M. A.
Hanna, chairman of the Republican Na
tional Committee, to-day mailed to each
member of the committee a letter calling
them to meet at the Arlington Hotel,
Washington, Friday, December 11. The
call Is also signed by Perry S. Heath,
secretary. The committee will meet Fri
day for the purpose of appointing sub
committees, and will hear the claims of
cities aspiring to be selected as the place
of holding the 1904 convention at Satur
day morning's session Senator Hanna
will entertain the members of the com
mittee at a dinner at the Arlington on
Saturday night, December 12. The call
follows:
"The members of the Republican Na
tional Committee aro hereby called to
meet at the Arlington Hotel, in the v.lty
of Washington, D. f; , at 12 o'clock noon,
rfiday, December 1L It Is expected that
the session will continue Saturday, De
cember 12, the business to be decided be
ing the time ard place of holding the next
Republican National Convention, and to
transact such other business as may
properly come before the meeting."
Among the cities that want the conven
tions aro St. Louis, Chicago, Detroit, Cin
cinnati, Pittsburg and Boston The date
will be the second or third week In June
BUSINESS MEN'S LEAGUE ACTS.
Tho Business Men's League, as soon as
news was received yesterday that Chair
man Hanna had called the Republican Na
tional Committee together for December
11. telegraphed to the Arlington Hotel in
Washington, vhere the session of the
committee will be held, to secure head
quarters and rooms for the local commit
tee, which will go on to ask the National
Committee to hold the 1904 convention in
St. Louis.
The committee has not vet been select
ed, nor has the number been determined.
It will probably go to Washington in a
special car.
Chairman Nathan Frank of the Commit
tee on Conventions, who has charge of the
matter, has been for several months in
correspondency with members ot the Na
tional' Commlftee, paving the way for tho
lormal presentation of the claims of St.
Louis to the convention.
HAWES OPENS IN HANNIBAL
Honors Request Made by Citizens
to Start Campaign There.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL
Hannibal. Mo , Nov. 13 Definite ar
rangements were made to-night for the
Harry B Hawes meeting. Mr, Hawes will
speak at the Park Theater In this city
Wednesday night, November 18, Instead of
Thursday evening, November 19, as pre
viously announced.
Delegations are forming at Palmyra,
New London, Monroe City and other near
by towns to attend the meeting
Mr. Hawes delivers his opening address
In this city In response to a petition signed
by many prominent citizens f this city
and county.
FOLK IN "PETTIS COUNTY.
He Will Address the Democrats
of Sedalia To-Daj.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL
Sedalia, Mo , Nov. 13. Joseph W. Tolk
of St. Louis will reach Sedalia to-morrow
morning. He will be received at the sta
tion by a delegation from the Folk Club,
headed by Lee Montgomery, R A. Hlg
don and John II. Rodcs In the afternoon
he will deliver an address on party sub
jects, and In the evening It Is likely that
he will be the guest of honor at a recep
tion. IVORY SUBSTITUTED
FOR BONE IN ARM.
Berlin, Nov. 13 Doctor Vogel of
the Bonn Hospital describes in to
day's issue of a German medical
weekly tho successful substitution
of an ivory bone for one of the
bones of the lower arm of a little
girl. Subsequent examination by
Roentgen rays has shown that the
healing process Is complete, with
the substitute bone In position.
Stevens of Portland. Me , delivered the
president's annual address.
Reports of various officers
submitted.
were then
Mrs. Stevens was frequently Interrupt
ed both by unruly applause and talking In
the audience, among those In the rear of
the edifice.
A greeting was then sent to Lady Som
erset In England, who failed to attend.
On motion of Mrs, Marie C. Brenn of
Chicago, the American flag was adopted
for the official salute Instead of the "un
hygienic use of handkerchiefs," and a
committee was appointed to secure the
flag.
To-night welcome addresses were deliv
ered by representatives of the city govern
ment, local churches. State and local
branches of the W. C. T. U., and other
organizations, with responses by Mrs. Ste
vens of Maine, Mrs. C. H. Howe-of Mis
souri and others. An overflow meeting
was conducted In another church bv Bpv.
erend Anna Shaw of Pennsylvania. mx
Deep-Laid Plot Was Discovered by Police Officials in Time to Balk
the Escape and the Fugitive Was Removed to the Penitentiary
Intention Was to Ride Acioss Country to the Sea and Board
Steamer Bound for Central or South America.
PLOT IS SAID TO HAVE
SPECIAL TO THE REPUBLIC BY CABLE
VIA GALVBOTON.
Guadalajara, Mexico. Nov. 13 It has
Just leaked out here that the reason for
the removal of Charles Kratz, the fugi
tive St. Louis boodler, from the jail to
the Jalisco Penitentiary was the discov
ery of a plot to get him out of the coun
try. St. Louis persons who do not want Kratz
to return are said to have proposed the
scheme and put up considerable money
to carry It through, but It was discovered
by the Mexican officials In time to balk It.
The Idea of Kratz'B confederates was to
take him to the Western coast In time to
catch a steamer south for the Central
American port3 The trip was to be made
overland on horseback.
DID SOT PAVOR
FLIGHT AT nnST.
When the scheme was proposed to Kratz
It is iaid that ho was not inclined to look
upon It with favor at first, but at the
urgent entreaties of his friends here he
consented to the plan.
Ever thing was arranged for the es
cape last Wedresdav night. A messenger
was to have been sent to the Inspector's
office with the news that one of Kratz's
children was critically 111 and not ex
pected to live. Kratz was then to make
a request of the Inspector, in whose pri
vate office he has carried on his business
since his arrest, to be allowed to go to his
djlns: child In tae company of an officer.
Or.ce in the house it would have been an
easy matter for Kratz to break for lib
erty. W hlle the officer halted at the door
of the supposed sickroom. Kratz n tn
rush through the room, p'unge out the
window and aash away with his com
panion on horses, which would havo been
In waiting, in charge of his brother, John,
and a guide who knows the country.
Other guards were to have been sta
tioned about the house to take care of the
ofTce: In case he became too "over
zca'ous" In the performance ot his duty.
COILD HAVE ILISILV
DISTANCED PURSUERS.
Once out In the open on horseback, they
could soon have gained such a distance on
any attempt at pursuit that they could not
be trailed.
A start was to have been made to Man
zanlllo, on the Pacific Coast, where they
could have boarded a steamer for Central
America or Panama.
Manzanlllo Is 130. miles south ot south
w est from here, as the crow files, but the
country Is wild and mountainous In many
sections, so that the fugitives would have
to mako a rather circuitous Journey. It
would probably take three days to make
the trip.
On learning of the plot, the police nt
once cofnmunlcated with Governor Ahu
mada of Jalisco, who Issued an order that
the prisoner be removed to the State Pen
itentiary, one of the most formidable
prisons In the Republic of Mexico. It Is
not recorded that any prisoner ever es
caped from its confines.
PLOT HATCHED
I.V ST. LOUIS.
It wa3 learned on good authority that
the plot was hstched In St. Louis by per
sons who do not wish Kratz's return for
fear that he might Incriminate them. All
of the associates of JlurrcU remember his
returning home from Mexico and the bomb
which exploded after ho testified before
the Grand Jury, and It Is to prevent a
repetition of this that the St. Louis
"friends" are anxious to block the extra
dition. It is generally conceded by everybody
down here who knows an thing of the
KING EDWARD WILL START HORSE
IN GREAT WORLD'S FAIR STAKE.
REPUBUC SPECIAL
New York, Nov 13 Tho race for the rich World's Fair Stakes at St. Louis next
year will be a truly International affair. King Edward of England has signified his in
tention of naming a horse to start In the event. It is not likely, though, that the
icing's colors will be worn In the race. It Is thought that the horse will be started
in the name of one of his tniners. Besides the English horse, all the flrst-clas3 thor
oughbreds of the American turf will bo named to start, and it is very likely that W.
K Vanderbllt will select his great horse. Champs Elysee, which has won many
stakes in France. The stake, it is expected, will be worth fully $62,000, the largest ever
offered on the American turf.
vwwwv
I LEAD
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ENDING TOPICS IN
THE SUN RISES THIS MORNING AT
6 41 AND SETS THIS EVENING AT 4.1S.
THE MOON RISES TO-MORROW
MORNING AT 2.46.
GRAIN CLOSED: ST. LOUIS-MAT
WHEAT WmSDc ASKED: MAY CORN
30c CHICAGO-MAY WHEAT TISTTUc
ASKED: MAY CORN U3'2c.
WEATHER INDICATIONS.
For St. Lonli and Vicinity Rain to
day, followed by fair weather; cool
er. For Mlssonrl and Arkansan Fnlr
Snlurdn). Sunday, increnslns cloud
iness. For Illinois Fair Saturday and
probably Sunday.
For East Texas Fair Saturday and
Sunday.
For West Texas Fnlr Saturday.
Sunday, fair In south; rain or mow
and colder in north.
PART I.
Page.
1. Roosevelt Urged That Canal Be Dug.
Confesses to Stealing Jewelry.
3. Railway News.
4. Odds Favor Yale Eleven.
Football on Local Gridiron To-Day.
5. Happenings in East Side Cltle3.
6. Editorial.
To Investigate Election Laws.
St. Loulsans St New York and Chi
cago. 7. Trains Collide at Fair Grounds.
Campbell Defends Himself.
MdEcogee Indian Land Sales.x
Dred Scott Case for Precedent.
S. Fired Hi3 Pistol In Four Courts.
Dun's and Bradstreet's Weekly Trade
Review.
BEEN HATCHED IN ST. LOUIS.
case that Kratz's extradition Is only a
matter of a few weeks Not only do the
signs point that way, but President Diaz
has practically said as much In hi3 Inter
view on the subject.
Now the men who are liable to be un
cov ered by Kratz have determined on des
perate means to prevent his return. It Is
not doubted that Kratz, when he sees he
cannot escape the Penitentiary, will
"squeal" on his accomplices. It is not
believed that he will be content to go to
prison alone, while those who reaped the
same bnefit as he remain outside.
MIGHT INVOLVE
,EW XAMES.
In the hope, too, of lightening his own
sentence. It It believed that he would re
veal a few things which would make
squirm some business men of St. Louis
whooe names have never been drawn into
tho "deals."
Kratz was head of the St. Louis City
Council combine, and he made most of the
"deals." In this way he has Information
that no other man would be able to re
veal. Thero appars every reason why Kratz's
return should be feared and why his ac
complices should be willing to risk all to
block the extradition.
ST. LOUIS OFFICERS
TO ACCOMPANY THE
PAPERS TO GUADALAJARA.
SPECIAL TO THE REPUBLIC BT CABLE
VIA GALVESTON.
City of Mexico. Mexico, Nov. 13. Mex
ico's official translator Is diligently at
work on the papers In the Kratz extradi
tion case.
There are bo many of them, and the
case Is necessarily so voluminous that he
may not be able to complete the papers'
In time to be sent to the Department of
rorclgn Relations oh Saturday, as wa
originally Intended.
it is expecteo. nowever, tnat tney wii
be completed by Monday at the latetl
The presentation will be a mere formality;
since the department already has been ini
formed of their arrival, and the authori
ties practically know their contents.
As soon as the official seals are at
tached the papers will be forwarded to
the District Court at Guadalajara, where
Kratz will have his hearing.
Chief of Detectives ifesmond and Sher
iff Dlckmann ot St. Louis will depart for
Guadalajara on the same train with the
papers, to watch the case'ln every step
of Its course.
FOLK SAYS HE KNOWS
THE NAMES OF MEN WHO
MIGHT BE INTERESTED
Circuit Attorney Folk, before his de
parture for Sedalia. lost night, was made
acquainted with the contents of the tele
gram received by The Republic concerning
Kratz. He said that he knew of persons
who might be Interested in thwarting the
ends of justice, but he was not at liberty
to make their names public ,
"If such a move is contemplated," said
he, "the persons contemplating- It are
none too well versed with the situation or
aro taking desperate chances in view of
the Republic of Mexico's friendliness
toward the United States."
It was the Circuit Attorney's opinion
that Mexico would hardly allow the car
rylrg out of any plan for the removal of
Kratz from his present place of Imprison
ment. TO - DAY'S REPUBLIC.
PART II.
1. Children and Battleship Fund.
St. Louis Wants Republican Conven
tion. 2. Books of the Week.
3. Many Applications for Methodist Club
Membership.
Sunday Church Services.
News of tho City Churches.
4. Republic "Want" Ads.
Birth, Marriage and Death Records.
New Corporations.
5. Rooms for Rent Ads.
6. River News and Personals.
Live-Stock Markets.
7. Movement of Shorts Helps Stocks.
No Sales of Securities on Local Ex
change. Better Demand for Wheat Helps Mar
kets. Local Grain Sharply Higher.
8. Becoming Styles in Winter Hats.
Camera Club Finds a Home.
Charged With Running Poolroom ln
County.
t OREGON TOWN DECLINES ?
OFFER FROM CARNEGIE.
Grant's Pass, Ore, Nov. 13 Aft- ,
er five months ot debate and con
sideration, tha Council of Grant's
Pass has decided to decline the- of
fer of J10.0OO made by Andrew Car
negie for a library for the cltyjThi
City Council did not approve oj
certain stipulations attached to
otter.
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