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The St. Louis Republic. (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, December 07, 1903, Image 1

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THE ST. LOUIS
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In St. Lool. One Cent.
NINETY-SIXTH YEAK.
ST. LOUIS, MO., MONDAY, DECEMBEK 7, 1)03.
a. Tito uenie.
rrc Cents.
IC'FOR LEADI
MIBWE
BARGAINS.
WEDNESDAY'S
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COLOMBIAN COLONEL BETRAYED COUNTRY
INTO HANDS OF CONSPIRATORS FOR $8,000;
AMERICAN PLUCK AND LUCK WON FOR PANAMA;
FIRST NARRATIVE OF THE REVOLUTION.
"United States Marine.- Stared Death in the Face Two Days Though I'oriy Against Five Handled,
They Fearlessly Faced Utiles of Colombian Troops When Any foment Might nave Meant An
nihilation by Sujwrior Foue Arrival of Dixie in Sick of Time Probably Prevent cd Anoth
er Thermopylae Colonel Torres, in .Command of Colombian Troops After Arrest of Their
(u-neraK Threatened to Attack Colon and Kill All Americans Panama Revolutionists Un
able to Jnlluenee Him to Change His Intention by Any Argument Save Money After Receiv
ing the (Sold the Troops Refused to Embark Without Their fienerals. and Crisis Was Precip
itated Which Called Out the Marines From the Nashville.
L KH. y.hMannnnnnnn&;BB fJ-- f(SWTW M . .MMaMl,vtf .jTii)- "sK" (( ivY1 &4X'K?SBB . V'a 5L ," l4biBBcaCVkC
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AMERICAN MARINES BEHIND
CORRESPOXDEKCi: OP TltK ASSOCIATin
PRESS.
Colon. Republic of Panama. Xov. S.
There were tvjTays at Colon -nhen a fen
Americans u-''JJJ' the commanll ot Lieu
tenant Conihder Witze). U. S. X.,
faced a desperate chance, and looked it
calmly In- the face; and, although thld Is
thVcustonVot buFU'iairirsoIaie'rs the
world over, and although the terse press
dispatch" and the formal and modest re
pori given out at Washington by the Navy
Department covered the happenings here
on November 4 and C, still the few men
who met a dangerous situation with un
flinching courage 'and faced the possibility
of a fight against great odds, with" never
i a quiver, deserve that their actions be re
corded more In detail and faiily presented
to the people at home.
AMERICAN GUNBOAT -
PLXTS A' PART.
On November 2 the United States sun
boat Nashville, Captain John Ifubbard.
S came Into Colon. Her presence was wel
come on both sides of the Isthmus to ev
ery man concerned In the brewing seces
lon movement, but the surface observer
or affairs saw nothing to make her com
ing necessary. There was apparently no
revoluUon on foot, and traffic oer the
Panama Railroad did not appear to be
threatened.
. The next morning, Tuesday. November
3, the Colombian gunboat Cartagena" un
expectedly eteamed Into Colon. wIthTji50
Colombian troops' on board. This news
was flashed over the wires "to the other
side, and tho whole isthmus waked up.
At once there was nervous excitement at
raaaus. loung men carried messages
hurriedly through tho streets; secret con
sultations were held; -wild plans were dis
cussed; some of the conspirators were for
quitting, declaring there vias no chance
of success with 430 Colombian Midlers in
Colon, and that tho opportunity had been
lost, while others insisted upon Instant
action. The arrival of the Cartagena was
forcing tho h'ands of, the secessionists.
Those who advocated action finally pre
vailed, however, and TuesJay, November
3. Is now known as tho "day of the inde
pendence of the Republic of Panama."
With the gunboat Cartagena came two
Colombian Generals, -Amaj-a and Tovar,
and Colonel Torres. The Generals were
Ignorant of the headway of the secession
movement on the Isthmus. They landed
from tho gunboat early on Tuesday morn-
tng and took the 8 o'clock train for Pan
ama, forty miles away, confident that they
would find all quiet there, and suspecting
nothing. Later In the morning the 430 sol
diers were landed, in Colon and took up
their quarters in the .old railroad passen
ger station. Colonel Torres being in com
mand. ,
XRRESTED GOVERNOR
AND OFFICERS OF TROOPS.
Late Tuesday evening Generels Amaya
and- Tovar and Senor Obaldia, Colombian
Governor of Panama, were arrested and
placed in jail, the declaration of Panama's
independenco was made and the directing
council, or junta, composed of Senors
Arango, Arlso and Boyd, was duly ap
pointed. This decisive action was accom
plished quickly and easily, and it v. us un
doubtedly hastened by the presence in
Colon of the Cartagena's troops, who
constituted the dangerous factor In the
problem, which must at once be disposed
of. The news'of the arrest or Amaya.
Tovar and Obaldia was not generally
known In Colon until Wedneadas- morning.
On Tuesday, shortly after the two Gen
erals bad left Panama, Colonel Torres re
quested the Panama Railroad to transport
his men across the Isthmus. Now, the
. railroad company Is obliged, according to
its contract with the Colombian Govern-
-ment, to transport Colombian soldiers;
but, before this can be done, an order to
that effect must be given to the railroad
by the Governor of Panama. Torres tele
srspbed for such an order, and the rail
road officials had a train made up In read
iness to move the soldiers as sacn cs It
hould be received. This meant delay, at
.which Torres chafed, but there wa.-vnoth-Ing
he could do, as the train could not be
Voaflmied on Iara Three.
THEIR BARRICADES READY TO FIGHT AND MEET DEATH AGAINST
OVERWHELMING ODDS,
PANAMA CANAL WILL COST
UNITED STATES $200,000,000;
- - CHANNEL MUST BE DEEPER.
KBPIitiLde sl'lXJIAl.
Washington, Die. C It i estimated that it will cu-i the I'iuIbiI Slates
S1S!.:S3,33S to acquire and complete the Panama Canal beside, the amount to
bo paid to the Government In control of the isthmus for the concession, Thi
will bring the total to about $200,000,000.
Already there has been an immense amount of money and energy 'xponded
on the canal. It Is bafe to say that a sum more than sufficient to dig a water
way from ocean to ocean at sea level has been collected from investors at
different times in its history.
It was the intention ot the Panama Canal Company to make the tan.il 29.5
feet deep. The increased dimensions of steamers now being built has made It
necessary to plan for a much deeper channel, and the Walker Commission's
plans are for a waterway 36 feet deep.
a
GIRL OPERATOR
SHOOTS INTRUDER.
Man Tried to Embrace Her While.
She Was at Work in'
Lonelv Tower.
Williamson. W. Va., Dec. 6. William
Hb'wardson, an alleged outlaw of notoriety
who worked in the lumber camps near
Thacker. this county, was shot and mor
tally wounded by Miss Katie Roubough.
a girl of less than 20 years of age, who is
employed as telegraph operator for the
Norfolk and AVestern Railroad at Thack
er. Howardson, late last night, entered
the tower where the girl was at work
alone and attempted lo embrace her, but
the girl had a revolver.
Four shots were fired, two of which
penetrated Ilowardson's chest. He will
die. The girl, after firing the fatal shots,
called up the telegraph operator at Wil
liamson, related her experience and told
him she would no longer be on duty that
night.
She then walked a quarter of a mile in
the darkness and surrendered to a Magis
trate. No one -witnessed the tragedy, the
inhabitants of the village all being asleep
at the time. ,
Miss Roubough lives nc?r Pu!a;kl. Va.
She was released on her own' recog
nizance. PASTOR QUIETED
. CONGREGATION,
Preacher Commanded Order and
Congregation Marched Out
of Burning Church.
RrjrUBLJC SPECIAU
Memphis, Mo.", Dec. C The First Meth
odist Episcopal Church, the handsomest
edifice In the city, was 'burned to the
ground this morning.
The blaze was discovered on th roof
of the building at 11:30 o'clock, while tho
morning sen-Ices were In progress. A cry
of fire caused consternation among the
congregation and theie was a stampede
for tho door, but wiser counsel prevailed
and the crowd was quieted until it could
pass out slowly. The pastor explained
that the building could not be destroyed
until all had time to get Into the street
The Flre-Department worked heroically,
but could not stay the flames. The best
the firemen could do was to save sur
rounding property.
It is estimated that the loss on the
building and furnishings will reach $10,000,
partially covered by C,000 Insurance.
Steps will be taken at once to rebuild
the structure.
It is supposed that the Are wait caused
bj- a spark from the cblmnw.
.a
!,'
OF "HANNA FLURRY,"
Closest Friends of the President
Are Intently W:itehinr
This Movement.
REPUBLIC SPECIAU
Washington, Dec. 6 -Senators and Rep
resentatives who have been home during
the last ten days and have leturned for
the opening of the regular session of Con
gress say that they have been surprised
at the fresh outbreak for Hauna as a
presidential candidate which has occurrcfl
within a week.
This has burst forth simultaneously nil
over the countrj-. It has been as noticea
ble In Indiana as In Ohio, and as fervent
In Chicago as In New York City.
Some of the Senators are asking: "U'hat
does It mean? Is It possible that there is
a concerted movement onfthe eve of tho
meeting of the National Committee to
make Hanna a rival of Roosevelt?"
Talks with many of these observers dis
close an interesting state of affairs. Those
who welcome the Hanna talk sav that
before tho time of the meeting ot the Na
tional Committee they expect it will be
come apparent to the President and all
his frlendsi that Roosevelt cannot be elect
ed and that his nomination will hopelessly
split the party.
Senator Hanna continues to enjoy tio
movement In his behalf. He will not do
anything to stop It, In addition to what
he has done already, and he certainly will
not cut himself from all hope by consent
ing to becoma a pait of the campaign
machinery of 1901. and by thus assuming
that Rooevelt's nomination Is settled six
months in advance.
' The statement can be positively made
that Senator Hanna will not change his
mind, and be the chairman of the Na
tional Committee next year. Etery friend
of the Senator's regards it as settled de
finitely since Friday night, that Roose
velt must look for some other campaign
manager.
The closest friends or the President are
watching every phaseor what they term
"the Hanna flurry" with great intent
ness. It Is the danger that comes from
this quarter that Is Impelling the Presi
dent by everj' artifice to try to Induce the
Ohloan to consent to lead his campaign.
HEATH WILI, NOT RESIGN.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
Chicago. HI., Dec. 6. Perry S. Heath,
secretary, of the Republican National
Committee arrived here to-day from Salt
Lake City, and reiterated his statement
that-he had no Intention of resigning from
the committee because ot mention of his
name In cennectlon wttlMhe postal frauds.
FIGHT FOR ZIEGLER
WiLLBEGINTO-DAY
EFORE GOV, ODELL
Attorney General Crow Be
lieves Dockery's Requisition
for Extradition Eventually
Will Be Honored.
EXPECTS HARD FIGHT FIRST.
Jinking Powder IWaiiiifaiiiiriT
Will Contend That He Did
Xoi Flee From Justice.
MAY TRY HABEAS CORPUS.
Final P.alile Probably Will He
Fought Out in the Courts
Fudge Harvey (Joes to
Odell Willi State:,
J'l'oseoutor.
ltKPL'UUi'hl'KOIAL.
New York. Dec. 0 Attorney General
Crow of Missouri and Judge Thomas J J.
Harvey of St. touts anltcd in New Yoik
to-day and left for Albany to-night, to
urge before Governor Odell the extradition
of William Zlegler, indicted on the charge
of suppljing J13.W tu brib -Missouri leg
islators.
This alleged bribe was said lo hae been
made In the interest of the Royal Baking
Powder Trust. In which Mr. Zlegler is the
largest stockholder. 31r. Ciow- will act as
the lepresentative of Governor Dockery of
Missouri at the. hearing in Albany, and
Judge Harvey represents the Interests of
rival baking-powder concerns which, it
is contended, have been driven out of
buslnes In the State by Mr. Ziegler's con
cern, and It Is expected that the hearing
to-morrow will be filled with sensational
statement onhath bides.
Mr. Ziegler will make a -vigorous light.
He will havo at his back, some of tho
most skillful lawyers in New- York, an
well as the aislbtaiice of a well-known
law ilr'm In St. Louis. Mr. Zlegler will
not submit to being taken to Missouri for
tiial until every resource of the law is
exhausted.
WII.I, VLJZAD THAT ZinGLEU
DID NOT I-T.Ei: FROM JUSTICE. t
The chief point upon which Mr. Zieg-"
ler's lawyers will make their fight against
extradition Is that he did not flee from
the Justice of the Slate ot Missouri, as is
said to be chaiged in an affidavit of Dis
trict Attorney F. M. Brown, before the
Grand Jury. Under the Federal Constitu
tion, II Is provided that any person Who
commits an extraditable crime and then
flees from the State in which it was com
mitted shall be surrendered by the Gov
ernor of any other State when official
demand is made.
At to-morrow's hearing, the question
will be raised whether or not Mr. Zlegler
did llee from Missouri Justice. The ques
tion of his guilt or innocence cannot ba
discussed before Governor Odell. but any
question affecting the legality ot extradi
tion may be presented.
It Is possible that Mr. Ziegler may not
admit that he was in Missouri on the
date named in the Indictment, but it is
said that Attorney" General Crow will
produce the register of the Planters
Hotel of St. touls showing what purports
to bo Mr. Zlegler's signature, and that
several witnesses will testify tlut he was
there.
ZIEGLER MAY RESORT TO
WRIT OF HABEAS CORPUS.
Attorney General John Cunneen ot New
York probably will act with Governor
Odell to advise him on the variouH po'nts
of law' to be" bro'ught up. Should Governor
Odell grant the request for extradition It
Is understood that Mr. Zieglei's lawyers
will resort to a writ of habeas corpus and
contest the matter in the courts.
Attorney General Crow anticipates Just
such a move, but would not discuss any
phase of the hearing, on the ground that
It might prejudice his case.
"I cannot discuss the Zlegler case,"
said Mr. Crow, when seen at the Holland
House to-day. "All there Is to be said
about it Is that Mr. Zlegler baa been In
dieted, and It is my duty to see that ho
goes to Missouri for, trial. I shall do my
duty In trying to procure his extradition.
I don't know what contention his law
yers will make, and I don't care. I know
what the facts are and I think they are
sufficient to convince the Governor of
New York that Mr. Zlegler should go to
Missouri and plead to the Indictment.
"I am not here to try Mr. Ziegler, anil
no attempt will be made to bring in the
question of his guilt or Innocence. Thsif
must be .determined beftne a jury In the
State wiicie the charge of bribery is
made."
CROW ON HIS WORK
OF PROSECUTING BOODLERS.
When asked about his work In prosecut
ing boodlers in Missouri, Mr. Crow said:
"I have always believed there Is only
one rule In life which is sure to bring a
reasonable amount of contentment to a
man. and that rue Is: 'Keep on good tenr.3
with your conscience.' That I -what I
have always tried to do. That Is the one
motto I keep before me whenever I have
a disagreeable duty to perform.
"Recently I have been obliged to pros
ecute some of my closest friends, many of
Hem friends of my father and my family;
but I Just kept on speaking terms with
my conscience at the time and went
ahead.
"That men In official position are doing
that very thing every day, many times at
great personal sacrifice to themselves, is
the best proof in the world of the wisdom
of the men who founded this Government,
placing the power with the ' people, and
Continued on Pave Tno,
SALOGN ROBBER
SUSPECTSARRESTED
l.stml.v and Koile.v Charged With
Locking Prevallet. a P.nr-
, lender, in Ice I'ox.
STOLE MONEY AND CIGARS.
Special Olficers Crceley and Ueg-
nuu Apprehended the Hen
Short y After Hobbery
Was Commit ted.
Crouched in tilf he box intu which he
had ben fmced to crawl by three robbers
who ccnered him with ieo!vers, Thomas
Prevallet. a bartender rmpIoid in John
Busenhart's saloon. No. 1S47 North Broad
way, watched the highwaymen while they
leisurely locked til- door and then lobbed
the cash icgister anil cigar cai a few
minutes alter j o'clock yesterdav morn
ing. llichaid M. Kerley, -on of Doctor Rich
ard M. Kcrley, formot Superintendent of
tho Female Hospital, and Hugh Landy,
alias Cods, were arrested by Special Of
ficers Geoige Oreelcy and Degnan of the
Fifth Distrlet. several bonis after the rob
bery. Both have been Identified by Pre
allet. Kerley was arrested at tr-" home of his
father. No. KJ.M Easton aenue. I.andy
was taken Into custody while in a saloon
at Sixth and Poplar streets.
Prevallet, the bartender, told the police
tint th.) men nine into the saloon and
with drawn revolvcis ordered him to
crawl Into the loo box. He promptly
obeyed.
TOOK MONEY AND CIGARS.
A Idle one robber .tOud guard at the
dcor to present interruption, the otht-r two
buried the:nrlt in empting the cash
register and da.ir cae. From the regis
ter they took 1T.M.
While the trio weie taking money and
goods Prevallet sat shivering in the ice
box, through a glass window of which he
could see the robbT working.
Aftor looting the saloon, the men disap
peared through the front door, loavi'g
Preallet in the ice bov. He called loudly
an-1 kicked, but for nearly half an hour
was unable to make liimself heard.
Private Wntehman Charles Dodge en
tered the place to warm himself, and.
noting the nbsence of the bartender, be
gan an Investigation. He released-Prevallet.
who was chlUed.
Prevallet and Dodge went to the Fifth
District Station to report the lobbery.
Special Ofllceis Greeley and Degnan were
assigned to the case. The former had
only been in the Fifth District one day
after his transfer from headquarters for
a breach of discipline.
rtom the description given In-Prevallet
Greeley suspected Krrlcy, who, It is
said, had been seen In the neighborhood
Saturday night. The police ovjjhc Fifth
District say that they have Iinonnatlon
tiiat connects Kerley with the robbery of
Daniel O'Brlen'-s saloon, at Ninth and
Tyler streets, shortly before Prevallet was
held up.
EMPEROR'S THROAT TROUBLE.
London Mail Says Keiuin if Mal
ady Is Feared.
Ixindon. Dc. 7. The Daily Mail under
stands that theie b reason to fear a re
crudewenre of Kmperor William's throat
trouble, and that it nriy be many weeks
before the Hmperor legains the meiof
lite voice, although the doctors are agreed
that the trouble I si not of a malignant
character.
LEADING TOPICS
-IX-
TO-DAY'S REPUBLIC.
THE SUX P.lSns THIS MORXIXG AT
7:03 AND SHTS THIS KVEXING AT 4:JS.
THD .MOON' 1USES THIS EVENING AT
S:10.
VKTIIKR IMllCTIOh.
I'or Missouri Knlr Moiitlny mill
Ttlexilaj.
Page,
1
. Flrt Narrative of Panama Revolution.
Fight for Ziegler Begins To-Day.
Tyner Writes Bitter Letter to. Presi
dent. . Signs That Market Is Recuperating,
Stabbed Over Bowl of Soup.
. Hallways Limit Pasa Issue.
Congress Will Coniene'ln Regular e
sion To-Day.
Jockey Conspired With Bookmaker to
Pull Horses.
Kearns Defeated the Spaldlngs; n.-iwl-
Ings Beat the Sportsman.
Race Entries.
Jealous Italians Murder Young Man.
I'rum Head of an Insurance Scheme.
Hadly Wounds Saloon Robber.
Aimy Doesn't Need Much lagi-Iatlon.
Editorial.
Stage Newt and Notes.
7. Rapid Growth In Banking Business.
Internal Commerce During October.
Masonic Lodge "Demit" Clears Mys
tery of Years.
I'nordalned Pator lljt Three Coun
ties. S. Republic "Want" Arivuitkement.
0. Republic "Want" Advertisements.
Iead and Zinc Report.
Expect Profit of Ji-.Oj-J.
10. Sermons and Services at the ChUrcIie".
Happenings In East Side Cities and
Townt".
Play Managers Look to St. Louis.
11. Bears Assume Control in a Very Dull
Market. I
Proi Lsions. '
Llve-Stock Market.
Ill ver New s.
12; Taken From Paris to 'Avoid Lynching.
Democrats Are Much Encouraged.
Memorial Service for Elks.
KRATZ DECISION
EXPECTED TUE
Denial of ltepori That I'lNoner
Wished to Jteturn to St.
Loui.i Voluntarily.
CASE NOW OUT OF HIS HANDS.
Alter .Judge Ilauds Jovn liis
Opinion There 3Iaj- I?e Fur
ther Delay in the Pro
ceedings. SFJX1AL. 'JO 1MB liKI'lTUUC 12V CAM.1:
VIA GALVESTON.
Mexico, Dec. 8. There Is absolutely no
truth In the report that Kratz will start
back Tuesday. On that day the court will
render a decision, which, even though fa
vorable to extradition, must still be re
ferred to tile Department of Foreign de
lations and then to the Chief Executive
for tlnal action. This will require a week
at the -, ery least.
An otHcial In the Department of Justice
said to-night that the ca--e had gone too
far now- to allow of its being dropped, even
though Kratz should offer to return vol
untarily. If he -hoold conclude, on hearing the
Judge.'s ilec'ion Tuesday, to return with
out futther light it is doubtful if his le
que.st could be granted, for it would give
the oilkeis of the United States uotMng
by which to hold him, xave his word, and
he would be at liheity to leave them at
any t.lace between Ouadalajaia. and the
northern border.
But even should the prosecution In- sat
isfied with his word to letuni, the case,
could not be dropped, -ave on an order
from the Chief Executive, which would
require several days' transit through the
regular oilldal channels.
UNEMPLOYED FORM
A UNIQUE UNION.
Would Organize Tlio.e Out of
Regular Work for Mu
tual Benefit!
The National Workers' Union will hold
a meeting to-moriow night at the head
quarters of the People's Fund and Wel
fare Association. Eleventh and Locust
.streets. All of the unemployed of the city
aie imited to attend.
The object of the met ting Is to perfect
the organization f-taited Saturday night,
when the following officers were elected:
Bobert AVIlson. president; W. W. Lane,
secietary-trcasurer. and Sidney Smith,
Iee pie&ldent.
Bv organizing the unemploed. thoe be
hind the moement say that they can get
in direct touch with the employer and be
beneficial, not only to themselves, but to
those who hire labor.
After the organization here gets In run
ning order the leaders In the movement
s-ay they will start locals In cities through
out the country.
The idea as projected is to effect an or
ganization of such scope as to keep every
branch in the country, when established,
well Informed on the labor situation, so
that when there Is an urgent demand for
laboren the exact needs will be known
and numbeis sent accordingly.
At the meeting Tuesday night minor de
tails will be taken up and dKpo'ert of.
These were left until wider notice could
be given the movement, so that those in
terested might have a oice.
FLOOD ALMOST
SUBMERGES VENICE
WateV Rises lo a Threatening
Height in Buildings and
Bridges Disappear.
Venice. Dee. C As a result of the ex
tremely bad weather, with a violent wind,
which has prevailed for some day?. Venice
was almost entirely under water for a few
hours to-day.
At the piazza of the Cathedral of St.
Mark the flood rose to a height of four
feet, while Inside the cathedral the water
was so high as to threaten serious dam
age. Gondolas had to be u?i d from shop door
lo shop door until bridge- were Impro
vised by the firemen, the ordinary bridges
having disappeared. The water gradually
subIded.
REFUSED TO HOIST
THE ITALIAN FLAG.
A tlae I.' Iliulr on Sotualllnm! Fori,
Ilnllnn Olflcer Warn Klll-il
In llle ItrDly.
ii ud
Aden, Dec. C. Lieutenant Commander
Charles Grabeati, an Italian officer com
manding an armed dhow, landed a party
of friendly natives at JDarbe. Somaliland.
and ordered the Italian flag hoisted on the
fort.
The commandant of the fort refused to
permit the order to lie carried out unless
It had the sanction of the Sultan. Lieu
tenant Commander Grabeau - thereupon,
gave the commandant two hours In which
to obey the order, and at the expiration of
that time, the commandant not having'
complied, fired upon the fort. The fort
replied with shell, killing Grabeau. The
dhow then put to sea and was picked up
by the Italian cruiser Galilee, which land
ed the officer's bodv bexe.
TELLS ROOSEVELT
HE
GRIEVOUS WRONGt
Former Assistant Attorney
General Tyner Writes Re
markable Letter of Protest
"From Brink of the
Grave."
ASKS THAT IT BE FILED.
Does Xol Longer Expect Justice,
but "RequeMs 1'res.ident to
Preserve Uis Statement.
BRISTOW'S REPORT GARBLED.
Executive lias Been Imposed Up
on, and Has Been Guilty of
Condemning Unheard i
Fellow -Man Whose
Death Is- Near.
liBI'L'HI.IC HI'ECIAT
Washington. Dee-. C Former Assistant
Attorney General James N. Tyner. wha
is under Indictment on the charge of con
spiring with his nephew. Harrison J. Bai
rett. to connive at certain violations of
the "fiaud and lottery statutes," of which
General Tyner wa the author, has ad
dressed a letter to Pres-ident Roosevelt,
taking exceptions to the denunciation ot
him by the Piesldent before an oppor
tunity had been afforded him to present
his defense In court.
The letter Is, In paL as follows:
"I do not deMie to question your good
faith or sincerity In accepting the conclu
sions of your subordinate. Mr. Brlstow,
and in dignifying them with the weight
nf-ynur -Irish official position, but hn it
occurred to you that, pending the trial of
the three indictments against me. based
on the allegations of the report, and
without having heard one word from m
ill my defense, your premature and un
warranted announcement of my assumed
guilt, and your call to the court and jun
to indorse the same. Is, to say the least,
extraordinary and dangerous?
"I am not asking that I should be pre
yumeil Innocent or that be-fore I am con
demned by ou or the department I
should be confronted by pioofs nnd wit
nesses, or given an opportunity to be
heard in my defense, or that in the trial
which confronts me I should have a fair
trial-all I am asking is that, in view of
the uncertainty of my life and the fact
that my lips may at any moment be for
ever sealed, this letter be tiled among
vour official recoids of my cae. together
with my letter of July V.. 1!W3. to Mr.
Brlstow. a copy of which I attach.
DENIES BRISTOW'S CHARGES.
"I desire again to specifically eleny every
one of the veiled charges made by Mr.
Brlstow- in his report and to call your at
tention to the fact that not one direct or
specified charge Is made agalnrt me In the.
conduct of my high office, nor has, nor
can, one cent of gain be traced to me. If
my life is spared I f-hall fully refute all
the surmises and Insinuations of Mr. Brls
tow, and shall be able to show the reason
which led him to withhold from you full
data, and to garble, misquote nnd falsify
that which he did submit to you.
"I also wish to deny your utterly un
warranted statement that The gross cor
ruptionin the case of Tyner has gone on
for a number of year?.' You should know,
and your subordinates do know, that no
single, act of corruption, gross or mild,
has been discovered against me: and th
TTniteii States Government, with its forty
inspectora and chief Inquisitor, Mr. BrU
tow, will be unable to discover one.
"I have tried for forty-odd years of
faithful service to my country to provo
my seal for faithfulness and honesty In
the public service, and I now say to you,
the President, of the Hhited States, my
chief accuser, as If It were the last word
I shall ever utter, that In your well-recognized
and honorable zeal for the public
good ycu have allowed yourself to be de
ceived nnd Imposed upon; and, while I
cannot hope for a hearing at your hands,
I shall. at,least. give myself the wretched,
solace of having denied these wrongs and
of having demanded that hearing which
right and Justice ought to accord me."
DRAMA FOUNDED ON B00DLING
Evansville Man AVriting a Play
Around St. Louis Diselosuren.
ni:punr.it t-ri:ciAU
Evansville. Ind.. Dec. 6. J. II. Curtis,
an EvAnsville man, has Ixrgun writing a
drama, entitled 'Ozark Valley." which
will deal with scenes connected with the
leefnt St. Louis boodle cases. The "hero"
in the drama Is a wealthy cattlemun from
the Ozark Valley.
A member of the St. Louis Council, an
honesty man. is approached by a bcodler,
who wants to bribe him for certain pa
pers he has la. his pojessJon relating to
a street-car franchise. The Councilman
refuses the bribe. The wife of the- Coun
cilman, who i a lover of fine clothes and
jewels, who is'willlng to sacrifice her hus
band's honor, steals the valuoblo papsrn,
and is about,ready to deliver them over to
the boodler when the "liero" steps in.
and, by a clever turn, secures the papers
ana raves the honor of the Councilman.
Curtis says he will carry twelve perfcOM
with his company. He Is his own finan
cial backer. He has been connected with
theatrical work for the last seven o? eight
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