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The St. Louis Republic. [volume] (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, January 31, 1904, PART I, Image 9

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THE REPUBLIC: SUNDAY. JANUARY 31, 1904.
HOW THE SHIPS OF OUR NAVY
ARE DISTRIBUTED OVER THE
WATERS OF THE EARTH.
I
u
"THE GO-OP"
BANKRUPT
STOCK
"THE GO-OP"
BANKRUPT
STOCK
To Effectively Carry Out All the Duties of Police, Neutrality, Protection, Exploration, and Train
ing of Armed Forces Afloat, the United States Assigns Its Cruising Fleet to Geographical
Divisions, Known Officially as the North Atlantic, Pacific, European, South Atlantic and
Asiatic.
)
610-612 WSH.N&T0N AVE., 0pp. LI3BEIL HOTEL
u
i
f
Tho black ships show the locations of our present naval force. The white boats represent the force recommended by
the Bureau of Navigation.
squadron, and this, It Is hoped, will make
Br COMMANDER J. D. JCRROLD
KJLLEY. U. S. N.
W1JITTEN FOR TI1C SUNDAY REPUBLIC.
CRUISING STATIONS.
The United States assigns Its cruising
force to Ave geographical divisions, and it
1 Interesting to recall that their official
boundaries hao varied but little In many
year.
It is true that the designations have
from time to time been modified, and
some old names, familiar onco a3 house
hold words, have disappeared.
Bevond this the navy, that most con
eervative of all executive bodies, has not
ventured.
To carry out effectively all the duties
of police, neutrality, protection, explora
tion and training our armed forces afloat
ore assembled on the following stations:
First, the North Atlantic: Fecond. the
Pacific; third, the European; fourth, the
South Atlantic, and. fifth, tie Asiatic.
Tne limits of the North Atlantic ex
tend from tho east coast of North Amer
ica to the f ort j -Ilf th degree of 'nest longi
tude, or to about the meridian of tho
Grand Banks, and from any Indefinite
north latitude to the equator, and thence
In a diagonal line westward along the
northeastern coast of South America.
Within this area, but not under its con
trol, aro the navy yards of Poitsmouth,
.". II.: Boston. New York, Iyague Island.
Norfolk. Charleston. S. C, and I'ensacola.
luid the naval stations at Newport. New
London, Beaufort, Key West anjj Algiers,
In addition there are various coal de
post, one notablv on Narraganett Bav.
nnd another on the Dry Tortus is. It Is
curious to note here, as an obiter dictum,
that the actual location of each Eastern
navy yard has a title quite different from
Its official designation.
Porstmouth Yard is in Klttery. Me :
Boston Yard Is In Charleston; New York
JCavv Yard Is In Brooklyn: Norfolk Navy
Yard Is In Gosport. a suburb of Ports
mouth. Va., and Pensacola Yard Is in
Warrington.
INCLUDES AMERICAN COAST.
The Pacific Station Includes the Pacific
coasts of North and South America, North
of tho equator It extends to 170 degrees
west longitude and Eouth to some point
not specifically designated in consequence
of tho extension of the Asiatic Station,
after the war with Spain.
Within its limits ore locatctd tho navy
J-ards at Bremerton, Wash., and Marc
sland, Cal.. and the coal depots at Pichl
llnque. In Loner California, at Tutuila,
Samoa, and at Hawaii, together with a
naval station on the Island of that name.
The European station embraces the
coasts of Europe, the Mediterranean on
bo:h shores and the African coast as far
south as St. Paul de Loando: thence diag
onally westward to the junction of the
equator and tho forty-fifth degree of west
longitude, this meridian separating it from
the North Atlantic
rormerly there was a storehouse within
tliesp limits, and a soft berth It afforded,
but it has been abandoned.
The South Atlantic station begins at tho
southern limits of the European and em
braces all the Atlantic coasts of Africa
and South America, and extends to the
seventieth degree of east longitude, north
to the equator that Is. beyond and around
the Cape of Good Hope.
The Asiatic station takes in tho east
coast of Arrica (excluding the waters of
tho South Atlantic), the Indian Ocean,
China Seas and the Pacific Ocean east of
1T0 degrees west. In this area are situated
the navy yards at Cavlte. Manila, the de
caying station at Subig Bay. and the s ore
house and hospital In Yokohama. Japan
Roughly speaking. Its waters Include
nearly one-half of the naval cruising area,
thus sharing with tho Pacific in a close
equality about twelve-sixteenths of the
zones subjec,ed to naval protection. Of the
remainder South America has about two
sixteenths and the Nonh Atlantic and Eu
ropean about one-sixteenth each. Reject
ing the water spaces of the world not of
necessity subjected to the visits of war
vessels, more than lOO.OOO.CCO of waer
square miles denmrd the protection of the
navies. If official reports be accepted our
contribution to this police dut U inade
quate in size and Illogical In compoalton.
NORTH ATLANTIC COAST.
In his report for 1SC3 Bear Admiral H.
C. Taj lor, U. S. N., describes the char
acter of the existing fleets and squadrons
and makes many pertinent suggestions
upon the actual force that we should as
semble In the various seas of tho world.
Our actual squadrons and what they
should be. according to his Judgment, are
et down in the chart accompanving the
article. Beginning with the North At
lantic station, he points out that this force
was in 19 C epanded Into a fleet consls ing
of tho battleship squadron under a Rear
Admiral, commander In chief: of the
Caribbean squadron under a Rear Ad
miral, and of the coast squidron, also un
der a Rear Admiral.
The flag officers commanding these two
latter mentioned squadrons are subject to
the orders of the commander in chief of
ihe fleet.
The battleship squadron thus forms a
nucleus around which may be gathered
the other units to assist as occasion de
mands In special duties or in the ma
nuevers and tactical exercises which now
form a part of our regular winter and
summer programme.
Tho Caribbean squadron, created In Oc
tober, 1S02, Is Intended to provide a forco
In Caribbean waters which can proceed
quickly to points demanding protection for
American interests.
Prompt action U mora thoroughly pro
vided for. It is believed, by the presence
of a flag oilicer. who may of his own
initiative investigate difficulties and enter
Into consultation with tho authorities
of the somewhat difficult countries that
border on the Caribbean.
The number of cruisers needed In this
squadron is set down as eight, five of
which should be improved 01mpia, and
three be vesels of light draught special-lv-
constructed for river service, but ca
pable of keeping tho sea. This would pro
vide at all times a division or squadron
of four cruisers for active sea service and
two vessels for river work, allowing one
of each type to be absent for repairs.
Culebra Island has hitherto been Its
headquarters, but Guantanamo has final
ly been chosen as Its primary base and
as a permanent dock ynrd. With this
position well defended by fortlfllcatlons, it
Is unlikely that strong works will be
needed at Culebra.
The coast squadron was organized on
Mav V. 1903. and Is composed of the
battleship Texas, the monitors. Arkansas.
Nevada and Florida and a flotilla of Ave
destrovers. This forco Is to constitute
one of the prinrtpal elements In the gen
eral strategic plan and will bo iiert pri
marllv for the defense of our const and
secondarily as a reserve to strengthen
our principal fleet in the West Indies.
It Is intended that this squadron shall
be composed of powerful ships, like tho
three new- monitors, which, though for
midable in battle, are not designed for
distant cruislnr or continuous foreign
duty. , ,..
It Is to be regularly based upon Key
West and its vicinity, as this Is a con
venient central poslt'on with reference to
the Atlantic coast, the Gulf of Mexico
and the West Indies. The ships of this
squadron find active employment during
the summer months as a training division
for the Naval Academy. Tho increased
number of midshipmen makes It neces
sary to have a large practice squadron,
nnd the use of an active cruising force
for this purpose has already prov ed bene-
The' midshipmen become familiar with
tho routine and customs of a regular
The Kieselhorst System
ONE-PRICE PIANO HOUSE
Serves Your Interest Best.
The Kieselhorst system of piano pricing and piano
selling is based on principles of right and justice to all
purchasers. Prices that are subject to be scaled down
"Just because it's you" and for various other flimsy ex
cuses are unfair to the great majority of buyers.
Your best security against over-charging is the Kies
elhorst System of piano-pricing, based on factory cost, and
not on the "what-we-can-get-plan" of many other stores.
PRICE TAGS AND PLAIN FIGURES.
AH pianos, organs and piano players at the Kiesel
horst Store are marked in plain figures. If for any reason
an instrument is reduced in price and that frequently
happens in the piano business as in all other kinds of busi
nessthe reduction is the same to one and all alike and
our price tags plainly show the price-concessions.
The Kieselhorst System
Saves yon $45 on a new $155 piano.
Saves you ?65 on a new ?18o piano.
Saves you 85 on a new $215 piano.
Saves jou 21 on a new $ 39 organ.
Our Small-Payment Plan Makes Piano Baring Easy.
WE ARE SOUTHWESTERN DISTRIBUTERS FOR
APOLLO KIMBALL DECKER
Piano Players. Pianos. Pianos.
And various other makes of pianos and organs.
KIESELHORST PIANO CO.,
ESTABLISHED J879. 9J4 OLIVE ST.
tiim TnnrA nuirUiv nvaiinhi imon gradua
tion for entering upon the arduoift duties
or their profess'on. This Is most desira
ble, because the present lack of commis
sioned o'.llcers enables mid-hlpmen to a
sumo at once positions of considerable re
sponsibility. The training squadron. consisting of cer
tain vessels that cruise actively, was or
ganized In July. 1M2 It Is independent of
the North Atlantic fleet, and has been
formed not for maneuvering and tae'lcai
exercises, but for convenience of adminis
tration. Under the old sjstem ships were
left largely to their individual devices,
uniformity of method being secured in
some degree by gtneral regulations and
regular Inspections.
FOUND IMPRACTICABLE!.
This system had some success when the
number of men in the-navy was insignifi
cant; but with several thousand under
training at one time It Is Impracticable to
supervise the details and Insure energy
and uniformity of effort through the per
sonal superintendence of the Bureau of
Navigation.
The cruises are to extend over a period
of two or threa mouths, and at stated tn
tirvals In the jear the ; hips will be
united for general drill This squadron has
its base In Hampton Road.
Tho irregular character of this force and
the diverse types, or i-hips of which it is
composed are undesirable.
Economy indicates that we should have a
number of vessels similar in class and
size, capablo of being used .is training
ships in peace and as cruisers In war. True
economy must be furthered by building a
M'e of training vessels that will have an
all around usefulness. '
eight such vessels are required and they
should be of tho same size as the San
Tranclsco. with n sea speed of sixteen
knots and a large coal endurance, but with
such reductions in armament as will ena
blo them t0 berth a large number of men.
rOREIGN DIVISION'S.
The South Atlantic squadron consists of
a fen- ships utterly unlike In design and
unequal In possibilities. Our Interests In
these waters are always Important and
the little group stationed there should he
Increased.
The least number of cruisers desirable Is
six, four of a scout cruiser tipo and two
improved Oljmplas Of the cruisers now
!n srv1rn ami buildinr three could he
spared for the station, thus leaving only
three to ne proviuea. -in ine uekeivpuivufc
of the fleet this force would be assigned to
the South Atlantic station during peace
for purposes of tactical drills and Inci
dentally to watch American Interests In
that region.
In case of war It could be united with
other squadrons In the West Indies, thus
forming a fleet of considerable strength.
Tho itot nfflclnl announcement is that
tho various squadrons are at set periods
to Interchange duties, and it Is reported
that the European and South Atlantic
squadrons are to exchange stations at tho
completion 01 me winter mauuutcis m
tho Caribbean.
This all! be. hetter news to the South
Atlantic officers and men than to tho
Mediterranean cruisers. It must be con
fessed that of late tho latter's employ
ment has not been all skittles and beer,
owing to thp difficulties at Bcjrout.
The European squadron consists of a
small division, us principal sirengrn cc
lng centered In tho flagship.
Tho nfflrlfil Tilnn rnntemlilatcs the aS'
signment to this Important station of
cruisers Deionging 10 me gene-rai Lyjjw ut;
fore mentioned.
Slir nf these vessels should be provided.
four of which should cruise together for
tactical nnd squadron worK. one tie useii
for visiting distant and minor ports of the
station and ono be under repairs.
It Is Important to keep all these Atlintic
squadrons at a proper strergth. so when
gathered Into a fleet tho rearrangement
found necessary last winter at Culebra.
owing to tho heterogeneous character of
the mobilized ships, may not be Impera
tive before any serious work can begin.
PACIFIC WATERS.
Tho Pacific Station requires a cruiser
squadron, nnd this should consist of two
divisions, each having four vessels. Hith
erto It has not been found practicable to
employ more than four ships actively
mtiisinir in these waters.
Tho extent of this station and our In
terests in the Paciflc make it impractica
ble to carrv on thn work properly with
less than the two divisions Indicated.
It Is not intended that these shall In
terchange with other squidrons as fre
quently as In the Atlantic, but It Is
deemed advisable that one division of
four cruisers should from tlmo to time
visit tho west coast of South America,
and when practicable Interchange with
tho South Atlantic Squadron at tho
Smtta nf Mnpellan.
It Is also probable that a division of
this squadron will occasionally Inter-
Change Willi ino cruiser uivisjun ut m3
AcH.ttt. fifof. meetlnir for that ourooe at
a convenient redezvous off Honolulu or
among tho Aleutian Islands.
Preparedness for war demands that this
habit or mommy snouia uecome neaiu
automatic Some objections have been
raised that squadrons will not remain
long enougn on any ono seanon. aim
therefore, fall to become famllHrly ac-
nilqlnl till it Thl tftcOt milst. hOW '
ever, be borne with for the greater good
that results rrom acquiring tne naDu
nf Trmhllttv "
Tho vessels assembled In Asiatic waters
have been for nearly six jears actively
nmnlnvml In VPfV trv inc duties.
Owing to patent reasons the force has
grown to such a slzo that It had to bo
organized In 1902 into a fleet with three
divisions, tho general situation apparently
demanding a battleship squadron. a
cruiser squadron and a squidron of small
vessels. , ,
Tills organization of the force will take
time to complete, but there is no reason
to doubt that it will proceed on these
broad lines The natural base of this fleet
Is the Philippines.
Mention has been made of a. naval de
pot at Subig Bay. and it may be added as
a matter of the first importance thit the
maintenance of our force In the Philip
pines and its readiness for use afe largely
dependent upon a naval base and dock
yard at this point.
A MEMORABLE CRUISE.
The battleships and cruiser division of
this fleet made at the very end of 1903 a
successful and memorable cruise of Hono
lulu, and after a short rest returned to
their own cruising grounds.
This cruise tested the seakeeplng quali
ties of the units In an unusual degree,
and It Is gratifying to know that both
battleships and cruisers ev en the low
freeboard Oregon came out of the trial
unscathed. ,
Six cruisers of an Improved Olympla
type and four cruisers of the scout type
are needed on this station.
Of thc two are available and two must
ho provided. The Commander In Chief of
the fleet recommends that two vessels,
small gunboats or large launches, be built
and assigned for service In Chinese rivers
for the protection of our Interests In such
places as our present gunboats cannot
reach, owing to their draucht.
Other nations have vessels of this de-
Knrntiiuii 111 itMdLiu wi&Liia. aim us nuitii-
can Interests In China are expanding It
I
13
OF THE B. J. HERY GO-OPERATIVE FUfiNITURH km URKT
G0MFW-"THE 60-OF" 00RNER TWELFTH 0 OLIVE STS,
Scooped in by "The H
UB"at45contheOo!!ar!!
1 The great sale is now on!! Attracting the attention of all St. Louis! Crowding, packing,
jamming the store with buyers! Flooding the city with the most amazing values ever offered!
TljlS ENTIRE 12&,GQQ.QO BANKRUPT STOCK OF FURNITURE AND
CARPETS IB GOING AT LESS THAN HALF PRICE!
Stop and think what that means to you!! Consider the tremendous saving this sale offers
you! Could you ask for a grander opportunity to furnish up those spare rooms for World's
Fair Visitors? Read the values offered below:
$4.50 Will Buy $10 World! $22,50 Buys $50 Worth! $45 Buys $100 Worth! $112.50 Buys $250 Worth!
No Goods Sold to Other Furnlturo Doalorsll Extra Saloipaopl to Walt an Evaryona Promptly.
BANKRUPT STOCK OF
IRON BEDS
The Co-Op' ?3.30
ltcdH arc
cut to
1.39
THE CO-01"S
BEDROOM SUITS
Sol lil (ink
were $2310
Elegant Snlts
were $43 00
..$11.75
.$21.50
THE CO-01"S
SIDEBOARDS
In fi old en Onk
were J-1KO
Extra I.arjrc
great K5t value.
..$8.98
.$15.75
THE CO-OP'S.
EXTENSION TABLES
C-foot Siir
were j'3 50....
42x I- Top
were sioia...
$2.98
$4.98
THE CO-OP'S UIMIIVIIT
FOLDING BEDS
With 18x40 Mirror PIO 7C
were EW.i-for OlO. Id
Elrjcnnt Hcd
were $50 w for
.$23.85
THE CO-OP'S. M VNTEI.
FOLDING BEDS
.$8.25
In Golden Onk
were $1SK
With .Mirror Top QlO Cfj
were $.7 30 for v)li3U
BANKRUPT STOCK OF
CENTER TABLES
Tlie Co-Op' $l.-r,
Tnl.l.' arc
cut to
Bg
THE CO-OP'S
IRON BEDS
Full size and s size
l?ti.((. qunltt
in this sale
1 !..- umilltj
:n tins sale
.$2.75
$4.95
THE CO-OP'S)
ODD DRESSERS
In Golden Onk
were $12 50 for..
$5.75
"WW. Inrce Level mirror OQ 7R
IJiCO value OOtlu
THE CO-OP'S.
Golden Onk
worth 7 50 for..,
Extrn AMile
worth Ji:i-for..
.$3.25
.$5.50
THE CO-OP'S
PARLOR SUITS
C Plecei
worth $33 00 for..
C Piece
worth $30 00 for..
..$16.75
.$24.00
THE CO-OP'S
WARDROBES
In Golden Oak
north $10Vfor..
Extrn Lnrjre
worth $13 vO for..
.$4.75
.$6.80
BANKRUPT STOCK OF
BRUSSELS RUGS
53.
Tl.e Co-Op' 0x12 feet
SIS Ilruiie-In Ituc
are cut to
THE CO-OP'S
HAT RACKS
Co-Opa $9.00 kind
in thi- sale
Co-Op's ?18.0O kind
In this sale
.$4.40
.$7.75
THE CO-OP'S COMBIXATIOX
BOOKCASES
$17.00 Qunlltlea
In this sale
93S.OO Qualities
In this sale
..$8.50
.$14.00
THE CO-OP'S
ODD PARLOR CHAIRS
$1.98
$4.00
$5.00 Vnlnes
In this bale
(9(IO Valnes
In thi sale
THE CO-OP'S
COUCHES
All color Telonrs J flfl
worth $S00 for i UU
Extra irlde and tnfted CC QQ
were $12.30 for tJJ.UO
THE CO-OP'S
CENTER TABLES
24x2-i-Inrk Tops
were $2.00 for
With brms feet
were S3 00 for
....85o
.$1.35
BANKRUPT STOCK OF
MANTEL
IRON
That the Co-Op Marked
nt $10 w are now
cut to
FOLDING BEDS
$4.93
THE CO-OP'S
TOILET SETS
Toilet Sets
w-lth slop jar were $3.50..
Dinner Sets
Si; pieces were $8.00
..$1.75
$2.98
Tiir co-op's.
MORRIS CHAIRS
With reierslble
cushions were $3 00....
The 14.00 quality
in this sale
.$4.25
$6,50
THE CO-OP'S
MUSIC CABINETS
Mnhosnny flnlsh
were $S00 for
With mirror top
were $12.00 for
$3.98
55.50
THE CO-OP'S
DINING CHAIRS
HlKh Back
were $L00 for.....
In Golden Onk
were a for....
.59c
85c
THH CO-OP'S
DAVENPORT BEDS
AH color -velonr
were $33 00 for.
I'pholstercd In leather (07 flfl
were $300O-for. QZliUU
$19.00
SAME GREAT VALUES ON SALE AT OUR EAST ST. LOUIS STORE, COLLINSVILLE AVENUE AND BROADWAY.
will be wise to provide the small and In
expensive types sugsoted.
In addition to the vessels regularly as
signed to the various stations other craft
havo been emploved in Important duties.
The first destrojer flotilla has under
taken a long oage to the Philippines by
way of the Canarie". Gibraltar, Med.ter
ranean. Suez, lted Sea and so onward
across the Indian Ocean.
A curious and Inexplicable effort was
made to Interfere with this cruise, but
wiser counsels have prevailed, and our
olllcers will, therefore, enjoy a new expe
rience and have an opportunity of com
paring their craft with foreign destroyers
that have accomplished equally long and
severe journeys.
It must be said In concluxlon that most
of this material has been taken from the
official report of the Chief of the Bureau
of Navigation, and that its text has been
largely used. No attempt has been made
to Indicate the names of the ships shown
In the chart, but their number and loca
tion may bo accepted as correct.
LIVES THREATENED BY GAS.
Motlier and Two Children Nar
rowly Escape Asphyxiation.
nnruBLic special
New York, Jan. SO Mrs. Matthew Mc
Nulta, president of the Catholic Women's
Benevolent Legion. No. 02. of Fordham,
was nearly asphyxiated with two of her
children in her home. Mr. McNuIta, a cus
toms inspector, worked all night Friday.
The youngest child. I"0. 3 years old. has
been ill for scmo time, und during his Ill
ness three of the children have been stop
ping with their grandmother, who lives on
nalnbridge avenue, near by. leaving Sirs.
McNulta with the sick boy. and Helen,
aged 7. in the house by themselves.
.loserh. one of the ch'ldren stopping with
their grandmother, has been In the habit
of running around to his homo early In the
morning to run errands for his mother. He
went there, but did not receive any re
.vponse to his knocks Then he tried to get
hi through the cellar, but was nearly over
come by gas. rearing something was
wrong, he nroused some of the neighbors.
An entrance was effected and Mrs. Slc
Nulta and the two children were discov
ered In their beas, semiconscious from the
effect of escaping gas which filled the
house.
Doctor Mulholland was summoned and
with some effort managed to restore Mrs.
SlcNulta and tho little boy to consclous
ress, but it was "ome hours before the lit
tle girl, Helen, was fully recovered.
It was found that the gas had escaped
fiom the pipe leading from the street main
to the house.
FARMER SHOT BUSY LINEMAN.
Mountaineer Misunderstood Man
Talking Over Wire.
REPITBIJC SPBCIAI
Cincinnati. Jan. 30. Because there ars
people in this section of the country who
have never seen a telephone, and know
nothlne of its perplexities nnd mysteries,
Harry Snodgrass, a lineman, is suffering
from a gunshot wound.
Snodgrass is a lineman employed by the
American Telegraph and Telephone Com
pany. The companv for which Snodgrass
works Is popularly known as the long-distance
"phone. , ,
A few- days ago he was sent down Into
the hills of Kentucky to locate a break
in the wires of the company. The line he
was sent to look after runs In a direct
line from Georgetown, Ky., to Hunting
ton, 'W. Va. ,,..
On account of the topography of the
country, the line, which frocs as a bird
would fly, crosses some of the wildest
oart of the "dark and bloody ground."
Snodgrass climbed a pole near Mount
Olive. Ky. He had a telephone with him,
suth as linemen carry, and wanted to tnlk
to Superintendent Kte of tho company
in Cincinnati.
When he reached the top. ono of the
natives came running out with a rifle in
his hands and wanted to know what he
was doing up the pole with such a queer
looking instrument.
The native was told he was a workman
and that he was talking to Cincinnati.
"Come uown out of that." was the In
junction he reeeived. "No honey cooler
can come around here and tell we'uns
such trash as. that. Come down. I say."
Snodgr.iss raid no attention to the com
mand anJ wrs shot In tho leg, which
caused him to fall a distance of twenty
feet.
The mountaineer took him Into his home
and dressed the wound, and then sent him
away with the explanation that a man
had paid him $3 for the privilege of put
ting the post In his front yard, and he did
not intend to let anybody climb It but the
min who paid tho money. ,
Snodgrass arrived in Cincinnati and had
his wound dressed by a doctor.
It was in the fleshy part of the leg; and
while painful, is not dangerous.
INFERNAL MACHINE SCARE.
Finding of a Firecracker Caused
Startling Eumor.
Rnrur.L.ic special.
New York, Jan. 30. Jersey City had tho
fag end of an Infernal machine scare, the
object of which. It. was said, was to blow
up the freight .steamship Kurdistan.
The affair began at 4 o'clock, when the
telephone bell at Police Headquarters rang
violently.
"What Is wanted?" asked Sergeant
Murphy.
"Send some one to the Manhassct dock
at once." was the answer. "An attempt
has been made to blow up the steamship
Kurdistan."
When Chief Murphy was Informed of the
message he sent Detective Frank Bennett
to the dock. An hour later he reported
that the only Infernal machine he could
find was a giant firecracker. The Kur
distan, he said, had unloaded a cargo of
Jlrecrackers at Brooklyn before going to
Jersey City to take on her cargo of oil.
Ona of the firecrackers had been left on
the ship, and an excited longshoreman
had spread the alarm.
Captain Hals of the Kurdistan was In
dignant over a. report that he had asked
tho police to hunt for some sailors who
were suspected of trying to blow up the
ship.
"Thero were no sailors on the ship."
said Captain Halg. "for the crew was laid
off when wo reached Brooklyn. There was
no attempt to blow up tno ship. There
wasn't even a firecracker on board. All
there was that I could And was the wrap
per of a pack of firecrackers. This blew
down Into tho hold and fell on a can of
oil, and a frightened longshoreman who
was helping to stow the cargo did tho
rest. I don't know who sent the alarm to
tho police."
Thenter Closes In New York.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
New York. Jan. 20. Health Commis
sioner Darlington announced that the Ital
ian Theater, on the Bowery, near Grand
street, which he had ordered closed, will
hardly again be opened.
In Blossom
Land, California
13
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There is brightness and beauty,
fulfilling your expectations.
The glory of the spring-time bloom
in the prettiest valleys in America, the
majesty of the forest-robed mountains
the charm of the semi-tropic sea and the
countless delights of outdoor life under the blue
sky of California do not disappoint.
Go now on the
Golden State Limited
H.
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Newest of trains, manned by experts, superior dining
cars, short line, lowest altitudes. All these features inter-
preted to the pleasure of its guests by the atmosphere of refinement
ERE and elegance. No other train to Southern California makes faster
time. No other train is so luxuriously equipped
V ..u Pan... riH.i1.ilv9t n c-n i ...
Through to hot Angeles, Pasadena,
Santa Barbara and San Francisco.
Information and California literature at this office.
Call or write. "
P. MANTZjDbtrict Passenger Agent,
8th and 4m Streets, St. Lou!.
V
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