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The St. Louis Republic. [volume] (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, February 01, 1904, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020274/1904-02-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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fy V ' KjETY-SIXTH YEAR. iOQ2
MONDAY MORNING. FEBRUARY 1. 1904.
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K- SEE WEDNKDAY "S MflJMJC HI LEADING ME1C1AHTS' IJWEEf' BAKCAMSL- .
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FOOTBALL PLAYER SERIOUSLY
HURT IN S0CKER SCRIMMAGE.
Full Back Ricksteiger of Spaldings Struck on Jaw by James Daly
of the Rawlingses and Carried From, the Field Unconscious
Assailant Arrested Pendiug Result of Injury Grieves Over
NEW YORK MAY INCREASE HER
RIS TRIRD CAR
TRAFFIC SUSPENDED
CITY COMMITTEE
Ifc:-
i:r
APPROPRIATION TO $500,000.
Bill Adding $150,001) lo Funds Available- for Empire State's Ex
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ON SUBURBAN LINE! TO MEET TO-NIGHT,
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hibit at World's Fair Will
Week Has Support of St
Legislators.
IEATER NEW YORK IS TO
REFUBIJC SPECIAI..
York, Jan. 31. An agreement has
.-a'k.j
reached which promises lo Increase
New York State appropriation for the
LouH 'World's Fair to a total of halt
's&Vr7. million dollars. Charles M. Reeves.
Secretary of the Exposition Committee on
rv;wsiaauon; came nere a lew uajs bu
S-fciiit"?1 Boston to see the members of the
Tork commission. The resu't.is that
bin -will he 'introduced at Albany this
week for J150.000 increase In the funds
now available for World's Fair purposes.
The bill has, the unanimous Indorsement
of the State Commission, or which E. H.
Harrlman is president,- and has been
drawn In accordance withtbe wishes of
Influential legislators at the Capitol.
The commission has expressed a desire
to make the Empire State exhibit the very
pSjf . best that will be seen at St. Louis, and It
rvS' Tilai probable' that the Legislature will place
iv- id.seai or approval upon uie pian.
JjpV'tf': .Greater New Tork, too. will make a fine
"Sfelrtowlhg; the details of which are now be-
t'StSKlnS rapidly arranged. Under Mayor Low's
sSis
ANOTHER DELAY,
"Explanation Given Is That Every
iEffort Is Being Made to Avoid"
- Rupture With Japan.
CZAR YET TO GIVE APPROVAL
Condition of Czarina's Health, It
Is Hinted, Another Reason
. for Not Hurrying the
Negotiations. .-
' arls, J Jan. H. Another' delay has oc
curred In framing and forwarding the
IVlssIan answer to the latest Japanese
note, and this will result In further avert
Jnir the culmination of the crisis. until the
middle or the latter part of this week.
The official advices received here from
St, Petersburg1 to-day, although somewhat
negative, gave definite, details of the
status of the note and the programme it
is intended, to. follow.
Count LamsdorlT, the Russian Foreign
Minister expected that the exchanges go
inj; on. would have permitted the final
drafting of the. answer, so that It could
liaye been presented to the Crar yester
day for his approval, but the expectation
wis notrealized, and, as a matter of-fa'ct,
thjl answer has not yet been Anally
drafted.
It was. therefore, determined to defer its
11 submission to the Czar until next Tuesday
orj "Wednesday.
Efforts are still being made to so shape
this answer as to prevent a rupture.
This new delay is interpreted as slightly
improving the "situation, as It indicates,
It .Is asserted here, that Russia is making
.extreme efforts to bring the answer with
in limits acceptable to Japan.
It is understood that the Empress of
Russia has an affection of the ear, which
may "necessitate an operation. This fact
is considered as having some bearing upon
vthe time when the answer will be sub
mitted to the Czar for approval. In any
event officials here are confident that
definite results wlil be known next Thurs
day. ,
LEADING TOPICS
IX
fO-OAY'S REPUBLIC
THE SUN RISES THIS -MORNING AT
7.-07 AND SETS, THIS EVENING AT 5:20.
WEATHER IXDICATIOS.
Far MUsoorl Fair Monday and
Tpiesilny; warmrr Taradny In weit.
Page. '
1. Russia Permits Another. Delay.
" 'Killed by Street Car.
Football Player .Seriously Injured.
I. Deaths Only One Day Apart
Dallas County Farmers Engage In
Fatal Fight' .
3... Says Motion-IVIH Not Be-Upheld. '
Commercial Club Indorses League.
Shake-up In Steel Trust Anticipated.
4. .Ellison Now Leads Winning- Owners.
- Race Entries:
,. "Lucky Corner" Lost by Changing
' Ring,
L . -Football.
'' .6..East Side Happenings.
"Seeks the O'Connell Heirs.
t. Editorial.
Stago Ncwb and. Notes.
7. Receptions Cost More Than Salary.
Frisco Secures Favorable Terms.
' -.To 'Define Boundary Line.
8..Republlc-" Want' Ad vcrtlsempnts.
'.. "Republic "Want" Advertisements.
,- .Lead and Zinc Report
5-ICtru? Was Pleased -With' Americans,
. 1-' 'River News. -
USSIA
SS&iftv sr'ioT Pertndns.and Services at. the Churches.
IcSS ' ' rf.-s-1"" "orlc on-aussoun jsuiioing.
Close Easier on JBearlsh Ad-
I!ai5r!?fi?1!ifnana-vegetaoies.
f'i .V'i-k."J?i Peenle Imorovlne In All Rcsnects.
', jffi.ctress'8ues Horsem'an'for B0,0W Dam-
Ik introduced at Albany Tins
ate Commission and Influential
MAKE A SPLENDID SHOWING.
administration, a bill for $23,000 was passed
by the Board of Aldermen for the purpose
of placing a display in the "Model City,"
but S14.000 of this sum reverted to the City
Treasurer through a failure to Issue bonds'
for the entire amount As soon as this
fact was discovered. Commissioner Thom
as V". nines and his coworkers set about
to recover the lost ground. An Interview
between Mayor McClellan and Mr. Reeves
was arranged, and on Tuesday a new' bill
for $23,000 will come up before the, AMer
rren. An effort Is being- made to amend the
bill to WO.OOO In order that a butldlas may
bo erected In the Model street In which
to house the social economy exhibits, but
there Is some doubt whether this will be
successful.
Boston has recently arranged to make a,
strong showing In the "Model City." The
money lias been pledged, and Boston will
have Its own separate building. This fact
Has had a great deal to do with the suc
cess of the efforts to bring Greater New
York into line.
ECCENTRIC RECLUSE
FREEZES TO DEATH.
Miss Emma Von Haaren Found
Lying on the Floor of
Kitchen.
COAL WITHIN EASY REACH.
Condition of Body Indicates That
She Died Alone in Her Rig
House Two Weeks
Ago.
Miss Emma Von Haaren, SO years old,
who had lived as a recluse for more than
fifteen years in Ker'large house at No. 426
South Fifteenth street, was found dead In
her room yesterday afternoon by Special
Officer Flynn and Patrolman Henry Shap
erkoetter. The condition of the body and facts ob
served by the policemen Indicate that .""he
had been dead for two weeks.
jThe police were directed to search for
the" woman by Doctor H. E. Millertof No.
2CT Missouri avenue, a nephew. Several
times in the last two weeks he had been
to the home of his aunt, and found the
house closed.
Yesterday afternoon he made another
visit, determined to solve the mystery of
her disappearance. Finding all the doors
locked, he went to the Four Courts, asked
for a patrolman, and, with him and the
detective, broke down the doors and en
tered the house.
The body of Miss Von Haaren was found
lying on the floor of her kitchen, near a
stove In which the fire had long since died
out. f
Doctor Miller states that his aunt was. an
eccentric person. She owned the Fifteenth
street property and lived in it when the
neighborhood was a more desirable resi
dence district than now. Other families
moved away, but Miss Von Haaren con
tinued to live there.
Her nephew repeatedly urged her to
come and live with him, or go to some
other part of the city, and rent apart
ment"!. This she refused to do, saying
she preferred to guard her property until
a tenant for It could be found.
ALONE IN BIG HOUSHL
She lived alone In the house, had no
servants, and seldom appeared "on the
Mreets. She was supplied with funds by
her relatives.
Two weeks ago she disappeared, but her
neighbors made no investigation. Doctor
Miller called and found the doors locked.
He refrained from informing the police,
thinking his aunt might have been away
on business.
When he asked for an investigation yes
terday he did not believe the worst, and
was almost overcome when, with the of
ficers, he found his aunt lying dead on
the floor.
Around her head and shoulders was
wrapped an old shawl. The clothing be
low her waist was scant She was lying
In a crouched position, as If her last con
scious effort had been to, get "into a chair
which stood a few feet away.
In the hall was found a tub full of coal,
and in the larder were provisions. Doc
tor Miller sayn his aunt was afflicted with
rheumatism.- and thinks that one of these
attacks caused her to fall to the floor.
She was unable to summon aid. It Is
thought, and. as the fire In' the stove
gradually went put, froze to death.
In thr front doorway were found the
daily papers since January 13, indicating
.that she had not been able to' move
around since that date. A postal from"
Doctor Miller, dated January 23, was also
found.
The police and neighbors thought that
In the house might be found a hidden
treasure, a there were stories that Miss
Von Haaren was well to do. Doctor Mill
er discourages this Idea, saying, that be
sides the property she owned, she had
nothing but what was advanced .to her.
The body was' taken to the Morguci
Doctor Miller will take charge of it" The
estate will be- put Into the hands of the
Public Administrator. '.
.- ' , i
IlrtmlltnM-BroTrn Shoe Company's
-' Shipments.
Shipments from December 14,
19tt. to february 1. 1W3. J1JC7.081J1,
Shipments from December 14,:
1S0J, to February 1, 1301.,;
...1,193,373.67
Loss
...'.,.:..... U4,oout
Patrick Greeley, 70 Years Old,
Sexton of Holy Innocents
Church, Killed.
BODY THROWN FIFTEEN FEET.
Three Transit Victims at Bran-
non Avenue and Arsenal
Street Within Last
Two Years.
For the third time struck by a Transit
caiv Patrick Greeley, 70 years old. sexton
of the -Holy Innocents Catholic Church,
was killed by a Tower Grove coach at
Brannon avenue and Arsenal street short
ly after noon yesterday.
It was tlie third fatal accident at the
same spot within tlie last two years.
C. H. Meyer, grocer at Brannon avenue
and Arsenal street, was looking at Mr.
Greeley when he was struck. Three cars
were following each other In rapid suc
cession, and the first car, in charge of
ilolornian Willlan- -:ke and Conductor
PATRICK GREELEY.
Sexton of the Holy Innocents' Catholic
Church, who was killed yesterday In his
third street car accident.
Jacob Underwood, Mr. Meyer states; was
going at a rapid rate of speed when It hit
the wxton.
"Mr. Greeley was standing near the cor
ner and waving his hand for the car to
siop." said Mr. Meyer. "I think he slipped
Just as he was about to step back from
the track. He was precipitated under the
car, and a moment later was hurled to
the Bldewalk fifteen feet away."
Witnessts who appeared on the scene
just after Mr. Greeley was struck, say
that the motorman was unable to stop
his car until It reached the Iron Mountain
bridge, which Is about VM feet from the
corner.
Mr. Greeley, meanwhile, was carried In
to a waiting-room adjoining a taloon, and
Doctor Hogg of the City Insane Asylum
was called. Father White of the Holy In
nocents Church was informed of the ac
cident and hastened to the wounded man.
The priest had just finished his acred
mission when Mr. Greeley died.
As soon as the car was stopped Motor
rcan Duke end Conductor Underwood re
turned to see how seriously the victim had
been Injureil. They remained in the room
until he died, and then hastened to their
car and continued the trip before the po
lice arrived.
Upon inquiry at the Tower Grovj divi
sion car barn, the cleiks In charge denied
all knowledge of the accident and claimed
that no report had been made.
Only a few months ago Mr. Greeley was
knocked unconscious by a car at Page and
Vandevcnter avenues, and at that time it
was thought he could not recover. About
ten years ago he was struck by a Broad
way car.
For the Iat ten years Mr. Greeley," who
lived with his son. Thomas Greeley, at No.
2829 Brannon avenue, had been "a sexton of
the Holy Innocents Church. He was a fa
vorite in the parls-h because of his genial
disposition and was highly thought of by
the pastor, the Reverend Father John
White.
The funeral will take place frora Holy
Innocent Church to-morrow morning,,
when a solemn requiem mass will be sung
at 9 o'clock. The body will be Interred
in Calvary Cemetery. Mr. Greeley's wife,
who is CO years old', and four children sur
vive him.
mT-'''' - -'-'.?, -
Hb'hkIK nv
' bV' 'AHHHb i
SUITS AGAINST CHICAGO
REACH $38,666,925.
Personal-Injury Claims So Large ThatCityAVill-Recnnie Bankrupt
Unless Favorable Action Is Taken on New Gharjer Sidewalk
Injuries Form Basis for a Majority of the Suits.
APPARENTLY AN ORGANIZED EFFORT AT LOOT HAS BEEN MADE
Chicago. .Tan. 31.-Personal injury suits amounting to $3g,&952 are pending
against tlie city of Chicago, according to the report- of the City Attorney, John- F.
Smulskl, made public' to-day. The Ccuncll. the Legislature, and finally the people
ure appealed to for relief. Sidewalk Injuries caused the majority of the suits.
Mr. SmuUkl. In Ms report, shows that the Interests combining- to loot the city In
this way amount practically to an organisation. Names "of lawyers, mostly young
men, and "doctors occur with great fiequtncy in the. list of siilts. The City At
torney says, the pUins up of suits will inevitably continue for, some years- even
should the city at once' .begin to tear up every wooden sidewalk.
The City Attorney says that tlie main cause of this condition Is the deplorable
state of theVltj'n finances, which makes it Impossible to care properly for Its streets
and sidewalks. "Tlie remedy, ho says, is n new Cit Charter.-,
The injur Judgments awarded against the city are 'pointed out, and Attorney
Smulskl says that unles favorable-action Is- taken In-regard to-' a new charter- In
evitable bankruptcy will result -. -
Leak in a Pipe Stops All Cars on
the City and County
Divisions.
MAY RESUME THIS MORNING.
jy
Coal Passer Finds.Crack in Water
Conduit WThielr.Supplies Rat-
teiy of Roileriirat De Hod-
iamont Station.
i
For tlie secomi time witldn two month"
the Suburban Railway Company was ye--terday
compelled to ceare operation of
cars on all of its lines, because of a break
In the boiler apparatus at the De Hodia
mont power-house.
Thousands of persons were left stranded
In the cur., which stopped suddenly in all
parts of the city and county at II a. ni
when the power was shut off. In many
Instances, where the Suburban lines were
the only ones available, passengers were
forced to walk long distance.
No "-ars were operated on the city lines
during the afternoon or last night At u
late hour It was thought doubtful If tlie
break, which occurred in a large watei
plpe that feeds a battery of eight boiler-!,
would be repaired, and operations le
sumed in time to carry the early-morning
crowds to-day.
Cars were operated outside of the city
limits, on the Meramec Hlghtauds and
Clayton division", for s-ever:il hours after
the breakdown. These linea were sup
plied with power from the Brentwood
. Station. I'asstngers on these lines were
taken to their destinations after long de
lay, and then operation ceased.
CARS TAKEN TO WARNS.
By concentrating the power from the
Brentwood Station to different parts of
tho city lines, cars were moved to the
sheds. At the time of tlie breakdown
about twenty-five cars were in operation
on the main line, -which runs from the
downtown district to Suburban Garden.
On the other lines the number was consid
erably less.
. The break In the pipe was first noticed
by coal passers who were working In front
of the bo'Iers. Tlie stream -of water at
first was small, but suddenly It burst forth
In a torrent. The -1)?am" pumps were
stopped and tlie firemen were ordered to
draw the fires from under the boilers.
Four steam pumps are 'used to supply
the battery of boilers with water. The
pipes from these all lead to one main pipe,
whicli runs above the boilers and from
which extend smaller feed pipes to each
boiler. .
On an examination of the Joint it was
found that it was cracked its entire length.
In many places It was worn very thin.
When this section of pipe was taken from
Its place and allowed to cool, the break
was hardly noticeable.
MAKE NEW SECTION.
To repair tiie break it Is necessary to
have a new section made, as a duplicate
could not be found in the city.
For several months the Suburban Com
pany has had a large force of men at
work insulling new equipment. Th steam
pumps now In use are to be replaced. A
new system of piping has also been In
stalled and connections will be made with
the boilers this week. With the new sys
tem it will be possible to shut off the wa
ter supply from any one of the boilers.
Superintendent McCuhe said last night
that he believed that operation would be
resumed early this morning.
A steam pipe leading from the boilers to
the enignes broke on December 22. A
steamfltter was scalded by the escaping
steam. The breakdown occurred early in
the morning and operations were not re
sumed until late at night.
FOURTEEN MINERS KILLED.
Fall 1,300 Feet Down Shaft of a
Mexican Mine.
Monterey,. Mexico, Jan. 31. Word has
reached this city from Victoria, capital of
the State of Tamulipas, stating that four
teen men were killed In a mine accident
near that city.
Sixteen men. it is stated, were being
hoisted out of the mine in a huge lift
after haying completed their day's work,
when the engineer, through some cause,
could not stop the lift when It reached
the surface, and a few seconds later, be
fore any of the men had an opporiunlty
to alight, all the cables broke, precipitat
ing tlie lift and its human freight to
the bottom of the shaft, a distance of 1,000
feet.
Of the sixteen men who were In It,
fourteen were' killed outright, one was
seriously wounded and one is missing.
T
V
Call for Gathering of Democratic
Central Body at Jefferson
Club a Surprise.
NOTICE NOT MADE PUBLIC.
May Set Date for Local Primary
to Select Delegates to
Nominating Con
vention. The Democratic City Central Committee
will meet to-night at the Jefferson Club.
For some unexplained .reason, no public
announcement of this meeting was given
A member of the committee stated last
night that while he knew a meeting of the
committee was to be held, he did not
know for what purpose.
From other sources the Information was
vouchsafed that the meeting of the com
mittee is to set tlie date fur the city
primary election to select delegates to
the nominating convention.
The same authnilty stated that tht
primaries will be held within the present
month. .
Heretofore St. Louisi has Invariably been
among the last to hold a primary.
The statement lias been made and denied
by friends of Mr. Folk and Mr. Hawes
that either is behind tlie call of the City
Committee, or favors an eaily city pri
mary. The primary election law, applicable to
St. Louis, requires twenty days' notice of
a primary. If reports are correct the call
of the City Committee will not exceed this
limit very much.
FOLK DEPARTS FOR FULTON.
Butler Trial on Bribery Charge
BegiiiM To-Day.
Circuit Attorney Joseph W; Folk.depart
ed last night for Fulton, Mo., Wnere- the
Butler case will be on trial to-day.
With Mr. Folk went Assistant Circuit
Attorneys C. Orrick Bishop and A. C
Maroney They boarded the M.. K. 'Ar-T.
train at 11:45 and "will arrive at Fulton
early this morning.
The trial is scheduled to begin at 8
o'clock and many friends of Butler will be
present during the sessions of the court, it
is said.
Butler will be tried on the charge of
having bribed nineteen members of the
House of Delegates In connection with the
lighting measure.
The first business of the court, over
which Judge W. W. Graves will preside,
will be to pass upon the demurrer to the
Indictment for bribery by wholesale. This
may be decided agalnt Butler, In which
event the Jury will then be selected; A
venire cf fifty Jurors has been selected,
nd It is thought that the Jury will not
be impaneled within two days at the ear
liest The examination of witnesses prob
ably will fill two days, after which the
arguments of the attorneys will be made.
It is thought that the case can hardly go
to tlie Jury before Saturday or Monday.
Mr. Folk will be assisted by Prosecuting
Attorney J. II. Murry of Boone County.
MUCH INTERESYlT FULTON.
An Enormous Crowd Will Re
Present When Trial Opens.
Fulton. Mo.. Jan. 31. Edward Butler,
his friends and attorneys, spent a quiet
day here. This morning Butle'r walked
out to the State institutions and looked
them over, returning at once to his hotel.
His movements are of great interest to
tlie community.
To-morrow, when the trial Is to open at
the County Courthouse, the crowd of vis
itors in Fulton will be the greatest the clty
has ever known. Hundreds of farmers
will be here, not only on account of the
Butler trial, but for the additional reason
that a local county campaign is on. the
stock sales are to take place and the
County Court Is to be in session.
PENNSYLVANIA RACE RIOT
ENDS IN NEGRO'S DEATH.
Black Flren Into Party of White Men,
Wanndlntr Two, Then ! Chased
Into the HIver.
Webster, Pa.. Jan. 31. One of a party of
five negroes last night fired upon a party
of white men who had hem making fun
of them. ,r
Two of the white men were wounded,
one of them fatally. In trying to get
.away, from the Infuriated companions of
the Injured men one of the negroes was
drowned In tlie Monongahela River. The
wounded are:
Robert Wilron, 22 years Old; bullet lodged
In base of brain; cannot recover.
Robert Booth, 23 years old; bullet in leg.
The name of the negro who was drowned
was not known.
For months a bitter feeling has existed
here among a number of white men. head
ed bv Wilson, and the' negroes of the
vicinity. .
PRAYING ON STREET CORNER.
Unidentified Woman Sent to the
City Hospital.
An unidentified woman, apparently ilo
mented.was found on the corner of Page
and Spring avenues last midnight pray
ing. In her hands she held . prayer
book and rosary.
She was sent to the City Hospital; and
declined to tell her name or anything con
cerning herself except that' she came from
Illinois.
The woman is about 5 feet S Inches In
height,, weighs 1W pounds, has blue eyes
and.rjrown nair, and appears to be about
25 years old. She wore a .black coai and
dark, dress..
Condition of Rival Did XoL
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A I,. V. RICKSTEIGER.
Full back of tlie Spaldings. who was seri
ously injured in a lni.-up in yterday'i
association football game at Sports
man's P.irk.
As a result of a :nlx-up In tlie Associa
tion Football League games at Sports
man's Park yesterday afternoon, A. D.
Ricksteiger of No. 3CJ9 St I-ouU avenue
is at his home, seriously Injured.
James Daly, forward for the Rawllngses.
of No. 2726 Stoddard street. Is being held
at the Ninth District Police Station pend
ing the result of Ricksteiger's injuries.
Doctor Keehn of No. 2702 North Grand
avenue, ,who attended Ricksteiger, says
that he 13 in a serious condition and may
not recover.
Spectators at the game say that Daly
dealt the blow which is responsible for
RlckFteiger's injuries. Statements as to
the cause of the trouble vary.
According to witnesses, the trouble
started In the second half. Those who
saw the mix-up say that Daly, forward
"for the Rawllngses. and Hanlck: forward
for the same team, were Involved in a
struggle with Ricksteiger of the Spaldings
and another player of the same team for
possession of the ball near the Spaldings'
goal.
While they were endeavoring to get the
ball. witnesses allege, Ricksteiger's
hands shot through the air, but whether
it was to strike an opposing player or to
keep himself from slipping on the frozen
ground they were not sure.
While the scrimmage was at its height
Daly Is alleged to have swung a right
hand blow, which landed on the side of
Ricksteiger's head. Ricksteiger fell for
ward. Friends and attendants at the game
nicked Ricksteiger up and carried him to
the Spaldings' dressing-room at the north
west corner of Grand and Sullivan ave
nues. Doctor Keehn stated that the In
jured man was suffering from concussion
of the brain.
The player recovered sufficiently to be
sent to his home at & o'clock, but later his
HURLED FIFTY FEET
-T01ATH BY CAR,
Cornelius N. Dorrian Killed at
Fifteenth and Olive Streets
While Crossing Tracks.
SKULL BROKEN BY IMPACT.
Salesman for Friedman Bros.
Shoe Company on His Way
to Visit Sick Friend
When Struck.
Cornelius N. Dorrian, a city salesman
for the . Friedman Bros. Shoe Company,
was struck by an eastbound Olive street
car at Fifteenth street at 8:30 last night
and died five minutes later from a frac
tured skull.
Dorrian had started to cross the street
to take, a westbound car, when the coach
that killed him. came down the grade. He
was unable to get out of Its way and was
hurled fifty feet from the west to the east
side of Fifteenth street Ills skull was
broken.
Dorrian lived at No. 1313 Locust street.
He Is a nephew of Con Harrison of Ninth'
street and Lucas avenue, He has one sis
ter living In St. Louis.
S. "W. Carpenter, motorman of the car,
was arretted. On the testimony of several
witnesses that he was not responsible for
the accident he was later released by
Night "Chief Glllaspy.
Charles Ambler of No. 2116 -Victor- street
said that .Dorrian started to cross the
street and stopped when about eight feet
from the tracks, and then made another
start, when the car was almost upon him.
Dorrian was on his way to see a sick
friend. The body was taken to the morgue,
where it was identified by Mrs. McDer
mott of No. 1313 Locust street, at whose
home Dorrian had roomed for three years.
American Flotilla Sails.
Gibraltar, Jan. 31. The .United States
torpedo-boat flotilla, escorted by" the
tt,,vtlljv .i-illr TtilffnTn 1ffk herA ttiAmv I
,....... . . . , ,
for Algiers,. on its way to aianna, ana I
will "nrobablv roach Algiers " to-morrow.
afternoon.
Mean to Strike Hard Blow.
JAMES DALV.
Forward for'the Rawllngses; who la belnr
held hv the notice netidlnar the. result of. .-?9
Klokstf-lifer's infurles. '" ' O-VSii
,,.,-w , . j, i . - ,'m
tuiiuiuuii K.ew srnuiu, turn uiieiiuiujs pux '$a
sicians uespaireu oi nis me at an ear.j-
Lrt.tr tlila mnmln.
............ ..,...., :-v?fe
james iaiy aumus striKing iucit3ieiBr,v-.. .,jr-
but claims that the blow was not a hard
one. .fc.ijs
DALY'S STATEMENT. 3 "?:f
WtnTnl cliroc ainint i f mi m?dln f ilTM rl,fi
Hanlck." said Daly, "and I went to the.
rescue.
"I struck Ricksteiger a light bloV on
the Jaw while the latter was runnlnr, and,
his feet shot out from under' him. His
head struck H ground and he was un
conscious. I am positive that the blow I
struck him was not sufficiently hard to
knock him out. In fact.I rather intended
to push him away.
"We were friendly, and. as a matter of;
fact, were in partnership with other play
ers to give a dance under the auspices of
the Association Football League. I.bar
bored no ill feeling against Ricksteiger.
anil am. extremely sorry that thei quarrel
happened.).
"t cannot account for Ricksteiger's con
Cltion. except that he possibly slipped and
struck his head on the frozen ground."
Daly was downcast over .the occurrence.
Friends who attended him at the police,
station offered to buy him food, but he re-,
fused to eat anything.
Mrs. Ricksteiger, wife of the player.who
was at the game, demanded Daly's arrest,
and the police took Daly in his player"
uniform.
Both players are well known to tha
local patrons of the game. Daly has been,
a forward for nearly all of the leading
teams In St. Louis during the last six
yeans while Ricksteiger has played full
back on many of the crack aggregaUons
for the same length of time.
At the police station Daly handed in,
his resignation as a player on the Raw
lings team, saying that he would .never
play another game.
STREET CARS
HAVE TELEPHONES
Signals From Main Offices Con
' trol Heating of East Side
Coaches.
Telephones were yesterday Installed on
the cars of- the suburban divisions of the
Eust St. Louis and Suburban Electric
Railway, which permit the street ear em
ployes to connect with the power-house
Or the general superintendent's residence
trom nny point along the lines. f
The system Is arranged to that on ev
ery fifteenth pole there are connection
Into which are placed the wires' of tha.
telephones, which are carried on the cars.
The instant the connection 13 made the
conductor or the motorman is. In com
munication with the officials at the cen
tral station. Trouble along the lino can
thus be quickly reported and repaired.
Another scheme which has been work
ing with good results is the heating of tho
cars according to Instructions from' the
main office at Third street and Broad
way, East St Louis. All of the can are
equipped with electric heaters and there
are three degrees of heat which are regu
lated by the motormen. At the office, a,
flag and a colored light indicate the
amount of heat which the officials decide
Is necessary to keep the cars comfortable.
VAN STUDDIF0RD BUMPED
HEADS OF PITTSBURG DUDES.
They Attempted to Flirt With Mrs.
Van Staddlford mad Cora Tracer '
at Theater Entrance.
REPUBLIC 8PBCXAU
Pittsburg, Pa.. Jan. . SI, Grace Van
Studdiford and Cora Tracer,, as they left
the Nixon Theater 'last night, were c- ;
costed by two Pittsburgers, who attempted .
to flirt with then). The- women walked
along Montour "Way after -having' made
their exit from,, the stage "entrance.
Charles Van Studdiford. the leading ldyr
husband, came out of the front entrance
with Harry E. ShepaVd,. treasurer of the :
Red Feather Company.
The flirts doffed their hats and asked
the women if they had any. 'dates." f
The star turned- to her. husband' iind
"Here ar two persons who .would. Jlke i-.g
"no.-no. maoame, rwe - were speajaa(to .VM
you,", said one of tb dudes. ,-,-.; ,! ".iSS-sffi
Charles Van Studdiford wanted: tm4hkk;-r?.3
to' the men and. demanded -.'what dvyW-;'i?"-'
:want?" '. ' a - SitSftast
"It's none of your business' retorted i'Sn
Ortl i?i
one oi in strangers.
Van Studdiford grabbed each of th:ssiSa;,l
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