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The St. Louis Republic. [volume] (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, February 02, 1904, Image 1

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THE ST. LOUIS REPUBLIC.
wOMfc
Good Barbers
".'Cooks and Nurses
Of fte best sort are found through
e "Help Wanted" columns of
I
Cm be secured through The Re
public's "Help Wanted" columns.
Thel
Take your aa 10 any uru .
republic.
WOBLD'S-
1904
-PAIB
(In SI. Lopli
price Isr'.r.:
In St. Lopla. One Cent.
INETY-SIXTH YEAR
TUESDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 2, 1904.
. Lnaii! .-. .,:
Three "
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I T
FRANCIS'S FRANK WORDS
WIN FRIENDS FOR LOAN;
$4,600,000 IS ASSURED.
World's Fair President and Tlis Associates Explain to the House
Committee on Industrial Arts and Expositions the Reasons for
Asking Government for Further Aid in Completing Work Al
ready Begun Higher Cost of Labor a Factor in Situation.
BILL WILL MEET LEAST POSSIBLE DELAY IN ITS PASSAGE.
J The Republic Bureau.
J Hth St. and Fenniylianla Ave
Washington. Feb. 1. Shortly after 10
jf- o'clock this morning President D. R. Fran
ti els had an opportunity of again explaining
the proposed big loan by the Government
to tho World's Fair.
Accompanied by W. H. Thompson. D. M.
Houser, Robert SI. Fullerton. the Govern
ment .disbursing agent, and Professor J.
A. Holmes. Chief of Mines and Metal
lurgy, he appeared before the House Com
mittee on Industrial Arts and Expositions,
t of which Representative Tawney of Min
nesota, is chairman.
Before hearing President Francis tho
committee listened to a statement by
Chairman Tawney in w hich he announced
that the Senate committee had the matter
.under consideration as an amendment to
o urgent deficiency appropriation bill.
He said tho hearing to-day was to enable
the members of the committee to be in
formed as to the exact nature of the prop
osition In the event that favorable action
I token by the Senate. It was proposed
have this amendment Introduced in the
buse In the form of a bill.
TWO SESSIONS HELD.
President Francis, of course, made the
main 4 argument for the loan and con
sumed most of the time before the com
mittee. A fuU committee listened to the
World's Fair representatives for two
hours In the morning and convened again
at 2 o'clock .for another two-hour session.
Mr, Francis went into great detail and
explained exhaustively what had already
been accomplished and what would be
done from now until the opening of the
Exposition.
W. H. Thonwon followed Governor
Francis, dwelling particularly on the
financial side of the Fair.
Jhe Senate subcommittee on the urgent
deficiency bill, before which Pi-evident
Francis and the other Exposition repre
sentatives hate appeared, as heretofore
stated In The Republic, finished its report
to-day and will report the bill to the full
committee to-morrow morning.
The bill as reported by the subcommit
tee will contain an amendment provid'ng
for. a loan of tl.Wa.O0Q. Unlessunexpected
opposition develops, the full committee
will adopt the report of the subcommittee
it to-morrow's meeting and the bill will
be reported to the Senate to-morrow aft
ernoon or Wednesday.
The preliminary work done by Repre
sentative Tawney, chairman of the House
Committee, and Senator Cockrell and the
THE CHAIRMANSHIP,
Democratic City Committee
i, 4 Elects Delegate McCarthy to
Succeed J. R. Butler.
IN SESSION FIVE MINUTES.
I Central Body Names a Delega
1 tion to Visit the Election
Commissioner Regard
ing Registration.
After a flve-rolnuts session of the Dem
ocratic City, Central Committee last night
at the Jefferson Club, it was reported that
John P. Dolan, chairman of the commit
tee, who represents the Twenty-fourth
Ward, may soon resign in favor of a
representative from somo other ward.
The possibility of Dolan's resignation
has been discussed among the committee
men for some time. Dolan's connection
with the naturalization fraud cases is
the primary cause of these discussions,
and some politicians predicted that Dolan
would, step down unl probably out of
the committee altogether.
Members of the committee would not
discuss the matter for publication, as
they are friends of Dolan. The subject.
It was said, was not mentioned In the for
mal meeting. Some, It Is believed, would
try to dissuade him from resigning on
sxcount of their friendship, but, should It
be placed to a vote, it Is believed that his
resignation would be accepted.
The entire body attendel the meeting,
twenty-eight being present, after the se
lection of Delegate John R, McCarthy to
succeed the late John R. Butler as com
mitteeman from the Twenty-second Ward.
McCarthy also becomes vice chairman
of the committee, a position held by But
ler. He Is Interested in the Excelrtor Haul
ing and Transfer Company, a Butler con
cern. He has proved a steady supporter
of the- Butlers sln.-e his election to the
Municipal AssemDly.
.A committee of three, consisting of
Isaac .Ccnran,. John J. Manton and Junes
Farley, was selected to visit the Elec
tion Comm'ssioneis' office and secure in
formation regarding election laws and the
pnper mode of registration. The committee-meets
on the first rnd third Monday?
of each month.
.Holds Men for Patrolman.
.William Garen. manager of Havlln's
Theater, yesterday afternoon held John
Miller. -Henry Mason and Frank Stanley
until the arrival of Patrolman McCormaclc.
Mr. Garen charges that the young men
forced a door In tee candy rtore -connected
-with- the theater and took a glass Jar con
taining candy, valued at (L
strong, straightforward presentation of
the Exposition's case by President Fran
cis at the hearings have, it is confidents
believed, obviated all serious opposition in
Congress to the amendment providing for
the loan.
In the opinion of Senator Allison, chair
man of the Appropriations Committee, the
urgent deficiency bill will pass the Sen
ate this week. It will then be returned to
the House and the conferees on the part
of both houses, whose duty It will be to
agree on the amendments made to the bill
since It left the House, will be appointed
by President Frye and Speaker Cannon.
The conferees from the Senate will
doubtless be Senators Allison, Hale and
Cockrell and those from the House will be
headed by Chairman Hemenway of the
Appropriations Committee. It will prob
ably take at least two days for the con
ferees to agree and concur In all of the
amendments added In the Senate.
The object of Mr. Tawney's bill is to
hae the House committee thoroughly con
versant with the amendment providing for
the loan so that when the bill comes back
from the Senate the delay of having the
amendment referred to committee may be
avoided and the final passage of the bill
facilitated.
CALL ON PRESIDENT.
In the afternoon President Francis and
part calledt the White House and paid
their respects to President Roosevelt.
In his speech to-day Mr. Francis re
viewed eery feature of the enterprise at
length. In acreage, he said, it equaled the
Chicago, Buffalo and Paris expositions
combined. Foreign Governments had ap
propriated a total of 17,500000 for their
buildings and exhibits. The States and
Territories have appropriated an aggre
gate of 7.O0O,CCO.
He said the estimate of J15.000.000 as the
cost of the exhibition had been found to
be decidedly too low. Chicago had ex
pended 5:2.000.000 before opening; the gates.
With the loan now asked the Exposition
would, he said, represent an expenditure
of J19.CO0.00O.
The increased cost of labor, as compared
with this Item of expense at the Chicago
exposition, he said, amounted to at least
25 per cent. Labor is 50 per cent of the
co3t of therExposltion. and this increase
alone amounted to at least J2,MO,000.
President Francis estimated that the Ex
position would have an attendance of 30,
000,000. which, with an admission fee of SO
cents, would be, he said, ample security for
the loan desired.
LEADING TOPICS
t
m-DAY'S REPUBLIC.
GRAIN CLOSED: ST. LOUIS-MAT
WHEAT S.7XSSCC ASKED: MAY CORN
9c. CHICAGO MAY WHEAT Wjc
ASKED: MAY CORN COHc BID.
THE SUN RISES THIS MORNING AT
7.-08 AND SETS AT 5:22. THE MOON
RISES AT 6:56.
WEATHER IDICATIOS.
For St. LonU and Vicinity Partly
cloudy and mocli warmer weather
Tnexdnyi fresh to brisk "westerly
-n-lads.
For Missouri Partly cloudy Toes
day i colder la -nest nnd warmer In
enst. Wednesday fairt colder In east.
For. Illinois Fair and nllfrhtly
wanner Tnrsday, followed by snow
In north. Wednesday fnlri colder.
For Arkansas Fair and colder
Tuesday-. Wednesday fair.
For East Texas Fair Tuesday.
Wednesdny fnlrt colder In north.
For West Texas Fair Tnesdayi
colder In Pnnhaadle. Wednesday
(air.
Page. '
1. Francis's Frank Words Win Friends
for Loan.
2. Work Begun on Fair Barracks.
Famous Irish Bard Will Play at Fair.
3. Democrats Will Talk Convention.
Sherman Keeps His Promise.
4. Brown Heirs Lose Fight.
Woman Foils Purse Thief.
5. Combine to Raise Price of Board.
New' Grand Jury to Probe Grafting.
German Column in Deadly Peril.
Roosevelt Says "Hello. Bat."
6. Dusky Lucky to Beat Claremont
7. East Side News.
Posse Captures Prisoner Who Shot
Detective Fahey.
8. Editorial.
The Stage.
9. Society Happenings.
Minister Criticises Lady Board Mem
bers Sheriff Dickmann Raises Salaries.
10. Republic "Want" Ads.
Birth. Marriage and Death Records.
New Corporations.
11. Rooms for Rent Ads.
12. The Railroads.
River News.
Llvc-Etock Markets.
13. Handful of Securities Interests Wall
Street
Transit Shares Firm.
Wheat Gains Strength in Chicago.
Summary of St. Louis Markets.
14. Colorado Fuel to Issue Bonds.
Church to Direct Fair Visitors.
Elect Board of Directors.
Blair Children Ask Court for Protec-
tlon.
Opens Omaha Exchange.
Largest Coaling Plant In the World.
OBELL REFUSES
OP
WILLIAM ZIEGLER.
Decide That Baking Powder
Magnate Is Not a Fugitive
From Justice, Under
the Law.
EVIDENCE ALSO IS LACKING.
Attorney General Cuneen Says
There Is Nothing to Show
ZiegleFs Presence in
Missouri.
FAULT FOUND WITH CHARGES.
Indictment on Charge of Bribery
Does Not Agree in Dates
Named With Dates Dis
cussed in Testimony.
Alt any. N. T., Feb. 1 Governor Odell,
upon the adUce of Attorney General
Cuneen. has decided that he will not honor
tl.c requisition of Governor Dockery of
Missouri, demanding the extradition of
William Zlegler of New York City upon
an Indictment charging him with bribery
In connection with the baking-powder
legislation in the Missouri Legislature In
the se."on of 1901.
The grounl upon which the refusal is
based Is that Mr. Zlegler Is not "a fugl-
WILLIAM ZIEGLER.
tive from Justice-' within the meaning of
the law, and that th-re is no evidence to
."how that hp was in the State of Missouri
In tho month of March, 1901, "when, it is
claimed, the crime was committed
EVIDENCE OF ALIBI.
"On the other hand," says Mr. Cuneen,
"seven witnesses are produced whose ei
dence is claimed to establish the presence
of Mr. Zelglgr In the City of New York
on the 13th, 19th, 20th and 21st dajs of
March, 1901."
It is, he sas, a question of fact for the
executive to determine. He adds:
"If the actual presence of Mr. Zeigler
in the State of Missouri at the time when
the offense Is alleged to have been com
mitted Is not established to your satisfac
tion, a warrant for his arrest and delivery
to an agent of that State should not Issue.
If the facts be determined against him, he
is a fugitive from Justice, and the duty of
the executive to surrender him to the de
manding State is Imperative."
Attorney General Cuneen, after citing
the law, sajs:
FUGITIVE DEFINED.
"It Is evident that a mere absence from
a State is not sufficient to warrant a
holding that a person has fled from that
State. Before one can be said to flee
from a State he must first have been in
the State from which he is said to have
fled.
"The difficulties with the contention of
the'Missourl authorities that the fixing of
the dates of agreement as the 7th or 8th
of January. 1901. brings Mr. Zeigler's case
within the law- are, first, that the date Is
not within the time fixed by the Indict
ment, as the time of the commission of
the crime: second, there is no claim of a
mistaken date In the indictment; snd,
thlrA. the.-e Is absolutely no evidence
tending to show any promise made by
Mr. Zeigler on January 7 or 8, 1901.
"Under the authorities, I am con
strained to advie that Mr. Zeigler's
presence In St. Louis in the early days
of January, 1901. Is not sufficient to war
rant the holding that he is a fugitive
from Justice from that State."
ZIEGLER MAY RETALIATE
ON MISSOURI OFFICIALS.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
New York, Feb. 1. At the time he was
Indicted, November 13, 1903. William Zleg
ler declared that the action of the Cole
County (Mo.) Grand Jury was part of a
plot for personal revenge.
To-morrow he and his counsel will con
fer as to what steps may be taken In re
taliation. It was stated to-night that
while Mr. Ziegler had not been arrested or
Imprisoned, ho might be able to sue cer
tain Missouri officials who were instru
mental in having the indictment obtained,
particularly one who, it was said, swore
that of his own know:edge there was
bribe-giving.
BCLLKT-PROOF WAISTCOAT
FOR PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT. 4
REPUBLIC SPECIAL. 4
Richmond, Ind., Feb. L The Zeg-
len Bullet-Proof Cloth Company at
South Bend, Ind., has finished a
waistcoat to be sent to President
Roosevelt, to be worn under his 4
outer waistcoat as a guard from
would-be"assassins.
OK
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COURT OVERRULES THE DEMURRER
IN BUTLER BRIBERY CASE AT FULTON;
LIGHTING DEAL TRIAL WILL PROCEED.
Judge Walter W. Graves Holds
That the "Wholesale Bri
bery" Indictment
Is Valid.
SPECIAL JURY IS DENIED.
Court Decides That the Circuit
Attorney Did Not File His
Motion Within the Prop
er Time.
TRIAL MAY NOW PROCEED,
"Village-Blacksmith" Greets Cir
cuit Attorney Folk in the Cor
ridor as the "Next, Govern
or Oi Missouri.''
BY A STAFF CORRESPONDENT.
Fulton. Mo.. Feb. 1 Circuit Attorney
Folk, for the State, won the first point in
the second Butler trial. The demurrer to
the indictment, .1 nurely technical issue,
alleging the multiple, character of the in
dictment in charging whilenlp brlbv.v,
was overruled by Judge Graves late tn's
afternoon.
Immediately following tthls action Mr.
Folk filed a motion asking for a special
venire from which to select the Jury. Ow
ing to the fact that the motion had not
been filed three days In advance of the
day set for trial. Judge Craves held that
such a request was' not mandatory, but
was discretional with him. and that he
could see no occasion for a special venire
Accordingly, the regular panel, selected
at the last term-of the County Court, will
be used This Is the. first time that the,
regular panel has been used in a St. Louis
boodle trial. -
FOLK SATISFIED" . mi-
WIT1I THE FAXEL.
The Circuit Attorney expressed hlmseif
as satisfied with the regular panel. It is
stated here that the regular panel repre
sents the best citizenship of Callaway
Count-, and will furnish a good Jury.
Persistent inquiry develops nothing indi
cative of attempts to Influence prospective
Jurors.
The panel li chosen In the usual county
manner (a hundred names upon slip of
which twenty-four are picked nt random
from a hat). The State has the privilege
of four and the defendant of eight per
emptory challenges.
One Important effect of the Judge's ac
tions with reference to the Jury will bo
to shorten the trial by at least two days.
A Jury Is expected to have been formally
impaneled by noon to-morrow, when the
taking of evidence can at once begin.
The trial will be concluded by Wednes
day evening or Thursday, noon.
Butler and Butler's counsel intimate
that it Is not their purpose to interpo-c
delajs. And It does not appear atthis
time, that as at Columbia, there Is like
lihood of Important witnesses being
"among the missing." No hint appears
of consequential personages like John R.
McCarthy belng lost somewhere in Illi
nois. COUNSEL AD WITNESSES
ARRIVE IN FtXTOX.
Mr. Folk and his assistants. Andrew
C Maroney and C. Orrick Bishop, arrived
early this morning. -ia the M.. K. & T.
and the C, At A., from North Jefferson
City. Another contingent drawn by the
trial. In which was J. H. Murry of Boone
County, who will assist the prosecution,
came in about 10 o'clock from Mexico
on the morning cattle train. The It
o'clock train from the North added others.
Including Judge A. H. Waller nnd William
Williams of Boonvillc. who will assist the
defense. In the afternoon there came
still a larger Influx., among them being
the Butler- followers. James J. and Ed
Butler. Jr.. and the State's witnesses
and ex-comblnc members. Butler himself
had come up on Saturday with his wife
and with his attorneys. Thomas Rowe and
Judge Chester H. Krum.
The formality of so arranging the mln
steo that Judge Orayts should preside at
the special term as eclal Judge necessi
tated delay In opening court until Judge
Wfllor arrived. The change was accom-jllsl-ed
by a few minutes after 11 o'clock,
and the trial then entered upon Its first
stages.
JI.DtiE-CRAVES
OVERRULES DEMURRER.
In ovrrullng the demurrer Judge Graves
said: "As to whether or not one crime Is
charged or nineteen separate crimes, I
know that the construction of one offense
as involving several persons can be put
upon crimes clnssed as murder, slander,
libel or rape. The test Is that the sep
arate crimes, composing the one crime,
must be of one grade or class, and have
be?n committed at the same time and
pli.ee.
"The point that now recurs Is whether
the rule, applies In this Instance of nine
teen alleged, briberies. I am Inclined to
think that the weight of authority favors
an affirmative of the ru'.e, but upon this
icint I have not looked up all tho author
ities. I shall overrule this motion at this
time, leaving the way open to a deeper
study .of the point' in such subsequent
bearings aa It may have t pon the trial."
In behalf of the demurrer Judge Krum
raised the followlns three point?:
That the Indictment is multifarious In
that nineteen separate offenses are pre
sented as one. which he declared to be a
legal Impossibility under the statutes of
Missouri.
That the bribery charged Is double, be
cause It charges a, promise on the.jpart of
Butler of a sum of money to-be. given by
defendant, and that It charges a sum of
money already given In. consideration of
votes already cast. .
That the Indictment Includes no offense,
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JUDGE GRAVES,
Presiding oier the Butler trial at Fulton, on a change of venue from St. Louis.
PANEL FROM WHICH
JIHY WILL BE DRAWN.
4 Claud Holt, farmer.
John BrdRorth, farmer.
Genie Iman. farmer,
11. (1. Leonard, farmer.
4 C. O. Atklnn. farmer.
Hendon Beawr. nude shipper.
J P. MoClannahnn. farmer.
J M. Hamilton, farmer.
9 S.- McCue, llc-toek dealer.
V II Nichols, rormer County Asaesaor.
Hiram Hudson, farmer. ' t
Reese School, farmer.
4 Wlliard Heralng. farmer. -J.
Edwards Hardin, farmer.
-William Muddox. farmer.
Walter Gibson, farmer.
John Oilman, fanner.
William Black. Jr.. farmer.
George Bratton, farmer
IIO. Stephen. fartr.T
Ira tVoraham. farmer.
Robert Rerry, farmer.
Y F. O. Jones, farmer.
I
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isn
nv
:
-
Horace Holt, fanner.
there being no such offense as wholesale
bribery in Missouri.
WILLI VMS ARGUES
FOR THE DEFENSE.
In supporting the contentions Attorney
Williams urged that under the City Char
ter of St. Loul and the Constitution of
Missouri each member of a cltjvand State
assembly casts his vote Individually and
that one cannot legally tally Jointly and
corruptly vote with one or any number of
others. In other words, he declared that
a combine has no constitutional existence
and cannot vote a- such and that It can
not be bribed.
"If ou hnd twentj-five voters In a
room." asked Judge Grave?, "and bought
their twenty-five votes, would that ba
bribery?"
"Yes," replied Krum, "it would be brib
eryas many Instances of bribery as
their were voters who accepted the pro
posal." "In connection with Joint indictments
charging fraudulent securance of whisky
license," said Folk, "the courts have ui
heio them. You cannot have two throats
with but a single thirst, two mouths
which drink as one; but you can have
Joint guilt In Jointly conspiring to trans
gress the laws In a like and simultaneous
manner."
The Circuit Attorney's main point had to
do with corresponding decisions in cases
of assault, slander, perjury, murder and
libel, and in indicating that if separate
crimes were allowed, conviction or. ac
quittal would act as a bar to further
prosecution.
It Is understood that Butler asserts (this
may not come out in the evidence) that a
delegate whose name has not been promi
nent In connection with the deal is the
man who got the lion's share out of the
deal and who negotiated It. For one
thing. It is declared directly from Batler
sources that Gutke got, so far from J2,H
not so much a 23 cents.
It is declared from among the Butler
ranks that. If the "old man" were pushed
to It, he could tell a story explaining his
presence at the House of Delegates the
night of the alleged bribery which certain
ly has some rather plciuresque .features.
The motive of his presence, as declared
by his henchmen, was to save them some
of tho "pie" which others had schemed to
net for themselves. In other words, his
Idea is asserted to have been to help h!
"bojs" out. There Is no likelihood of the
defense attempting to present evidence
to this effect, since it would most assured
ly expose some of the said "boys." What
ever Butler's moral deficiencies. It is em;
phatically declared that to save his own
hide at somebody else's peril is not In his
line.
KTATE TO RELY I'PON
COMni:tE WITNESSES.
The State will pursue a course similar
to that followed In previous lighting-bill
cants, relying chiefly on testimony fur
nished by the members of "the nineteen"
who have confessed. This means the de
picUng of the evidence of the famous and
dramatic scene on the floor of the Housq
of Delegates the night the lighting bill
was pasted, November 23, 1S; and of the
subsequent and equally dramatic "birth
day party." This, with the new point of
Butler as the central figure.
Tho defense,- aside from technical con
structions of daw, will be based Upon a
Continued on Paste Two.
S
GROUND HOG MAY
NOT SEE SHADOW.
Forecaster Says Cloudy Weather
- Will Allow Prophetic Animal
to Remain Out of Hole.
If Candlemas Day be fair and bright.
Winter will hava another flisnt.
Rut If Candlemas Day bring clond and rain.
Winter ia one and won't come again.
'If the prediction of the local weather
forecast official proves true. It Is prob
able that th" ground hog will not see
his shadow to-day. According to an old
porverb. "If on February 2 the day Is bright
and clear." the ground hog will stay in
his den, thus Indicating that cold and
stormy weather will prevail for at least
six" weeks more; but If It rains or snows,
and if the weather is cloudy, he will creep
out, and winter is ended.
Partly cloudy and much warmer weather
Is predicted by the forecaster. According
to the proverb, if It is partly cloudy, the
ground log may come out and sun him
self. Indicating that four weeks Of stonny
weather will follow.
Fresh to brisk southerly winds will pre
vail this morning, shifting to westerly
later In the day. The minimum tempera
ture last night was about 1& degrees above
zero, much warmer than on the preceding
night
Snow fell yesterday In all sections east
of the, Mississippi Rler except In the
Gulf States, where the precepltatlon was
In the form of rain. Snow- flurries were
also reported from the Missouri Valley
and Montana.
A cold wave of moaerate Intensity,
which spread rapidly southward from the
region north of Minnesota, reached St.
Louis yesterday morning. Tho thermeme
ter recorded 2 degrees above sero at 6 a.
m. The night before it was 25 degrees
above at S o'clock.
During the morning hours the tempera
ture rose slowly, and at noon It was 12
degrees above ro. The thermometer re
corded degrees above xero at 6 o'clock
last night.
The cold wave gave much colder weather
In the Ohio and Upper Mississippi valleys
and the lake region. In many places the
fall in temperature was from 30 to 40 de
grees. Zero weather prevailed In Indiana,
Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and
Michigan.
In the West and Northwest the tempera
ture is rising rapidly. A storm which is
forming in the Northwest is rapidly mov
ing eastward, which will give cloudiness
and much warmer weather In this sec
tion. COFFEE MAKES HIGH RECORD.
September Option at !c, au Ad
vance of oc in Eight Months.
RFi'Unuc si-bcial.
New York. Feb. L The highest prices
of the year, and for several years, were
reached In the Coffee Exchange this morn
ing. September futures sold at 9 cents,
an advenes of 2 cents a pound In less than
two rrcnths. Last summer coffee in this
city sold at about 3V4 cents, a pound, and
in less than eight months quotations have
advanced more than 5 cents a pound.
A feature of the morning trading was
the buying by Wall street Interests. D.
J. Sully & Co. were heavy buyers below
9 cents, last week, and the advance to-day
was. In a grent measure, attributed to the
activity of this firm.
Conditions surrounding the coffee mar
ket are believed to have changed radically
during the year, and It will be several
years before Briillian plantations can be
restored to a condition where a full yield
can be hoped for. Now that speculation In
ceffee has set In, trading at the Coffee
Exchange Is proportionately as heavy as
that of the Cotton Exchange next door.
..'
JAPAN FIXES.WAR PAY
FOR. ARMY. AND NAVY.
Londont Feb. X The Tokio corre.
spondent. of the Times cables that
an ordinance has been Issued fixing
the war 'pay of men In the army
and navy.
OH
COTTON PASSES
17-CENT MARK
MARKET
Closing Figures Near the High
est of the Day, While Tu
mult Among Traders
Is Tremendous.
THIRTY-CENT PRICE POSSIBLE
Experienced Commission Man,
Who Says He Is Not Interest
ed, Says Bulls Are ia
Control.
SULLY TALKS OF SHORT CROP.
Declares Strength of Speculative
Movement Is Furnished En
tirely by Lack of Need
ed Raw Material.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
New York. Feb. 1. After a day of In
tense excitement and the soaring of cot-,
ton prices to a figure not reached since
Civil War times, the cotton market closed
strong and high.
The closing figures were near the high
est of the day and the tumult was tho
greatesL After the opening of the mar
ket prices went up. then there was a re
action. The rise continued again, how?
ever, and at the cloe the following were,.
the quotations:
March 17.01c: May 17.41c; July 17.19c; Aug.
16.82c; Sept. 14.27c.
Cotton has not passed 17c a pound in
New .York since 1S75, when it went to 17Ho,
It touched ISTic In 1S74. nijsc in 1573 an4
2T?!e In the year of -vild speculation. 1S72.
when the crop, as against 4.34T.00O bales)
in the previous season, turned out only
2.974.O0O.
WAR-TIME RECORD.
The high price of-war tiroes, when tha
South was blockaded, was 11.90 per pound,
in 184. ,
At a time when the cotton market was
becoming more rational, though still main
taining its high prices this afternoon.
Theodore H. Price made the following
statement, prefacing his remarks with a,
declaration that he was not In the mar
ket. "It Is possible that th" price of cotton
will go up to 20 cents, ecn cents. This
Is not based on the demand for It. but
simply on the fact that the manipulators
are In a position where they can put It
where they want to."
Daniel J. Sully, the bull Ieadr. waa
active on the floor and had something- to.
say regarding the present phenomenal
prices of cotton.
"The rise." said he. "of more than 200
points in the last few weeks has a more
solid basis than mere manipulation, as Is
regarded In some quarters.
"The future market hss for Its founda
tion the strength of spots. So long as
splnnrs absorb actual cotton and make
consumers pay the cost. tecbnicaliUes are
trivial matters.
MAXIMUM TO COME.
"This point seems to have been reached.
The advance of print cloth to 4 cents for
regulars is the highest price for twelve
years, and, considering, the unyielding at-,
Utude of sellers, tbe maximum price has
not yet been reachd.
"Slowly tbe realization Is beginning to
dawn on the trade that a cotton famine
does not end with raw material, but ex
tends into the manufacturing and commer
cial world ss well."
This prediction of Mr. Sully that cotton
would, reach a still higher figure, created
consternation among the shorts. ,
Reports from the Fall River distnet
show that a great many cotton mills are
in distress on account of the rise In cot
ton. Many of them are unable to buy the
raw material at the prevailing prices to
meet their obligations without absolute
failure and so they have had ta shut
down.
The cotton trade proper, while doing
everything it can to check the bull move
ment, Is completely in the hands of the
leaders, such as Sully, who are playing
the holders of spot cotton against the mill
men with the object of attaining their end.
which Is higher prices.
OLD RESIDENT DIES.
Death of Madame M. J. Knapp in
Chicago.
Dispatches from Chicago announce the
death In that city yesterday of Madame M.
J. Knapp. youngest sister of the lato
George and John Knapp of this city.
Madame Knapp, who was in her eighty
first year at the time of her death, was a
member of the religious order of the Sa
cred Heart, which she entered In 8L Louis
In 1851, and her death occurred at tho
house of the order in Chicago.
Although she had been In rellgfcHis life
for more than halt a century, she had
many friends still living among the older
residents of St. Louis, who will deeply re
gret to learn of her death.
TIME LIMIT FIXED BY COURT.
Delegates Must Show Caww? Why
Bonds Are Not Perfected.
: J
Jefferson City. Mo.. Feb. L-Defendants;
Hannlgan. :Albrlght. Sheridan. .Haxtmann
and Lehmann, convicted of. bribery, who.
have.not perfectedJhelrjiPBeals by.pajf
Ing the docket fee, and. release adayi
which, the Attorney General U,trjlaa.to
have forfeited; were.g!venwunmaMarch..,,
to show cause why tbe bonds should est
be.fv forfeited.
V
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