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The St. Louis Republic. [volume] (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, March 15, 1904, Image 1

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THE
ST. LOUIS
REPUBLIC.
WO.'R.LXD'S
-IF.A.IIEo
NINETY-SIXTH YEAR,
PRTCE jg-
St. LonI. One Cent.
TUESDAY. MORNING. MARCH 15, 1904.
ultldc St. Lonls. Tiro Cents.
TmJns, Three Cents.
EE T0M0RR0W!
ANNOUNCEMENT
1904
S REPUBLIC FOR MERCHANTS' MIDWEEK
DUMONT HERE TO MAKE FINAL
PLANS FOR AERIAL RACE.
Famous Brazilian Airship Navigator Arrives From Paris and An
nounces That World's Fair Will Afford the Greatest Balloon
Contest Ever Known Declines to Discuss His Reported En
gagement to Hiss Spreokels, the Young Heiress To Sail From
New York for France March 22.
Santos-Dumont, tho daring young Bra
zilian aeronaut, one of the most formida
ble airship navigators to announce him
self as a contestant for the JlOO.Ofl) prize
at the World's Fair aerial races, arrived In
St Louis yesterday to inquire into the
preliminary arrangements for the contest.
The little baJoonlst apj.red In perfect
health, as he wrote his namo on the
register at the Southern Hotel. He had
hardly laid the pen down when there was
a stir In the corridors, and he was soon
the center of an admiring crowd.
He bore his popularity with the- air of
a man who has become used to attract
ing attention. Motioning to a bellboy to
lead the way he went Immediately to his
rooms.
When seen by a reporter a few moments
later Dumont was writing a letter. As
an excuse ha said that it wag too late
to go to the World's Fair grounds and
that he could pass the time easier by
writing.
It was suggested that he probably was
writing to JIIss Sprekle3 of New York,
tho young heiress to whom he Is said to
be engaged.
Dumo.it gave an expressive shrug of his
J hair. In his embarrassment he held up
his hands as though he would hide his
face and stammered:
WOULD NOT DISCUSS
ENGAGEMENT TO WED.
"I am here to talk 'airship'; please' don't
ask me to discjss that rumor of my en
gagement." When asked If there was any truth in
the report as published In the newspapers,
he evaded the question by replying:
"These American newspapers never give
a man any peace. They are always pub
lishing something about him."
Ho quickly turned from the subject and
shpwed a marked ab'llty to ask questions.
He is Intensely Interested about every
thing pertaining to the Exppsltlon. and Is
especially enthusiastic about the balloon
races. He asked how many contestants
would probably try for the prize, and ex
pressed the wish that there would be
rra't.y entries.
"What do you think of your chances?"
he was asked.
"I shall do ray utmost," he answered
cautiously. "While I believe I can fulfill
the conditions of the contest, thera may
be sonn one else wlio shall do better, and,
of course that would cost roe the prize.
"This race will be tho biggest of its.
kind eer known, and I think It will ac
complish great things In the development
of aerial navigation. As I am making the
problem a life study, I am quite Inter
ested In anything that will advance my
work."
Mr Dumont was asked about his ma
chine and the speed which he hoped to
make In the contest.
"I shall run my balloon at a speed of
almost forty miles an hour." he answered.
"Such a speed seems hard to conceive
of, but I am satisfied that I can go that
fast. Two years ago in competing for a
prize with a ten-horse power machine I
did almost twenty miles an hour and
now that I shall use a seventy-horse
power balloon, I think I can easily double
my former speed.
"The number of hours that I can main-
f tain this speed will depend on how mucll
I fuel I carry., I may be able to go for
ten hours
and may bo not so long. At
any rate,
I can go for more than five
hours.
SATS AERIAL FLIGHTS
ARE NOT NERVE-TRYING.
Mr. Dumont was asked if tho mental
strain of these contests did not wear on
bis health.
"On the other hand, it is a healthful
exercise." he resiled.
"I know of no persult which will give
a man a greater appetite. As soon as
one goes sailing about In the air two
thousand feet above tho ground he be
gins to feel hungry. Cruising In the air
Is a greater appetizer than the hardest
manual labor.
"The average person has a mistaken
Idea of flying about In an airship. It is
not such a daring feat as It appears.
One never feels dizzy. A person who can
not climb a stepladder without being over
come with dlzzlncss.can easily make a
trip in an airship. One sits in a chair
and looks ahead into the air without real
izing tho great altitude.
"Last summer I took three women in
my omnibus machine. I thought that they
would soon become frightened and want
to make a landing. Instead they liked It
Immensely and wanted to go higher and
higher. They were all eager to repeat
the experience."
The question of expense attached to con
testing for tho world a Fair prize was
mentioned.
"The expense will be enormous;" Mr.
Dumont replied.
"It would be hard to estimate how great
the expense may be. There Is always that
element of uncertainty which preyents us
from figuring on expense. A "balloon may
be built at great cost and be wrecked.
Then there Is the additional expense of
making changes and repairs.
"The winning of the World's Fair prize
will not mean so much from a profit
standpoint. The cost necessary to enter
the race will take a big slice out of that
J100.0CW. It is the honor that attracts bal-
loonists."
Mr. Dumont will remain In St. Louis two
or three days. He expects to sail for
Paris from New York. March 22. He re
turns to Paris to superintend the shipping
of the airship with which he hopes to win
the prize.
A dinner was given at the St. Louis Club
last night In honor of M. Santos-Damont,
at which several World's. Fair officials
were present. The dinner was wholly in
formal and no set speeches were made.
BATTLE
IN SAN
DOMINGO.
One
Hundred and Fifty
Were Killed.
Men
SPECIAL BY CABLE TOTIIB ST. LOUIS RE
PUBLIC AND THE NEW YORK HERALD.
San Domingo. March It The military
and naval forces of the Government have
captured San Pedo De Macotta, after two
days' fighting. The losses were 150 killed
on both sides. The Insurgent chief, with
a, hundred of his followers, mads his es-cpe
t S
i
ttBBBBBflPiv BBBBK
bbbRbbbbbRbbBhbsbbbbB
M. SANTOS-DUMONT.
Famous Brazilian aeronaut, who arrived
in St. Louis yesterday to complete his
plans for the airship contest at the
World's Fair.
MISSOURI SOCIETY HAS
ITS ANNUAL DINNER.
Members of Organization In Xew
York Do Honor to Denton's Mem
ory Champ Clark Speaks.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
New York. March H. The birthday of
Missouri's greatest statesman. Thomas II.
Benton, was celebrated to-night by the
Missouri Society of New York at tho
Waldorf-Astoria, thn event being its
fourth annual dinner. Representative
Champ Clark Missouri made the prin
cipal address, and, contrary to his cus
tom. Was Intensely In earnest. He lauded
Benton a3 the greatest man that Mis
souri, noted for its statesmen, lawyers,
jurists and men of affairs, had ever pro-
' duced. He recalled one of his gieat po
l'tlcal fights when Benton il'Ited Union.
Franklin County, where one Charles
Jones, an enthusiastic .-.dmlrer, called up
on him to submit a set of resolutions.
They recited:
"First That the Honorable Thomas H.
Benton Is the greatest man now living.
"Second That the Honorable Thomas
H. Benton Is the greatest man that ever
did live; and,
"Third, that the Honorable Thomas H.
Benton, for thirty years United States
Senator from Missouri, Is the greatest man
that will ever live."
Johns handed the resolutions to his Idol
and awaited his decision. Benton read
them over twice and then, with a majestic
wave of his hand, exclaimed, "You may
read them. Mr. Johns, read them to the
people. They simply do mo Justice."
"Benton." said Mr. Clark, "had a right
to be an egotist, and if Missouri neve?
d'd anything else than give to the world
the man whose memory we honor to-night
she would have done her full share in the
sisterhood of states.
"I did not come her to make a political
speech." said Mr. Clark in closing, "but
I want to sav that I do not know any
good reason why a Missourian should not
bo President of the United States. And
here I want to add that if Francis 11
Cockrell is not nominated next fall he
ought to be, for a more honest man never
lived. If Diogenes were to go to Mis
souri with his lamp, looking for on honest
man. and met Cockrell, he would blow if
out, slnco ho would have no further use
for It. If he docs not secure the Demo
cratic nomination for the presidency, then
he will bo elected to begin a sixth, term
In the United States Senate."
Mr. Clark was followed by Bishop Eth
elbert Talbot of Pennsylvania and the
Reverend Rufus P. Johnson of New York.
The speaking was preceded by a luxu
rious dinner. Joseph C. Hendrlx presided.
The guests of honor were Champ Clark,
M. E. Benton, tho Reverend Bishop Ethel
bert Talbot, tho Reverend J. Nevett
Steele. Wilson McDonald, George H. Dan-
Jels and Webster Darts.
The musical selections included "Joe
Bowers,"' "Show Mo. Missouri." "Dixie,"
"Old Black Joe" and "The Star-Spaigled
Banner."
The song written by F. A. Mills for the
occasion, entitled "Meet Me In St. Louis,
Louis." was sung by the entire company.
The refrain goes:
Meet me in St. Louis. Louis:
Meet ma at tho Fair.
Don't tell me the lights are shining any place
but there;
We will dance the hoochee kTOChee,
I will be your tootsle wootule:
tf ou'U meet me in St. Louis. Louis,
Meat me at the Fair."
RISING TEMPERATURE TO-DAY.
Clear Skies and Fresh Southerly
Winds Predicted.
Sunshine and rising temperature is the
prognostication of the local Weather Bu
reau for to-day. Fresh winds will shift
from the west to the south. 'No precipl
tatlon Is In sight, and the weather pre
diction generally for St, Louis and vi
cinity is agreeable.
Unsettled conditions exist generally over
the United States. A storm of considera
ble severity centered over Ohio Sunday.
This storm gave rains In the States south
of the Ohio and Missouri valleys, and
snow In the Upper Mississippi Valley,
Lake region, Illinois, Missouri, Indiana,
Iowa and Eastern Nebraska.
The snowfall was heavy over Indiana,
Northern Illinois, Michigan, Eastern lows,
and Wisconsin. Tho temperature was low
in the Southern States.
FOR PUBLIC AND
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
Kansas City. Mo., March 14. Tbe Kansas City Star (Independent) says
this afternoon in a double-leaded editorial headed "An Honest Newspaper:"
"The rigorous, courageous remonstrance of The St. Louis Republic
ngainst the infamy of thwarting private riclit and personal llbeny is oue of
the signs of the times that calls for hearty congratulation.
"As a journal of undoubted Democracy, it can exercise a tremendous in
fluence in exposing and overturning abuses and outrages practiced in the
name of Democracy. 'When the moral tone of a newspaper is as high as the
intellectual tone of The Republic always is, it becomes an instrument for
good whose force cannot be estimated.
"By maintaining the attitude which it has assumed as the censor of boodle
and fraud and police despotism. The Republic will find that the benoflts of
Its course will be equally divided between itself and the party whose cause
it has espoused."
GRAND JURY BEGINS
OBJECT TO
Folk Supporters File Protest
Against Board Passing Upon
Assaults at Primaries.
FRYE WILL NOT TALK.
Bends Letters to Voters Who
Made Complaint, Asking Them
to Appear Before Commis
sioners To-Day.
TEXT OF PROTEST AGAINST
POLICE COMMISSIONERS.
The following protest against the
proposed action of the Police Board,
signed by H. L. Haydel. president
of the Folk Democratic Club; Cor
nelius H. Fauntleroy. secretary of
the Folk Executive Committee, and
B. S. Lewis, treasurer, was mada
yesterday afternoon:
St. Louis. Mo . March 14, M04
To the Editor of The St. Louis Re
public: The afternoon papers five notice that
the Board of Police Commissioners will
ba convened for Ue Investigation and
O trial ot policemen charged with hating
0 failed to do their duty in the recent pri
mary.
Now we, the undersigned, desire en
the behalf o Mr. Joseph W. Folk, one
ot tho candidates for Governor, to chal
lenge such action, because Judges should
not ba triers of the case In which they
are Interested, and the commissioners
who are to try such matters Involved
ssalnst policemen, were candidates and
claim to be selected asguch on the
TiAtrea ticket at auch primary."
s
The Board of Police Commissioners thl3
morning will begin an Investigation of
charges made against certain policemen,
who, it is said, neglected their duties at
the primaries on last Saturday.
"I wish It understood," said President
Frye. "that the members of the Police
Board had decided to make this Investiga
tion before any communication came from
Governor Dockcry requesting it. Further
than that I have nothing to say about the
matter."
Letters dictated by President Frye were
sent out last night to a dozen prominent
men who had complained of the failure of
the police to grant them protection at the
Twenty-eighth Ward polling place, at Del
mar and Taylor avenues; asking them to
appear before tho Police Board to-day and
give their information.
The list of witnesses Included all the
men mentioned In Tho Republic yesterday
and Eeveral of the business acquaintances
of Commissioner Hanlon on Washington
avenue, who made personal complaints to
him.
Attention has been called to the fact
that President Frye was the first of tho
Police Commissioners to Indorse the can
didacy ot Hawes.
Sterling P. Bond, one of Mr.Folk's sup
porters sent a letter, of which the follow
ing Is an exact copy, to Governor Dock
ery: March 14. 1314 Honorable A. il. uocKery.
Jefferson City. Mo.: My Dear Sir I notice that
you have written the Honorable William G.
Frje. Preiident Board of Police Commissioners
of 9. l.oul?. to convene the Police Board forth
with for the purpose of Investigating the
charces of Interference and willful neglect of
the police to do their duty at the primaries.
What kind of an lnv estizatlon do you expect
to -ome from men who are responsible for the
Infamous outrages perpetrated upon the Demo
cratic voters on last Saturday?
Three of your rollce Commissioners were
members of the Regular Hawes d'lesatlons.
No one who knows the situation here expects
these men to Investigate anything. Their names
on the delegations was notice to the police to
willfully neglect their sworn duty and to abet
the ruffians.
You should summarily discharge these three
men. and In tbelr place appoint Incorruptible
men. and men whose characters are unsullied.
Then let thee three new Police Commission
ers, which you select, and jourself. lnvestlgtte
the conduct of the president of tha board. When
thla is done, have your new Board of Police
Commissioners clve public and due notice tD
bring forth charges and testimony of the out-j
raged public
Then, and not till than, win the ln estlgatlon
amount to anything I can give evidence my
self that ought to be sufficient to discharge at
least the Acting Chief cf Police and to of
the policemen who uere stationed at the First
District polling piece of tha Twenty-eighth
Ward. Tours very truly.
STERLING! P. BOND.
TELEGRAM FROM GOVERNOR.
The telegram from -Governor Dockery to
President Frya of the PoUce Board, which
was delivered yesterdayTnomlng, reads:
Jefferson City. Mo.. March 14. 1904. Honorable
William O. me. President Board of Police
Commissioners. St. Louis. Mo.: I note In the
columns of the press charges of Interference
and willful neglect of duty on the part of cer
tain police officer at tha primaries last Satur
day. Please convene your board forthwith, investi
gate fullr and Impartially each of these
charges, and If any police officer is found guilty
ot Intimidating voters or other willful neglect
of duty or violation of law. dismiss him from
the force at once.
Kindly report to ma the result of your ia
v estlgatlons at the earliest practicable moment.
A, M. DOCKERT.
After sending the message Governor
Dockery gave to The Republic's Jefferson
City correspondent the following state
ment concerning -tha Interference of the
Continued on Page Two.
PARTY BENEFIT
INVESTIGATION;
POLICE BOARD TRIAL.
Grand Jury Examines Several
Witnesses to Saturday's Po
litical Disturbances.
W. R. HALL FIRST TO TESTIFY.
Subpoenas to Be Issued for D. R.
Francis, Jr., and His Broth
er, Who Were Assault
ed by "Indians."'
When the Grand Jury convened yester
day morning Assistant Circuit Attorney
Hancock at once called attenUon to the
reports of outrages at the primaries last
Saturday and suggested that an investiga
tion be commenced at once.
ine Grand Jurors, one of whom, is said
to have witnessed several of the disturb
ances, agreed that such an Investigation
should be made.
W. R. Hall of Xo. 33 Maryland avenue
was the first witness examined. Ab told
in The Republic jessterday, air. Hall had
expressed his intention of taking tho mat
ter before the Grand Jury and he ap
peared at the Four Courts without being
subpoenaed. - .
He brought three friends- with him to
substantiate his charges, but their names
were withheld by the Grand Jury.
Mr. Hall has the numbers of the police
men whom lie charged with misconduct,
and gave them to the Grand Jury. He
told of tho outrageous conduct he had
witnessed at the Twenty-eighth Want
polling place at Delmar and Taj lor ave
nues. Mr. Hall says the policemen whose num
bers ho obtained saw him dragged away
from tho line in front of the polling place
by "Indians" and assaulted without prov
ocation. After hearing Mr. Hall in the morning
the Grand Jury decided to send for tho
Police Commissioners. The Commis
sioners, President Frye, Mayor Wells and
Mr. Hanlon, who had arrived at the Four
Courts for a meeting to Investigate the
charges against policemen, went upstairs
to the Grand Jury room, but remained
only ten minutes.
As all three were admitted at the same
time It Is not believed that they were
questioned on their oaths.
The Grand Jury had also decided to
subpoena David R. Francis. Jr., and Per
ry Francis. Summonses also will be
served on John W. Krlstoe, William K.
Kavanaugh. J. T. Wallace, Captain J. J.
Corker-. Charles B. McDermott, John B.
O'Meara, Houston T. Force, Edward Cun
ningham and Edward Shaw, whose names
were given by The Republic yesterday as
witnesses to the assaults made by "In
dians" and the seeming Indifference of
the police to the conduct of the thugs
and tough.
need's Lost Annnnl Pnss.
A politician from Howell County, who
was in the city yesterday, said that one
of yie reasons for the success of
Circuit Attorney Folk in the primaries
there Saturday was the undisputed chargo
that Mayor James A. Reed had lost an
annual pass over the Burlington Railroad
last March.
Congressman Vandiver had a copy of
the bulletin Issued by the Burlington Rail
road to all of its conductors and which
was posted In the Kansas City Union De
pot at that time.
LEADING TOPICS
n-
TO-DAY'S REPUBLIC
WEATHER IDlCATIOS.
For St. Lonls nnd Vicinity Fair,
with rlslne temperature Tnrsday;
frnh westerly winds, ahlftlnsr to
southerly.
Page.
J Call Indignation Meeting of Voters.
Judge C. F. Shultz Victim of "In
dians." Requests Dockery to Denounce I'olice.
4. To Investigate Frisco Merger.
Weird Scenes at Queen's Funeral.
8. Race Result and Entries.
Crack Canines at I.ocal Collie Show.
7. Happenings in East Side a ties.
8. Editorial.
Society Happenings.
Will Show Bedlam Horrors at Fair.
9. The Stage
10. Republic "Want" Ads.
Birth. Marriage and Death Records.
New Corporations.
H. Rooms fcr Rent Ads.
12. River Telegrams.
Real Estate News and Transfers.
13. F nancial New.
Summary of St. Louis Markets.
II. Sued for Divorce by Second Wife
Court to Decide When a Rock is
Stone.
Site Bought for Shields School.
AN EVIDENCE OF INDIANS' PRIMARY WORK.
) '.' ' ill '. i. I i '. 4S hi ! ! i. i hi iii . .
After Leslie Green, 431S Cook avenue, nai beaten by tne Indians In Saturday's
primary at Delmar and Tajlor avenues, he found his hat in the gutter in tho con
dition shown in tho photograph
SUPREME COURT HOLDS THAT
NORTHERN SECURITIES MERGER
VIOLATES THE SHERMAN ACT
Government Wins Its Suit by Narrow Margin of One Vote on Su
preme Bench, Chief Justice Fuller and Justices White, Feck
ham and Holmes Dissenting From Majority Opinion Given by
Justice Harlan Decision of .Circuit Court Sustained in Every
Point.
STATE'S RIGHTS IN THE PREMISES ARGUED PRO AND CON.
0$s0s$ss0sss
JUSTICE WHITE USES FORCIBLE
LANGUAGE IN DISSENTING OPINION.
Washington, March 14. Justice White. In his dissenting opinion, took up
especially the power of Congress to control commerce. Beginning with argu
ment In support of dissenting opinions, he outlines the points involved in the
.case. Ho referred to its importance, nnd called attention to the fact that only
four members of the court had united in the opinion of tho court. He then
said that such principles as are laid down in that opinion are "destructive
of government, destructive of human liberty and destructive of every principle
upon which organized society depends"
Justice White said he conceded to the fullest extent the power ot Con
gress oct interstate commerce "But this question," he said, "Is ownership
commerce. Is the acquisition and ownership of property Interstate commerce?"
Commerce undoubtedly is traffic, he went on, but it is something more. If
it ba true that ownership of railroads may be controlled by tha Federal
Government, "why may not all ownership be controlled?"
If the principle hrre adopted be true, ho contended, Mr Hill's control of
the railroads in question could be taLen from him. He could not accept this
theory, but contended for the right of the States to regulate matters of this
character for themselves. For the Federal Government to take the position
that it can supcnlse In such Instances, ho said, is for it to pull down the
pillars of the temple upon which it
rests.
4vAeVVVVV79VTVV
FOUR OF NINE JUSTICES
DISSENTED FROM DECISION.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL
Washington, March 14. Four of
the nine Justices of the Supreme
Court dissented from the majority
opinion in the Northern Picitlc
merger case. The vote was as fol
lows: roR Tiin covnnMiEVT.
Justices Harlan. Brown, Brewer,
McKenna and Day
AOWNSiT TIIll GOVHR.VMirVT.
Chief Justice Fuller and Justices
White. Feckham and Holmes.
s
s
s?
l'vvvvvvvvvvH
Washington, March 14. In the United
States Supreme Court to-day an opinion
was delivered In the merger case of the
Northern Securities Company -versus the
United States In favor of the Govern
ment's contention that the merger was
Illegal.
The opinion of the court was handed
down by Justice Harlan and It upheld the
decree of the District Court for the Dis
trict of Minnesota in every particular.
Four of the Justices dissented from the
fle constituting the majority.
The division in the court was due to a
difference of opinion as to the right of
federal control ot State coroprations.
The majority opinion proceeded on the
theory that Congress has a right under
the Constitution to control interstate
commerce, r.o matter by whom conducted.
while tho minority or dissenting opinion
was based on the theory that 'in tho
present case, the effort to regulate owner
snip Is not Interstate traffic.
An effort was made by the court to pre
vent the knowledge of the fact that tho
opinion was to bo rendered to-day from
getting to the public, but, nevertheless. It
was quite generally understood among
newspaper men, attorneys nnd others for
an hour or so before the convening of
court to-day that the decision would be
announced.
When, therefore, the members of tho
court filed Into the chamber at noon they
were met by an expectant crowd which
filled every seat, both inside and outside
the bar. Betted among the attorneys were
Attorney General Knox and Secretary
Taft and an unusual number of Senators
and members of the House.
There was no surprise manifested, when,
promptly on the assembling of the court.
Justice Harlan began the delivery of the
opinion. The fact that he had been se
lected for the preparation of the document
at once led most people to conclude that
the decision would uphold the Sherman
antitrust law and sustain the contentions
of the Government. The Justice read his
opinion from a printed copy, which cov
ered thirty cages and consumed about an
hour and a ouarter In Its delivery.
GOVERXMENT WOX nY
!
XAnROW MARGIN OF OXE VOTE.-
Verv soon after Justice Harlan had con-
s
WHAT SUPREME COUnT
RESTR VI.S SECURITY $
COMPANY PROM IOI.CI. $
O Washington. March 14. The de- s
cree of the United States Circuit
Court, which was to-day sustained
by the Supreme Court, contains
the following: "
"Enjoining the Securities Com-
pany. its officers, etc
"From acquiring or attempting to
4 acquire any more of such stock.
"From toting any such stock at
s any meeting cf stockholders of
cither railroad company.
O From exercising or attempting to
s exerclt; any control, direction, su-
V pcrvlslon or Influence upon the acts
O of eithpr railroad company by virtue s
of its holding of stock therein.
"From allowing the Securities s
s Company or Its attorneys or agents
to vote the stock held by it.
s "From paying any dividends on
s such stock to the Securities Com-
pany. o
s "From permitting the Securities
Company or Its officers, etc., to ex-
O erclse any control over the cof- s
porato acts of such railway com- s
panles."
s The decree further provides that It
shall not be construed as prevent- s
lng a re-exchange between the Se-
curlties Company, and those to s
whom It has Issued Its own shares s
In exchange for those of either rail- s
way company.
L'vvOvOvvvB
eluded his presentation of the case it be
came evident that the court had divided
on the question at Issue, and ere the opin
ion was announced it developed that net
only had there been a very close shave
for tho Government but that one ofvthe
members of the court, who cast his vote
for the majority, entertained opinions of
hl3 own. which fact rendered the division
nil the more marked and interesting. This
was Justice Brewer, who, while he con
curred In the result, announced in an in
dependent opinion of his own that he held
tho view that previous antitrust decisions
had been more sweeping than was Justi
fied. Four of the nine Justices dissented out
right. These were Chief Justice Fuller and
Justices White, Peckham and Holmes.
The opinions of Justices Harlan and White
were long, while those of Justices Brewor
and Holmes were comparatively brief.
All told, the court consumed two hours
and three-quarters in disposing of tho
case. Tho fact was noted by several per
sons that the argument In tho case was
begun December 11. Just three months pre
vious to the decision. For so Important a
case this is considered a very brief In
terim between the arguments and the de
cision. The effect of the opinion is to sustain
the contention that the Sherman anti
trust law applies to railroad combinations
of the character In question.
Justice Harlan said that In the merger
Continued on rage Tne.
F
KEEPS UP STEAM
Russian Admiral it is Reported,
Has Almost Blocked the
Channel at Port
Arthur.
ARMY PLANS TO FALL BACK.
Retrograde Movement to .Con
tinue Until 300,000 Soldiers
Are Ready to Fight.
NIUCHWANG RUSSIANS ANGRY.
Anxious Inquiries About Inten
tions to Blockade River Ir
ritate Them Natives
Say Japs Are in
Manchuria.
SPECIAL BY CABLE TO THE NITSV TORK
HERALD AND THDST. LOUIS REPUBLIC.
Yin-Kow. March H.-(Copyright, 19W.)
With regard to my telegram of March 9
reporting the present of Japanese troops
at Fung-Wang-Cheng, my runner has evi
dently been detained. Details are. unob
tainable, but constant Chinese -reports con
firm the previous one of the Japanese oc
cupation. Russians are buying up all the available
foodstuffs her. There Is great scarcity of
everything.
Cossacks are scouting fifty miles west
of tho Liao River.
Admiral Makaroff at Port Arthur has
issued orders to the effect that the sav
ing of coal is unnecessary, but that his '
men must be cautious about wasting tha
big gun ammunition In the) forts. Evi
dnUy this Js running short
After .f removal of the battleship
Retvlzan. lour Russian steamers, tho Har
bin, the Hailer, the Ningutft and the Sun
gar!, were anchored at the mouth of the
entrance to Port Arthur in proper posi
tion and sunk, leaving only a small chan
nel available. Vice Admiral Makaroff hav
ing previously ordered the whole fleet to
remain outside with steam up.
The local Russian authorities are ap
parently Incensed and manifestly much
annoyed at the solicitous inquiries of the
commanders of foreign gunboats regard
ing the projected blocking of the Liao
River before the afrlval, of the Japanese,
which latter eent la regarded as a fore
gone conclusion aa soon as the Ice melts,
which will be In about ten days.
Although the blocking of the Liao and
also the defense of the settlement and na
tive town are regarded as unattainable. It
Is certain that an Important disposition of
guns and the arrangement of a defense
plan have already been made. The ar
rival of General Kondratovltch a few days
ago. however, arrested tho arrangements
and threatened to cause the abandonment
of the original Intention.
The best Russian information obtaina
ble at Port Arthur and Nluchwang admits
the Government's intention to fall back
Indefinitely until the mobilization of 300,
000 troops for the purpose of assaulting
and opposing the Japanese and probably;
300,00) more to oppose the Chinese can be
completed.
The same opinion asserts that Vice Ad
miral Makaroff will fight hard. He is de
termined to weaken the enemy at any
cost and make the operation of the Baltic
sea fleet In the far East feasible, though
It may be necessary to fight without the
Pallada. Czarevitch and Rotvixan, which.
It Is admitted, cannot bo fully repaired
within six months. On'account of the un
certainty of the success of the scheme of
constructing a mud dock In which to re
pair the Czarevitch and Retvlzan. naval
experts allow a year for the work.
I have just returned here from a tour
along the Manchurlan fronUer. The trains
are crowded with Chinese soldiers, num
bering upward of 21.000. on their way to
garrison the border.
WOMEN AND CHILDREN, FIRST
VICTIMS OF WAR, PINING IN
DIRTY.CROWDED STATIONS.
St. Petersburg. March 11. A Russian
correspondent proceeding to the front
writ3 to the St. Petersburg Telegraph
Bureau from Irkutsk, Siberia, as follows:
"At Irkutsk we met the first victim of
the war women and Children trying to get
back to European Russia. On our en
trance into the semldarkness of the station
wo were greeted by the walling of' chld
dren issuing from the dirt heaps and bag
gage encumbering tho floor. Their waxen
faces and bloodshot, sleepless eyes would
melt a heart of stone. The wild, panic
stricken night of their mothers from Man
churia after the startling outbreak of tho
war led to great sufferings. They reached
this place after untold hardships, only to
find that thoy will have to wait weeks
more till there 19 sufficient train accom
modation to enable them to proceed furth
er. "So the children have been pining,
sleepless and motionless, in this fetid at
mosphere, because outside reigns deathly
frost."
HAYASHI PREDICTS LONG
WAR WITH RUSSIA; ADDS
THAT CHINA IS WAKING UP.
SPECIAL BY CABLE.
Paris, March H. Viscount Hayathl. the. ,
Japanese Minister at London, has been In
terviewed by a representative of the PpL
trle. In replying to the suggestion that
It was England that launched Japan into
the war in order that she and the United
States might reap the fruits of a Jsp&aeM
victory, he said:
"We did not need anyone's hlp. W4
Continued on Faca Twa
4
".r $&:.' WW -v -

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