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The St. Louis Republic. [volume] (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, April 07, 1904, Image 1

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THE ST. LOUIS REPUBLIC.
I HOMES THAT PLEASE (
AT PRICES TO SUIT
5 ' Ars advertisei tfaily in The s
Republic. J
FILL WIIR ROOMS
Through an ad in The Republics
"ROOM FOR RENT columns.
Any druggist will take your ad
for The Republic.
WOIE&LID'S
1904
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NINETY-SIXTH YEAR.
THURSDAY MOVING. APRIL 7, 1004.
fj
COURT SAYS BURTON
WAS CONVICTED BY
Judge Adams, In Sentencing
Senator, Declares He Accom
plished More Than Evi
dence Disclosed.
"JURY'S VERDICT IS JUST."
Sentenced to Six Months in Iron
County Jail and Pay a Fine
of 2,500.
CASE GOES TO HIGHER COURT.
Court of Appeals Will Have Final
Jurisdiction Unless Consti
tutional Question Is
Raised.
I
JUDGE ADAMS'S COUMET
IX THE BCRTOS CASE.
"It may be true, and In the light
of correspondence It seems as If it
were true, that the defendant ac-
completed much more in the de-
partment. either directly or indi-
rectly, by ways and means which
-were not brought out in detail,
than was disclosed by oral testi-
reony of witnesses. His own admis-
lions, contained in letters, strong-
ly indicating that he employed
some other means for obtaining
bis information and accomplishing
his purpose than those actually
disclosed by witnesses produced."
In passing sentence on Senator Joseph
Ralph Burton of Kansas yesterday. Judge
Elmer B. -Adams said that the. defendant
bad been mainly convicted on his own ad
missions, contained In letters;, and that
he had accomplished more In the. Post-Office
Department in behalf of the Rlalto
Orain and Securities Company than had
been disclosed in the testimony during his
trial.
Judge Adams sentenced Senator Burton
to serve six months in the Iron County,
VtiynrtJaUand pajr-i.flnooX-X2,MOSr.-.
tenc was passed at 12:30 p. m., and Sen
ator Burton, through his attorneys, Ches
ter H. Krum and Fred W, Lehmann.
promptly moved for an appeal to the
!UiKe States Court of Appeals.
She appeal was allowed, and Senator
fearton gave a bond in tho sum of 0,000.
ijrlth George W. Davis, Ernest H. Kastor
lead Herbert A. Vrooman, aa sureties.
Tb case will corns up before, the United,
Circuit Court of Appeals in St-
xTcTember next. Attorneys in the
i agree that the latter court will have
final jurisdiction, unless a constitutional
Question Is raised or the cas is certified
to fhs United States Supreme Court on Its
Own motion or upon a, writ of certiorari.
SENATOR BURTON DEPARTS.
6eoator Burton, accompanied by his
left tha city at 2 o'clock this morn-
; tar Washington. Concerning bis case.
Senator declined to make & atate-
' agreement between Senator Burton's
nays and United States District Ai-
ttey Deyer the noon hoar was selected
r passing sentence. This was presumably
Be lor the purpose of avoldinjc the
rd and subjecting tha Senator to hu-
1 liatlon, which could be avoided.
When Senator Burton acpeared with
(fa attorney an attache of the United
plate Marshal's office notified the court
Lad Senator Burton stood up to receive
yentenne.
u accordance with the usual farm
fc4re Adams asked the defendant
Whether he had anything to say why sen
tence should not be passed, and Senator
Burton said:
MTOUT honor. T Will O.lr V ti m--mmA
from saying anything at this time."
COURTS COMMENTS.
In pasting sentence. Judge Adams said:
"After a fair and Impartial trial by a
Jury of exceptional Intelligence, you have
been found guilty of the offenses charged
Xa the Indictment against you.
"A motion for a new trial in your be-
tiaU has afforded me an opportunity to
arefully review and consider the evi
dence. As a result of this, I ant satisfied
that the jury reached tha just and true
result. Tha evidence abundantly warrant
ed their verdict, and I 'find ns .reason,
either in the law governing the case or
In the proceedings attending the trial, for
disturbing It.
"Tour conviction necessarily results In
your punishment. Its Importance, In my
opinion. Is not confined to its effect upon
you.
LAW IB EQUAL.
"Tour exalted station in life, and the
character of your offending, give unusual
significance to your conviction, it dem
onstrates that the law of the land is
equal to any emergency, and that it can
be administered regardless of tha person
ality or station of the accused, it also
demonstrates to all the people that public
office cannot be prostituted to self-serving
purposes, and that public office is not
a sure or safe passport to private thrift.
"The humiliation attending your convic
tion and the statutory disqualifications re
sulting therefor, which forever incapaci
tate you from holding any office of honor,
trust or profit under the Government of
the United States, are In themselves heavy
punishment for your offenses, and leave
but little in the way of severity, which
could be added.
"It is neither my pleasure, nor purpose
to Impose any unnecessary punishment
"I think the majesty of the law will be
sufficiently vindicated, and tho public wel
fare sufficiently safeguarded by Imposing
a single sentence, warranted, as it Is, on
any one of the six counts of the indict
ment on which you were convicted.
"This sentence will be: That you be con
fined ih the Iron County Jail for .a period
of six months and that you pay a fine of
J1E00."
BUP.TOX IS SILENT.
There were few persons In the room
when Senator Burton was sentenced.. He
Continue on Page Too,
OWN
ADMISSIONS
JUDGE PARKER'S REPORTED
CHOICE FOR SECOND PLACE
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EX-SENATOR WILLIAM A. HARRIS OF KANSAS.
Ex-Senator Harris, whom Judge Parker of New York hopes, according to reports,
to have nominated with him on the Democratio national ticket, is a farmer and
stock raiser, being one of the world's leading authorities en hlsh-bred shorthorns.
He is a native of Virginia and S3 years old. In the Civil War he was Assistant Adju
tant General of Wilcox's brigade in the Confederate Army. He was elected, as a
Populist indorsed by the Democrats, to the Fifty-third Congress. In 1S97 he was
elected to the United States Senate bv the" combined Democratic and Populist
strength and served until 1903. Senator Harris Is a speaker and writer of ability, and
a-roan of the highest character. Judge Parker Is said to admire Senator Harris as a
man and to have expressed great confidence In the Kansnn's availability as a na
tional candidate. The former Senator is a real farmer, an educated man of affairs, a
typical Westerner of Southern birth, one of the most popular of Democrats among
the Populists, and yet a well-balanced and conservtivo business man. These at
tributes have attracted the attention of the Parker advisers.
SENATE'S ATTITUDE
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
Washington, April . Senator Bjrton's sentence at St. Louis to-day does
not change the situation so far as action by the United States Senate is con
cerned. It is still the disposition to await final action by the Circuit Court of
Appeals, which is the tribunal of last
While the case is still pending in tho form of an appeal the Senate will not
act. and therefore the question of expulsion will go over until the next session,
unless the Circuit Court of .Appeals should render a derision this month.
The final disposition of the case is not expected until this court convenes In
St. Loots next September.
Mr. Burton could relieve the situation at any time by resigning his seat in
the Senate, but this is not expected by any of the Kansas delegation In Con
gress, because It would leave the appointment of his successor to the Governor
of Kansas., who Is not on friendly terms with the Senator. He will therefore
draw pay as a United States Senator pending a final decision In his case, though
,.h In nil expected to come to Washington or agalu appear upon the floor of
. the Senate. .
IT MAKES
HIS "BLUFF,"
Congress 'Appropriates the $30,
000 Needed to Entertain Eu
ropean Dignitariea.
HIS EXCRUCIATING ANXIETY.
St. Louis Congressman Secured
International Peace Parlia
ment for World's Fair on
His Own Daring Promises,
The Rttmbtle Bureau,
ltth St. and Penntylvanli Ave.
Washington, April S. The $50,000 appro
priation needed to defray expenses of the
International Peace Parliament at the
World's Fair was whisked through the
House late yesterday afternoon in the'
form of a Joint resolution, which will cer
tainly bo concurred in by the Senate.
Senator Cullom of the upper body has
taken a decided interest in the matter and
will call it up In the near future. It is
assured that the Parliament, the first of
its kind to be held either la. the United
States or In any city other than a na
tional capital, will meet next September at
the Exposition.
"BARTHOtLDTS BLUFF."
Now that the money will be obtained,
the story which Is back of the appropria
tion' is circulating widely in Washington.
The Incident is summed up as "Bartholdt's
bluff." It seems that the Representative
from St. Louis Invited the dignitaries of
the European parliaments to the World's
Fair and secured their acceptances, de
claring that the United States would foot
the bills. Naturally he as somewhat
anxious to secure the O. K. of our Con
gress to the proposition, else his predica
ment, to sav the least, would have been
embarrassing.
But Congress Is In an economical mood
this year, and also fa somewhat listless
toward further appeals from expositions.
On Tuesday the House refused to con
sider the Portland Exposition appropria
tion and not a few members declared that
Portland should have no money at all.
FOREIGNERS SKEPTICAL.
When the parliament met In Vienna
two years ago the invitation was extended
to its members. At the time one crusty
Enslishman arose and desired to know
whether the thing were not an American
advertising scheme, and-Rhether arrange
ments for entertainment suitable to the
dignity of fcuch visitors would be made.
Most seriously was the proposal put for
ward, replied the St. Loulsan, and most
lavish would be the reception accorded
so distinguished a gathering. But. until
informed that, during his absence from
the floor. Hitt of Illinois had slipped the
.incionrlatlon through. Bartholdt was in
agonies. In Ills mind's eye he. saw siich
BARTHOLD
men as Premier Balfour landing on this
side only to face "the tender mercies of
American railroads and hotel proprietors.
As it is a special train will be run for
the t orelsners and they will be given the
best junket that SO.OW will buy.
.
a
TOWARD BURTON t
resort in criminal cases.
,
wB
L
WAYTOTHE FAIR.
General Cronje, War Hero, a Pic
turesque Figure at New
port News.
GLAD TO BE IN AMERICA.
Preparations Being Made at Ex
position Grounds for Recep
tion and Housing of
Party.
nEPUBUC SPECIAL.
Newport News, Va., April 6. The steam
ship Doune Castle arrived to-day shortly
before noon, having on board the South
-African exhibit for the St Louis World's
Fair, consisting of English and Boer vet
erans of the Eoer War. Boer women and
children and native Zulus, Kaffirs and
Zambesls.
Standing well forward and leaning over
tho rail of the vessel, apparently in deep
meditation, was a small, rugged figure In
a dark blue suit of faded texture. On his
head was a khaki helmet surrounded by
a crepe band, from which protruded a
black plume.
He attracted very Utile attention from
the crowd, and seemed to be looking be
yond them and contemplating the miles
of railroad track, elevators and piers and
the indications of great commerce and
prosperity.
It was General Cronje.
"I am glad to be In America." said the
General. "It Is a land that I have alnajs
admired, and I expect my former opinion
to bo confirmed during my stay here."
"What are the conditions existing In
South Africa to-day? Are the Boers pros
pering? Have thej- fully arcepted British
rule, and arc they happy?" were some of
the questions asked of the General.
"The spirit of peace and Industry has
settled over the land." interpreted the in
termediary. "Everjoije has his farm back,
and the people are now at work culti
vating them. Like In all cuuntrles at the
close of a war, there arc some dissatisfied
spirits, but the great majority of the peo
ple are reconciled and happy. The scarci
ty of sheep and cattle Is the greatest set
back tlvst the country has rece!ed, and It
will take years to recover from this."
A permit was Issued to-day for the
erection of tents and temporary buildings
on the grounds Jus east of Sklnker road
allotted to the Boer AVar Concession. Sev
eral 12x14 wall-tent are being pitched
there.
These preparationsare designed for the
prospective arrival of General Piet Cronje,
the Boer commander, who was deported
by the British during the South African
War.
As poon as this party arrives Its mem
bers will be placed under military disci
pline. A kitchen has been erected, from
which army rations will be issued to
them,
AD
SPEED OF AUTOS
MOSTBE REGULATED
City Official.') Say That Ketklcss-
liess of Chauffeurs aIpimicpk the
Safetv of Park Visitors.
ACCIDENTS -ARE FREQUENT.
Cliii-f Kiely Issues Instructions to
"Arrest All Persons (iuilly of
Driving Machine's at
- High Sliced.
4.-s
KlEl.'S,l.V'CKICTIjl,
' TO .H.l.(HfTl,l.
To Ail C.-.pralnn iluch romplilnt
1 being m:ide by citizens of auto-
s mobiles running throughout tht-
e city nt a high rat of speed.
I attach herewith a copy of the
s oidinunre governing thrsu vehicle",
s and 1 dfsdre you to instruct your
s officers to ree that this ordinance
s 1 not violated, arresting all par-
ties found to be running their ma-
chines at a higher rate of speed
s than that prescribed by law. Re-
4 spectfully, MATHEW KIKLT.
Chief of Police.
Following a meeting at tbe Four Courts
yesterday, attended by William G. Frj-e,
President of the Board of Police Commis
sioners; T. R. Ballard, a member of tho
Board of Police Commlwionera; Robert
Aull, Park Commissioner; Captain George
McNamee of the Mounted Police District
and Mathew Kiely. Chief of Police. Chief
Kiely Issued orders to the officers com
manding the several districts, Instructing
them to see that the ordinance regulating
the rate of speed of automobiles be en
forced, r
This order was the result of the many
complaints which have been made to the
police by cltliena, that automobiles are
being run through the city at a very high
rate of speed.
During the last month many persons
have been knocked down by automobiles.
Several have been seriously Injured. In
many instances drivers of automobiles,
after runninr down a person, have re
fused to Btop and their Identity was not
learned.
Captain McNamee told Chief Kiely and
the members of the Board of Police Com
missioners that every day visitors at
Forest Park narrowly escape being run
down by reckless chauffeurs, ' especially
in the evenings.
As the opening of the World's Fair ap
proaches the number of automobiles In
St, Louis is increasing. , There are prob
ably three times as many automobiles
in St. Louis now as there were six
months ago.
Park Commissioner Robert Aull told of
witnessing many narrow escapes in For
est Park. On tho hills near the Cottage
Mr. Aull stated that chauffeurs some
times ran their machines at a speed
equal to that of a passenger locomotive.
The ordinance regulating the rate of
speed at which automobiles shall be run
Is as follows:
Ko automobile, locomobile or honelew vehicle
propelled by tha uto of !ectrlclty, sasollae or
team, by-whattvtr nam such vehicle may ba
known, whether uied for purpose of pleasure
or buslaeas. shall bo movtd or proplld along,
over or upon any public street, avenue or
boulevard, or other public place et a rate of
vpeed exceeding eight miles per hour, and no
uch vehicle shall be movtd or propelled in any
public park in the city at a rat of speed to
exceed ix miles per hour.
Any person violating any of the provision, of
this ordiaanc shall, on conviction, be subject
to a tin of not lea than H nor more than (SCO.
LABOR DISPUTE IS ENDED.
New York's Building Operations
Will Be Resumed.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL
New York, April S. Labor troubles,
which for a month have threatened to
make the building season of 1904 a repeti
tion of 103 with Its long and costly strike,
were ended to-day.
The unions of bricklayers and laborers,
representatives of which held out the
olive branch, approved of this action.
Twenty thousand men. skilled and un
skilled, will return to work to-morrow
and work on more than JM.OW.OOO worth of
new- buildings will be-resumed.
LEADING TOPICS
-is-
TO-DAY'S REPUBLIC.
THE SUN RISES THIS MORNING AT
5:37 AND SETS THIS EVENING AT t-JS.
THE MOON RISES THIS MORNING
AT 12:.
GRAIN CLOSED: ST. I.OUI8-JULT
WHEAT. K!ic ASKED; JULY COKN.
Vic. CHICAGO-JULY WHEAT, fcSc
ASKED: JULY CORN, SFic BID.
WEATHER INDICATIONS.
For St. Loot and Vicinity Showers
Thnrsdny; alluhlly warmer) variable
wind, becoming; fresh sootlierly.
For Mlsaonrl Showers Thnrailay.
rrldny iienernlly fair.
Page.
1. Court Says Burton Was Cunvlcted by
Own Admissions.
RequesU Decision on Bribery Treaty.
5. Dockery Took Charge of Police.
Stone Reiterates His Support of Cock-
rell.
i. Nichols's Pitching Won for Cardinalx.
Kace Results and Entries.
I. Mr. Hawes Replies to the Ministers.
River Telegrams.
6. Editorial.
1. Meriwether I.lbel Case Is on Trial.
Court Not Under Inquiry.
S. World's Fair News.
's," Financial News.
St. Louis Grain Markets.
10. Republic "Want" Ads.
Birth. Marriage "and Death Records.
New Corporations.
11. Rooms for Rent Ads.
13. Chicago Grain Market.
Lfve-iStock Sales.
K. Happenings In Illinois Cities and
- Towns.'
Real Estate News and Transfers. -
EXPOSITIONS PLAY IMPORTANT PART
IN LIVES OF MR. AND MRS. THURSTON.
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MRS. CLARENCE THURSTON, r
Who was M1.--S Nellie Cotter. Her husband is the son of farmer United States
Senator Thursto n of Nebraska.
Clarence il. Thurston, son of former
United States Senator John M. Thurston
of Nebraska, attributes his good fortune
In meeting his bride to his enthusiastic
interest in expositions.
Mr. Thurston met Miss Nellie Cotter of
Omaha, Neb., at rhe Omaha Exposition
five years ago. and last Tuesday in the
parsonage of the New Cathedral Chapel, in
St. Loul3, Mr. Thurston and Mies Cotter
were married.
That Mr. Thurston's Interest In exposi
tions has not abated, despite other at
traction. In proven by the number of
ofUces which he has held with other ex
positions. Mr. Thurston was connected
MEN-OF-WAR START
UP MISSISSIPPI.
Xashville and Lawrenre Will
Come to St. Louis
Slowlv.
REPUBIJC SPECIAL ,
New Orleans. La.. April 6. The United
States man-of-war Nashville and the torpedo-boat
destroyer LawTence arrived here
to-day from Pensacola on their way to St.
Louis.
The vessels left Pensstcola Tuesday and
cleared off the passes last night. This
morning the Lawrence took on a quaran
tine officer at quarantine and ran up to
New Orleans, 100 miles, in four hours and
a half, breaking all records. She Is able to
make thirty knots an hour, and managed
twenty knots against the mighty current
of the Mississippi, now swollen by flood.
She anchored off the foot of Canal street.
The Nashville did not reach the city until
7 p. m. and was compelled, on account of
darkness, to anchor at the naval dry dock.
The two vessels will be here three or
four days. The Nashville will receive vis
itors, but tho Lawrence will not. as she
can accommodate only a very few- at a
time, being all machinery.
No date is yet fixed for arrival at St.
Louis, and It will depend on the orders
from Washington. No stops have yet been
arranged, but It is probable that the two
vessels will make short stops at Memphis
and other points.
The Lawrence could easily make the run
In three days, but will take longer, not
running by night und stopping at various
points.
The Lawrence has a crew of seventy
four men: tbe Nashville 4JJ.
MORE RAIN PREDICTED TO-DAY
Considering Weather Elsewhere,
St. Louis Is Favored.
Variable winds and showers to-day Is
the forecast Indicated by the local
Weather Bureau. Indications are that
the temperature will rise slightly.
Considering . prevailing weather In
other parts of the country, St- Louis has
not been discriminated against, according
to local forecasters.
Cold weather Is reported from the Pa
cific Coast States, with heavy to killing
fronts In Oregon and Washington. A
storm of considernble intensity It cen
tered in the Mlssojrl Valley, ami on the
east slope of the Rockey Mountains. Snow
Is falling In the Northwest and the lake
region.
EX-QUEEN ISABELLA IS ILL.
Attack of Iiillueirzu Causes Anx
iety. Paris, April C Former Queen Isabella of
Spatn Is suffering from nn attack of In
fluenza, which causes anxiety on account
of her ndvanced age.
The people lit the entourage of Queen
Isabella say that reports that her condi
tion It! "rerioiih are not warranted.
BARS INDIVIDUAL CUPS
AT COMMUNION SERVICE. I
Manchester, N. H.. Apill 6
Bishop Charles H. Fowler D. D.,
4 of Buffalo, declined to administer
4 the encntnicnt of the Lord's 8up-
4 per at tho orenlng session of the
4 Now Hampshire Methodist Epls- w
a copal Confirenee here to-day be-
csure Individual communion cup
4 had been- furnlhed.
4, To these the Bishop took marked
4. objection, and as no uther cups
were available Immediately, the
sacrament was not sdlmlntstered.
4 The service probably will be held
later. , . .,
Bjejwwvwwwww)si
officially wi!h the Paris Expoltlnn. and
now holds the post of secretary of the
Manufactures Department at the World's
Fair.
So engrossing and Important were Mr.
Thurston's duties that he Anally prevailed
upon MIsp Cotter to come to Ht IjuIs
and have the ceremony performed in this
city.
Miss Cotter finally assented, and Mr. and)
Mrs. Thurston will spend an ideal honey
moon seeing the Fair and having many
happenings to remind them of the first
days of their courtship at the Omaha Ex
position. Mr. and Mrs. Thurston are now keeping
house at No. 4W1 Delmar boulevard.
MUST STOP FOR
ALL PASSENGERS.
Captain ilcCalloch Says He Will
Try to Break Up Practice That
Has Become Too Common.
Motormen who deliberately speed by
corners where people are waiting for a
car will be asked to explain the reason
why.
Captain McCulloch. the new vice presi
dent and general manager of the St.
Louis Transit Company, says he is deter
mined to break up this practice that has
been the cause for Innumerable com
plaints. Making up time will not be considered
as a good excuse, except where there has
been a blockade on a line and the motor
man Is compelled to speed his car to re
lieve congestion, and where one or more
cars are following closely, said Captain
McCulloch,
On this point Captain McCulloch said:
"I heard before I returned to St. Louis
that passing people without stopping was
quite common. Sometimes there Is a good
reason for doing so; but where there is
no excuse I shall try to put a stop to It."
In regard to that statement that he had
reduced the force of claim agents and of
registered "spotters," to effect a saving of
from 115,000 to 83,000 a year. Captain Mc
Culloch declined to make a statement.
In a comparative statement of gross
earnings of the St. Louis Transit Com
pany for the months of March. 1S04 and
1903. an Increase In the earnings over those
or the corresponding month last year of
S74.7fi0.e7 is shown. The gross earnings for
the months stated are as follows: March.
1901. HHJ.4J1.83: March. 1908. ttffl.73I.lt
COCKRELL DID NOT
MAKE STATEMENT
Denies Article in New York Pap
er Declaring He Is Ostensibly
a Candidate, but Really
Is for Parker.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL
Washington, April 6. A news article
published this morning by a New York
newspaper declared that Senator Coclc
rell is "osteislbly a candidate for the
Democratic nomination," but is. In fact,
for Judge Parker. The Senator stamps
the whole publication as untrue in Us
every statement.
It is known In Washington that Senator
Cockrell Is no; "ostensibly" a candidate
or In any Sense nn avowed candidate, but
that his friends and udmlrers In Missouri
and In the Missouri delegation In Wash
ington arc sponsors for tlm mention of
lily nstne.
He. has exprexted appreciation of the
honor thus done him. but has not made
.11 y statements either announcing a per
son.il candidacy or bearing upon the
qualifications of others who are men--t
tuned to head tbe Democratic ticket
TO MAKE PEACE Tij IOWA.
Miner: and Operators to Have
Another Conference on Scale.
Orkaloosa, la., April S. An' official call
was lsued from miners' headquarters
hero for a joint meeting of operators und
miners oil April 11. at which It is certain
some agreement will be reached, and the
differences between the miners and op
erators satisfactorily adjusted.
It U predicted that the' IMS striking
miners In Iowa will be back at work
within a week.
IEL1EVE
JAPS WILL ATTACK
THEM OS HOLIDAY,
Army May Be Pushsd Across
the Yalu River or Other
Troops Landed on Man-
churian Coast.
KUROPATKIN AT NIUCHWANG.
Reports Are Heard of Minoe
Skirmishes Alonp Korean
Frontier Retwen Scout-
iii!,' Tarties.
ARMIES ARE IN CLOSE TOUCH.
News of Heavy Operations Ex
pected Any Day. in Spire of
Rad Roads British About
to Succeed in Thibet.
CZAR SOON MAY START
TO THE SEAT OF WAR. Z
4fr SPECIAL HT CARLE TO THE ST.
03U1S REPOU.1C ANO THE NEW
YORK HHRALD.
4 Berlin. April 6.-(CipyrlBht. 1904.)
Dispatches received in Berlin
from Russia report that it is
stated that (he Czar i about to
proceed to the seat of war.
For the tlmo being, however, his
Majesty will only proceed as far -
as Irkutsk, where ho will await the
final disappearance of snow and ice
before entering Slanchuria.
4 The fact that the statement In
the Russian prs that part of the
Czar's private police has already e
been ordered to Irkutsk has ben
4 allowed to puss, without contradlr-
e tlon is regarded here as confirms-
tlon of the report.
Russians believe that the next few days
will mark a desperate forward movement
of the Japanese, either by crossing the
Talu River or by landing troops some
where in Manchuria under cover of a
bombardment of Port .Arthur. Th'y.would
be a repetition of th6 Brltlsh-Firu at
tack on Odessa In ZtS. when the allies
took" advantage of the fact that all the
Russian troops were engaged In Eaatar
festivities. A declaration by a Japanese
sailor that another attack soon will he
made on Port Arthur lends color to the
Russian Rtorlea.
General Kuropatkln has reviewed the
4,000 troops at Nluchwang and inspected
the fortifications.
From Russian sources come reports of
minor skirmishes slong the Yalu River, in
which, the Russlsns assert, several Jap
anese were killed. Skirmishing between
frontier suards and Chinese bandits Is slso
roported.-
The opposing forces along the Talu cer
tainly are In close touch and heavy mili
tary operations may be expected any day.
though the spring thaw has rendered the
movements of troops more difficult. The
Japanese hope to be able to pass the Rus
sians' first line of defense without serious
trouble when the proper moment arrives,
which would give them a tremendous ad
vantage. Colonel Younghustand, In charge of the
British expedition' Into Thibet, believes
that the Thibetans will speedily yield to
his demands.
JAPS BELIEVE THEY CAN
PASS RUSSIANS' FIRST
LINE OF INTRENCHMENTS.
Shanghai. April 6. It is not believed
that the Russian troops between An-Tung
and Chiu-Tlen-fJheng (about ten miles
north of An-Tung) comprise the mala
Russian line, and consequently the en
gagement which Is looked for at or near
these places probably will not be de
cisive, but only a forerunner of larger
operations.
The. Russians are constructing intreneh
ments at several points on the Yalu and
Turner! rivers. These Instrenchments.
however, are not yet completed and if the
Japanese succeed In forcing their way
past one line of defense it would give a
distinct advantage and make It more dif
ficult for the Russians to concentrate and
oppose them
The Ice on the Yalu Is melting rapidly
and the muddy roads make promptness la
military operations most difficult.
JAPANESE TRANSPORT RAN
AGROUND ON ISLAND AT
NIGHT WITH LOAD OF MEN.
Victoria. British Columbia; April . Tha
Nippon Yusen Kaisha'a steamer Aki Man;,
lately on the Puget Sound-Yokohama rue
nearly 7,000 tons register, now used ss
a transport by the Japanese Government,
ran upon Quelpart Island at night while
proceeding from Mojl to Chemulpo, loaded
with more than 2.0DO troops of all arms.
The steamer stuck fast on a falling tide
and at daybreak was found to be in an
awkward position. Fortunately, the rising
tide enabled her to float off practically un
injured. She will be docked at Chemulpo.
CZAR CUTTING EXPENSES
IN ORDER TO MEET HEAVY
COST OF EASTERN WAR.
St. Petersburg, April 41 The scheme for
effecting retrenchments in the State ex
penditure In consrquence of the war, re
cently drawn up with a special conference
presided over by Count Solsky and sanc
tioned by the Emperor, was gazetted to
day. . It Is prcposed to devote the "free bal
ance" In the Imperial treasury to war pur
poses, and- to increase the funds in' the
treasury-by economies in tha budget cf
U0t especially in iha ctvfl estimate v
RUSSIANS I
TS
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