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The St. Louis Republic. [volume] (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, April 10, 1904, PART I, Image 14

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020274/1904-04-10/ed-1/seq-14/

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THE ST. LOUIS. REPUBLIC: SUNDAY. 'APRIL 1,0.' 1.304.
IMMMIMIMM 0 MM
IRISH WILT SEND
HEIRLOOMS TO FAIR
MMMMMMMMMMMMM4
Priceless Collections of Antique
Silver, Glass and Musie In
struments Will ISe Shown.
1)1
I
l!c
fv
WORK OF SKILLED ARTISANS.
Artistic Treasures of Peers, Land
. ed Gentry and People of Erin
to Be Displayed at the
Exposition.
SPECIAL CORRESPONDENCE.
Dublin, Ireland, -March CO. The revival
of art In IrcHnd, which began at the
clow; or the Sscnteenth Centun, corre
sponded with the rise and growth of her
nationality. The most brilliant period In
Ireland's, .political history, that which saw
the cradual' liberation of the Irish Pal
lament from foreign restraint and the tri
umph of Henry Grattan. taw also thq de
elopmcnt of indu-trj nnd the ncourage
ment of art. When on reads tho history
of Uio troubled times which had gone be
fore a h!tor marked by a continuous
sacce.-slon of land wars and military cam
paigns and which is written in the M-H
Ufa .blood of the people one stands
amazed at tho etraordirary italit of a
nation which could, in a few short jears,
(o completelj rccoer from apparentlj
mortal wounds.
And this wa exactly what did happen.
Ireland, with the growth of her independ
ence, recovered all her old skill In crafts
manship, in art, in letters and in music
Her orators were famous throughout Eu
rope, and her Parliament Hou-e was a
center of the mot lgorous nttion il life.
Beautiful houses sprang up, as if at the
touch of a mjgichin'i wand, and were
furnished and decorated in a princely stj e
by Dublin artisans. A school ot Irish
portrait painters and engravers nro-e.
whose works remain to do them honor;
music was cultivated in castle and cot
tcge, books were printed, and all the an
that go to the refining and beautifying of
life was practiced with marked success.
The extreme beauty of the silver plate
and glass manufactured In Dublin and
elcsewhere at this period has long been
recognized by connoisseurs
FINE IRISH SILVER.
We are glad to be able to state that
this eighteenth-century craft work will be
represented at St. Louis by a particularly
fire collection of Irish silver. The collec
tion Includes a magnificent set of Irlsh
allver dish rings, loaned by Colonel Claud
Cane, and which is admittedly the linen
collection of these unique treasures In the
possession of any single ow ner. The hand
some soup tureens lent by Lord Drogheda.
the quaint two-handled cups loaned by
Miss O'Grady, Sir. Roleeston and others
are also -most interesting.
As an example of a fumlly collection of
sllier, that loaned by Henry S King.
though not absolutely complete, will give
& very fair idea of the wealth of old sil
ver plate which is still to be found In
Irish cojntry houses. The chief beauty
of this Irish silver lies in the extreme dig
nity and quietness of the shapes, which
are quite free from the o erelaborateness
which is the pitfall of the skillful silver
smith. Much ot Its charm Is also due to
the fact that It has all been beaten out
from the inside with a hammer, every
stroke showing the hand of the crafts
man. Like even thing else that has .come
to. us from the Eighteenth Century,it.ls
essentially mellow. The light plays with
a subdued. radiance on Its round surfaces,
and the- charm of its accldentations. in
whichthe outside world Is reilected as in
,3ouTnlFhed mirror, will be dear to the
heart of every lover of beautiful crft
work.
- The waterford glas, loaned by Lord
Mayor and others, is on Its way. Just as
unique and as attractive as the sliver.
Z. r GLASS SERVICE.
We cannot recall ever having seen a
more striking collection of this much
prized glass than the service loaned by
Alexander S. Deane. J. P.. in which cut
ting of the plain rectilinear type con
trasts most effectively with the rounded
upper bands.
' In calling attention to this most valua
ble collection of Eighteenth Century IriMj
arts and crafts, mention must be made
of the small butt highly intercstly collec
tion of music Instruments In this branch
of work Dublin has always held an hon
ored place; and harps by Egan are now
fetching fancy prices In the salerooms. A
very fine example of one of these small
.Irish harps, with Anger action, date about
ISM, has been loaned by Lady Florence
Burke, while several sets of Irish pipes, an
old spinet made in Dublin, and some line
3 old Dublin violins will also be Miown.
Some costumes, illustrative of the tail
or's art of the ECghteenth Ctntury, and
which were worn at the Irish court, aro
being loaned by Do Vismes Kane and
others, and their elaborate detail will re
call the picturesque period treated of by
Thackeray in "The Virslnian."
JAMES A RBARDON.
NAVY WROUGHT UP OVER
QUESTION OF PROBABILITIES.
REPUBLIC EPLCIAL.
Washington, April 9 The remarkable
sinking of a warship's boat In Guantana
mo Harbor by a shark, which bit a hole
In the boat's bottom, has started a contro
versy of no little violence at the Navy De
partment. One set of officers maintain that the ver
dict of the court of Inquest, holding a
uhark responsible for the drowning of
Seaman -Longwell was probably correct;
others declare the "enemy" must hitve
been a swordflsh, that a shark would never
attack a boat.
It has been suggested that the scientists
from the Smithsonian Institution Investi
gate the accident.
Commander Cameron McR. Wilson, of
the Bureau of Navigation, expressed the
belief that the disaster was probably due
to a shark. He has seen many viclou
sharks In Central American waters and
their aggressiveness convinced him that
they would tackle even a Captain's gig.
That the shark of Guantanamn w.is one
ot the man-eating Kind was evident from
the fact that Longwell's bodv w hen recoi -Ted
-was without a head One leg was
missing and also part of one arm. It was
identified only through a tattoo mark on
otie shoulder. Captain Lemly, Judge Ad
vocate General of the Navy, believes It
was a swordflsh.
ENHHN
Eruxsa
r IX MONTHS AGO we had already organized our
X shipping forces to take care of the Fair trade. We
are daily delivering with our usual promptness
and care the little iron bed that the housewife has
chosen or the full equipment for some large hotel.
Every purchase, whether it be for a dollar or a thou
sand, receives our most careful efforts. We are head
quarters for low-priced furnishings.
SftftRSJS!ftSKSSiKy
YC N.'Vi'Oa. 4 T tut
m-7 l X 1 8
BEGAL TAPES1 RY
ROOM RU!
.i3U
CASH
FOR THIS
LET
DSOME
Tills Rug i: manufactured exclusively for us The de- J
signs of artistic elegance are both floral and Oriental The
colorings arc rich and beautiful, and of such abundant ,
variety that they meet everv teste and all surroundings.
Tl e wearing quality is fully guaranteed. To Introduce J
this Rug Into general use, and by special arrangement i
wltn the manufacturers, we offir a limited number of the '
Regal Rugs at the introductory price of $13 50. Sizes for J
looirj 11x15 feet. Catalog price, JK0O-OUR SPECIAL
PRICE.
And the Balance Payable $1.00 a Week.
This is a wonderful bargain.
12.50
SSJr-'-s' V
It
(Illustrations show Couch when closed and when pened
for a Bca.)
SteeS Folding
Bed Couch.
This Couch as made entirely of steel, and therefore is
perfectly sanitary. It la extremely simple to open and
makes a -very comfortable bed. Its appearance as a
Couch Is very handsome and its comfort is complete-
worth $12 00 Our Price for Couch and Spring,
$5.98
has met with tremendous success
in our other stores, and we are
now prepared to offer this splendid
Bedroom Outht to our fct. .Louis
natrons at the same remarkable
price. It cannot be bought any
where for less than $38.00. The
complete set "consists of a three
coat enameled metal bed, fitted
with the Famous .f untan spring
and a comfortable cotton and fiber
mattress; a solid oak dresser, high
ly polished and fitted with a large
beveled French plate mirror; a
large, roomy washstand to match;
two dainty bedroom chairs, taste
fully carved, and a pretty rocker
Oriental room rug and a pair of
$26.25
XG&XGCCG&C&C&SG&C&XC&SX
Cash or Easy Weekly or Monthly Payments,
25tf5Si2S3325
of the same
beautiful lace
style; a
curtains.
handsome floral or
The Complete Set $2.50
Cash and $1.00 a Week, for
' w& w
n
rtSTm
LZ J
CARPETS.:
INGRAINS- QCa 2
Worth 40e, per janl fcww W
m
INGRAINS- CCa
Worth 73c, per yard W
TAPESTRY ERUSSBLS- Atlts.
Worth G5c, per yard "I"
TAPESTRY BRUSSELS C
Worth 80c, per jard WW
VELVETS- OAa W
Worth $1.05, per yard www A
MOQUETTES QCa A
worm $1.1 1), per yara www te
A-VTwrwaTWBa Af a? w
r r iihhmwiw kh ..
Worth $1.25, per yard iww
AXMINBTERSI f IC
Worth $1.40, per yard ii
MATTINGS- ICa
Tin..i. vr nAM n...i a.aK
Ui IU AH., jJCi jaiU -
VTT IT ffclMLJ a M
jiijjnsmo ...
Worth 35c, per yard iww
Lace curtains- 7K
Worth $1.12, per pair WW
PORTIERES- l OR
Worth 53.00, per pair ipiaww
SOOCOOOCCCOCOOOOCOCOCfSAftftSf
(Illustrations show closed Davenport
opened lor a Bed.)
and the aae
SURGEON OWES HIS LIFE
TO HIS OWN OPERATION.
I?KPUBUC SPkClAU.
Saiannah, Ga , .April 9 Alderman
George iL Harman, a prominent sur
geon, who two weeks ago, was reported
to be In a dying condition from blood poi
soning, is now convalescent.
It has been learrjed that he owes his
life to his own surgical skill and, nerve,
and that two weeks ago whea his' life was
despaired of by the phys'clans 'in attend
ance, he performed a difficult operation
upon himself, being supported in front of
Mi, mirror by his colored valet, while he
wielded the scalpel.,
A month agOj Doctor Harman was the
operating surgeon in a hospital case. Dur
ing the operation-he in some manner
scratched the lower part ot his face, 'and
In -lime an abscess-formed under the eye.
Doctor Harman described the progress
oi.the poison to the physicians attending
.him and advised an. Incision, but there
were objections. Doctor Harman resolved
to do the job himself. Weak and ema
ciated from pain, he Instructed his serv
ant to select certain instruments from a
case in his office and bring them to him.
.The servant then lifted him from his
bed and held Dim in his arms before the
mirror, while the operation was in prog
ress. Doctor Harman ran the lanoe from the
inside of his mouth up almost to the
eye- The cheek was severed from the
bone, and an opening made so the poi-
on could drain downward.
BiiH ll 9 iH HiHHvuiiiiiB 41
MANTEL
No matter what
ikindvof Folding
Bed you want, yod
are coming to head
quarters, when ou
come to Sommers'
for It. We can show
you bigger assort
ments ana at most
reasonable prices.
' Here to a most com
fortable Mantel Bed
this week only
$12.50
Wash Bench
(Like cut ) 450 only. Folds compactly;
when opened is large enough to hold
two tubs; white maple, nicely finished,
very substantial; worth 75c;
25c
OPEN SATURDAY UNTIL 9 P.M.
wsssssooooooooooooocooooooooocooooooooooooooo
SOMMERS
"IT STAND ALONE
Folding Go-Cart
This Go-Cart is not like the general ran of
cheap folding carts, yet our price is lower
than elsewhere. They are well made, neat
and strome. Their entire
weight it about 9 pounds. They
fold compactly and can betak
en in a car. Our Special Price..
Ml made, neat
11.98
UsUuMMtliuKuS
Steel Bed-Davenport.
For gnce of style and thorough comfort, we can heartily
recommend this DavenDort. It imv tw ni m Ko,ir,
any room during the day and in a minute be converted
into a comfortable, sleep-Inducing .bed. It la made
throughout of steel worth CS 00 Our Price for Davenport
and bprlng,
$7.50
aRftftftsK
1126-1128-1130 Olive St.
CORNER
NSQ )
OF ALLEY.
(Like Cut). This Re
frigerator will keep
food pure, cold and
dry. It is very Bavins
in the use of ice. Full
steel lined, bronze
locks and binges
worth $7.50
COLE YOONGEB'S
T
SWEETHEAR
Newspaper Woman Who Sought
to Marry Him After His -Parole
Dies in Oklahoma.
s
nnpcBLic SPECIAL.
St. Paul, Minn., April $ After a hope
less battle with consumption in an ag
gravated form. Alls ilullcr, sweetheart of
Cole Younger, the noted ex-bandlt and
the woman whoae lnmicnce on his life of
recent years was most powerful, 1 dead
In Oklahoma, Brief announcements of the
end of her suffering were received In
St. "Paul-last night.
Miss Muller was a brilliant newspaper
woman and, .in 'a, professional capacity,
called on Cole Toungcr at Stillwater Pen
itentiary before the Pardon Board pa
roled him. .An attachment between the
old man and the cleer girl grew up,
which developed into a love full of
trajredy.
Both hoped against hope for an ulti
mate opportunity to marry, but this Stats
refused them and Cole Younger found,
waen released, that his dearest hopes
could not be realized,
banger left the State according to his
parole , and Miss Muller followed soon
after, Joining a brother In Oklahoma m
hbpe of recovering her"health. Her de
cline has been steady since that time.
Miss Muller was connected with leading
St. Paul newspaper) at different times and
afterwards with papers in Los Angeles,
Ban Francisco and Salt Lake.
SARAH BERNHARDT MAY
PRODUCE "VARENNES" SOON.
Parts, April 9. (Copyright. UOD-Mme.
Sarah" Bernhardt will probably produce
"Varennes" at the close of next week."
It Is a historical play, dealing with Jhe.
French Revolution and the flight of the
King to Varennes, where he was ar
rested and whence he was brought back to
Paris. Marie AntolnettA and the roval
children appear in a copy of the vehicle of
BRAVES BEASTS
IN MAN CHASE,
Landlady, Suspectinp . : Circus
Employe of Theft, Is Un
daunted by Animal's.
BEPUBUC SPECIAI
, New York, April St After an irilertstlng
chase through sevvral .streets that finally
en led among the animal cages in Madison
Squire Garden" Miss Xioulse Burke, who
conducts a boarding-house-at No. IS Bast
Twenty-eighth" street, captured a man
whom Bhe suspects of having stolen 00
worth of Jewelry and wearing" apparel
from her place. A suit of clothes which
the man wore led to his arrest.
The man is EU Luplen. an employe of
tho circus, who was boarding at her
house. Miss Burke says that she had no
suspicion that Lupien might know of
thefts from her boarders until Monday
night, itnen she discovered that a trunk
had been broken open and Jewelry and
two suits of men's clothes stolen.
She declares that when Luplen appeared
for dinner last night he was clad In one
of the stolen suits. She followed him out
and as ho reached the sidewalk called up
on him to stop. Luplcn, she asserts,
started un a run toward Lexington ave
nue. Miss Burke gathered her skirts
about her and, made after him Miss
Burke is a tall, muscular woman, while
Lupien is small. Thinking he might es
cape, she cried loudly tor help.
At Tcnty-slxth street, Lupien turned
west, nlth Miss Burke close at his heels.
Fully a hundred men and women had
Joined in the chase. Upon reaching Fourth
a enue Lupien made a flying leap for the
entrance to Madison Square Garden and
darted through the dcor. with Miss Burke,
her bair streaming In the breeze, almost
at his coat tall. Without hesitation she
Chased him down the inclined roadway of
the garden into the cellar, where the ani
mals are kept.
Thoughts of wild beasts had no terrors
for her, and she darted In and out amnng
the cages, horses and zebraa until she
captured the fugitive. Seizing Lupien by
an ear, she led him In , triumph into the
street, whero she turned him over to Po
liceman Bresnan.
In the Tcnderlora Station she charged
him with grand larceny. Lupien denied
the charge, wneit asKed by sergeant wu-
Refrigerator L xjti i
x our price, Mrmmi&
S5.S0 W!
SUITOR'S EAR FELL OFF
WHILE EMBRACING GIRL
She Fainted nnd Enxsgemtat Which
Promlaed to Bind Together the
East and IVeat Is Broken.
fcEFUBMC SPECIAL.
New York. April 9. For a cause un
doubtedly unique In the history of the
art of love-making an International court
ship, which promised to add a link to the
chain binding the East 'with the West.
has been rudely broken off. The abashed
suitor has sought seclusion to hide his
shame and his Inamorata has been taken
to the country, to recover from the shock
to her pride, as well as her heart.
But great would have to be the love
which could resist the sort of shock a
young American girl, whose name has
been carefully suppressed by all who are
concerned In thlii story, received at the
hand's ot a wealthy Japanese, who ha.
been living in New York.
One of the thlnss abuut the Jat).inM
son why he had run he said he thought which the young woman admired was his
Miss Burke was crazy, and that as she glossy, long hair. Which he wore well
was bigger than he, he bad tried to escape, down over the sides ot his head, so as al
most eomnTtjkiw ...
mw w wraceai nis ears. Her
whTn LWaS eMM one evenTn
but i btmX5. nJl nad cropped,
her. 8reater -rarprisa was In stori for
1.1. .
rtK, rtl mi??.c?nS er bidding her
ped a hai
lade a gr.
ring on tl
UU ., , --,.
fSinV"JK,iS.xoi,5n.??isM . o n
..'.: ""'""lis tr in Dlddlnar
to .hVa,VeV-SnCdIam5di fgrSS
S L-'JHSk.. 1"" "! Japanese rushed dla-
""y irom the house, to which he
has since not dared return. He had in
some way lost the greater.VSrt of hlsTleft
ear several years ago, but until he camn
to this country he hid not minded ItstoSS
rlJS ,f nS "."? which tt rouM ' t
rep.aced. In New York, however; he had
.J . Yr '""". wuran ne ODtalned It
- !T SI"" j"""cKjry ne need
said if it
jot pay for It. He was to wear it a few
days on trial. After losln? htafWicee th?
?a?n?"-fe'2sfd Parent. ThdJaler. i.i
Vw5L.Jdne1 t0 P th U1 rendered by
(fftSss .iaiut. xrss&
bannljded-aV.Mr- Bf'SHStiUedW
h?mPwith.'lgodstS aWarted tte to
ir, a-.l,SJ'w",h,"tM " Retorn.
X,a VandUa-PennsTlVanIa Unes April
i&u11, S- vii01"!? ltmih Including-Aprifli,
streets, and Union Station.
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