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The St. Louis Republic. [volume] (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, April 28, 1904, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020274/1904-04-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE ST. LOUIS REPUBLIC.
WORLD'S FVYIR APRIL 30 OPENING .DATE
fr-
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bi
lb"L
. I Id SI. Loali
price jgrv.:.4;
In St. Loals. One Cent.
ninety-sixth year.
THURSDAY. MORNING. APRIL 28, 1904.
Louis. Tin uewu.
Three Cents.
STALWART MEN AND PRETTY GIRLS
REPRESENT IRELAND AT THE FAIR.
PRINCE PU LUN
ARRIVES TO-DAY,
PRINCE OF THE ROYAL HOUSE OF CHINA
WILL REACH ST. LOUIS THIS AFTERNOON.
SUBMARINE BOAT
Great Crowd Greet Erin's .Contingent at Union Station and the
!
a. ..-. . . ! . ..
JAP TRANSPORT
i JJUDun isaua. "ircianas uwn," l'layea "Tlie weann' or tue
Green" Actors Who Accompany the Delegation Devoted to
Classics and Look Upon Farce Comedy as Beneath Their Dig
nity Glowing lied Cheeks of the Colleens Impiess Exposition
Visitors.
Will Spend a Month in St. Louis
Viewing and Studying the
Exposition.
Vessel Carrying 600 Troops
to Korea Reported Lost
With AH on Board.
-.-
PLEASED WITH ALL HE SEES.
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, , By a Republic Photographer.
- MItfeES IfeElE JiND MOLL1E FOLEY.
Who irlll sine Jn national theater In the Irish Village this summer.
to .., .& '
o CQIRRAMMATir PCMARICQ RJ.PflMPn
Wl iwnn ruivr iikiiimiuv.Mi.nii.v .
conu 0
' "We didn't like New York and we didn't see half as many Irishmen as
' expected. In St. Louts It was different. There teemed to be nothing but fa-
miliar faces at Union Station."
"The tremendous bustle of America is the thing that most Impresses us.
' Don't the people ever rest?" )
4 "A lelsurelv way of doing things Is characteristic of all European countries.
-but It Is more noticeable in Ireland than anywhere else. If a Celt can earn
enough in six months to support himself for a year he sees no use in worrying
from June to January."
"An Irishman doesn't look upon work as really important. He would quit
work any time to admire the beauty of the sunset. An Englishman never
thinks of the sunset, and the American probably refuses to."
. "You hato a line country In America, but we wouldn't trade the green
grasses of Ireland for anything you hate."
"Lack of wealth never worried a real Irishman. He argues that there Is no
use in accumulating money, for he knows that it isn't really his and he will
4 have to- leave it some time, anyhow."
"The discourtesy of men in trams (street cars) is a discredit to your coun-
try. Not until v.e arrived in New York did we ever see men deprive women of
seats In the public carrying cars."
l "The tost quality in an Irishman, peasant or lord, is his politeness. If an
Irishman's shoulders 'were weighted, down with a trunk he would stand aside
, for a woman, and If ho knew her he'would tip his hat, even though the gesture
4v broke his back."
: "Religion doesn't figure In Ireland's cause. Some of the most ardent Na-
tlonallsts are I'lotestanis." i
"American women? They are gorgeously decorated " A
Ireland's participants In the Louisiana
Purchase Exposition arrived at'Untor. Sta
tion yesterday morning and while several
thousand persons looked with Interest up
on the stalwart Irish boys and the rosy
cheeked Kirlr. the Dublin band, "Ireland's
Own," struck up "The W'earln' of the
Green," and aU the threats and the en
' treaties of the Union Station officials,
couldn't stop the music The policemen
- .In the Midway were asked to abate the
melody, but whether the policemen
couldn't or woudn't is a matter not defi
nitely known.
There are eighty-one persons in-this Irish
contingent, and forty of these are mem
bers of the Dublin band. .Six principals of
the cast In the National -Theater In Dublin
at included in the party, and with the
assistance of American talent they will
produce classic plays of the Irish school
in the World's- Fair Theater this summer.
The journey from Quecnstown to Stl
Louis was marked with the greatest inter
est. Most of the members of the party
had never been outside of Ireland. They
confessed to knowing that the rest of the
world wa3 much larger than Ireland, but
they jiever dreamed that the Atlantic
Ocean was so broad, and that the distance
between New York and St. Louis was
more than LOCO "miles.
S "OCEAN THE WORLD."
"AIrer we had been on the ocean two
dartv'' said Miss Shela Dillon, a member
o'jxjie Dublin Theater Company, "we
inpuijnt that most 01 tno wuim waa me
lt$,t
fatic Ocean. After wo left New York
began to get a proper appreciation of
enormous .proportions or tne earin,
nd Justly concluded that America had
osf of It.
.'What a great wide country the united
tes is. Haw much farther does the
K3M reach? You say 1.500 miles? Mercy!"
kGET $10,000,000;
3?s-
PNT
Fare Mlt WhUkey be nuw
the ir en nine. It I Ihn only m
r Pr" 'r""'T.' """VJu
- lukHlni nnlv. Mvfi In
TttlU. IiOOlc for the trade-marl
pure the sen! over the cork
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it Jm4flfa OTlA ffTrVflrH eV A
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-itxlt Whiskey Company. Rochester,
"SbfiBSS
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cm pci Tin duii nenoucne
The Irish Commissioners evidently se
lectedfthe best that the Irish beauty mar
ket afforded. Most all of the girls are
prettv and every feminine member of the
party has those glowing red cheeks that
would make her conspicuous if nothing
else would.
Like their English brethren, the Irish
participants suffered Journalistic "tor
tures" In New York, and when one writer
referred to the girls as colleens, who said
"upon my soul" and other familiar
phrases, the aforesaid colleens stood on
their dignity and refused to be inter
viewed. Miss Dillon has been a member of the
Dublin Theater company for three years.
She was advised to go on the stage by
the English Hress, Ellen Terry, and la
proud of this, because Miss Terry, she
says, advises most girls to stay away from
the footlights. She is an admirer of Yeats
and other poets and dramatists of the
Irish school, and is devoted to the Irish
classics
OPPOSE GROTESQUE.
The uplifting of the drama is Miss Dil
lon's hobby, and the other members of
the company are so thoroughly opposed
to the grotesque In stage presentations
that they even refuse to take part In what
,they are pleased to term farces. ,
An Irish actor who is proud of his pro
fession always adopts a nom de plume
when he is forced to descend to the ranks
of farce comedy.
The Irirft plajers had never heard of
Joseph Murphy. Edward Harrlgan and
other well-known delineators of Insh char
acters on the American stage, and when
such plas aa "Shaun llhue" and the
"Kerry Gow" were explained to them they
shrugged shoulders and expressed, the fear
that Ireland had been badly misrepresent
ed in American theaters.
Tfl nnNTROL ZONE.
,. !. to., r.n.1 mh
cuuierecs uu i" - jw .....
iy accepting the first section of the
rnt of 810.000,000 to Panama and
canal zone under the control of the
ide regarding the bonds for construe-
!.-
Finds It a Kit Difficult. HoweVcr,
to Keep Pace With the "Stren
uous Americans" Resents
Obtrusive Curiosity.
Thf fi"iubl1e IHirrao,
ItthSt flnit lVnnsjlvanla Ave.
Washington, April 27. rrinci I'u I.un
Tree will next bestow the p1''a,I"r" ol nls
presence upon the citizens of St. Louis.
He left here this morning nt 10 o'clock
with his suite over the naltlmore'and Ohio
Railroad, bound, for tiro World's Fair City.
He departed from Washington Impressed
with the beauties of the cr.ipltal. satisfied
with all that he has seen here and all that
bar, been done in his honor, and expectant
of the pleasures of hl entertainment and
the sights to be seen at the International
Exposition.
The Prince appears to be an easy-going
Chinee gentleman, mid li flnd3 It a Ilt
t bit dimcult to keep abreast of Ameri
can iWtUItics.
"Wi. Amfrlrnn npcnle." he Said
through Mr. Wong Kal Kah tn-day, "trav
el at a vr fast pace. What no you can
it? Ah. yes the strenuous life."
"It has been hard, though very pleas
ant, for rr.o to keep up with the plans
for my entertainment. I want you to sav
that I look with most especial and tho
mo3t fellcit.is pleasure ,to the St. Louis
Exposition." )
At the station to see the Prince awsy
was thn "chlnwc Minister. Sir Chentung
Uang-Cheng. and the entire legation
staff. They escorted the scton of royalty
Into his car. Having done'this, they re
paired to the platform, where they Uned
up, a gala company, and waited in a semi
mllitaxy formation for the train to roll
out of the station. As it did so they gave
the representative of their imperial mas
ter the Chinese salute, which is due his
high position.
PRINCE'S PLAN8.
The Prince will arrive In SC-LooIs at
1 o'clock to-morrow. Present plans In
clude a stay of a month. After that date
his movements are. not fully decided, but
It la probable that ho will remain in
America for a longer time, visiting New
York, Boston and other places of Im
portance and Interest.
As Is generally the case among the Chi
nese of the younger generation who come
to this country, the Prince is here en
deavoring to educate himself in modern
progress and American Institutions, and
deprecates very decidedly the American
tendency to regard his peacock feather
with three eyes, his yellow jacket and
his other very picturesque accessories as
a sort of highly diverting side show.
But he takes the natural curiosity of our
citizens very good nkturedly, and last
night demonstrated that he can enjoy a
real show with all the gusto of a Western
audience. With his party, he occupied
two boxes at the Columbia Theater and
witnessed "The Serenade," as produced by
the Bostonians. He adopted our method
of clapping his hands loudly by way of
appreciating the absurd antics of Mr.
Barnabee.
To the observer It was clear that ho
had Mr. Wong translate to him the theme
of the opera and the various Jokes ok
they occurred. Some of the quips evi
dently appealed to his Oriental sense of
humor, though others and It Is not sur
prisingevoked from him only a blank
expression of amazement.
ST. LOUIS WILL WELCOME
CROWN PRINCE OF CHINA.
Prince Pu Lun. China's Imperial Com
missioner to the World's Fair, a nephew
of tht Chinese Emperor and tho Crown
Prlnce'of the Celestial kingdom, will ar
rive, In St. Louis at 1 o'clock this after
noon. He will come direct from Washington,
where he paid his respects to President
Roosevelt. Accompanying him will be
Wong Kal Kah, Vice Commissioner from
China to the Word's Fair; four attaches
of.the imperial court at Pekln and nine
servants.
A suite of three rooms has been engaged
at the Washington for the special use of
his Highness. In addition to these, there
will be two rooms for Mr. Wong, two for
the four attaches, and other rooms will
be secured for the Prince's long line of
servants.
Prince Pu Lun will be met at Union Sta
tion by the members of the Chinese
World's Fair colony, as well as members
of the Committee on Foreign Relations.
In an appropriately decorated carriage,
drawn by four white horses, he will be
taken from the station to his apartments
at the Washington Hotel.
The Chinese Pavilion at the World's
Fair has been completed, and the com
mission has planned several gorgeous re
ceptions, .which will take place in the
pavilion.
The Chinese building Is an exact repro
duction of a part of the Prince's Imperial
home in Pekln, and is one of the oddest
and prettiest buildings on the World's
Fair grounds.
Prince Pu Lun's" journey to America has
been an extensive one. From Pckin he
went to Shanghai, where he was royally
entertained by John Goodnow, the Amer
ican Consul-General. From Shanghai he
went to Japan, where he was the guest
of the highest court officials of the Jap
anese Empire.
In a telegram received from Mr. Wong
the Prince expresses himself as most grat
ified at the manner in which he has been
treated in America, and also gives ap
proval of the plans for his reception in
St Louis to-day. - '
JUSTICE COURTS EXPENSIVE.
City Will Petition. Legislature to
Amend Present Laws.
At the expiration of the terms of the
present Justices of the Peace, the city Is
planning to have the next Legislature
amend the laws governing these courts, to
moke them self-sustaining.
During the fiscal year Just ended the
gross' receipts of the eleven magistrates'
courts were $43,606.79. Gross expenses of
tho courts were 392,976.96, a. net loss to the
cit of 7,370.1i .' . .
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" : ru LUX AXD VICE COMMISSIOXER WOXG KAI KAH AT SHANGHAI.
The Imperial Chinese party 6topped at Shanghia on their trip to the United States, and while in that city
were the guests of John Goodnow, United States Consul General. Prince Pu Lun took a ride In Mr. Goodnow's
automobile, the first time that his Highness bad ever ridden in a horseless carriage. In the picture he is sitting
next to Mr. Goodnow, in the rear seat. Charles S. Virgil, an attache of the American consulate in Shanghai, acted
ah chauffeur, and, standing to the right of him, was TVang K'ai-kah. an attache of the imperial Chinese court.
Wong Kai Kah Is in the foreground of the picture, facing the camera. The building shown in the picture Is St.
IS
iW COMPtETE,
Senator Bnrnham of Jfew Hamp
shire and Representative
Tawney to Speak.
MANY GOVERNORS. COMING.
Secretary of War Taft and Gen
eral Chaffee Will Be Accom
panied by Commercial Club
of Cincinnati.
Tho Ceremonies Committee of the
World's Fair met at tho St. Louis Club
last night and decided upon the following
additions to the programme for the open
ing ceremonies:
United States Senator Henry Eben Bum
ham, chairman of the Senate committee
to the Fair, will deliver the address on
behalf of that delegation.
Representative James A. Tawney has
ecn requested to deliver the address on
behalf of the delegation 'from the House
of Representatives.
The dean of the Foreign Commissioners
will respond on behalt of the Foreign
Commissioners.
El J. Harrlman, chairman of tho New
York committee, will respond on behalf
of the domestic exhibitors.
The Governors of the following States
will bo present with their staffs: Joseph
H. Peabody of Colorado, Myron T. Her
rlck of Ohio. Alexander M. Dockery of
Missouri, J. K. Toole of Montana, Thom
as B. Ferguson of Oklahoma, James B.
Frazer of Tennessee. Heber M. Wells of
Utah and S. R. Van Sant of Minnesota.
Henry Roberts. Lieutenant Governor of
Connecticut, and William M. Brown of
Pennsylvania will represent those States
The special train containing Secretary of
War Taft and Major General Chaffee will
ai-rive between 9 and 10 o'clock to-mi rrow
night. It will be Joined at Columbus. O..
by Governor Myron T. Herrick and staff
and at Cincinnati by the Commercial Club
of that city. A committee of the Com
mercial Club of St. Louis will meet the
train at the station.
A committee of the Board of Directors
of the Exposition will meet Prince Pu Lun
on his arrival at the Union Station to-day
and escort him to bis quarters at the
Washington Hotel.
Daniel C. Nugent announced last night
that Information had been received from
Mrs. Taft, wife of tho Secretary of War.
that sho would arrive In St. Louis from
Leavenworth. Kas., where she has been
visiting for a few days, at 6 o'clock to-,
: to-
Mrf
thrf
morrow night, so that she will be at
Nugent's home In time to welcome
Secretary upon his arrival.
DIAMOND ROBBERY
AT LORRAINE HOTEL
Rooms of Mrs. 31. Hnlbert, Entered
by TlUevM. Who Abstract Jewel
ry Valued at 4O0.
During her absence from the Lorraine
Hotel, at No. 04 Llndell boulevard, yes
terday afternoon, the rooms of Mrs. M.
Hulbert, wife of the Chief of Manufac
turers' Exhibits at the World's Fair, and
abstracted about SMO worth of Jewelry.
The Jewelry consisted of a heart-shaped
-diamond sunburst, containing thirty-two
diamonds; a lady's open-faced watch, val
ued at ITS, and several minor articles, val
ued at about Co. '
The police, arrested Jerry Crelgbton, 24
years of ago, and John Wllmer, of the
same age, housemen, employed ip the ho
tel, who .were in the house at the time
PCGRAIliE
CONGRESS ADJOURNS TO-DAY;
MEMBERS WILL ATTEND FAIR.
Washington, April 27. Congress Is
fore it so as to adjourn sine die to-morrow. It was for this reason that both
houses met at 10 o'clock in continuation of Tuesday's legislative session. There
are now no important public matters pending which ore likely to prevent an
adjournment at the end of Thursday's session of each house.
Chairman Fayno of the House Committee on Ways and Means predicts that
Congress will adjourn to-morrow. He
lution until to-morrow, ana says ne Bees no need ror a session to-night.
Many of the Congressmen and Senators will attend tho opening exercises at
the World's Fair.
ROOSEVELT WANTS
F
Threatens to Call Extra Session
of Senate if There Is No Action
on Crum Appointment.
THE DEMOCRATS REMAIN FIRM
Gorman Says Session Will Be
Talked Away if President In
sists, and Party Leaders
Go to the White House.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
Washington, April 27. President Roose
velt's absolute and stlffnccked determina
tion that the Senate act Immediately upon
the appointment of Doctor W. D. Crum,
a negro, as Collector of the Customs at
Charleston, S. C, provoked a wild scene
in the United States Senate during exec
utive session this afternoon and to-night,
and has earned for him again the Ire of
the more deliberate and conservative Re
publican Senators. Under the presidential
threat to call an extra session of the Sen
ate to consider this matter, it was taken
up to-day.
The debate conUnucd until 9:15 to-night
without any action being taken.
Democrats took an emphatic position.
Senator Gorman, the minority leader, de
claring that this appointment had become
an acute issue in the South, and that to
air it at this time would cause such bitter
enmities on both sides that the conse
quences could not be foretold. He said
that the Democrats would fight Drum's
confirmation to the last ditch, would talk
the session out indefinitely; in short, would
never consent to Roosevelt's arbitrary pro
gramme. The result was that the Republicans re
treated from their position and voted that
the question go over until the short es
slon. To-night, as soon as they could get
away from the Senate, and while the ses
sion was still In progress. Senators
Spooner, Aldrich and Allison went to the
White House. There they conferred with
the insistent author of all the disturbance.
They used their every argument to In
duce him to admit the error of his posi
tion. The-result of their activities is not posi
tively known to-night, though the pres
entation of the case by so Influential a
trio is expected to influence even so posi
tive a personage as Mr. Roosevelt. Still,
his attitude is known to be very definite
with reference to Crum.
The report of an extra session was cir
culated late this afternoon with all the
confidence of a final announcement. Ac
cordingly the President may yet undertake
to force the Senate into obedience.
The Crum appointment has dragged
along from one session to another because
of the Implacable opposition of Senator
Tillman. The Senate refused to confirm
at the special session last November. The
President, however, renamed him, and
Crum Is now executing the functions of
his pjiltion. though without pay.'
NEGRO
IRMFD
I
endeavoring to dispose of all matters be
v, ill not introduce tho adjournment reso
a
LEADING TOPICS
-15-
TO-DAY'S REPUBLIC.
WEATHER INDICATIONS. '
Forecast for St. Loal. and Vicinity
Fair, Thursday and Fridays de
cided change in temperatnre fre.a
northerly winds, becoming rarlable.
Page.
2. Mississippi "River Eight Miles Wide.
Barnes Medical College Graduates
Many Students.
Iowa Convention Likely Will Split.
3. Clinton Sends Two Sets of Delegates.
Railroads Prepare for Fair Traffic.
Russian Officers Slain at Warsaw.
4. Race Results and Entries.
5. Carter and O'Brien Spar To-NIght.
Robison and Nichols QuarreL
6. Hawes Withdraws From Campaign.
The Stago.
7. World's Fair News.
8. Editorial.
Society News.
9. St. Bridget's Choir Will Give Benefit.
'Cockrell Pushing Civil War Claim.
la Dominican Cruiser Routed by Forts.
Maine Gunner Does Wonderful Shoot
ing. 11. Summary of St. Louis Markets.
Financial News.
12. Republic "Want" Ads.
Birth. Marriage and Death Records.
New Corporations.
13. Republic "Want" Ads.
14. Republic "Want" Ads.
IB. Republic "Want" Ads.
News In Near-By Cities.
16. Germany Column's Losses Heavy.
Senate Committee is Going to Utah.
GOVERNOR PROCLAIMS HOLIDAY :
FOR WORLD'S FAIR OPENING.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
Jefferson City, Mo., April 27. Governor Dockery Issued the follow
ing proclamation to-day declaring April 30, the opening day of the
World's Fair, a State holiday:
"As a country develops, as its civilization broadens and as its in
dustries grow, its people naturally seek wider fields for the promotion
of the general welfare.
4 Hence, it was In the last century we sought to expand our nation
s al domain by the peaceable acquirement of contiguous territory.
"The monetary necessities of France, the commercial necessities of
s the United States and the Internecine troubles due to foreign domin
s ion over the Mississippi BIrer led to the acquisition of that wonderful
s territory known as the Louisiana Purchase.
s "A little more than a century has passed eince the ratification of
the treaty between tho United States and France. It was an event of
s transcendant Importance, and Is to be fittingly commemorated on Sat
s urday next In the city'of St. Louis, when the gates of the great 6ou-
Isiana Purchase Exposition are to be formally opened.
s "It should be a day of general thanksgiving and praise that the
wisdom of our forefathers made It possible to add so mightily to the
sr wealth, the power and the glory of our beloved country.
4 "I, therefore, ask all Missourians, so far as may be practicable, to
abstain from their usual avocations on Saturday; April 30,-1004, In
s grateful recognition of the masterful statesmanship of Thomas Jeffer-
son which gave this priceless heritage to the American people."
JAPS' ARMY IS AGGRESSIVE.
Attacks Intrenched Muscovites
North of the Yalu, Supported
bv Gunboats.
RUSSIANS CLAIM A VICTORY.
Unofficial Account of Cossacks'
Operations Says They Have
Occupied Anju, Between
Ping-Yang and Wiju.
Paris, April 28. The Bt. Petersbnrsf
correspondent of the Journal reports
that a Itn.alan submarine boat has
unit a Japanese transport, wblett
-was conieylnc; COO men to Korea,
and that all the troops were lost.
RAILWAY DAMAGED.'
London, April 2S The Dally Tele
graph's correspondent at Irkutsk.
Slbtrla. under yesterday's date, says
that the Japanese have blown up a
portion of the railway at Khallar,
but that the resultant damage Is in
significant. JAPS AGGRESSIVE.
Llao-Yans;, April 27 The Japanese
troops which crossed the Yaln
north of Wiju . chanted darias; the
night of April 28-27 the Russian po
sition near Llsavena, a -villas; on
the llanehurlan bank of the Yalu.
They were repulsed, butvthelr loss
Is not known.
Two annboats steamed up the river
to the support of the Japanese, when
a Russian field battery at Amtsan
opened up on them, resulting: In a '
duel which lasted for twenty min
utes. The Russian Are was too hot
nnd the srunbouts were forced to
steam out 'of ranee. -
The Japanese were facilitated In
crossing by thelr-oecnpation of tho
Island of Samallnda.
COSSACKS IN KOREA. '
St. Petersburg. April 27. An account
given here of the movements of the cav
alry, under Major General Mistcbenko. the
commander of the Western Cossack
Brigade, while not officially confirmed, is
accepted as trustworthy. It follows:
General Mlstcbenko's Cossacks arrived
at Song-Chon. Northeast Korea, and. aft
er leaving that place, turned north along
the Seoul-Pekln route and occupied Anju. '
Not a shot was fired, the Japanese and
Koreans withdrawing.
The unexpected appearance of Cossacks
In the rear of the Japanese force near the
Yalu caused a panic among the Japanese
troops proceeding toward the Yalu-from
Ping-Yang and they, consequently, re
treated. The Japanese troops at Pak-Chon.
Ku-Song. Ka-San and Chong-Ju did not
attempt to stop the Cossacks, but moved
toward the northwest by forced marches.
KUROPATKIN'S DEFENSES, '
HE BELIEVES, MAY HOLD
JAPS LONG IN CHECK.
Chicago, April 27. A special to the Dally
News from Niuchwang says:
"If official Russian advices from Unkden
can be relied on. General Kuropatkln's de
ployment Is so far advanced that it covers
the vefy lines the Japanese purpose to
occupy.
"Should the Japanese succeed in. driving
the Russians north, tho Muscovite line of
defense will extend from Niuchwang to
Llao-Yang and from Llao-Yang to the
Yalu River. The Russian Generals pro
fess confidence that the Japanese can
make no headway by frontal attacks, while
the Russians can cope with the widest
flanking operations the Mikado's men are
likely to undertake.
"When these operations begin, say the
Muscovites, Kuropatkln's counterstrokes
will bring down the Japanese scheme of
offense like a. house of cards. The con
tinued delay on the part of the enemy la
a great surprise to the Russians."
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