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The St. Louis Republic. [volume] (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, May 06, 1904, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020274/1904-05-06/ed-1/seq-1/

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NINETY-SIXTH
L MANY PERSONS ARE
REPORTED KILLED
III TEXAS TORNADO
Terrific Storms Sweep State,
Leaving Death and Destruc
tion in Their Wake.
WIRES NEARLY- ALL DOWN.
Little Town of Moran, Near Cisco,
Said to Have Been Almost
Wiped Ont and Many Killed.-
PROPERTY LOSS ENORMOUS.
Electrical, Wind and Eain Storms
Reported in Other South
western States, With
Many Casualties.
Fort Worth. Tex., May 5 A special to
the Record from Cisco, Tex., says:
It is reported here that many people
were killed end much property and live
stock destroyed by a tornado, Just south
of Moran. eighteen miles north of here.
Wires are down, and It Is impossible at
this time to get particulars. Relief par
ties cannot start on account of the Im
passibility of the roads.
At Moreland, in EhacUeford County,
several people are known to bare been
killed.
A tornado Is also reported in Barker
County, near 'Weatherford. with, lives lost.
TEXAS STORM SWEPT.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
Dallas, Tex., May 5. A teniflo rain and
electrical storm, equaling that of yester
day In Its fury, burst over Northern and
Northwest Texas about 9 o'clock to-night.
"Reports Just coming in show that im
mense destruction of property and some
lots of life has happened.
TERRIBLE RAD? IN KANSAS CUT.
Kansas City, Mo., May EL The rain
storm that ended to-night was of ex
traordinary severity. Its most serious re
mit being the crippling of the city water
service. A SO-lnch mala leading to the
Turkey Creek pumping station, was
washed out, and another main, a 0-lnch
Jtte,.was bent. - '
Eleven persons, nine tt them women,
were Injured in a panlo among the pas
sengers of a crowded Independence
electrlo car to-night. The controller on
the front end blew out and most of the
passengers became panic-stricken. In a
rush to get to the rear platform of the
car the men roughly shoved the women
aside, threw an aged woman to the floor
and trampled her and pushed others from
the steps to the street below. Some of
the men broke the glass In the wlndowr
with umbrellas and Jumped through the
windows to the ground. The Injured:
Mrs. John Nolan, aged 75. of Inde
pendence; condition serious.
Mrs. John Moody, Independence se
verely bruised.
Sophia Burns, Independence) knocked
down and bruised.
Mrs. Cathrlne Mercer, Miss Irene Bry
ant, Mrs. Joseph Mercer, Mrs. Will Clark
and Mrs. John Cozwell, all of Independ
ence, received bruises.
Daniel Collier of Independence; eye cut
by flying glass.
Fred Wllkins; hand and wrist cut.
Doctor O. C Halderman: hands cut
OKLAHOMA TOWNS BUFFER.
Kansas City. May B. A tornado is re
ported to have struck the town ot Bridge
port, Ok., this afternoon. No details ot
the damage done hare been received. Ac
cording to Weather Observer Connor of
this city, cyclonio conditions prevailed In
this part of the Southwest to-day, ac
companied by a terriflo rainstorm.
Bridgeport is a town of 100 persons, on
the Rock Island Railway near the Cana
dian River, midway between El Reno and
Arapahoe.
The tornado ls also reported to have
struck the little town of CordeU, In Wash
ita County, southwest of Bridgeport, doing
great damage. Wires are down in Okla
homa. JETT ACCEPTS
LIFE SENTENCE
Murderer of James B. Marram
Dismisses Appeal for
New Trial.
REPUBLIC 6PpC3AI
Frankfort. Ky., May S. Fearing to
stand the trial that might have been
granted him, Curtis Jett, the convicted
assassin of James B. Marcum and Town
Marshal Cockrill of Jackson. Breathitt
County, to-day dismissed his appeal and
accepted the life sentence given him for
the murder of Marcum.
j , this action was dictated, it is said, by
"Smr influential friends In Breathitt County.
V Jtt. who i nnv in th T-nulwtlt inAi-
will be brought here as soon as the order
of court is entered and placed In the
Penitentiary.
The appeal of J'tt and Tom White for
41.A .Tmwnm mtlnl, vn, vat- fnv p . i '
M ment before the full bench of the Court
oi Appeals lo-o&y. vmen we case was
called J. H. Hazelrlgg, counsel for Jett.
asked for the dismissal of the appeal.
MARUS JOKAI IS DEAD.
Is Eegarded as the Creator of
Modern Hungarian Literature.
Budapest, lux 6. Marus Jokai, the
Hungarian cSveltst, who was recently re
ported to be seriously 111. died this after
soon from Inflammation of the lungs. He
was 79 years old. Marus Jokai stands
beside Xossuth, the patriot; Franx Lisxt,
the musician; Munkacsky, the painter, and
Asdrassay. the statesman. In the first
rank ot Bangary's great names. He la
wm uuwr ui mo zaoaern .Hungarian liter-1
attire. J
- ;ri7 - rr'
THE ST. LOUIS REPUBLIC
WORLD'S FAIR NOVA "OJPEN CLOSES DEC. 1.
YEAR.
PRINCE PRESIDES AT OPENING
OF GERMANY'S FAIR PAVILION.
Hohenlohe-Schillingfuerst and His Princess Receive Guests in Na
tional Building at the Exposition Prince Pu Lun Among the
Distinguished Callers Exhibit Furnished by the Kaiser In
spected Filipino Band .Welcomes President Francis and
Boyal Party.
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PRINCE HOHENLOHE.
Representative of royalty who presided at the reception given In the German
pavilion at the World's Fair. The ceremonies were attended by a distinguished
company.
Germany's welcome to all the world rang
out from the great dome of "Das deutsche
Hans" at 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon,
and the brilliant reception which marked
the formal opening of the German Pavil
ion at the World's Fair was on.
All the pomp of Continental Europe was
displayed In the arrivals of the distin
guished guests, among whom were repre
sentatives of almost every country on the
globe. A constant stream of splendid
equipages, drawn by horses r.'chly capari
soned, passed the main entrance ot the
pavilion, pausing only long enough, to al
low the occupants to alight.
Royalty, represented by two Princes and
one Princess of the blood, mingled with
the hundreds of guests who crowded the
Eichenhola Gallery and spread through
the spacious halls of the magnificent
building, which Is an exact reproduction
of the Charlottenburg Castle, the home cf
Frederick the Great.
Prince and Princess Hohenlohe-Schinlng-fuerst,
who came from Washington
Wednesday night, arrived at 5 o'clock, ac
companied by President Francis.
MOBS GUARDS REQUIRED.
The approach of the royal couple and the
President of the Exposition was heralded
by the Philippine Constabulary Band and
two companies of Philippine scouts, which
represented the military. The scouts were
paraded In front ot the main entrance and
stood at present arms as the carriages
bearing the Prince and party drew up to
the door. The band played "Hall Colum
bia," and the vast crowd which lined the
plaza cheered lustily.
Prince Pu Lun, heir-apparent to the Chi
nese throne, arrived half an hour before
the German Prince. He came In Quite a
democratla fashion, walking from the toot
of the Cascades, followed by his train, who
marched at Intervals according to rank.
Prince Pu Xun departed soon after he had
been presented to Prince Hohenlohe.
St. Louis society, represented by more
than SCO of the leading citizens, began to
arrive soon after 4 o'clock, and parties
continued to come until long after the
arrival of Prince Hohenlohe and the Prin
cess. Outside of the great pavilion was a vast
sea of humanity. Thousands of persons
were attracted by the playing of the bands
and the chiming of the great bells. De
spite the efforts ot the Jefferson Guards,
who were stationed at the building, the
crowd pushed and struggled to get closer
that they might not miss an opportunity
to see the arrival of the Prince and Prin
cess. EMPEROR'S PRESENTS.
The crush became so great that re-en
LEADING TOPICS
-u
TO-DATS REPUBLIC.
THE BUN RISES THIS MORNING AT
4:0 AND BETS THIS EVENING AT 6:56.
THE MOON RISES THIS MORNING
AT 12:30.
WEATHER nrolCATIOSS.
For St. LoaU and Vicinity Partly
cloudy with aherrcm and thander
rtcrast cooler la the afternoon or
nights freak to fcritlc southerly
winds.
Page.
L Japs Ready to Cut OS Port Arthur.
Second Tornado In Texas.
2. Jefferson Guards Increased to SCO.
3. Fight Expected In Howard County.
Bliss Does Not Commit Himself.
i. The Republic's Dally Racing Form
Chart.
Race Results and Entries.
6. Baseball Scores.
. Editorial.
Reed Signs Saline County Pledge.
7. To Remodel Baptist Church.
Veterans to Greet General Osterhaus.
Highly Enthusiastic Over World's
Fair.
S. World's Fair News.
9. Financial News.
Summary ot St. Louis Markets.
10. Republlo "Want Ads.
Birth, Marriage and Death Records.
New Corporations.
1L Republic "Want Ads.
IX. Republic "Want Ads,
13. Republlo Want" Ada
'Happenings in Near-By Cities.
River Telegrams.
II. Transit Company Causes Indictment of
Wddle.
Breaks Arm in Throwing Cigar From
Window.
,-gTC--fS.tt-?ri-iiM,f-
FRIDAY
forcements for the guards had to be called
out. and the way was pretty well cleared
before the arrival of the royal train.
Inside, the galleries and halls of the
pavilion were decorated with labumam
trees, roses, carnations and hyacinths.
Busts In bronze of great German states
men, soldiers and men of letters lined the
walls, panel paintings of German scenes
added to the richness of the appolntmenta
In the "Brandenburg Zimmer" and the
"Tresscn Saal." where the Kaiser's pres
ents were shown, the guests thronged and
eagerly examined tho ornate silver pieces
which were protected, by large glass cases.
Some of the pieces were wedding presents
given to the Emperor by the Czar.
Court luncheon was served in the reading-room
on the flrst floor of the building.
The tables which held the refreshments
were gaily dressed with flowers and mav
sire canydalebra. '
The guests were received by Doctor
Theodor Lewald. Imperial German Com
missioner, to the World's Fair, who was
assisted by Mrs. Adolphus Busch of fit.
Louis. Other members of the German
World's Fair Commission assisted in en
tertaining by showing the guests through
the pavilion and explaining the signifi
cance attached to the beautiful furnish
ings. PRINCELT COURTESIES.
The main interest of the guests was
centered in Prince and Princess Hohen
lohe, around whom was a lively circle.
Prince Hohenlohe has been In America
six weeks, and has become .quite accus
tomed to American customs. He Is CO
years old and wears a long, gray beard.
His clear blue eyes sparkle with con
geniality, and if one catches his glance
a strong character well grounded In a
democratic nature is the first Impression.
He Is tall and of good physique.
Prince Hohenlohe Is the eldest son ot
the late Prince Hohenlohe, Chancellor of
the German Empire. Mrs. Borgniss and
Miss Anna Borgniss ot Munich accom
panied the Prince and Princess. Mrs.
Borgniss was formerly a Mlas Jay of
Washington, and Is a descendant of Chief
Justice John Jay. Her husband is a warm
personal friend of the Prince, and when
the latter decided to come to America she
was Invited to Join the party.
Prince Hohenlohe, who Is stopping at
the Washington Hotel, will likely call on
Prince Pu Lun to-day.
According to the Oriental custam, the
German Prince must call first. The call
will be promptly returned by Prince Pu
Lun, and Prince Hohenlohe and party
will then be invited to Prince Pu Lun's'
reception at the Washington Hotel to
night ADMITS MURDER
OF STEPFATHER.
Seventeen-Year-Old Boy Led to
Confess Crime Done Near
Joplin.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL,
Jcplln, Mo., May 6-Two months ago to
day. J. H. Kernel was killed In a wood In
the northern suburbs of Joplin. His body
was not found until five days later.
To-night hlat stepson. Jim Horton. aged
IT years, after being sweated ten hours by
Deputy Marshal Sowder. admitted com
plicity in the crime.
He says that he and his brother. OUie
Horton, aged IS years. Induced their step
father to accompany them to the wooda
Just as they reached the woods" OUie
Horton Is said to have dealt the old man
a terriflo blow over the head with a
coupling pin. As he sank to the ground,
pleading with-Ollla Horton for mercy, the
lad dealt another blow with the heavy
Iron, which brought Instant death.
Jim Horton says he ran away as soon as
Kennel sank to the ground, and was
Joined a few moments later by OUie, who
had searched the old man's pocket and
secured t, CO ot which, Jim Horton ad
mits was turned over to '",
FORECAST INDICATES RAIN.
Showers Fell in Mississippi and
Missouri Valleys Yesterday.
There was but little change In the'
weather conditions throughout this vicini
ty yesterday, but the forecast still indi
cates showers and thunderstorms to-day.
There, was rata J the Mississippi and
Missouri valleys yesterday and la the
Rocky Mountain region.
SJ..sy !.-.jwIk-. W4ifjJ,ljm;.
MORNING." MAY
MAY HANG PICTURES
IF THERE'S ROOM,
Portraits of Promineat Women
Will Have to Undergo Bigid
Inspection.
SECRET COMMITTED .NAMED.
Will Pass on Photoj
iphs Or-
dered by Mrs. "BJaii
-Board
of Lady Managei
(Plan
Many Entertaini
its.
Without a dissenting voice the Board
of Lady Managers ot the World's Fair
yesterday decided that the pictures ot
prominent women of the United States
should be hung on the walls of the Wom
en's building provided the pictures col
lected by Mr. Bain are really those ot
prominent women, and provided that there
Is room for tho portraits after they have
passed a discriminating Inspection to be
made by a specially appointed committee,
the personnel of which Is tot be kept se
cret, f
As there are 400 portraits tn Mr. Bain's
collection, approved by Mrs. James L.
Blah-, former President of the Board of
Lady Managers, and as the resolution
adopted provides that the pictures shall
be hung in the small rooms of the Wom
an's building, and not In tha reception or
banquet halls, it Is feared that there will
be few prominent women honored by hav
ing their likenesses In the Woman's build
ing at the World's Fair.
The pictures are stm In the Woman's
building, and It la understood that the se
cret Committee of Inspection Is to take its
time In examining the portraits.
When an officer of the Board of Lady
Managers was asked what she. knew re
garding the identity ot the pictures, she
said she knew nothing.
"Do any of the members of the board
know whose pictures are contained in the
unopened casesT" t
"I think not.- said the officer.
"Win all the pictures be plicedT"
"Their character and the space offered
win control that." '
"And there is not an abundance) of
spacel"
"Now, don't ask any more questions.
The disposition of the pictures Is In the
hands of a committee."
"Why are the names ot the committee
being kept secret?" r
"Because soma ot the portraits may sot
find a place In the Woman'abuUdlng. and
If the committee Is not identified the dis
appointed ladles will not know upon'whom
to spend their wrath."
The Board of Lady Managers yesterday
began plans for some of the entertain
ments which It will promote during the
Exposition period.
Upon a resolution of Miss Helen Gould
It was voted to tender a reception In the
Woman's building the latter part of May
to the officers ot the army and navy, who
are affiliated with the Exposition.
In a like manner it was voted to enter
tain the foreign Commissioners to the
Wotld's Fair at a date to be decided later,
but which probably will be about May 15.
A resolution that the board should give
one reception In honor of Miss Alice
Roosevelt during her visit In St. Louis
was unanimously adopted.
July 15 and IS were fixed yesterday as
the dates for the midsummer meeting ot
the Board ot Lady Managers. At this
meeting plans for a ball, at which the
members of the Lady Board will be hos
tesses, will be definitely arranged. This
ball probably will be given In the west
pavilion, and It will be cne of the note
worthy social functions of the Exposition.
a
PROGRAMME FOR TO-DAY
AT THE WORLD'S FAIR.
S a. m. Gates open.
9 a. m. Buildings open.
11 a. m. Cascades turned on.
11 a. m. Concert by Weil's Band
in east stand, Plaza of St. Louis.
2 p. m. Vocal concert at the Mis-
sourl building.
2 p. m. Executive Committee and
Executive Commissioners Assoda- 4
tlon meet in New York State build-
Ing.
230 p. m. Concert by Soma's
Band In grand band stand, east
end ot Machinery Halt
2 p. m. Dedication of Chinese na-
tlonal pavilion.
4 p. m. Concert by Innesa Band
tn east band stand. Plasm of St.
.Louis. 4
t-M p. m. Concert by WeiTs Band
on the terrace at the Admlnlstra-
tlon building.
4 730 p. m. Concert by Scrasa's 4
4 Band In grand band stand. 4
4 ISO p. m. Concert by WetTa Band 4
4 In Plaza of Orleans. 4
7 JO p. m. Illumination begins. 4
4 2 p. m. Concert by Innes's Band 4
4 in east stand. Plaza of St. Louis. 4
B
IRONWORKER'S BODY FOUND.
Herman Van Achen Disappeared
From Home Last January.
The body of Herman Von Achen. a
structural Iron worker, who resided at
No. S3 Morrison avenue, and who dis
appeared from his home oa the after
noon of -January 8, ltOi, was found float
ing In one of the settling basins at BIs
sel's Point, near Ferry street, yesterday
morning by Henry WaeUlng. a gatekjeper.
Mrs. Von Achen. who, since her hus
band's disappearance, has been mnfclng
every effort to locate him. Identified the
clothing found on the body as that worn
by him when he disappeared.
Von Achen disappeared from his home
on the afternoon ot January 3. His fam
ily offered a reward, hoping that they
might locate him. The family physician
stated at the time that be believed Von
Achen to be mentally deranged.
Money Stolen Front Soldiers.
George- French and Robert Beflly, Uni
ted States soldiers oa their way to West
Virginia, reported to the nolle last Bight
that they had been robbed ot SN3 la a
house near Fifteenth and Chestnut
streets. French lost fUS and BetUy 2MB.
Aprordlng to French, they were sect at
)Fltteeath and Chestnut streets) fey an va-
Kirrmnea negro, who inaucea una to
visit a house la that vicinity.
6, 1904.
JAPANESE BEGIN LANDING
ON THE UAO-TUNG
x&r aoctry bat yfS.J
o HTU5 n ,,S si5' rJr
TOGO GUARDS TROOPS;
PORT ARTHUR ISOLATED.
If Japs Gain Foothold at Either Kin-Chow or Pit-
ecwo They Probably Will Quickly Reach the
Railroad and Isolate "Russian Gibraltar"
Viceroy Alexieff Has Suddenly
Gone to Liao-Yang.
ST. PETERSBURG HEARS RUMORS OF SANGUINARY CONFLICT.'
Toklo, Hay G (Noon.) It Is officially
announced that a Japanese force be
gan landing on the Llao-Tung Tenln
snla yesterday. Tho place where the
landing Is occurring and the number of
men being, landed Is withheld.
Fort Arthur, liny 5. The Japanese
squadron Is behind the Llao-Thle-Sban
promontory, south of Port Arthur.
Transports with Japanese troops on
board have arrived at Pltcrwo, north
east of Tort Arthur, with the object
of making a landing.
(Editor's Not Tlfriro If situated oa the east
coot ot tt Uia-Tusg Trr -nuU. and abeat
lerentr-flTe miles northeast ct rort Arthur.
It 1 near the sarraweit part ct Its penlnsoU.
along which parses the railroad coanectleg
rort Arthur with Mukara and Ilartlo. Kln
CSow Bay. whtre the Jspaaea transport are
alto reported to have been 'slchted. Is oa the
west coot ot the LUo-Tucr renlasula, and
not far from FltrewoJ
WARSHIPS AM) TRAXSrOIlTS
ARE SEES XGAIt KI5-CIIOW.
Nluchwang, May C Fire Japanese
warships with a largo number of
transports have been seen near Kln
Chow Bay on the west coast of Uao
Tnng peninsula, north of Port Arthur.
Chefoo, May 5. Chinese Junks, which
havo arrived hero, report that a fleet of
forty Japanese warships and trans
ports was off "Wcl-Hal-Wel Tuesday,
steaming northwest.
RUMOR OF SECOND nATTT.E
WITH LOSSES OF 17.000 StK.T.
London, May 6. A dispatch to the
Central News from St. Petersburg
says a rumor Is current there that a
MISSOURI'S BUILDING
TO BE DEDICATED JUNE 3.
Governor Dockery and State Com
missioners Decide on Plans to En
tertain Many Guest.
Governor A. M. Dockery made a flying
trip to St. Louis yesterday afternoon to
meet a committee of the Missouri Com
mission to discuss plans for the entertain
ment of guests during the summer and
for the dedication of the Missouri build
ing, which was set for June i.
The conference was held at tho Southern
Hotel last night. Governor Dockery re
turned to Jefferson City on an early morn
ing train. At the conference were: Presi
dent M. T. Davis, Secretary B. H. Bon
foey. J. H. Hawthorne and J. O. Allison
of the Missouri Commission.
Attar the conference It was announced
that a programme had been outlined, but
would not be given out In detail, as addi
tions probably would be made. It was
said, however, that a grand military dis
play would be a feature of dedication
day, the militia and Battery A to take
part. Many prominent citizens ot the
State were listed to makoaddresses. Gov
ernor Dockery. probably will have his
staff In full regimentals to receive guests
In the Missouri building.
Plans for other elaborate entertainments
were discussed Informally. It was said
that probably a day for the entertainment
ot Governors of the Louisiana Purchase
States might be decided upon, or, per
haps, a day for the entertainment of Gov
ernors from all the States ot the Union.
X general invitation to Mlasourtans will
be extended through the press, while
many Invitations wfll be sent throughout
the United States. Commissioner Davis
was appointed as a committee of one on
Invitations: Commissioner Bonfoey will
arrange for. the military features'; Com
mtslsnnrr Hawthorne will arrange the
programme, and Commissioner All lean
was assigned to do press work.
second battle has been fought at Kin-Llan-Cbeng
In -which the Russian loss
was 7,000, the Japanese lossed 10,000
men and resulted In the Japanese being
driven back In disorder. The dispatch
adds that no confirmation ot this re
port Is obtainable.
ALEXIEFF HASTES S AVYAT
TO COXFER WITH KCROPATKLT.
SU Petersburg. May J.-Viceroy Alex
ieff has left Port Arthur to confer with
General Kuropatkin at Liao-Tang, to
which place the General will return Imme
diately after an Inspection of the troops
at Flng-Wahg-Cheng. Rear Admiral
Wittsoeft. chief of staff to Viceroy
Alexiff. has been left in charge of the
naval forces at Port Arthur.
RUSSIA AND JAPAN BORROW
BIG SUMS AT HIGH RATES
TO PROSECUTE THE WAR.
London. May 5 Further Inquiries show
that a Japanese loan of tSO.ODO.040 will be
Issued next week. It will take the form
of seven-year K-per-cent bonds, and the
Issue price probably will be K'.i. the se
curity being a first charge oa the Jap
anese customs.
The lean will be issued simultaneously
In New Tork and London, each taking
half the issue. Kuhn. Loeb & Co., will
handle the bonds In America.
Paris, May t. Parties connected with
the negotiations for a Russian loan give
the following statement:
"The loan Is not yet signed, but It Is
certain that It will not te long deferred.
M. Hottlnguer, representing French
financiers. Is now at St. Petersburg, ar
ranging the details. It is understood that
It will be C00,CO0,CCO at S per cent for five
years, and that it will sell between 93
and SS.E3.
ART EXHIBITION' IS OPENED.
Interesting CanvnRes Shown at
Museum of Fine Arts.
An Interesting and unique collection cf
paintings from the International Society of
Sculptors. Painters and Gravers of London
was exhibited for the first time here last
night at the 8t Louis Museum of Fine
Arts, wlvcre members had an opportunity
to view them.
The canvases, which fill three rooms of
the museum. Include works of T. Austen
Brown, whose "After the Harvest" and
"Homeward" are notable contributions:
Thomas MIHie Dow, John Lavery. Profes
sor Franx Stuck, tho principal Interpret
er of the German secession school; Vf. M.
Chase, who has contributed a portrait of
his daughter; Jean Boldlnl. whose portrait
of Whistler Is famous In the world of art:
Charles Cottet. David Gauld and many
equally famous masters.
The exhibition will be open every after
noon during the World's Fair period.
Among the visitors at the museum last
night were: Halsey C. Ives. E. H. Wuer
ple. C. M. Kurtz, C. G. Waldeck, Profes
sor G. W, Krall. Hplmes Smith, C P. Da
vis. Seymour Thomas of Paris, T. White
lng of Boston, Professor Walter Sheldon,
Mrs. Harry Chase and daughter and Mrs.
B W. Paulson.
t OLD LIBERTY BELL WILL BE EXHIBITED AT FAIR.
Philadelphia. May E. The Liberty BeU wlU bo taken to St. Louis.
This was decided upon to-day, when both branches of the City Council
' adopted a resolution appointing a special Joint committee of twenty-four to
escort the Revolutionary relic and appropriating 05,000 to defray the expenses.
The start will be made early in June, but before the old bell la placed la
the Pennsylvania building at the World's Fair It Is the present Intention to
have It pass through the principal cities ot the States end Territories lato
which the Louisiana Purchase Territory was dlvMed. These are Montana,
North and South Dakota. Wyoming. Colorado. Nebraska. Minnesota, Iowa..
Missouri. Arkansas, Kansas, Indian Territory, Oklahoma and Louisiana.
The bell will remain at St. Louis until the close of the Exposition, and
be under a constant guard of FoUadelphla poUcrssen.
President Francis of tha Exposdtloa wfll be asked to same a special eat
be known as "Liberty BeU Day."
- - I In St. LoaU
PRICE Is-sms
'
In St. LoaU. On Cent.
Three Cents.
TROOPS
PENINSULA.
PORT ARTHUR AJ.TJ VICTSITT.
Showing points where Japanese trans
ports are most likely to attempt to land
soldiers. Transports have been seen both
off Kin-Chow, on the western coast, and
at Pitsewo, on the eastern coast, about
seventy-five miles from Port Arthur.
From either place the railroad can be
readily reached unless the Russians put
up a remarkably strong defense, and
then Port Arthur will be Isolated com
pletely, for the Japanese squadron la
vigilantly watching that point closely.
EIGHTY PER CENT
OP EXHIBITS HERE.
Shipments Bushed in Order to
Complete Fair Installations
by Next Tuesday.
DELINQUENTS AGAIN WARNED.
While Number of Cars Is Less,
the Capacity of Freight Con-,
veyances Exceeds the Chi
cago Exposition Eecords.
Eighty per cent ot the total shipment of
exhibits to the World's Fair have been re
ceived at the Exposition grounds, accord
ing to an annooBcement by the Bureau ot,
.Expedition yesierday. Of tola assess
most of the exhibits have already been In
stall ed.
The total exhibit shipments received up
to yesterday, stated In carload lots, ap
proximates 1000 cars. A comparatively
large number of these cars have beenre
celved In the brief Interval since opening
day.
Since the formal launching ot the Ex
position season official estimates ot the to
tal amount of exhibits to be received at
the Fair have been considerably amendsd.
The last official estimate before that
time placed the total number ot cars at
the Exposition at 12.000. Yesterday It w
stated that the total number would reach
about 5.000 cars.
The total exhibit shipments at Chicago
have been variously stated at from 7.080
to S.000 cars. It Is probablehowever. they
approximated 7,500. It has been stated fre
quently for the World's Fair at St- Loul
that It would contain 5 per cent more ex
hibits than the Chicago Exposition.
The apparent discrepancy between this
estimate and the lesser total of carloads of
exhibits at St. Louis Is explained by tha
fact that at the time of the Chicago fair
the averago capacity of freight cars was
much less than at the present time. la
1SSJ, it is sail, the capacity of freight
cars was irons 4S.000 to 60.000 pounds. To
day it runs from 80.000 to 130,009.
Another circumstance that tended W
swell the receipt of cars containing ex
hibits at Chlctgo was the fact that tra
der tie terminal arrangements existtec
there it was posible to switch Into tha
grounds cars which contained but three
or four packages, and this. It la said, was
frec.vently done.
At St, Lculs. however. It has been nec
essary to economise on trackage space)
and every car switched Into the grounds
Is leaded to Its full capacity.
Every dellnpient exhibitor at the Ex- ,
position Is being warned that he must
positively complete the installation of hla
exhibit by next Tuesday, the day set for
the tour of inspection of exhibit palaces
by the President and officials of the Ex
position, with a party ot invited guests.
Work Is being rushed on the exhibits,
and It is thought that by that time the
palaces will wear a completed look. The
route ctrosen for the Inspection party Is
as follows: Leaving, the Administratloa
building at I o'clock, they proceed east to
the Transportation. Varied Industries,
Manufactures and Liberal Arts palaces,
then westwarily to tho Mines and Metal
lurgy, Edieailon. Electricity and Ma
cMLery palaces.
A detcur is then made to the palaces
of Fine Art, after which the party pro
ceeds to the Fish. Forestry and Game,
Agriculture and Horticulture palaces. In
the latter palace a collation will be served
at S o'clock la the afternoon, after which
a promenade concert will be given.
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