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The St. Louis Republic. [volume] (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, August 12, 1904, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020274/1904-08-12/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE ST. LOUI S REPUBLIC.
WORLD'S FAIRNOW OPEN CLOSES DEC I.
Competent Bookkeepers
Intelligent Boys
l ml nti'iiujrrniihersi read Thr
lli-mililli- es-erv ln. If jnn ,
rt. set-uri'il lliriinc.li
Vile nf S
lllllit "Help Wnllti-d" cl
II In ii. '
1 I WORDS OH l.lS J HP.
Any droirulsl "III tiiko oar nd.
noil'il nppnrr IIipIp Tfkr nse .
a Republic "Vtnnt" ml. I I mirila ,
I ir learn. I lie. All ilrnKKlnlH InUr ,
i nil for llic lleimniif.
NINETY-SEVENTH YEAE
EKIDAY lOKNTNG. AUUVST '2. 1 J 0 I
; in si. unii
At I UJj o Train..
In SI. Lonls One Cent.
.on!. Two f.enta.
Three Cent.
PIGMIES WOULD
VISIT ROOSEVELT
ROOSEVELT WILL
NOT COME SATURDAY
SPLIT 11 CATROLIC
TWO RUSSIAN CRUISERS, FLEEING FROM PORT ARTHUR,
ENTER GERMAN PORT OF KIA0CHAU TO ESCAPE JAPS;
DISARMED DESTROYER SEIZED IN CHEF00 HARBOR
TEMPERANCE
L
ftcaloiis S.n.ip'S Di'hiit' 1o Go to
Washington and Meet the
l'ri'biik'iit.
ENVIOUS OF THE IGORROTES.
Wht Slimilil House of Liituhat
I'.c Slighted for Mere 0er-hiMln.TlievAr.k-
Cordial
Feeling EiiiLiugercil. -
I'Ipiip. eonsuinlng Jenlousv hums In the
bosoms of tlio African pjgmles at the
World's Fair. Chle-f Antonio, Igorrote po
tentate, mid Ditto Ficuiidl, Moro Grand
Vlzlcr. aio the oliJ'Cts of their especial
eilvj
To the i-amp of tlic pjgmles has traveled
the news tint th" Philippine alinrlgliies
have journe-ved to 'Washington, wlero tln-j-were
gr.ae Intisly received In the White
lions' nn Iho honmed guests of the Prcsl
di tit of th" Lulled States. Anil now the
pjgmlas climor to go to Washington and
repeat there the socl il triumphs of Book
ir T. Washington, not to mention the
Philippine gentrj-
Tiio "llltlo bUck men" from tho Congo
fcrl keenly that a. great slight has been
put upon them They had not been lone
on thesn hospitable Miorcs before The
realized that lh were in the nuntr" of
n friendly nutlon and that tho ruler of tit
lind loved men of their complexion with
nn ardor tint knew no eolor Hue They
. had heard of the affection that President
1 Roosevelt entertained for tho colored
jrothr, and they wero pleased: for they
Joicw Uien that no slight would bo put
Upon them and that racial differences had
been brushed aside by tho "great white
kins" at Washington
Hut now Princo lituna and his ebon re
lHlnern hnvo found pause In their admira
tion for tho creat man at Washington.
Into their simple rotiselousncss has cropt
an uneasy feeling that after all. perhaps,
their unbounded faith in the friendship of
tiio Irosldcnt for the Sons of Ham has
l"en misplaced and tliat his affection Is
not undjlng
i-vtubats feel slighted.
It was tho triumphal Journey and recep
tion by the President at Washington of
the three browii'skinned savages from the
Orient that awakened the demon that
t-Iept in tho brca&ts or the dlmlnutlvo
black men.
I'rinco La tuna, heir to the llirone of tho
Litubals, having a legal dignity to be
aKStllcd, feels the sllirlit yut upon the
si nolo negro race In the persons of hlm
Ktlf and Ids retainers more keenly than
the others.
j I'rinco Laluna, being of the blood royal,
ffuclleves' tbat he lias a greater claim to
Jprcridcntlnl conbldcration and hospitality
than any mere mountain chief or Jloro
iiuije'lord. The rhlllpplne faioritcs cannot
ci en claim any negro Mood, and the
Wince and his retinue fall to understand
why lliey should bo singled out for hon
?rn at Washington.
(The pygmies feel that it will be a sorry
confession to be obliged to make, when
they Join their fellow pygmies in the
jCongo, after tin Fair, that the great
friend of the black men had neglected
Uicm when other black men of lesser de
cree had been honored by putting their
legs under the presidential mahogany.
But as yet no summons has come from
ha President to the black pygmies bid
ding them accept his hospitality at the
White House, and unless It comes soon all
relations may be broken off between the
Washington Government end the court of
JtoLatubat.
ic
0 LEAVE ST. LOUIS TUESDAY.
iPilipinos Will Sail for Manila
Angrist 30.
Washington. Aug. IL Tha Filipinos who
Malted the President this week will leave
pt Louis on August 18 for Seattle, Wash.,
Iwhere they will remain two days, and
Portland. Ore., where their stay will last
nno day. Thence they will go to San
Francisco.
On August SO they will sail on the Si
beria for Manila, touching first at Yoko
hama. The officials here arc convinced
that the visit to America or these Filipi
nos will have an Important bearing on the
future relations of tho archipelago with
iho United States.
jfr
WORLDS FAIR. PROGRAMME
SrECXiL EVENTS
Automotlla Da&
9 JO a. ni llcetlng, Army of th Philippine!. VUtym Tnetttr,
0 Philippines.
Child gardeners. United States Plant Map.
19 00 a. m. Session International Typographical Union. Conv. Hall.
Concert, Well's Band, automobile section, Tran-p. bMr-I-adles'
Auxiliary. X. T. U.. Iiutde Inn.
Drill. SpalOlnc Grera, Administration quad.
Physical training lectures, physical Culture bulldinr.
11.00 a. m Concert, Constabulary Band, Philippines.
11:S a. m-Orran recital, Rerve D. TV'llklns, M, A, Festival Hall.
Concert, Second U. 3. Infantry Band. Government bldr.
2-00 p. m. Intertribal anthropology athletic meet. Stadium.
Baseball, Jefferson Guards vs. Globes, stadium.
: 50 p m Physlcat culture lectures. Physical Culture) bulltJInr.
Parade of .000 automobiles. Fair grounds.
Concert. Weil's Band, automobile parade.
Concert. Mexican Artillery Band. Machinery Gardens.
I Concert, Kilties Band. Tlaxa St. IjOuIh.
3.00 p. m Manual training classes, St. Louis pubjlo school section.
Bducatlon bulldinr.
4. p m Concert. JUUiois U. S. Infantry Band, Government bide.
Brill. Sixth Illinois. Plaza St. Louis.
Concert, Boston Band. Tyrolean Alps.
Joint dress parade. Scouts and Constabulary. Philippine..
7.30 p. m. Concert, Mexican Band, Machinery Gardens.
American and Loan Section. Palace of Art, open.
J 00 p. tn. Reception to Kxposltlon ofncUIs. T. P. A bonding.
, Frraphony concert, Exposition Orchestra. Festival RalL
1 Concert, Kilties Band. Plaza S Lou I..
t-l p. m Concert, Boston Band, Tyrolean Alps,
s 00 p. m. Igorrote dog feast for Liberal Arts Club. Philippines.
REGULAR KVENTS.
8.00 a. m. Grounds open.
Pike open.
Troo- drill. United States Marines, Plaza Orleans.
1.30 a. m Feeding birds and game. Missouri Outdoor Bxhlbit.
t.00 a. m Hourly concerta, women of harems of MorQ Soltans,
Philippines.
Bonding open.
Laboratory experiments. Government building.
Teetiln' beavers. Palace of Forestry, Fish and Game.
Stereoptlcon lectures. Philippine Art Section.
Hourly dances. Igorrote. Negrito and Uoro village.
Demonstration, vli-atoiy method. Education building.
Vlsayan class work. Model School. Philippines.
Mint In operation. Government building.
M a. m. indurtriul classes of Indians. Indian School.
Court rt. Government Indian Band, Indian School
Hourly submarine mlns demonstration. War Department,
Government building.
PiUMdeiit Decline.'. In A I lend
Fair Manila Dim I'.ecan-e
of Politics.
MAY MAKE FALL VISIT.
E.jdain That There Is an Un
written I,aw Against Presiden
tial Candidates Appearing
I Miring Cnmpaicfn.
Tli I: i"ibln Hureau.
14lh St aii'I I'tnn)lwiMta Ate.
Washington. Aug 11. I'rcidcnt IIooe
elt will not bo in St. Louis for tl" cele
bration of Philippine l)a. Faturdi).
lie so Informed W 11 Thompson. Trc-i-urer
of the Kxpoition Company, and Itep
revntathc .lames A. Tawnev, chairman
of the llouo Committee on KxiKiiltloni,
to-da when tl"y called, and. on behalf of
President Francis, extended to Mr. Itoosc
elt an earnest Imitation to be present on
that occasion.
The President stated that. In his opin
ion. Hare was an unwritten law against
a chief executho accepting Mich Imita
tions during the campaign in a prcsldcntHl
joar. Howcier. It is nol lx-llciod this will
interfere with the published desire of the
Pretldent to make a short visit to the
Fair after election.
As pubiislied In these dispatihes t-o
weeks ago, tho President is minded to lislt
St. Iyiuis in tho fall. His InteieM in tho
i'xponition has not diminished In the lc.u,t,
and assurances were gvicn to-day th it it
is ids purpose. If possible, to scnd a short
tlmo there.
Tho Pretldent Bhoncd his interest by
asking Mr. Thompson nraij questions
ubout conditions in fct l.ouis, cpccUIly
(us lo the attendance. Mr. Thompson told
him the attendance last week .lAtrosed
lJWWa day, and that there was every rea
ton for belleMng an unprecedented crowd
would lislt the Fair in September and Oc
tober. He assured the President that all condi
tions point to success, and that every cent
of the big loan of ti.GGO.00O would be re
raid to the Government, and all other obli
gations met by the Exposition.
Mr. and Mrs. Thompson left this after
noon for SL Louis. They had been 'visiting
their daughter in New Jersey for tio last
week, and returned by way of Washing
ton in order that the invitation might be
extended to the President,
rti
ROMANCE BEGUN AT CHICAGO
FAIR ENDS IN WEDDING HERE
Pinter L. II. II. Hardt, 54, and Pnnllne
Kopfa, 28, Married Iiy Justice
Carroll.
When Pinter L. H. B. Hardt. II jears
old, of St. Louis, and Miss Pauline Koch,
18 cars old, of Chicago, were married In
the parlors of the Terminal Hotel by Jus
tice of tho Peace Robert J. Carroll yes
terday, a romance ended which began in
Chicago eleven cars ago, during the
Columbian Exposition.
The attendants at the wedding were
Frederio Taylor, chief of Agricultural Ex
hibits at the World's Fair, and George H.
Koch of No. 1SZ1 Schild a enue, a brother
of the bride.
While the ccuplo had known each other
since the World's Fair at Chicago, they
had not contemplated getting married un
til Miss Koch came to St. Louis three
weeks ago to visit her brother. Since her
arrival Mr. Hardt has been a frequent vis
itor at the Koch home, and a week ago
they became engaged.
Business made it necessary for Mr.
Hardt to leave St. Louis jesterday. As he
thought that his mission would kcp him
away for somo time. It was decided to be
married at once.
Mr. Hardt Is a solicitor for the Lewis
and Clark Exposition, which will be held
at Portland, Ore., next vear. He was
previously connected witli the General
Delivery at the World's Fair. The couple
departed last night for Chicago.
KEGUliAn BVDXT" (Continued)
10.00 a. m. Hourly dan""s. Moro village. Philippine"
Feeding seals, Government Fisheries Pavlliun
niograph demonstration, naral exhibit. Government bid;
Queen's jubilee presents on vlevr. Congress building.
Heliograph demonstrations. Government building
Anthropometric demonstratlonc. Anthropolocy building.
10.30 a. m Igorrote. Negrito and Moro cUsc. Model School. Phll
lppir.es. Demonstration, model dry dok. Government building.
Drill, seacoast guns. Government Hill
Blograph exhibitions. Interior Department. Govt. bldg.
11.00 a m Classes of bllrd and deaf. Education building.
Vlsajan .Theater, hourly programme. Philippines
Wireless telegraph demonstration. Government building
Cascades In operation.
11. M a m Lantern tilde exhibition. Interior Department Govt bldg.
J2 W noon Milking and feeding cous. dairy test. Dalrj rrn".
1.30 p. m.-Concert. Government Indian Ban.L Indian School.
Clashes of blind and deaf, education building.
Teaching English by phonograph. Guild Hall; Model Ft.
: M p m Blograph views of cab, San rranclsco building. Model st.
Concert Itaymond Orchestra, Temple of Fraternlij.
Cascades in e Deration.
2.30 p. m Drill. U. S. lire saver", lake north ot Agriculture bldg.
Lantern slide exhibition. Government building.
3 00 p. m Fancy shooting rango -west of rorctry building
Heliograph demonstrations. Government building
Radium exhibit. Interior Department. Government bldg
3-0-) p. m Orchestrion recital. German section, l'alace of UbernI
Arts
I'eeJlng of birds. Government Bird Cage.
Spear throwing. Igorrote Village, rhlllpplne".
floating dry dock. Nivv Department, Government bl Ig.
3.Stl p m Dress parade. United States Marines. Plaza St. Ixml.
4 p. m. Blograph vlea of Cal . San Francisco building. Model st.
Wireless telegraph demonstrations. Government building.
Missionary prajer "ervlce. Woman's Anchorage.
Drill. U. S. Hospital Corps, camp near parade entrance.
Programme by Indian pupils, porch Indian School.
Feeding the seals. Government Fisheries Pavilion.
i M p m Feeding birds and game, Missouri Outdoor Exhibit, t
Drill, seacoast guns. Government HI1L
Rifle drill and wall scaling. Scouts. Philippines.
00 p. m Dress parade and rlflo drill. Constabulary, Philippines.
Cascades In operation.
6.00 p. m. Blograph views of Cal . San Francisco building. Model st.
6.13 p m. Dress parade and review. Scouts. Philippines.
7:00 p. m. Milking and feeding co. dairy test. Dalrj Barns
Concert. Constabulary Band. Philipp'ne.
7:30 p. m. Illumination of grounds And buildings
8 JO p. m. Cascades In
Kahili.-, of r.ilher Mnlhew I)e
she Change in Con
st it ill ion.
MEASURE IS VOTED DOWN.
William O'lSiien S:n (lidei Will
Secede at the Next .Meeting of
the (iiiind Council.
licence the Citholie Total Abstinence
Union of Aiiierr a n.fiiHeH the individual
councils of tl Knlghtb of Father Matin w
the licht to vole in convention. xc pt
they are rtprsrnt d throuch the district
unions of the llrst-n mieil jo'ictj, l ilrmlj
b'llfvo we v 111 uiianmioUbly vote to se
cede from the organic ition at our n.t
Crawl Council ni"etliiK. IH tuber 1"" 'I his
was lh" statement of William O Itrleii. tho
supreme grand knlKiit of th,. Knlght'i of
Fathi r Mathcw. nflir a Ualed debate In
the Temperance Convention, in favor of
i li insilif.' the constitution of the union.
'vIiIlIi whs Intended to Rrant representa
tion to the individual councils of the
Knights through the St. Louis parent or
ganization In FiH.ikln:: of tho affair .Mr. O lirien
said that so far .is be coul 1 determine no
henelits uccruo lo the Knights by b' in;
atlllialcd with the Union
"We are pijim; out wood monev " he
said, "and reveive no returns 'J ho tem
pcranco feature of the ordu is the onl.,
thing we hivu In common with the union,
and this we can attend to without afliila
tlon with tho Catholic Total Abstinence
Union of Ann rlca." The voto on the
change of constitution was lost by 100 to
W.
The session yejt' rday opened with a sol
emn reunion, cnlebntcd bi the Itovcrend
Father W.ilUr J Shanley at bt. ly o u
("ricii After the discussion relative to the
changes In the constitution, ieports from
tho various lomnilttee-s were read ojiJ
adopted.
This was followed bj the election of of
ficers, which resulted In the election of
the night Kevercnd J. Itegis Cancvln. co
adjutor Uishop of 1'ittsburg. Pa.. a presi
dent, Edward Muircady of lioston. as ilrst
vice president, K. J. Johnston of Dubuiiuc.
la., as second vleo president, and I onora
N. Lako of St. Louis, as third vice presi
dent. Tho Reverend Father James Curran
of Wilkcsbarrc. Pa., was elected treasurer,
and J Washington Logue of Philadelphia
tecretary. Tho next National Convention
will bo held at Wiikcsbarre.
Tho Itevercnd Father Coffey presided at
tho lempcranco rally in Music Hall last
night, vvhlcJi wa lurgey attcncV.il" by
non-Catholics as well as members of that
creed. Tho first address of the evening
was delivered by tlae Itovcrend lather
Walter J. Shanley of7 Hartford, tho retir
ing president of the union. Other tpeok
era were Mra. Lake, Bishop Cancvln, J.
Washington Loguo and William O'Brien.
The speaking was Interspersed with a
music procramme In which Miss Agnes
Tierney, James McNulty. J H. Itoltan
and Miss Florence Furey participated.
Tho banner for the largest attendance
was awarded to St. Kose Union of Chi
cago. Tho Knights of Father Mathew. under
the auspices of the Uniformed Rank, will
give a reception and lawn party in honor
of tho delegates at Sportsman's ball park
this evening.
WARM, BUT BREEZY WEATHER.
Easterly Winds Will Make Condi
tions Comfortable.
Fresh breezes tempered the thermome
ter, which climbed up to about SI for a
short time after 4 o'clock j estcrday after
noon. It is near mid-August and warm weather
is in fashion everywhere, but St. Louis
weather compare. favorably with places
where people flock to secure relief from
city temperatures.
Warmer weather Is reported from New
lngland, the Missouri Valley and the east
slopes of the Rocky Mountains
It is expected to be somewhat warmer
to-day. but eaEterly winds are promised
and fair weather will continue, according
to the forecast.
FOR TO-DAY.
operation.
.!
HcliiiN of All-D.i.x K.itllc Oil I'nri Ailliin Nol r I.Vifiwil ;il
ClirfcMi, Wlii-ic Kiiiiiiii' K CiiritMil Tlml .liipiiiirsf ('miv..,. K!t
it";i whs Sunk sii(;il Ship .Monuliii. I.itiidi-d Willi Women
and riiildicii, Kfptirli-tl Trviiij' lo Kent Ii Sli:in;li,ti ;cnci:il
Stocsscl'.v, Wife, II Is Said, a l'ii,.cii";i'i' on ICn-,i:i it Uo.it
Wliirli I.ioiilit I)isiiitcliL's 1'ioin lle.-ii'ed fit y.
SORTIE INDICATES THAT FINAL
"iH-rixi. An. 1. ii :i in. Tlif Iiii
M.I1I )Hol('((esI cnilMTS Asicold Mini o
v Ik :iik1 one toiiKMlo-lMiat dcslrovcr on
liTisI llic Klncltati I'..iy l.f-t ni'lit
i'i liui-ii.iv i ami cl'Ii.iiik1 saluti"
vvilli Cciiii.in v i'ssoK.
Il h licliovdl litre that tin' Russians
will avk i"iinivioii to ills.irm and le
iii. nn until the- cud of tho war.
'Flu- fate of tin- nllicr Kli- t:in vf-si Is
uliidi left Fiiit .illiur at tlic- inn
llmu lias nut vet iiccii learned. It is
ix'liuv is!, liovvt-vor. that the liospil.il
sliii MolisiIi:i. (.'itr.vin vmmiicii. and
children, K lijius to lr.itli Sli.iuh.ii.
(lMttor s Not- K.llochiu Is the prlnelral jrt
nf a G-mwn eoi,ii on the u,o"lt" of the.
Shantung lpcninula from r-hefoo .ind hout Vjj
miles In direct line from the latter tuvn I
.lAI'S rAI'TFRH
ai:.ssi:l at chi:koo.
Cllcfoo, Atl'. l'J. ti a. III. A iMMtlllllrT
pirly from two .laitanc-o torptdo-lri.it
dostroviT'! vvliicli crilcnil tin- linrlmr
laht nlslit lio.irdetl iliu dismantled Rus
sian toneilo boat destrovor Rjct-lilfeliii
this iuorulu at i'.'M o'cloik.
The Jaiunecc' li-eharsetl their small
anus and during the liiinir :i Russian
was wounded.
Ila.vljnak t-howtd a third .laiitnoo
di'sirojiT tovvin? Hie Ryesliitclni out
of tliu hailKir, and all disappeared.
The .Tapanc-e OiaMil ei.tinis tli.it the
.Tapaneso ships wore ignorant: of the
disraaiitlini; of the RveshiteluL AiiJv
r.oelated Tress representative, howev
er, informed the Japanese naval of
iicers of the fact when lie visited the
two Japanese destrovers at 2::0 o'clock
this morning.
It is nuderstood that the Chinese Ad
miral last night discovered the pres
ence of tho JapanSic torpedo-bo.it de
tlrovers, and presented the same de
mands to them that he Jud earlier
given to the Russian destroyer Kye
shitelni, namely, either to leave port
or disarm, hut nothing came of the
demand at the time.
Darkness prevented a close inspec
tion of the Japanese destroyers, but
outwardly they appeared to be In
good condition. A Japanese oflicer
who was talking over the side of one
of the vessels with the correspondent
of the Associated Press was repri
manded by a superior officer and com
pelled to cease. This action is in strik
ing contrast with the frankness of
Captain Shestakovsky of the Uveshi
telnl. The passongeis of tiie Rjeshitelni in
clude two women, one of whom, it is
s.iid, is the wifo of General Stoessel.
This, however, is denied.
It is evident that giave reasons
caused the Ryeshitelni to undertake
her hazardous voyage. Presumably,
she came here to hie urgent dis
patches. JAP CRUISL'R
IMPORTED SUNK.
Chcfoo, Aug. 11. S p. m It is re
ported that the Japanese protected
cruiser Kasagi has been sunk off
Round Island m an engagement.
Round Island is'fotty-eiglit miles east
of Port Arthur.
The Russian ships befoie leaving
Port Arthur tool; on board heavy
stores machinery and materials for
ship repaiting.
SALLY OF SQUADRON MEANS
THAT SIEGE OF FORTRESS
IS NEAR ITS FINAL STAGE.
Vladivostok, Aug;, if. Preparations ale
Lelng completed here for tho reception
and protection of the Forf Arthur squad
ron. The departure of the rquadron from I'ort
Arthur ii generally Interpreted to indi
cate that the siege of the fortress is en
tering on It final stare, at the programme
has repeatedly been announced by the As
sociated Press for the squadron to leave
& soon as the situation at I'ort Arthur
became desperate.
The preservation of the squadron Is con
sidered to be vital to Russia's future
flans, and, while it is acknovv ledc.ed that
Its departure will greatly weaken the de
fenive power of the garrh"on. without the
capture of the squadron the fall of the
fortress would be robbed of much of Its
strategic Importance. The smaller ships
probably were left behind on account of
their slow spced and inadequate fighting
power, while the torpedo-boat destrovers
would constitute a constant menace to the
Japanese cflet outside.
Definite news- of the result of the report
ed battle outside Port Arthur is awaited
lure with feverish anxiety. F.vcn if the
squadron succeeded in getting through tho
Japanese nhips, it Is realized that it runs
a desperate rlk In trjlng to rcanh Vladi
vostok, as Admiral Togo's fleet is larger,
of superior strength and faster than the
Itusslan squadron. Besides, the Straits of
Korea arc understood to be mined.
The Port Arthur squadron is under the
command of Rear Admiral Wlthoeft, The
report that Vice Admiral Bezobrazoft ha,d
taken over the command of that squadron
is untrue. The latter Is now- 111 at Vladi
v ostok.
As the speed of a squadron Is not faster
than that of the slovvefct unit, which in
this case is the Poltava, which could not
at her best make over sixteen knots, that
ppecd Is tho estimated rate of steaming of
tho Port Arthur squadron, whereaa the
Japanese battleships have eighteen knots
STAGE OF SIEGE IS VERY NEAR
speed Both sqimlroti" bovvr have
probiblj gratly ilttinoraUd in cd
WOMEN CARRY WATER TO
SOLDIERS IN TRENCHES;
SHELLS FALL EVERYWHERE.
Mao ,un- Auc 11 A refugee, frimi
I'ort Aithur who lias j 1st arrived at
i.lao an-, sajs the defenders of thy
fortrtn 4. main all .Jaj .u their po .ti, in
pit.) of tii- drcaciful heat, tho women
lirolc-alI c irrjing valcr to th. paichcd
suldii rs, although not a slngli- mmcj
within the jilincttr of tho iurtrcij n
fie from bull, ts an.I bursting shells
S-iiutthncs tho vvhob- fortress s'.mul n
vtloned in tnioke from the countless shell
xphniuus
W hilo no fightinr lias occurred ,m the
eastirn front of Kururutkln's arms, a r--markably
he ivy movement of Japancs-i
northward has be n reported The Jap
am -o semi i i. to I mr a turning move
ment on Yantal or .Mukden
Tho Chinese bandits oro becoming ex
ceedingly bole They nttickcd a rarty of
Russian scouts from a jo's liou near tho
Vant.il malncs. and VI of them fell upon
the military telegraph stat'on. but weio
driven off The daring of tho bandits is
attributed to the preiimllj of the Jap
anese iccroy Iuuji Shi Kai is reported to be
moving north with his army, but ho has
not jet jiliiIu .a hostile move.
RUSSIANS INEASTK0REA
RENEW ATTEMPTS TO REACH
GENSAN BUT ARE BEATEN.
Seoul. An,; ll.-(Copynght. r4)-Ali
the women and children have been re
moved from Gens in to a fortihed temple
tvventv- miles south.
Kirly t!ib morning the Russians ad
vanced with two smail Held guns to the
river and attempted to cross to Gensan
at the s-une point as esterday. One hour's
brisk lighting ensued Six Russians suc
ceeded in reaching this side of the river,
but were driven back. Tho Russians are
now encamped on tho riv cr"3 bank.
Liter, three Russian dead were brought
Into tho town, rurtiicr loss is probable.
Artillery, ammunition and alto ono of
ficer's sword were captured by the Jap
anssc. PROMINENT ENGINEER HERE
Owen Clarke Returns After Ab
sence of Tluee Years.
Owen Clarke, a, well-known St. Louis
engineer, has returned to till-, city, niter
an absence of three vearp. For twent-flve
jears ho made fct. Louis his headquarters
and has a wide acquaintance here.
Since his departure he has traveled In
evco- Kuropcnn country and has had au
diences with the Czar of Russia, tho Sul
tan of Turkey, the Pasha of Persia and
other potentates. He traveled in South
America and was connected with a rail
road In llrazll for several months.
He is now staling with his family at Xo.
EOS South lowing avenue, but will depart
In a short time for Johannesburg, South
Africa, vvlicie he is connected with a min
ing company.
LEAD1NQ TOPICS
-IX-
TO-DAY'S REPUBLIC.
TUB SFX RISKS THIS MORNING AT
3 09 AND SLITS Ills DVENING AT T W.
TIIE .MOON snTS THIS MORNING AT
GRAIN CLOSED fcT. LOUIS: SEPT.
WHEAT JLWs'ijl.OO'i ASKED; SEPT.
CORN K'ie BID.
CHICAGO-SEPT. WHEAT 1 OTiASK:
ED; SEPT. CORN sc BID.
W IiVTIIKlt FORECAST.
Indications for St. I, onl and 1 l,.n
It.v I'nlr nnd warmer, fresh easterly
winds, xliirtiui; lo southerly.
Page,
1. Pigmies Would Visit Roosevelt.
Roosevelt Will Not Come Saturday.
:. Expect to Arrest Murderer Soon.
Autoists Visit Major Wells.
0. Strikers Seek Gov crnment Aid.
Handit Ends Life in Governor's Home.
Vest Is Buried With Brief Service.
4. Offer Made to Buy Union Race Track.
'Iho Republic Daily Racing Form
Chart.
Munro Tells How Ho Will Win.
.". Cardinals Defeat Superbas in Longest
Gamo ot Season.
fi. Editorial
Society New.
Visitors at St. Louis Hotels.
T. Ten Bailding Permits Revoked
Dies Trom Operation After Long Ill
ness. 5. Pennsj Ivania Day Next Big Event.
Visitors Registered at State Buildings.
D. Coroner's Jury Holds Motorman.
10. Republic "Want" Advertisements.
Birth. Marriage and Death Records.
New Corporations.
11. Republic "Want" Advertisements.
12. Republic "Want" Advertisements.
Happenings in Illinois Cities and
Towns.
13. Grain Outlook Upsets the Stock Mar
ket.
Local Securities Active, With Increased
Demand.
Grains Sharply Higher on Speculative
Buving.
14. Tries to Escape From Detectives.
Missouri Coal Land Is Leased.
New Cotton Plant May Revolutionize
. Industry.
!!
Z ST. PETERSBURG KEENLY ANXIOUS OVER KUROPATKIN'S t
Z PERIL AT LIA0-YANG, WHERE BATTLE IS PREDICTED. ;
St Petersburg Aug 12. 2:25 a. in Ev en with the abborbing topic of tho
s flight of the Port Arthur tquidion, the question whether Gm' ml Kuropatkin
s will accept or refuse a general engagement at Llao-1'ans continues to bo a
subj ct of the live ll,t inti rest
Opinliiis iliffer In imlitirv as well as in civilian circles. Tim profounel Ig-
noninc- legirding General Kuropitkin's plans is shewn in tho different views
s held bv in mbirs of the General Staff. Experts of tho Bureau of Operations
s incline to the- belli f that a i ollWun between the mam forces Is Inevitable.
a
PYGMY ATTACKS
CAMERA FIEND
Africtii fsr.ajio Hiishrs at I'ho
toj'iaiiliur in Slailiuni With
l')iaistd Spi'itr Oflii-ial
(lives Wuiniiifr.
Hlmmlj.i on" "t the group of p cmies
at the World's Fair, wetuld have useil hi I
(pear em a photographi r a.t tho Stadium
vcsterel.iy afternoon had not the Reverend
S. P. Vcrnir Interfered with him.
Threats from the little Africans and
warnings by the Reverend Mr. Verner, who
lw.s them In charge, havo been ignored by
camera liends. who persist in taking snap
shots of tl e savages
While the InterraciU meet was In
progre."s at the Stadium a photographer
clipped up behind a group or pjgmies Iti
tin- Inllcld and was about to t hia tripod,
when lie viaa discovered by Shaniba.
The pjgmy party was on dress jiaraele m
honor of tho event, mid each was anrcd
with natlvo spear and bow and arrows.
When Shamba espb d tho photographer he
rr.-ido a dash for him with his Ion.r bpear.
Mr. Verner Interrupted tho s-pearlng act,
which w.i3 not down on the programme,
just in tho nick of time to save the pho
tographer from Injury, bhamba vr.is dis
pleased by the interruption and hid for an
hour under tli3 grand stand.
"Photographers mut understand that
tl.cso peopio are unaccustomed jet to the
whito man's civilization," said Mr. Verner.
"They represent a people of superstitions
and customs of their own which date back
1 undreds of jears. One of their strong"
inbred beliefs is tli.it relating to photo
graphs. "They believe that If an enemy gets pos
fesslon of their likene.-s, in any shape or
form, he ins them in his power. An ene
my or anjono who does not entertain a
kindly feeling for them, they think, can
bring them ruin by repeating incantations
or prajers to the evil ono over their pho
tographs. It Is dangerous to attempt to
photograph them, as Sharnba's act indi
cates." HOKE SMITH SAYS PEOPLE
HAVE TIRED OF ROOSEVELT.
Cleveland' Secretary f the Interior
Answers n Sppcli Made tn Rrook-
ln ly Leslie Miner,
RUPl'RLIC SPlZCIAI..
New York, Aug. 11.' Constitutionalism
versus ImpcrSa'is-n" might have been tho
text of the address delivereel to-day by
Hoke Smith, who was Secretary of the In
terior under Grover Cleveland, to the Uni
ted Democratic Clubs of Qceensboro. Mr.
Smith's spe"ch, which was delivered at
College Point, was intended as a replj- to
that recentlv- made bj- Secretarj- Shaw be
fore the Republican Club of that town,
and was shocked by the inattention of his
auditors. Mr. Smith said, in prt:
"Three jear3 of the administratior of
Mr. Roosevelt cs President have produced
an earnest desire for a change. He has
disregarded international law, he has over
ridden the rights of Congress, he has vio
lated the Constitution.
"The feeling of doubt and uncertaintj
produced bj- the administration of Mr.
Rocevelt has checked the prosperity made
bj- the administration of Mr. Cleveland
and realised under the administration of
-Mr. McKinlcy.
"President Roosevelt has sown the seed
of sectional hatred where the true heart
of President McKinlej- had inspired uni
versal love.
"In the recent Democratic National
Convention it Is safe to sav that SO per
cent of the members favored tho gold
standard. The nomination of Judge Par
ker would have been impossible had not
tho delegates recognized In him a gold
standard advocate. The wisdom under
pre-ent conditions of the gold standard
having been once recognized, will be ad
hered to. It can form no issue tn tho
present campaign.
"The telegram 'of our candidate to the
National Convention only confirmed the
view of the overwhelming majoritj' nf the
delegates and of the voters thej- repre
sented that the gold standard had been
Irrevocably established."
DEMOCRATIC HEADQUARTERS
WILL BE OPENED SATURDAY
Clinlnunn Tasjcarl. While llnklnic
Arrangements, Hearst Kncnur-
xiKlnjc .Veto.
I'.nr-FBLIC SPECIAL.
New Tork. Aug. II. Chairman Tagrart
and Vice Chairman Nicoll of the Demo
ciatic National Committee spent this
evening in conference at the Hoffman
House. Mr. Taggart said that he expect
ed to open the headquarters at No. 1 West
Thirty-fourth street Saturdaj-. Some of
the rooms cro now ready, and a part of
the headquarters' working force rmj"
move In this evening or to-morrow. Mr.
Nicoll will spend much of his time at
headquarters during the campaign.
Homer S. Cumming, the Connecticut
member of the National Committee,
brought some interesting information to
Mr. Taggart to-daj-.
He said that tiie Republicans In Con
necticut and Rhode Island were In a panic
anil that agents of the Republican Nation
al Committee had been sent to these
States to try to restore confidence. Mr.
Cummlngs declared thit Connecticut was
j-urc tn return to the Democratic column
this jcar.
James K. McGuIre, former Mayor of
Sjracuse. who managed the State cam
paign of 1901. may have a hand in tills
campaign. It -vas reported to-day that
T.iggart had asked him to take charge
of a. bureau at National Headquarters.
Mr. McGuire Is .m experienced campaigner
and was brought up In the David B. Hill
EChool of polit.es.
RRITATES RUSSIA
.St. l'ut'ifcburr Tapers Comment
on American "Interference"'
in the East.
COMPLICATIONS LOOKED FOR.
One Organ Asks if Threatening
of Turkey May Xot Mean
Threatening the Peace
of Europe.
SPECIAL BT CABI..K TOTIIBST. TXUHS KB.
PUBLIC AND TUB MJW YOltK UKKAJ.D.
St. Petersburg'. Aujr. 1L CopyrlBht.
LwD The action of tho United State3
as regards Turkey met here with a. con
siderable display of irritation. Evident
fear is displayed lest what arc coosideredi
as the brusque methods of the American.
administration may lead to complications
which may be highly inoporttine for Rus
sia, in the present crisis.
Tho Novoe Vrenrya hoa bemm a press
attack, remarking that America had so
littlo cause for legitimate complaint
against Turkey tliat the only explanation
her bellicose demonstration must be, Mr.
Roosevelt's desire to show to the nation"'
"fait accompli" previous to the prcsidc-i-tlal
election and assure his return.
The more serious BIrpavara Vredomost
saj s: "Europe has now to deal with a new
diplomatic question. Not content with
the Monroo Doctrine, the United State-
now mixes, matters of the near East. This
may provoke a fanatical outbreak -with
the gravest results to the Christian popu
lations, the Independence of Turkey be
ing threatened by the people or the Mon
roe Doctrine. Sending squadrons tbern
shows that America is prepared to rpcalc
to Turkey in the language of arms. Who
will deny that threatening Turkey by
America. Is threatening the peace of Eu
rope?" The Russ savs editorially: "The Ameri
can 'Joes,' Tommies,' Teddies' and 'Wil
kes,' having measured their strength
against one of the old nations of Europe,
would hke to 'have a go' at another. Tho
present intention of the United States is
a matter of high interest to all the Pow
ers. Its present action will be the least
pleasant of all to America's great friend.
Germany. Tho probabilities of a coalition
of the European Fowers against the Uni
ted States Is increasing dally."
USE WOMEN
FOR RAMPORTS
Natives of North Sumatra Em
ploy Living Walls to Protect
Them Frqni Enemy's
Fire.
New Tor. 'Aug. It. An Interesting ex
planation of the killing of large numbers
of w omen and children In the recent fight
ing between tba Dutch expeditions and the
natives la North Sumatra, is given by
Colonel II. F. Van Bjlevelt, a retired of
ficer of the Dutch East Indian army, who
has just arrived here.
'The Alas natives are well armed, but
their rifles do not carry as far as those of
our troops," said he, "and in order to
overcome this disadvantage their leader.
being well awaro of the disinclination of
oue men to harm women and children,
place them tn front of their fighting lino
as a living screen.
"The women and children are sometimes
armed and havo often fired at our troops.
Sheltered by this screen, the natives often
allow our men to approach within point
blank range of their positions. Then they
dUcharge a noverwhelmlrg fire. In al
most all engagements they have followed
the same tactics, though repeatedly
"warnsd by our officers. As a rule, our
troops withhold their fire as long as pos
s.ble. but they are not ruining the rUk
of being overwhelmed by a sudden rush
of tho natives from behind their livlns;
wall, and are often forced to fire, regard
less of tho women and children."
BUSINESS MAN SAYS
ROOSEVELT IS UNSAFE.
Xeiv Ynrlc Republican Becomes Dem
ocrat and Gives) Reason for
Change. t
RKPCBI.IC SPECIAL.
New York. Aug. IL A B. See, a proml
nent elevator man, came out to-day with
an announcement for Judge Parker and a
demand for the defeat of Roosevelt.
"I never voted a Democratic ticket be
fore, but this year the business interests
of the country demand the defeat c
Roosevelt. While no ono questions hQ
personal Integrity. sUll ho is unfortunate
In the possession of a rough-riding naturffc
He is Impetuous and explosive, and is r
garded by the best interests In the country
as unsafe. If elected President by & rot
of confidence, he Is not the man to hav
supreme power at hia command.-.
?l
lill
&ar-3..fra rtt.lriaWIt'. Of y.v. .&
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