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The St. Louis Republic. [volume] (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, December 07, 1904, PART I, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020274/1904-12-07/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE ST. LOUIS REPUBLIC.
MMBMIMMMMiMNHMM
LIC 1
PART I.
8 PAGES.
- -
TO-DAY'S REPUBUC
b Printed In
i wu ruio,
rsi
PRICE &?
la M. Lev, One Cat.
NINETY-SEVENTH YEAE.
WEDNESDAY, MOENING. DECEMBER 7. 1904.
Uili,Tw. Oats.
Tltree Oafs.
H
I
4
s5.
GARRISON LOSES
3,000 TRYING 10
IE
T
General StoessePx Forces at
Port Arthur Sustain Tre
mendous Blow With
out Gaining Any
Result.
RUSSIAN SQUADRON RIDDLED.
Guns on 203-Meter Hill Pour De
structive Hail Upon Battle
ships Cooped Up in
the Harbor.
JAPANESE CRUISER IS SUNK.
Adsoma, Carrying 482 Men,
Strikes a Mine in Liaotie
Channel and Goes to Bot
tom Immediately.
BULLETIN.
Toklo, Sec 7, IX a. xm-As a result
f the eealiasona bombardment by
tat) JuaatN f Pert Arthur, the be-lea-era,
fcr aalajr SOS-Meter BUI as
am harrratiaa point, hare dlseov
crea that am or the Rnsslan battle
sklpa la the harbor has a heaTT Hs
Owtac to the for. the Teasel la aot
clearly eUseerzUble, bat ft eoold be
sera that the damaged rmrsblp iraa
battleaala.
gPBCIAL BT CABLB.
Toklo, Deo. (.General Stoessel lias lost
1,080 men In the last few days In his re
peated attempts to captors 203-Meter Hill.
now bald by the Japanese. General Kofi Is
tocressJng hia defenses, and thus tar has
repulsed eTery assault, Inflicting heavy
losses on the enemy. Observations Indicate
that the garrison Is feeling the shortage of
men. and this. It Is expected, wttl end the
siege much sooner than otherwise.
Reports from the Japanese headquarters
show that they are ranking favorable prog
ress In the works agaustTungsbu Moun
tain and the forts to the eastward. All
Inrtlostfcms point, to an early general as
sault; though the date Is kept secret.
Tba successful bombardment of the But
ataa Seat hi the harbor at Port Arthur" la
cited aa proof ot the ability of the Japa-
" nese to aweant andtnilntrln siege guns on
Ms-Meter HUL The damage already in
flicted upon the Russian squadron Is evi
dence usadent to show that It most dash
for the open aea or be shot to pieces.
GBNKRAL yOOI REPORTS
(RIDDLING- RUSSIAN FLEET.
In the e (Brill report of the bombard-
ment Saturday, Geceral Nogi says: "The
PoMeda (Battleship) was struck six times;
'a vessel at the ReUvlsan (battleship) type
was hit eight times and on other ships
sixteen shells took effect.
Oa Xaeatay, following the same plan.
ttae IHslisa. was hit seven times, the Pol
tava (hatOeahtp), eleven times and the
.Retrtaaa ajtrsa times. At about 8 in the
KM
V mesaa one or our aneus strucs: a
Vh irispsstai south of Pera Xonntaln, cans-
T fa heavy aploalon. The conflagration
S N. whloh foUowsd was not extlngushed for
The saaas tay our heavy guns were
alreetea at th enamy'a ships. The Perta
vlet (MMMsda) was struck twice, and
twa saers aheOa ware lodged In other
ahlaa. A vassel of the Poltava type was
eaarrat to he on are for one hoar, send
tag y aTest votmie of smoke.
The tttaflttns; operations against the
eaaalBl KumiIiIii forts eastward are
carrlat em oar and night. Two te-mflli-
mster ajalek flrars were captured Sunday
in BaU-ooa xort defending a conn
tersoarp sat RThlung Mountain."
JAPANBBB CKDIBER
BTJrtX BT KTNIJ.
A stesmer arriving at Vladivostok re
port that the Japanese armored cruiser
carrying: eB men, was blown t.p
en a
soine north of the uiaotao
These Islands are in the Liaotie
Casual, between the Kwanttmg penin
sots. en which Port Arthur la situated,
and the Shantung promontory.
The Adsuma Is said to have sunk I
'moat Immediately after striking the mine.
.It it not known whether any ot the crew
were saved,
KTJSPSCT ATTEMPT ON. XJFB
OF GENERAL KTJROPATSIN.
St Petersburg, Deo. I A curious dis
patch has been received from a oorre
suoalont at General Kuropatkln's head-
emarters about the arrest of a fMwaTpan
who was found in possession ofK feet of
fuse ased In detonating high explosives.
The telegram speaks of the necessity for
providing larger bodyguard for General
KtB-etmtktn.
The wording of the dispatch generally
leads'' to tha Inference that an attempt
made oa the Commander In Chief's life
nasbeeo foiled. No conformation of the re
port la obtainable here.
.WARNS THE REICHSTAG
OF THE "YELLOW PERIL"
BerUa, Deo. . In tha Reichstag to-day
Beer Usieiiiaiii von Sonnenberg (Conserv
ative) asm eased regret at the enthusiasm
of 'tha Germans for Japan. He said nice
coBeetoaaaeas should be awakened.
"We are white. They are 7ellow," the
speaker aflaeft,
"A& tha European peoples must stand
together against the yellow peril. "
Tha Socialists and Radicals laughed at
this raeaark.
, '"The RaesUaa, oontinned Ton Sonnen
berg, lare defending against Japan the
v.rBsest saersd poseenlons of Europe. They
ftn:HfiHtat a common yellow enemy."
2Tale etataBMnt caused renewed lanchter
Visaed mm BooUUst aeonted: 'They don't
;;vre amy dattwsslese SUhennc n.v
t'tlT-. . aiMiii.jTn.rii AA1' trtt ..
paa.- -- i m - JC
their next object win be
(the German pot-fin China), as
JaaaBese officers have aureadr'ad.
!Si-5SS-. - v ", - V
aaaneaaa
aataissTLI
SUMMARY OF
The St. Louis Republic.
Wednesday, December 7.
CHAIN CLOSUD: ST. LOUIS-DEC. WHEAT.
JL10-4 N ; DEC. conx. -iC BID.
CH1CACO DEC. WHUtT, tlWA; DEC.
COItX. iCSWUC ASKIID.
the wcwnEn-
OlJaboma and In J Ian Territory Ialr Wednes
day and Thursday.
Eastern Texas Fair Wednesday .nd Thurs
day; llcht northwest wind, beoo-nlnr variable
Arkansas Fair Wednesday and Thursday.
Indiana and Illinois Fair Wednesday and
Thursday; fresh westerly winds.
Missouri. Western Texas. Xebraka. Kansas
and Iowa Fair "Wednesday and Thursday.
For St. Louis anil Viplnlty Fair to
day. Tilth no decided cbanife In tem
perature. IIUSINESS.
Yesterday, bank dearlncs were StlTTiKO:
balances J1.CHMS3. Ixical discount rates wen
between tL and 6 per cent. Dome-tie exchange
was quoted as fellows: New York. 45o prem
bid. Ko prem. asked; Cntcnco. S5o prem. bid.
tic prem. asfcod; Cincinnati. LouUMlIo and
New Orleans, par bid, 10c prem. asked.
SVTieat closed loner at ll.Ufll II bid May:
11.11 nominal Xo. I red. Corn c!osd lower at
Cic bid May: tseiSc No. 2 mixed. Oau closed
at tVia May; ags:4c Xo. 2 mixed.
Spot cotton was nominally &o lower In the
local market.
"WAXT" l'AGES, 4 AND B.PART2. 4
!
WASHINGTON XEWS.
lllssonrl members ot CongrcFs are hope
ful of securing appropriations for new
publlo bulldlnss and river Improvements
In the State. PAGE 3. PAP.T 1.
Major 'William "Warner formally an
nounces his candidacy for the Senate to
succeed CockrelL PAGE 3. PART I.
Senator Piatt will Introduce to-dav a
bill providing for the reduction of South
ern representation In Congress.
PAG&5. PART L
The President almost entirely Isnored
Isthmian canal matters In his message,
because the Imperative changes that are
to be made In the government ot the
canal zone are not yet clearly outlined.
PAGE a PARTI.
THE nASTERJf WAR.
Toklo learns that General Stoessel losei
3,000 men In futile attempts to recapture
203-Meter Bill, from which the Japanese
siege guns have riddled tha Russian
squadron, bottled up In the harbor. The
garrison Is reported suffering from the
shortage of men. The Japanese armored
cruiser, carrying S2 men, is reported sunk
on Russian mine. PAGE L PART 1
Emperor of Japan writes three poems
on the war. PAGE 1, PART 1.
XOCAL AND SCBCRDAX.
A publla hearing on the question of re
vising the building code of St. Louis will
be held In the Council chamber Friday.
PAGE 8, PART 2.
Editor E. H. Butler, former president
New Tork State Electoral College, says
selection of William H. Thompson to the
United States Senate is the logical solu
tion of contest for Senator CockreU's seat.
PAGES, PART X.
Railway Notes At the second day's
hearing on the "uniform bill of lading,"
before the Interstate Commerce Commis
sion, F. J. Firth testified.
PAGE 7, PART 1.
The Instruction Committee of the Board
of Education recommends the shortening
of the writing periods in kindergarten
classes to save the ees of the children.
PAGE 7. PART J.
Attorney General Hamlin says that the
poolrooms In Madison can be suppressed
In ten days if the State's Attorney and
county officers will enforce the provisions
of the law. PAGE 8. PART L
Doctor James Stewart, member elect
from Warren County, declares that since
he learned R. C. Kerens "has. given sub
stantial aid throughout the campaign" he
is for Kerens for Senator.
PAGE 3, PART X.
Doctor Theodore Lewald declares Na
tional Commission has no jurisdiction 'In
making awards. PAGE 1, PART L
A thief by hiding his, hand under tno
sleeve of another woman's cloak stole a
diamond valued at S2M from Mrs. J. R.
Johnson's ear on a street car.
PAGE L PART L '
President Francis says the reports of a
"triumphal tour" are premature.
PAGE L PART L
GENERAL DOMESTIC.
Five persons, one ot them a woman, are
convicted at Portland, Ore., of a conspir
acy to defraud the Government of public
lands. PAGE , PART 1.
Trinity Church of New Tork forbids its
pastors to marry any divorced persons and
'forbids the use of any of its chapels for
etch a wedding. PAGE 4, PART L
The shipment of coal Is resumed at
Zelgier, I1L, under military protection.
PAGE 4, PART 1.
Seven of the twelve men who will try
.Nan Patterson on the charge of murder
are selected. PAGE 5, PART 1.
The expected conference of Federal offl
clols with Carnegie as to the Chadwick
affair falls to take place. Numerous other
conferences are held In New Tork, but
their details are not made publla
PAGE Z. PART 1.
Thomas TC NIedrlnghaus, in New Tork
City, declares that the story of a 25.000
campaign contribution from the Repub
lican National Committee to carry Mis
souri Ss absolutely untrue.
PAGE X. PART L
SPORTING NEWS.
Van Ness, a strongly touted good thing
irom toe ocnorr si&oie, won at New Or
leans by virtue of getting the good go
ing In the outside "path."
PAGE 8, PART 3.
Abe Attell wul depend on footwork to
score over Tommy Feltz.
PAQB J, PART t.
Jungle Imp. and King's Trophy won
their races at New Orleans.
PAGE, part t
American. League wttl hold, Its annual
meeting at unicago this afternoon.
PAGE X, PART 1
Ed Cotrlgan says Western Jockey dub
is making mistake in its treatment of un
recognised tracks. PAGE J, PART i
MOVEMENTS OP OCEAN VESSEL.
New Tork, Dee. 1 Arrl4: Urarta. jreekar.
Sailed: Armenian. Koalsen Lulse. Keaaolltaa
Frlnc.
Liverpool. Dee. . Arrtredl Ionian.
Genoa, Dee. L Arrived: Phoenicia,
CbnitlaoU.,Dec. g,-6ailed: TJnltad States.
Hamburg, Doc. X-Arrlveds Tstmea. ,.,
Sydney. Nw South Wales. Dec. . Arrrrtd
Oprevtously): Sierra.
- Brisbane, Dec. C Arrlred (prstlosaly). XJo-
Antwerp. Dec'. Arrived: Kroonlaad, .
'iaWw.-D8. V-Arrlred: it wfii"-
M'LEOD WILL HOT
GO ON IRE ROARD
Original Folk Man Cannot Find
'rime for Management
of Polfce.
SAYS ANSWER JS FINAL
, C. Stewart, E. S. Lewis and
Wallace Simmons Are Men
tioned as Possible
Members.
Governor-elect Folk has not made up a
'slate' of appointments. The only fore
cast that has had a positive ring has In
volved Nelson W. McLeod, an original
Folk man, as the head of the Police Board.
This rumor reached Its end last night,
however, when Mr. MceLod authorized a
statement to the effect that he cannot pos
sibly make the business sacrifice necessary
to a proper attention to police affairs.
Governor-elect Joseph W. Folk said jes
terday afternoon that he would not an
nounce any appointments until he hail
taken the oath of office In Jefferson City.
He insists that no slate has been pre
pared and that publications heretofore
made purporting to give the list of his ap
pointments have been without foundation.
However, among the close friends of Mr.
Folk gossip regarding the personnel of
some of his appointments has been grad
ually getting more and more definite dur
ing the past few days. For instance, it
may bo said that the Indications Point to
the selection of the Police Board from
among E.'C. Simmons, WaCace D. Sim
mons, E. S. Lewi, A C Stewart and A.
C. Maroney. Mr. McLeod having definitely
decided to keep out. "
It Is an open secret that Mr. Folk has
long wished Mr. McLeod to ha president ot
the new board. It is also an open secret
that business matters have been so press
ing that Mr. McLeod has said from the be
ginning that he would be unable to accept
the honor. Added to this Is the further fact
that, like Robert H. Kern, also a member
ot the Folk campaign Executive Commit
tee, he announced before the election that
he would not accept an appointment.
DEEMS TALK UNWISE
Mr. McLeod said last night, regarding
the gosslD concerning his appointment:
"Whatever has been said about my con
nection with the new board has been
most complimentary to me. I feel, how
ever, that a discussion of the subject at
this time would be unwise. I am will
ing to say, however, that In the probable
event that I shall have "no connection with
the next State administration. I shall al
ways stand ready to do all tn my power.
In a personal way, to further the develop
ment of the Idea that has gained such
headway in Missouri. Anything on the
subject ot Mr. Folk's intentions in the
matter of appointments cannot, of course,
come from me, since I am merely an in
terested lookeron."
A C Steward is also discussed for the
presidency of the board. He has been as
sociated with the Folk movement from Its
Inception and Is a friend of Mr. McLeod.
He is a member of the: law firm of Stew
art, Cunningham 4 Eliot and counsel
for tha St. Louis Union Trust Company.
Both B. C. Simmons and his son, Wal
lace D. Simmons, are discussed aa prob
able appointees.' It is said that the father
is averse to serving on the board. Wal
lace D, Simmons Is president of the Sim
mons Hardware Company.
EL 8. Lewis, who was treasurer of the
Folk campaign, is also discussed, and his
friends are counting upon him as one of
the new members of the board. A C Ma
roney, at present Assistant Circuit Attor
ney, Is mentioned for the Police Board, as
well as for the Board of Election Commis
sioners. MAT BE FOUR VACANCIES.
There tvlll be three vacancies on the
board, and possibly four. The terms of
William G. Frys and T. R. Ballard will
expire, and it Is said that Richard Hanlon
probably will resign the first of the year.
Possibly Anudrew Blong may follow, al
though he has not said that he would.
Friends of Congressman- W. D. Vandl
ver. as has been previously announced, ex
pect that he will be the State Coal Oil
Inspector, to succeed William J-. Flynn.
Absolutely no person hts been selected for
Excise Commissioner, despite all reports
to the contrary, and tha place Is open.
For Election Commissioner, besides Mr.
Maroney, the names ot Judge R. E. Rom
bauer and John FJ. Shepley are most
prominently mentioned. Mr. Shepley is
one of the best-known citizens of St
Louis, and has always been active in
publlo work. Judge Rombauer is attorney
for the School Board, and was formerly
on the Court of Appeals bench.
Friends of Harry B. Hawea assert that
he win work in entire harmony with the
new Police Board; that the fight against
Butlerlsm In this city will be continued
from now until the spring election, and
a clean city ticket will be nominated for
the suffrage ot the citizens.
COTTON SLUMPMAY SETTLE
FALL RIVER MILLS STRIKE
Laborer Coatesul That staaafaerar-
ers Camaxot Leatrer AsTord f
Lose Baalaeaa.
REPUBUC SPECIAL.
FaU River, Mass Dec. I The sudden
slump In cotton, which has been the sen
sation of the local market for the past
few days, during which the price of the
raw material dropped from 9.40 casta to
the present figure of t, has caused wide
spread comment among both raanufactmv
era and labor leaders, and no end of spec
ulation as' to its effect on the local strike
situation.
The labor leaders, who aU along have
expressed entire confidence in ultimate vic
tory, are now surer than ever that the
manufacturers must yield within a .few
days. They are satisfied that the manu
facturers are greatly disturbed, and that
It la only a question of time before they
win grant the demands of the strikers
James Tenser, president of the Textile
Council, says that if the mill men live
up to thelr,statements"they must concede
that under the present conditions ther are
able to pay the cad rate of ws at Jaaat,
THREE NEW MISSOURI CONGRESSMEN
WHO WILL GO TO WASHINGTON SOON
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)
CASSIUS M. SHARTEL
Of Neosho, who defeated Congressman
Benton in the Fifteenth District.
DOCTOR LEWALD.
Calls-Attention to Act of Con
gress Slaking Jury Inter
national. GIVES IT SOLE AUTHORITY.
Says Germany "Would Sot Have
Exhibited if Findings Were to
Be Revised by Katiqnal
Commission, fjf
Doctor Theodor Lewald, Commissioner
General to the World's FaIrvTrom Ger
many, and first vice president of the' Su
perior Jury of Awards, has taken issue
with the contention of the National Com
mission of final jurisdiction in the matter
of awards made by that jury.
When asked yesterday If he had seen
the letter of President Carter to Major
Pangborn, outlining the claims of the Na
tional Commission, and for his opinion of
lta merits. Doctor Lewald mads the fol
lowing statement:
1'Of course, I read the letter of President
Carter and the statement made by Preal
dent Francis. I fully share the stand'
point as expressed In this statement, but
would, however, like to draw attention to
one very important point in particular.
"In the act of Congress it is stated ex
pressly that the Exposition shall be inter
national in character, and the rules and
regulations state explicitly that the jury
shall be international. In accordance
with this the representatives ot foreign
nations have been members of the Group
Jury, the Department Jury, the Superior
Jury and the Committee of Five.
"It would, therefore, be Irreconcilable
with the international character of the
Exposition were a corporation, be It the
National Commission or the Exposition
Company, which are not International cor
porations, In any way to interfere with the
distribution of tha awards.
JURT MADE GERMANY'S AWARDS.
"There Is no doubt that the Imperial
Government of Germany would never havb
permitted Germany's partldpation In the
competition had there been the slightest
possibility that the findings of the Inter
national Jury could be changed by any
corporation that was not an International
one.
"As the Committee ot Five has definitely
determined aU of the German awards, I
have already had the list published In the
Official Journal of the German Govern
ment. "I have participated In the meetings of
tha jury from the first day. The number
ot Germany's representatives was seven
ty-two. Among them were men who are
the most prominent and ablest experts In
their respective field of knowledge, and a
number ot them had already served as
jurors at former International expositions.
"They informed me of one accord, and I
have already previously taken occasion to
voice their remarks, that the fullest ap
preciation was due the work ot the jury
at this Exposition. The gams was said of
the integrity, impartiality, expertness,
earnestness and devotion to duty shown by
the jurors in nil the various instances.
"Tha awards gained in St. Louis are
not in the slightest way inferior to those
gained at any other exposition.
PANGBORN ADDRESSES CARTER.
la answer to the letter of President Car
ter of the National Commission of Decem
ber L a copy of which was given out for
publication from the offices of the Na
tional Oammla-don, Major J. G. Pangborn,
president of the United Exhibitors' Asso
ciation, yesterday addressed a letter to
President Carter.
Major Pangborn claims that up to the
moment that the letter was written there
had been no Intimation to the association
of which he is president, nor to himself, ot
any dissatisfaction on the part of any ex
hibitor with the "awards nor the treat
ment accorded exhibitors either by the
juries or the Exposition.
Major Pangbom'a letter follows:
Dee. K ltt-Honorabl. Thomas H. Carter,
TtresldeBt national Commission, Loubdana Pur
chase Tr""' , SL. Lools. Mo. I Dear Sir I
br to acknowWer. receipt cf your letter of
1st mat., In which you acquaint me with the
reasons that have ltd your commlsrioa to delay
approval 'and publication ot awards.
Owing to absence from my ofnee, I hare only
had- oupmluultjr to road your latter this morn
ing, although! had previously rad It in the
saommx papers. '
As tha president ct ,tb Halted Exhibitors'
Ooatlsneel aa Paa-aJTsra.
COMMISSI
HAS
JURISDICTION
EDGAR C. ELLIS
Of Kansas City, who defeated Congress
man Cowherd In the Fifth District.
EMPEROR OF JAPAN WRITES
THREE POEMS ON THE WAR
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
New Tork, Dec. 6. The following translations of poems by his Majesty, the
originals of which appeared In tha Kokumln Shlmbun for November 7, 1901,
seem to have been composed at different periods.
No. 1 evidently was written before the war, when the Emperor saw himself
surrounded by ominous signs of a coming conflict.
No. 2 dates from the actual commencement of the war, when all peaceable
means had been exhausted and the declaration of war had become inevitable.
No. 3 is what we see In Japan to-day.
The poems will appear In the Independent ot December t.
THREE POEMS.
BT MLT3CHTTO, EXFEBOB OF JAPAN.
L
My heart's at peace with alL and fain would I
Live, as I love. In lifelong amity;
And yet the storm-clouds lower, the rising wind
Stirs up the waves; the elemental strife.
Wages around, I do not understand
Why this should be.
IL
'Tls surely not our fault. Wo sought to be sincere In deed and wordj
We have exhausted every means to press
A clear and truthful case, but oil In vain.
Now may the God that sees the hearts of men
Approve of what we dot ,
They're at the front.
Our brave young men; and now the
Are shouldering their arms; and In the fields .
The old men gather in the abundant rice.
Low stooping o'er the sheaves; sll ages vis
In cheerful self-devotion to the land.
Kyoto, Japan.
DIAMOND STOLEN
FROM WOMAN'S EAR
Large Sleeve on Cloak Worn by
Another Lady Hides Thief s
Hand.
ROBBERY ON A STREET CAR-
Mrs. J. B. Johnson of Dallas, Tex.,
the Victim of the Daring
Theft Gem Worth
$200.
Working under the voluminous folds of
a fashionable woman's sleeve in a crowd
ed Market street car coming In from the
World's Fair grounds, thieves took a t3X
diamond from the ear of Mrs. J, R John
son of Dallas. Tex.. Friday evening. De
tectives were put to work on the case
yesterday.
Mrs. Johnson was a prominent exhibitor
In the Horticulture building at tha Fair.
She says that just before boarding the
car she felt her ears, as had been her
custom after passing through a crowd, to
see if the diamonds were there.
Standing in the aisle near her were sev
eral persona among whom was a lady who
was formerly connected with the Montana
building. On account of the lurching of
the car, Mrs. Johnson saya repeated
ly the lady was brushed against her. She
wore a handsome cloak, the sleeves of
which were quite fulL She held to a strap,
which brought the sleeves close to the side
of Mrs. Johnson's head.
1 firmly believe," said Mra Johnson
yesterday, "that two thieves occupied a
seat just behind me, and that they noticed
tho lady's sleeves brushing against my
neck. Under this cover I think they sa
voured the missing earring. The other was
unfastened, but doubtless they did aot
have time to extract It"
Mrs. Jchnson says she was en Market
street car No. 223L and that she called
the conductor and Informed him that she
had been robbed. At this time the car
was west of King's highway.
She states that she received no assist
ance and was told that she should be more
careful. In the confusion resulting from
her declaration that she had lost the
gem, and while searching the car seat and
floor, one of the men disappeared. When
King's highway was reached the ether
suspect got off.
Mra Johnson declined to give the name
ot the Montana woman, but as soon as the
car approached Twelfth street she In
formed detectives of the occurrence. She
was prominent as an exhibitor at the Ex
position, and is now enraged in shipping
her fruit and nursery specimens back to
Texasi She is boarding at No. tTM Locust
'street.
The earring, was attached to Mrs. Job-,
son' ear by means et one f trap M-
MARION E. RHODES
Of Washington County, who defeated
Congressman Robb in the Thirteenth
District.
DX sy
middle-aged
s
fashloned fastenings. Working with his
hand secreted beneath the large sleeve of
the Montana woman's cloak; It is believed
the thief unfastened the hook and then,
taking advantage of the jostling of the
car, removed the diamond gradually.
The police say It was one of the most dar
ing thefts committed in Bk. Louts tn some
time, and that it was one of the first rob
beries of the kind ever reported in the
City.
ORDERED TRAIN
BY TELEPHONE
Special Arrives From Kansas
City, .Where 9300 Had Been
Left at Hotel in Payment
A special train, which had been ordered
by telephone in Ksnsss City, and poo left
at one of the hotels in payment for its
use, sxrived at Union Station yesterday
morning at 8: o'clock. The run from
Kansas City had been made in six hours
and fifteen minutes.
Aboard was a party of officials of the
Philadelphia Gas Company, who departed
later over the VandsJIa for the East. It
was not untn St. Louis was reached, how
ever, that the identity of the passenger
was ascertained.
When E. B. Jewett, city agent of the
Missouri Pacini-,, arrived at his home In
Kansas City at 1:39 o'clock yesterday
morning, he found a telephone call await
ing him. He called the number and the
following conversation is said to have
taken place:
lly name Is Clark and I want a special
train to St Louis. Must be there be
fore U o'clock-In the morning."
"Put up 8300 with the clerk at the
Coates House and I will order the train."
Mr. Jewltt is credited with having said.
The party Immediately left the hotel
and by the time they reached the Union
Depot an engine, baggago car and coach
were awaiting them. The start was made
at 139 o'clock, as second section of No.
10, and fast schedule was maintained, the
special reaching St. Louis more than aa
hour ahead ot the time set as the limit.
BURNED IN ATTEMPT TO
SAVE MOTHER FROM FUMES.
Timely Arrival of Hasbavad Prevents
the Death of Mrs. Joaa T.
FlenUas Frosa Fire.
Despite the heorlo efforts of her daughtar
aCary, Mrs. John T. Fleming probably was
fatally burned In her home. No. 2203 Orat
ion street yesterday afternoon. Miss
Fleming also sustained severe burns about
the hands in attempting to beat out tha
flames which enveloped her mother's cloth
ing. Mrs., Fleming was preparing dinner over
a coal stove when a pan of grease sud
denly boued over.- Some of the blazing
grease spattered onto her apron, which
caught fire.
Her screams immediately brought her
daughter to her side. Miss Fleming at
tempted to beat out the flames with her
bands, but probably would have been un
able to save her mother but for the ar
rival of her father, who wrapped Mra,
Fleming la a rug and axtlnj-tifsbed tha
Samea. . . ii
LIQUID METALS
AS
Solution Containing Gold, Sil
ver, Platinum and Other
Metals Injected Hypo
dermically. DISCOVERY OF FRENCHMAN.
Doctor Albert Robin's Sensation
al Theory May Cause Revolu
tion in Science of Medicine.
CURE IN NEARLY EVERY CASE.
Only One Oat of Fourteen Pa
tients Failed to Respond to
the Treatment "Metallio
Ferments" Is the Name
Applied to New Find.
SPECIAL BT CABLE. l
Paris, Dec .-(Copyiight. L)-A set.
sationa communication was made to thf
Academle de Medicine to-day by Doctorr
Albert Robin, who reported his disco vera
of the fact that certain metals, such aa
gold and silver, very finely subdivided and!
employed in infinitesimal doses exercise sj
considerable effect on the vital phenom
ena. Reduction of the metals to the desired
state is obtained by their electrical disso.
lutloa In water. Tha metal so treated so.
quires the property of developing a farce
similar to that of a ferment. This pe
culiarity of the phenomenon has led Doo.
tor Robin to use the term "metallie fer
menr In reporting his discovery.
His metallio ferments are employed lsj
case3 of pneumonia in bypodermlo In
jections of from five to ten cublo centi
meters of solution, containing from JK
to J of a milligramme of gold, silver,
platinum and so forth, produced a brusque
defervesencs of the malady In six cases
out of ten before the seventh day.
Thirteen cures were obtained In four
teen cases thus treated. There is a com
plete similarity 'between the natural fa
vorable crisis in pneumonia and that- pro
duced by metallic ferments. These fer
ments, therefore, are capable of producing,
aiding or hastening this natural favorable
crisis.
After one or two Injections the tempera
ture falls suddenly, almost always in a
definite manner. The employment ot these
metallic ferments does sot constitute the
complete treatment of pneumonia, for
complications and the predominance efi
certain symptoms necessitate accessorji
therapeutics, but great progress would ap
pear to be made by their use In the treat
ment ot this frequent and serious maladjk
NO WORLD'S TOUR
FOR THE PRESENT
Forest Park Most Be Cleared Be
fore He Departs, 8ays Pres
ident Francis. &
Reports of a "triumphal tour arouse)
the world for President Francis are pro
nounced premature by the Immediate ob
ject of the rumors.
They have their source, he says, in sues
interchange of compliments which ordi
narily take place between the host an4
his guests at the moment of the da
parture of the latter.
"I have made no plans for such a trip.
said President Francis yesterday la dlir
cussing his reported Intention to swing
round the globe early next year.
"Of course, It Is not Impossible or Im
probable that I may sometime take
trip around the world, but at present any
contemplation of the journey Im necessa
rily very hazy.
T expect to be very busy for soma
months to 'come with the affairs of tha
Exposition. After the exhibits have been
reshlpped and the buildings raxed front '
the Exposition site, the World's Fair
management has yet before it tha great
task of the restoration of that part ol
Forest Park included la tha Fair site.
T expect and hope to give that im
portant work some of my attention and to
see the work of restoring the park safely
launched. Then I hope to be able to give
my private business someattention.'whlchi
I have not been able to do during the six
years in which X have been interested la
the work of the World's Fair.
"In parting with Foreign Commissioners
I have said 'that I hoped to meet them
again In their own countries, and hence, Z
suppose, the origin of the report that X
would tour the world soon after the close
of the Fair."
TANSEY SUCCEEDS JENKINS.
Dockery Fills Vacancies on States
Board of Arbitration.
RaTPCBLXC SPBCLVZ.
Jefferson City, Ma, Deo. 8-Governoa
Dockery to-day made tha following ap
pointments: G. D. Kennedy, Coal OH
Inspector of Brunswick, Mo.; T. A. Bry
an, of Sta. Genevieve. School CorMnlssWtn
er of Ste. Genevieve County, vies W. L.
Morton, -resigned; Ed P. Caruthers of
Kennett. member of the Board of Re
gents of the Cape Girardeau Normal
School, vice T. B. Rely, realgaed; J. B.
Thomas of Albany, number at the State
Beard of Arbitration, vice E. S. Carver.
resigned; George J. Tansey of St. Loafa
member ot the satae beard, to laocaeel
Toss Jenktoa, raaiaatt. . . .
USED
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