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The daily morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven, Conn.) 1894-1907, August 12, 1897, Image 6

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NEW HAVEN! MOENJNG JOUIttL AKD COURIER. THURSDAY. AUGUST 12 1897.
MILt'Oltlt.
'Aug. 11. Miss Alice Bradley la visit
ing friend In East Longmeadnw, Mass.
William H. Horton, formerly of Mil
Iford, but who lias been residing in
.West Haven, has moved into the build
ing recently occupied by Green Broth
ers, near the memorial bridge. Mr.
llorton will conduct a bicycle repair
ehop.
A daughter was born to Mr, and Mrs.
Arthur . Smith recently.
Don't forget the lawn party at the
1'esidence of Mrs. King on Broad street
to-morrow evening. Salads, sandwich
es, Ice cream and cake will be served,
and there will be some' very fine music
by the Milford Athletic association or
chestra. Following is a list of the jurors se
lected for the year commencing Sep
tember 1, 1S07; Charles "VV. Beardsley,
Nathan Gunn, Wallace S. Chase, James
A. Smith, Charles E. Tuttle, George J.
Smfth, Calvin D. Baldwin, A. Clark
Piatt, James B. Baldwin, Theodore E.
Piatt, Samuel A. Nettleton, William B.
Thomas, Samuel A. Rhodes, William
F. Burns, Mortimer E. Treat, Mark
Tibbals, Henry Cornwall, Theodore
Thompson, David B. Piatt, John W.
Buckingham, Harry C. C. Miles, Albert
Plumb, Roger S. Baldwin, Elbert N.
Clark, Nathan Perry Merwin, Edward
L. Oviatt, Fred D. Clark and Edgar C.
Piatt.
Funeral of lUra. Henry Schindler.
Thve funeral services of Frances, wife
f Mir. Henry Schindler, who died In
Springfield, Mass., last Monday, took
place yesterday afternoon in Orange,
Conn., at the residence of the parents
of the deceased, Mr. and Mrs. Bucholz,
well known residents of Orange. Many
friends of the sleeper attended to pay
the last sad tribute of friendship and
regard and there were many beautiful
tributes of flowers. High mass was
celebrated at 9 a, m. at St. Boniface
chuvoh In this city and the pastor, Rev.
Father Schaele, made remarks very ap
propriate to the sad occasion. The de
ceased leaves beside her husband, one
child. She was twenty-two years of
age amd was ill but a short time with
meningitis. Deceased was a native of
Orange. Her husband Is employed in
Springfield. Stahl & Son were the fu
neral directors. The Interment was in
St. Lawrence cemetery. The bereaved
"husband has the sincere sympathy of
Ills many friends In the sad loss he has
sustained.
i, ELM CITY TENT ORGANIZED.
New Tent of K. O. T. M. Elect and
Install Officers
Elm City tent, Knights of the Mac
cabees, was organized last evening with
thirty charter members, by John F.
Johnson of Hartford, assisted by Thom
as W.' Ounshannon, deputy collector of
customs of Hartford.
The tent thus successfully organized
elected and Installed the following of
ficers: Past commander, James F. Mc
Keon; commander, Edward P. Keat
ing; lieutenant commander, Arthur J.
Klernan; record keeper, Thomas B.
Healy; finance keeper, Thoma3 J.
Lynch! chaplain, Riley E. Phillips;
serpent, Meyer Lambert; master at
arms, James Anderson; first guard,
Joseph F. Kennedy; second guard, Ed
ward L. Hodges; sentinel, Sigmund A.
Lauber; picket, John P. Casey; trustees,
T. J. Lynch, J. F. McKeon, Robert
Sirnond.
Sir Knight Thomas Thompson, from
one of the local tents, was also present.
GAME IN THE YUKON REGION.
But Little of It Where the Miners Are,
Though Plentiful 500 Miles Away.
It Is not necessary for everybody to
feed on dog meat on the Upper Yukon
River and In the vicinity of the Klon
dike gold field In winter, as a member
of a party which was up there said
several of the members did. He re
fused the dish, hut at the same time he
acknowledged that more than once
after food had been thrown to the dogs,
literally speaking, he had snatched it
away from them before they could eat
It. Fish which small worms had ap
nrooriated to themselves he did not
hesitate to eat, he said, and was glad to
set it. ,
That la one of the great troubles
which be encounteredbypersons visiting
the gold field. The further up the Yu
lrnn one travels the scarcer becomes the
food supply, until in the . Klondike
region and thereabouts it ceases almost
entirely. There is practically no large
game, with the exception of one or two
moose and reindeer, which have be
come separated from the rest of the
herd and wandered out there. So that
prospectors who intend visiting the
field should not rely in the least on the
resources of the country to feed them.
There may be a few rabbits, ducks and
geese in the spring, which disappear
very quickly. These are not sufficient
to supply even the wants of the few
natives who wander nomadically
about the region.
Lower down the Yukon at certain
seasons of the year, there is abundance
of game, probably from 400 to 500 miles
from the Klondike river. The moose is
about the largest of the mammals,
while the reindeer is fairly plentiful.
Ab the population has increased the
DON'T
PlS'NTHEHOUSj
CLEARS OUT
Bed Bugs, Flies, Cockroaches,
Ants, Beetles, Waterbugs, Insects,
Rats, Mice, &c. 15 c. Druggists.
15?&IQUID-
Also Bough on Corn Batve and Plaster.
ROUGH - W.RJ,S
Worms in a few hours. X ice to take. In iabler. and
liquid form. S&o. E. S. Wells, Jersey City, N. J.
ROUGH on HSS?
met effective, mf relief. At Druggists or by
inaa B. 8. WKua, Jersey City, V J.
r iW'lllSTANtREUplOj
gamehascorrespondinglydecreascd, and
in the winter the Indians there have a
hard time securing food, as they are
very improvident. During the season
when It is abundant they never think
of laying by a supply. There are
beavers on the stream and various
kinds of deer, bear, and caribou. In the
winter months these go south and dis
appear almost entirely. The polar bear
is found several degrees further north,
never appearing in that vicinity.
In the mountain streams which feed
the Yukon river, up toward its head,
near the Kathul Mountain, there are
mountain trout of good size and flavor.
Many of these streams dry up in the
winter, as they are fed by glaciers,
which, of course, In cold weather are
frozen entirely. The salmon Is found In
the Yukon but only lower down, toward
St. Michael. Occasionally they are
caught high up on the Yukon, but the
water Is rather cold for them. There is
a sort of fish known as the white fish
which Is found near the Klondike river,
and is said to be excellent eating. It
ranges in size about the same as our
black bass, and is one of the chief
mainstays of the Indians. In winter if
it is not too cold, holes are cut in the
ice and the fish pulled out by means of
bone hooks. They are more plentiful
than any other kind, and the ice cold
water appears to be their natural
habitat.
Early In the spring water fowl, such
as ducks, geese, and swan, put it an
appearance, but they do not tarry long,
and wend their way after a stay of only
a few days. They are very plentiful
when they do appear, and the natives
kill them by hundreds. The trouble Is,
however, that things of the kind do not
last as they do in warmer climates.
Reindeer formerly were seen In very
large numbers on the Yukon, some two
or three hundred miles from where the
Klondike flows into it, and a gentleman
who spent two or three winters there
several years ago stated to the reporter
that he had seen a herd of at least 6,000
cross the river on the ice in one day.
He also saw moose arid caribou in herds
of large number, but such an occur
rence is an unusual rather than a com
mon one.
Klondike would-be prospectors should
bear in mind the fact that in that re
gion, where game is scarce, the ap
petite is something wonderful. All
kinds of food Is eaten with relish, par
ticularly anything that has fat or
grease about it. The sharp air in
creases hunger nearly a hundred-fold,
and it is necessary to have plenty of
provisions in order to withstand the
temperature of sometimes as much as
68 below zero. Persons who have passed
the winter there state that it is much
better not to touch alcoholic liquors,
the after effects from indulgence in
them are much worse than any benefit
which may be derived from temporary
stimulation.
Tea is considered one of the best
things which can be taken, and it is
drunk in large quantities, strong and as
hot as possible. This seems to keep the
heat in and the cold out better than
anything else. AH kinds of canned
goods are excellent and dried fruits or
lime juice should be included in every
bill of fare, as scurvy is prevented by
making use of them. It is necessary to
use large quantities of salt meats,
which produce the disease.
It is believed by travelers up the Yu
kon river that vegetables which grow
rapidly could be raised profitably in the
summer months. Potatoes, it is thought
could be brought to fruition without
trouble, and turnips also. The latter
have been raised successfully by mis
sionaries 400 or 500 miles or so from the
source of the river. The sun there is
said to have very strong power in the
three or four months of summer, and
in hothouses lettuce and other vege
tables could be raised easily.
It is believed by many who do not
understand the situation thoroughly
that it is not allowed to any one to take
provisions Into that country the syndi
cate furnishing them for $400. This is a
mistake. The syndicate merely does
not allow any one to transport them up
the Yukon river, reserving 'that right
for itself. If they can be taken to
Juneau or either the Chilkat or Chilkoot
pass they can be transported over the
mountains on muleback, and this is
much the closer way. The cost of
transportation,.- however, is considered
expensive. Washington Evening Star.
THE BAY STATE'S BIRD LAW.
Later Views as to the Prohibition of
Feathers for Hat Ornamentation.
These are days of stagnation in the
millinery business, but the usual calm
of "between seasons" Is broken just
now by the passage of the law relative
to the selling and wearing of certain
kinds of feathers. A tour of the whole
sale and retail establishments leaves
the Impression that the dealers look
upon , the whole proceeding as ridicul
ous, but, at the same time they confess
that the talk about the act affects their
business, and is likely to still further
before the excitement dies away. The
interpretation of the statute seems
rather difficult even to the officials.
Chief Wade has sent out notifications
to the dealers and inspections will fol
low, so it is stated. Now the question
arises as to who will do the inspecting.
Naturalist and experienced dealers are
the only ones capable of judging
whether the birds or feathers are such
as the law says shall not be worn or
sold. Most persons would recognize an
owl,- a parrot, or an English sparrow,
but there are dozens of other millinery
birds used for ornamentation that
might be a combination of barnyard
feathers the like of which never walked
or flew.
Pigeons, geese, ducks, turkeys, and
other birds sold at the market stalls for
food contribute their plumage toward
the milliners' stocks. The artisans of
Europe arrange them skilfully, and the
result is an article of ornament that
might easily be mistaken for a song
bird. Said one of the largest wholesale
dealersinNew EnglaDd to-day: "I have
thousands of dollars' worth of feathers
in my possession. 1 paid the govern
ment a good price for the privilege of
bringing them here from Eroupe: I fiay
the city taxes and am given the right
to conduct my business. I should be
glad if I might be arrested in order to
have a test case of this absurd law. I
haven't a feather in my stock that was
not imported, and yet I can show many
that might have been taken from birds
killed here in Massachusetts. I shall
proceed as before and buy what I think
my customers will want. I understand
that the ostrich is not included in the
new law, when, as a matter of fact, the
plucking of its feathers means actual
cruelty.
A buyer for one of the large retail
houses cited instances of customers
who had feathers removed from hats
for fear of arrest but he Bald he should
not countermand the order left in Eu
rope for next season, which Includes
hundreds of dozens of'blrds, which form
large proportion of the millinery de
partment stock.
A woman milliner, who has a large
trade, declares that the law is the re
sult of misdirected sentiment on the
part of half a dozen personB, who have
nothing else to think about than mak
ing trouble for others. "I have always
made it a point to have nothing in my
stores," she said, "that I knew to have
been killed cruelly." Look around; you
see no aigrettes. It is not in good taste
to wear such things when there is a
strong public Bentlment against them;
and my customers are quite willing to
substitute a bit of lace, If only the deli
cate effect is desired. But all women
cannot pay for thread lace and severely
simple styles, and the dealers who sup
ply the country trade are the ones who
will feel the force of this interference
with business. Here is one of the most
elegant and expensive hats in my stock.
See this feather arrangement. It Is the
beauty of the trimming. An expert
designer is paid a handsome salary to
make Just such novelties from what
may be called refuse odds and ends,
turkey wings, chicken wings, etc. The
people who cry out against the wearing
of birds' feathers would better stop and
think of the women who work in the
factories of Europe. If there is no de
mand for such goods their occupation is
gone. I am not in the least afraid of
the law, but I do think that by Its en
forcement, a large amount of business
will be given to New York, for there
will be no demand here; and. then, I
suppose, we shall be forbidden to sleep
on feather beds."
While Chief Wade and Gen. Martin
have been consulted by inquiring deal
ers, they are undecided as to what
move they will next make. The Fish
and Game Commission has determined
to act at once. Its sixty deputies,
stationed in various parts of the State
have been ordered to enforce the law,
which, by the way, makes an exception
of game birds, English sparrows, crow
blackbirds, crows, jays, birds of prey,
and wild geese. Boston Evening Tran
script.
SKIRTED FLEECE
HOUSE.
IN THE
Representative Johnson's Odorous Ob
ject Lesson. .
One of the more serious as well as
sincere statesmen in congress, says the
New York Tribune's Washington cor
respondent, is Representative Johnson
of North Dakota, of the committee on
ways and means. Being a practical
farmer himself, Mr. Johnson naturally
believes that the agricultural indus
tries are entitled to fair consideration
in all protective tariff legislation. One
day Mr. Johnson decided to give his
colleagues an objeot-lesson on the sub
ject of "skirted" fleeces. He obtained
possession of a sheepskin with all the
wool on a real sheepskin whose odors
had lost none of their pungency while
in store and this he brought to the
room in which his colleagues were as
sembled to consider the wool duties.
"Now, gentlemen," said Johnson, with
a manner and In a tone "that would
have made a market for lightning-rods
even in a heavily wooded country," as
one remarked, "I have promised my
self the pleasure of giving you an object-lesson
on the subject of skirted
fleeces. Here is a full sheepskin," and
Johnson unrolled and spread it on the
floor. The room was somewhat close
and the sheepskin immediately began
to assert Itself. Governor Steele of In
diana eyed it askance and sidled into
the corridor, murmuring, "That's a
mighty strong argument." He was
quickly joined by Tawney of Minneso
ta, who lighted his cigar at Steele's,
blew a cloud and remarked: "Well, I
worked in u boiler-shop once, but it
wasn't so loud as that odor." One by
one Johnson's colleagues edged past
him and out of the room, but he was
so busy teaching his class that he did
not mark the desertion of his pupils
until he finished his lecture and looked
about him. There remained only Ding.
ley and Payne, and they were prepar
ing to flee. Even Grosvenor, the great
"sheep man," had vanished behind the
cloud of tobacco smoke Steele and
Tawney and Russell had raised in the
corridor. But Johnson's lecture was a
profitable one. One of his colleagues is
said to have remarked: "Johnson can
get anything he wants, so far as I am
concerned. If he doesn't get it he may
unroll another ancient sheepskin or
something worse."
If your boy
is not well and strong his bread and
butter does him no good
change your flour
Se DulUtll
liiMPEMAL) Imperial
I ' has life-giving qualities and
I children thrive on it.
I " Best in the World.
I Try ft. Your grocer has it. Buy it
1 R. G. DAVIS, - New Haven, Conn. I
iimiiimmiiiiiiminiiiiiiiiiiiinimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimB
We Give Trading Stamps
For Credit or Cash.
FURNITURE, CARPETS, Etc.
699 Chapel street, New Haven, Conn.
Below the Bridge.
Brer? Artlcl Guaranteed.
Pin this up where you can see It.
Cliara cter U Credit.
Store open Monday and Saturday Eventnes.
FURNITURE ON WEEKLY PAYMENTS
Prices 111
at the first of the season.
WE DON'T
wait until the rush is over
and then put our prices down
EARLY PURCHASERS
buy just as cheap as
these who wait ; they
don't pay $25 more than
a wheel is worth because
they buy early in the season.
are one price to all.
They always hold their
price and they
are always worth every
cent asked.
At $35 and $50
they are worth double
any other bicycles at the'
same prices.
SOLD ONLY BY
H.
6 Church Street.
OPEN MONDAY AND SATURDAY EVEN
INGS.
Telephone 825-3.
Going to the mountains
or Seashore ?
If so, a pair of our Opera
or Field Glasses would add
greatly to the, enjoyment of
your trip.
Gall and Examine Them.
C. J. loisra, Jr., Ho.
861 Chapel Street.
WELLS & GUNDE.
Watchmaker! and Jeweler.
Full Line Sterling Siirer and
feilver fisted Ware,
RIMBAL'S ANTI-RHEUMATIC RINGS
No 788 Chapel Street
rflOROOGAtV BHJOY
'OUTING TMP,
?TAK& WITAYOO
A PAIR OP OUR ,
CELEBRATED
AKeS.-UASTCOST.
. .
CM O RCA STREET.
P
Cafcfcettei't Envll.1i Dtaman4 Bi-mA.
ENNYR0YAL PILLS
Original and Only Genuine.
Safe, always reliable, ladies aak
DrrjMlnt for Chir.htittrr'B Ennlitk Din-.
mond Brand in Red tod Gold metallic
pn, neaieo with nine notwn. i hk
no other Rtfutt danaerout mbititw
tionMnntltnitmnm At Dmiririili. or mm A
Id starapa foi aartieulara, testimonials and
teener Tor jLsdles," m or retain
r simii. iw.vw i cimooiwi. nmao rapwr.
flfelhuHrL a. ..I Si. Afl-jl!u a
Sold by all Locm Druggist PfllLADA, 1A.
, Sold by GeaC. Goodwin & Co.,
General Agents. Boston, Mm
YAULTS and CESSFOOLS
NEATLY CI.EANKD BY
FARNHAM.
Trices low uud satisfaction guaranteed.
Orders left at
BRADLEY & D ANN'S, 400 State St.,
ROB'T VEITCH SON'S. 974 Clmpel St.,
LINSLEY & LIGHTBOURN'S. 33 Br'wa,
will receive prompt attention. P. O.
Address Box 855. Telephone 425-12.
781 CHAPEL STREET.
A bfbt prr tr- rrrTii
, lit 1 D-d I Obi ur I cc i n
ON
RUBBER BASE, $8.00
A Good Set at $5.00
Crescent Bicvcles
If M
0Mf M
I AT
5
Teeth extracted without pain by the am
of our Vitalized Air made fresh at our office
TEETH EXTRACTED, 26c
VITALIZED AIR, BOc.
Office open at all hours.
I. D. MONKS, D. D. S., Manager
Here is Mr Oirtiitr
TO GET A NEW,
1897
High Grade Standard Make
BICYCLE
FOR A LITTLE MONET.
Wi Want 25 Secii-lani
BICYCLES
For Immediate use and will take them In
exchange for the above new Wheels on ex
ceedingly liber:-1 terms.
Remember the Number
Is limited, and only early buyers will get
the advantage of this Special Offer.
The VERU Bicycle & Rub
ber Co.,
156-158 Orange Street,
Just North of Chapel street. New Haven,
Con a.
Call and See
our
Alert Special,
Made by Packer Mfg. Co.,
$45.00.
Also agents for
E. Howard, $100. Phoenix. $100.
Packer, $60 to $100.
Stormer, $60 to $75.
AH kinds of repairing on bicycles.
R. J. KIRBY& CO.,
180 Orange Street.
She bought It at
No. 7 Center Street.
Kound hotter viiIiiar thiin af
bargain howlers. You can do as well.
ARTHUR GRIGGS.
7 CENTER STREET.
Tfeo Trill is i Winner.
If you want to be In the race, ride a
"BLUE STREAK"
and you won't be long.
Tribunes, Charter Oaks and Eurekas.
PRICES RIGHT.
JOHN BROWN,
153-157 GEORGE STREET.
Open Monday and Saturday Evenings.
Just received, another lot
of those New 180,7 Bicycles.
Maroon or Black, Decorated
Frames, Seamless Tubing,
etc., at
$21.00.
A chance for those who
came too late for last lot. Al
so other bargains for cash.
REICHERT'S,
532 STATE STREET.
THE RACYCLE.
WHY NOT RIDE THE BEST?
The Racycle with Its narrow tread. The
only Wheel on earth with chain and
sprocket pull Inside the ball races. Do you
know what this means ? Tome In and ex
amine It at 360 STATE STREET.
SILAS G-ALPIN.
pVtscellaucouB.
HEATING HOUSES.
The best work in
HotWaterand SteamHeating
assured.
ALSO CAREFUL ATTENTION PAID
TO ALL KINDS OP STEAM FITTING.
Repairing Promptly Attended To.
Estimates given.
ISAAC TEASDALE,
106 Crewn Street
P. O. Bos 1614. dU tf
cf1.GMT IJ5T . '
Finest
Day
Kcsort
on
Long
Island
Sound.
THE STEAMER
JOHN H. STARIN,
CAPTAIN MCALLISTER.
Will commence her remilnr trips to this
ueuutirui lsiana
TUESDAY, JULY 6th.
continuing
Every Tuesday and Thursday
during the season. Leaving New Haven
from foot of Brown street at 8:30 a. m.
shun), and Glen Island at 4 D. in. Giviiiu
one-half hour longer on the Island than pre
vious seasons. The attractions at the Island
are well known, but wo will mention those
Superior Dinners, Glen Island Clambakes,
Little Germany, Boating, Bathing, Daily
Concerts at the gruud pavilion, and other
attractions that go to make up a first-class
summer resort.
Faro, round trip, 75c; children between
ages of 5 and 12, 40c; one way, BOc. Spe
cial rates to parties of 100 or over. Music
for dancing on boat. No liquors allowed on
boat, which is a sufficient guarantee tnat
ladles and children need not fear molesta
tion. C. H. FISHER, Agent.
Take water St. cars to Brewery at. .vl
NEW STEAMER
MARGARET
Will Observe Following Schedule :
a.m. p.m. p.m.
Lv New Haven (Belle Dock) 9:30
Ar. Pico Park .10:25
00 8:00
2:50 8:45
Ar. Branford Pt 10:35 3:00
Ar. Pawson Park 10:40 8:10
RETURNING:
. a.m.
n.m. p.m.
Lv. Pico Park ..... 11:40 5:35 10:45
Lv. Branford Pt 11:50 5:45
Lv. Pawson Park 12:00 6:00
Ar. at New Haven..'. ... 1 p.m. 7:00 11:45
A sail will be extended around the Island
on afternoon trip down.
Sunday time from New Haven: 10:30 a.m.
and 2 p. m.
E. H. MARTIN. Sup't.
1 Benedict Building, Evenings.
THE AFOLLO LAMP the most econom
ical Lamp ever manufactured consumes
only 2V4 cubic feet of gas per hour; less
than any other Lamp in the market. The
Apollo Lamp can be adjusted to any Gas
Fixture, is adopted for natural, coal nr ena-
ollne gas, and is provided with an Auto
matic iteguiator, wuicn prevents tne break
ing of chimneys by a sudden Increase of
gns pressure. .
The APOLLO MANTLES are the most
durable ever manufactured ; they are made
m any acsirea tint, jne urange Light be
ing the best adnpted for private dwellings,
as it is free from that ghastly hue so ob-
.lPcnnuaDie to me lumen, xnc Blue-White
Light Is the best for stores and where the
greatest possible candle-power is wantpd.
These Mantles are suspended from the toD
Hivti w imtii, i'. njwij ui umieiiui, Haiue as
that from which the Mantles are made.
There Is nothing to burn off and destroy
the Mantles, and their being suspended
from the top prevents any sudden lar from
breaking thorn, as Is emmon with other
Mantles. THE ARNOLD CO... Sole Agents,
statu in ripnw-v stpbeto '
Five Beaso
no
no
FOR USING A GAS COOKING STOVE IN
SUMMER.
1. It Is clean and safe no coal ashes no
oil stove which Is offensive no gasoline
stove which Is damreions.
2. Economical add the hauling of ashes to
i ue rosi; ol coat anu see.
3. It saves a hot and fiery kitchen and
kpnnfi vonr ennlr in n nlpnsnnf tpmnpr
4. It furnishes hot water night or day, If
required for the sick room or toilet.
5. It broils and bakes quicker and better
than a coal Arc and preserves more of
the nutritive and tasteful qualities of
meats, fowls and fish. .
We cordially Invite von to Inspect our
largo line of GAS COOKING STOVRS and
KAJNdKN at our Salesroom, under office of
The New Haven Gas Light Co.
80 CROWN STREET.
BAKER and CATERER.
DINING ROOMS.
PURE ICB CREAM and tfANCX OAKE3
My Specialty.
825 Chapel Street
Three Years Old Has Gems tn Stav!
a time-tried tobacco siecific
good-rv
Certain to Stop the Practice Costs One
A DOCTOR'S RECIPE.
T aiflnna nf Tnat mnnnila T .-i
Address M. F. BRISTOL, Agent, No. 854
Chapel street, New Haven. apl7 tf
Storage Warehouses,
35 Olive Street and 2tt2 Whalley
Avenue.
Largest and most complete facilities in
tne scale.
Private apartments securely locked.
Packing and trausf erring. au7
U. S.' N.
Deck Paint.
A Paint for Floors,
Interior and Exterior.
Dries Hard in One Night
Hign u-loss iinisn.
Send for Circular.
THOMPSON & BELDEN,
396-398 State Street.
ftj'APOUO.l
gvaufllcvs' 5xtitle.
Kew York, Kow Haven and
IIartfordIt.lt.
June 13, 1897.
FOK NEW YOKK--4:05, 4:50, x6:10."
:00.. '8:00, 8:10, 8:30, 11:35, xl0:30
m '12:00, 12:05, n:3Q (parlor car UmK.
ed). '1:35. 2:1111 !.'in j.n.i .i.nn
. : - ' -v, w.vv, i.w,
4:J0, 5:10, 5:20. 6:35. 6:3(1. 7-m K-in
8:lo (Bridgeport. accommodation), 9:10, -:15
p. m. Sundays 4:05, 4:50, 8:00 a.
m., X4:30, x6:15. 7:10, 8:10, 8:15, 9:10
p. m.
FOR WASHINGTON via Harlem
Rrver-.-lrto, '11:60 p. m. (daily). .
FOR BOSTON via Sprlngfleld-'l:l6.
xl0:10, '11:05 a. m., '1:45, '5:52 p. in.
Sundays-'1:10 a. m., '5:52 p. m.
FOR BOSTON via, New London and
Provldence-'2:10, '2:20, '11:35 (parlor
car limited) a. m '12:05, '2:47, '4:20,
4:55, 6:65 p, m. Sundays '2:10, '2:20
a. m., '4:55, '6:55 p. m.
FOR MWDmiPXT -r-r . .n.,
SPRINGFIELD, etc.-'l:10, 6:40, 8:00.
xl0:10,10;50 , (Br White Mountains,
lVVk St0. Har"oN. n:05 a. m., 12:06
e nf'o ;i0,,6:00 6:52 fl:15 to Hartford),
8:05, 9:55, 11:15 (to Merlden) p. m. Sun-
71:1 m., 5:52, 8:28 p. in. '
NEW LONDON DIVISION
n rn ew Lo"don, etc. 2:10. '2:20,
A ' 11:0B 11;35 (Parlor car 11m
i; m,- 12:05' 2:47- 3:0. 4:C '4:20.
o i'a ,V.15.,(' Sayrlt June), 6:15, 6:55.
.I in ("i'for? acc- P- m- Sundaya
AIR LINE DIVISION '
For.Mlddletovm, Willimantic, etc.-l
V a".;1" 12:55' 2:33' 6:05 P- m. . Sun
days '7:15 p. m. Connecting at Mid
dletown with Valley Division and at
Wilimantic with the N. E. R. R. and
N. L. N. R. R.; at Turnervllie with Col.
Chester branch
NORTHAMPTON DIVISION
For Shelburne Falls, Turner's Falls,
Williamsburg, Holyoke, New Hartford,
and intermediate station 7:50 a. m.
and 4:00 p. m. For Westfleld and inter
mediate stations, 5:55 p. m. . ; .
For Farmington, New Hartford and
points this side 7:50 a. m., 12:04, 4:00,
5:55 p.- m.
BERKSHIRE DIVISION
For Derby Junction, Derby, Ansonla,
etc. 7:00, 8:00, 9:35 a. m., 12:00, 2:39,
4:00, 5:35, 7:50, 11:20 p. m. Sundays
8:10 a. m.. 8:30 r. m.
For Waterburv 7:00. s'trto a-as ' m
12:00. 2:39. 5:35. 7:50 d. m. Snndavs
8:10 a. m., 6:15 p. m. (via Naugatuck
Junction.) . 1
For Winsted 7:00. 9:35 a. m.. 2:39.
5:35, 7:50 D. m. Sundavs R:1n a m. fi:1K
p. m. (via Naugatuck Junction.)
For Sheltntl. 'Rntafnrrt xr
Danbury, Plttsfleld, State line 9:35 a.
i., :uu p. m. , 1 1 . -
For Albany, Buffalo. Detroit. Clncln.
nati, St. Louis. Chicaeo and the West
via State line 9:35 a. m.. 4:00 p. m. .
For, Litchfield and points on S.. T,. f
N. R. R. (via Derbv Junctions a
4:00 p. m. ' ; ' -, '
Express Trains. xLocal Kxpress.
C. T. HEMPSTEAD,
General Passenger Agent. '
New Haven Steamboat Co.
Summer Arrangement.
Double Dally Service.
Steamers from New Hnvon lo.n. nii
Dock. Old Line Pier: C. JJ. NnwpuiiS
10:30 a. in., and RICHARD PECK at 12-30
midnight. Sundays 3 p.. ui. and 12:30 mid
night. steamers rrom New York, leave Piers 21
and 26, East River: RICHARD PIOdK 3
. m. and 0. H. NORTHAM 12 midnight,
undays 9:30 a. m. and 12 midnight.
Fare S1.00. Excursion tickets, atinrt tn
15 days, $1.50. Sunday Excursion, $1.00.
Staterooms and tickets for sale at Peck
& Bishop's, 702 Chapel street, and at 'Mix's
drug store, cor. Chapel and Church sts.
A5i nuiium. i
Throueh rates quoted over ETnria
Freicht Lines to DOlnts West. South nH
Southwest, and through Bilis of Lading is
sued in connection therewith.
UHAS. 1. FRENCH, Agent.
STAKIN'S NEW HAVKN TRANS-1
DAILY EXCEPT SATURDAYS.
Steamer JOHN H. STARIN. Captain Mc-
Allster. leaves New Haven from Stnrln'a
Pier, foot of Brown street, at 10:15 p. m.
Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. Steam
er "KKASTUS uuuiNiiNU,-' uaptaln Spoor,
Mondays, weanesaays ana Fridays. The
STARIN leaves New York from Pier 13,
North River, at 9 D. in. Mondays. Wednes
days and Fridays. The "ERASTUS CORN
ING Sundays, ruesaays ana Tiiursuays.
Fare Toe ; excursion tickets state
rooms, ifl.tlU.
Tickets and staterooms for sale at J. B.
Judson's, 867 Chapel st.; Peck & Bishop's,
702 Chapel street; xontine jaoiei, ana A.
Goodman & Co.'s.
tfree stace leaves the dcrjot on arrival of
Hartford train, and from corner of Chnrch
and Chapel streets every half hour, com
mencing at 8:30 p.m. Through freight rates
given anu uuis ui uiuuik ishuvu iu points
West, South and Southwest.
C. H. FISHER, Agent
Order your freight via Starln Llae.
ANCHOR LINE.
United States Mail Steamship!
Sail from New York everr Satnrdav'if
GLASGOW VIA LONDONDERRY.
Ratos for Saloon Passage
CITY OP ROME. 60. Other Steimors, 859.
Second Cabin
Rome. 843.50. Furnessia, $37.50. Other
Strs., $35.
Stoerarc Passage
Rome. $25.50. Furnessia, 1)84.50. Othor
8t,rs., $23.50.
For now Illustrated Book or .Tours aul
further information, apply to HENDERSON
BROTHERS, General Atents. 7 Bowlinr
Oronn, New York; or M, B. Newton O)., il
Orange St., or Wm. Fltzpatriok 681 Oraal
ave,. or Pools & Bishop, 703 Chapel street.
Now Haven. jy7 3m
GLASGOW and NEW YORK
ALLAN . STATE LIMB. '
The Steamers of this favorite Line sail
from New York to Glasgow, calling at Mo-,
vllle (Londonderry), every alternate Friday.
Mongolian, Aug. 201 Mongolian, Sept. 17
Nebraska, Sept. 3Nebraskn, Oct 1
CABIN I'ASSAtJE:
$45 to $65, single; $00 to $123.30 Return.
v SECOND CABIN: ,
$33, single: $64.12 Return.
Steerage to Glasgow, Belfast, Londonder
ry. Liverpool. London or Queenstown,
S2K.50. Any Scandinavian port, $28.50.
For tickets, apply to M. B. Newton & Co..
86 Orange street ; A. Goodman & Co., bJ
Orange St.: Peck & Bishop, 702 Chapel St.;
John P. Cunningham. 730 Chanel St., New
Haven; or AUSTIN BALDWIN & CO.,
au8 tf 53 Broadway, New lork.
HORSES.
Two carloads just received.
Draft, Business, Coach, and
seveial well broke Saddlers.
Ample trial, and r erfect satis
faction guaranteed.
QMT?-nT w nuns t. no
154 Brewery Street. .

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