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The daily morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven, Conn.) 1894-1907, September 15, 1897, Image 6

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NEW HAVEKl MOBKiyG JOUKS,AL AKD COURIER. WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER V 1897.
Clara Barton, President of the Red Cress Society
The Indorsement by tie Red Cross Society of Br. Greene's itevora Means
Everything to fee Who Heed Medicine, for the Whole Aim
and Object of the Society is to Relieve Suffering.
Clara Barton, Head of the Most Benevolent Order on Earth, and Best
Known Woman in the Whole World, thus Gives the Encourage
ment of Her Own Word to Every Sufferer that Dr. Greene's Ner-
vura will Give Back Lost Health and Strength. One Has Only to
Use It to be Well and Strong.
Why will people continue to suffer and drag
out an unhappy and miserable existence o
sickness, pain, weakness and debility when
there is a remedy sure to cure ? Dr. Greene's
Kervura blood and nerve remedy is pro
nounced on every hand and by all classes of
people to be the most wonderful euro for dis
ease ever known. It cures where all others
fail. Physicians'declare Dr. Greene's Jferv
ura to be beyond doubt the grandest medical
discovery of this century and recommend and
prescribe it as the 6urest of all remedies to re
store health and strength, to make the sick
well and to relieve the weakness, debility , pain,
anguish and suffering of disease.
What higher commendation can this medi
cine have, what more convincing proof, what
more positive assurance that Dr. Greene's
Nervura blood and nerve remedy will surely
cure, than the recommendation and indorse
ment of the Red Cross Society through its
President, the world wide known and univer
sally loved and honored, Clara Barton, who
has brought relief to thousands ot the world's
MOURNING THE DEAD JURIST
WiySTED VAYS FINE TltlBVlE 'IO
tbm wonrn of iter sox.
Judge Fenn's Funeral, Yesterday Su
preme Court Members Were Honorary
Fall Bearers, and Superior Conrt Judges
Were Active Bearers Body lay In State
Action of the Army and Navy Club.
Winsted, Sept. 14. All Winsted is
'mourning to-day the death of the late
Augustus Hall Fenn, associate justice
of the supreme court of the state of
Connecticut, and the residents of tha
town in which the distinguished jurist
imade his home are assisted by. many
prominent men from all parts of the
Btate in paying the last tributes of
respect to the memory of Judge Fenn.
General sorrow prevadls at the loss of
the man, and there are everywhere ev
idences of the respect borne him.
Out of respect to th deceased busi
ness was suspended this afternoon.
From 1 until 8 o'clock all stores and
places of business were closed.
The Beardsley public library was
closed for the day. The town hall was
draped in black and the flag on the Gil
bert High school was floating at half
mast. The public funeral services were
Jield at 2 o'clock this afternoon in the
Second Congregational churoh.
This morning at 10:30 prayers were
said for the family at the late resi
dence of the deceased. Rev. Edward S.
""Ferry, pastor of the Methodist Episco
pal church, a warm friend of Judge
Fenn, officiated and none but members
cf the family attended.
At 11:30 the remains, accompanied by
a guard of honor from Palmer post, G.
A. R., of which Judge Fenn was a mem
ber, were taken to the Second Congre
gational church where, in the vestibule
the body lay in state from 12:30 until 2
o'clock.
The public ceremony was conducted
toy Rev. Mr. Ferry, assisted by Rev. N.
51. Calhoun, pastor of the church. Mr.
perry delivered the address. The hon
orary bearers were Judge Fenn's col
leagues on the supreme court bench,
Chief Justice Charles B. Andrews of
liitohfleld. Justice David Torrance of
Derby, Justice Simeon E. Baldwin of
iNew Haven, ex-Court Reporter John
Hooker of Hartford, Prof. Francis
Wayland, dean of the Yale law school;
and Governor Lorrin A. Cooke. The
active bearers were judges of the su
perior court, Judge Frederick B. Hall
of Bridgeport, Judge S. O. Prentice of
Hartford, Judge George W. Wheeler of
feridgeport,and ex-Judge Dwight Loom
is of Hartford.
The church was filled with friends
and acquaintances of the deceased.
There were delegations from the Army
and Navy club of Connecticut, of which
Judge Fenn was president, and from
the Litchfield County Bar association.
The interment took place in the family
lot In South cemetery.
Meeting Held of tbe Army and Navy Club
Its Tribute.
At a special meeting of the Army nml
T?avy Club of the State of Connecticut,
held at Winsted, Conn., on the 14th day of
September, 1897, the following was adopted
as the report of the committee appointed
to draft resolutions relative to Comrade
Lieut-Col. Augustus H. Fenn. Second Regi
ment Heavy Artillery, . Conn. Vols., a
Oudge of the Supreme Court of the State
of Connecticut, and President of this Asso
ciation, who died at Winsted, Conn., Sep
tember lith, 18!)7.
REPORT.
Lieut.-Col. Augustus H. Fenn was born
In Plymouth, Conn.. January IHtli, 1844,
and died at Winsted, Conn., September
12th, 1807. His ancestors were among the
first settlers of the colony of Connecticut,
and he inherited from them the sterling
end sturdy traits of character which en
' ablcd him to rise to positions of Influence,
trust, and confidence among his fellow men.
.The outbreak of the war found him pursu
ing his studies for his chosen profession,
but, feeliiiK his country's need of defend
ers, he laid down his books aud entered
the service. He enlisted lu Co. K. Second
Jteglment Heavy Artillery. Conn. Vols., ou
the Wth day of July, 18ti2, and was com
imUelnneri First Lieutenant. Ou Anrll i:ith.
1804, he was promoted captain of Co. ('. of
the same regiment; major January sum.
ikkr. TJent.-Col. by brevet April 0th. 1805.
aud mustered out of the service August
imh 1865. He participated in nil the en
gagements of his regiment, including tlio
iWUderuess campaign of 1864 and Cedar
Creek Va., October 19th, 1864, in which
latter' engagement lie lost his right arm,
and the surgeons proposed to muster him
out of service for disability, but he stren
uously objected and was detailed as assist
ant adjutant general of the brigade, and
Tvlthin seven weeks from the day his arm
was taken oft at the shoulder he was in
active service, and afterwards was in sev
eral battles. After Cedar Creek he was
Biade major and brevetted leutetiaiit colo
nel for bravery at Little Milors Creek.
At the close of the war Colonel Fenn re
turned the study of law In the office of
tellogg & Terry, lu Waterbury, and was
; Greene's Norvu
suffering, whoso crowning act of benevolent
charity in carrying to stricken Armenia, ships
laden with tiie tender mercies of charity is a
matter of history known to all the world.
Such is the world famous Clara Barton,
President of the Red Cross Society, and her
words in praise and recommendation of the
wonderful ctirer of disease, Dr. Greene's Ker
vura blood and nerve remedy, will be the
kiudling of new hope to thousands upon thou
sands of those who are sick, out of health,
weak, nervous, or who suffer from headaches,
rheumatism, neuralgia or other painful and
distressing disease, nervous affections or poor
and devitalized blood.
No suffering person certainly can hesitate
for an instant to immediately "secure and use
this grandest of medicines, Dr. Greene's Nerv-
ura, when the President of the greatest benovo
lent order on earth gives personal assurance
of the great value and wonderful health-giv
ing powers possessed by Dr. Greene s jNervura
Diooa and nerve remedy.
Clara Barton savs :
" We have tried Dr. Greene's Xervura blood
and nerve remedv and although the remedy
has been in our hands but a short time, we
admitted to the bar February 15tb, 1867.
He then studied one year in the law school
of Harvard university, receiving the degree
of Bachelor of Laws. He practiced in Wa
terbury for a year and in 1809 moved to
Plymouth, where he practiced until 1870,
holding the office of town clerk aud Judge
of probate, and In 1875 he was the republi
can candidate for secretary of state. In
1870 he removed to Winsted. where he had
since lived. He was judge of probate for
the Winchester district for seven years. In
1884 he was elected member of the house of
representatives in the general assembly
and served on the judiciary committee and
as house chairman of the committee on
forfeited rights. He was appointed by the
legislature on the committee to revise the
f rebate laws of the statu at this session,
n 1885 Governor Harrison appointed him
a member of the commission to revise tho
statutes of the state, the revision being
published in 1888. In 1887 Colonel Peiin
was nppointed a Judge of the Superior
court, and In 1893 he whs promoted to be
an associate justice of the Supreme court
for a term of eight years, which office he
held at the time of his decease.
He had been' a member of this associa
tion for many years an'd was elected its
president in lHfltl, and again In 1897.
He was a brave and enthusiastic soldier,
who met every situation with perfect com
posure, great firmness, and a personal mag
netism of rare quality; and yet was so
modest that with a record for courage and
dashing bravery, that but few could excel,
he could rarely be Induced to speak of his
personal experiences and actions upon the
field.
His civil record, like his military career.
Is stainless. In his dealings with men he
was Just and honorable.
He was broad-minded, manly, and honest.
He was liberal in spirit nnd generous to a
fault. He was as loyal to the state in civil
affairs ns he was true to his country in its
time of trial, and he was ever ready to
draw his sword in defense of the weak nnd
down-trodden and for the support of the
right.
He was an eminent jurist; a loyal and
Inveable associate; a true comrade; a kind
mid loving husband and father. In this
brief tribute but little can be expressed:
much must be left unsaid. But lo those
who knew him ns we knew him, nnd as his
friends and neighbors knew him, no record
Is needed to keep green in memory the re
membrance of this rare man. soldier, and
jurist, one of nature's noblemen, grand and
Irreproachable.
Therefore resolved: That this association
unites with the soldiers of this state, the
citizens of this commonwealth, and with
his hosts of friends, and the community in
which he lived. In expressions of deep re
gret and sorrow that lie was taken away
in the prime of his usefulness and In the
vlcor of his manhood.
Resolved: That this association tender to
his widow and family Its sincere condo
lences. Resolved: That this tribute to the mem
ory and worth of our departed president he
entered upon the records of our association
and that copies be sent to his family.
Official: DAVID TORRKNCK.
W. T. RATCHKIXRR,
ALFRED B. BEERS.
Committee.
SIMEON J. FOX. Vice President.
J. N. COE, Secretary pro tern.
Nelson K. lioomls.
Nelson E. Loomis, aged seventeen
years and six months, died September 7
at the home of his parents, William A.
and Frazalea Loomis, 58 Winter street.
He was a graduate of Chllds' business
college, and an expert bookkeeper In
the employ of the Winchester Repeat
ing Arms company, where he gave ex
cellent satisfaction and was universally
liked by his superiors and his fellow
employes. Some time ago at an outing
of the Young Men's Republican club,
of whloh he was a valued member, he
contracted a heavy cold that settled on
his lungs, causing a fatal complication.
During his long Illness he was attend
ed by the best of medical skill, and
everything possible was done to save
his life. At his own request ''Divine
Healer" Schrader was called in, but
his efforts were of no avail. Frequent
ly during his illness a great number of
floral remembrances were sent him by
his friends and fellow clerks and there
were a host of callers at the saddened
home dally to learn how he was getting
along.
To the great sorrow of his many
friends and the unspeakable grief of
his family he passed away on the 7th
of this month. Deceased was a consist
ent member of Summerfleld M. E.
church, a young man of excellent hab- ;
its and exceptional character. The fun- j
eral was held on September 12. Rev.
J. Balfour Smith, his pastor, officiating, j
There was a large and sorrowing at- j
tendance of friends. Interment was in i
Evergreen cemetery. The pallbearers
were Henry L. Coggeshall, S. Marshall,
G. Jonovan, A. Fields, A. Norton and
P. Henry.
The funeral arrangements were in
charge of Undertaker Theodore Keiler.
PAINTING THE ARMORY.
To-day workmen will commence
painting the interior of the armory,
which te to be repainted and kalsomin
ed throughout. R. B. Bradley has the
contract for the work. These repairs,
which are much needed, were determin
ed upon by Quartermaster General
Von Keuscn on his visit to the armory
last week.
judge that tho remedv lias all of the merits
. r1, . , " !. . ..till
wnica are ciaanea ior n. e oimn m uiu
ilnue its use, with thu expectation that we shall
be able to indorse it still more highly.
CLARA BARTON,
President of the American National Red Cross,
Washington, D. C."
Dr. Greene's Ncrvura blood and nerve
remedv is indorsed and recommended by more
people' whom it has cured, more physicians,
more hospitals and moro charitable societies
than anv other remedy in the world, and if
you wish to be made well and strong again, if
you wish health to take the place o disease,
if yon wish to know what it is to be without
pain, weakness, nervousness, humours or in
deed any kiud of norvous and physical suffer
ing, take Dr. Greene's Ncrvura blood and
nerve remedy.
Dr. Greene's Nervura is rot a patent medi
cine, but the prescription of Dr. Greene of 35
West 14th St., New York City, the most suc
cessful physician in curing diseases, and is,
therefore, exactly and perfectly adapted to
cure. Consultation, examination and advice
in regard to any case may be had free at Dr.
Greene's office, either if you om or write.
MERIDEN ELECTRIC ROAD.
Old Officers Re-Elected at the Annual
Meeting.
Meriden, Sept. 14. At the annual
meeting of the Meriden Electric Rail
road company, held this afternoon, the
following old offlblals were elected:
President Colonel N. H. Heft,
Bridgeport.
Secretary-treasurer W. L. Squire,
Meriden.
Directors N. H. Heft, Judge J. M.
Hall, New Haven; J. W. Mix, Yales
ville; J. C. Byxbee, E. J. Doolittle, C.
L. Rockwell and J. L. Btllard, all of
Meriden.
PICTURED THE KLONDIKE.
"Klondike and Alaska" was the in
teresting theme of F. C. Southard's
stereopticon lecture at the Hyperion
last evening. Mr. Southard treated his
subject in a manner at once instructive
and interesting to those who had as
sembled for the purpose of hearing
something of this distant gold field.
The pictures shown by Mr. Southard
were excellent, being carefully chosen
for the purpose of exhibiting the sal
ient features of the country. In the
course of his lecture Mr. Southard gave
many facts about the country and the
difficulty and cost of reaching the
Klondike.
j Dr. W". G. Anderson of the Yale uni
j versity gymnasium will be present at
the opening of the Meriden Y. M. C. A.
I gymnasium, September 28, and deliver
j an address.
HIGHEST GRADE DM PRODUCTS.
Pasteurized Milk
AND
Pasteurized Cream.
Our Pasteurized Milk Is a perfect food.
Our Pasteurised Oretm will whip In froai
two to three minutes.
FOR SALh, Hi GROCBR3.
Dally Delivery to Families.
M. B. andF. S. HUBBELL,
MAPLH BILL IT ARM.
NrthfoH, Conn,
Office 2M W coster street.
weicpbon U3-V,
Plumbing and Gasfitting
J. 11. Buckley, 179 Church S
THE APOLLO LAMP the most ocouora
ical Lamp ever manufactured consumes
oulv 2"t cubic feet of gas per hour; less
than any other Lamp in the market. The
Apollo Lamp can be adjusted to any Gas
Fixture, is adupted for natural, coal or gas
oline gas, and is provided with an Auto
matic Regulator, which prevents the break
ing of chimneys by a sudden increase of
stab pressure.
The APOLLO MANTLES are the most
durable ever manufactured: they are made
in any desired tint. The Orange Light be
Ing the best adapted for private dwellings,
ns It is free from that ghastly hue so ob
lectlonable to the ladles. The Blue-White
Light is the best for stores and where the
greatest possible candle-power Is wanted.
These Mantles are suspended from the top
like a bell, by a loop of material, same as
that from which the Mantles are made.
There is nothing to burn off and destroy
the Mantles, and their being suspended
from the top prevents any sudden jar from
breaking them, as Is emmon with other
Mantles. THR ARNOLD CO.. Sole Agents.
STATF. AND CROWN' STREETS.
for the Treatment nnd Cure of.
LIQUOR, MORPHINE
kBia narcouc urug noons.
i mined male ana ii-ui.e
Mmtrses. Send for iiluetrated
I OaUlcrrm. TeleuHom?. Addr.
1 DR. KOBE'S 8AHZTARIUU,
(fi!": Witifl'niii. Luiin.
Jy2 eod orm
t AP0UC;
BREWING INTERESTS UNITED.
Colonel Pahst Married Miss Lemp,
Whose Father is a Millionaire Brewer.
Ventnor, Isle of Wight, Sept. 14.
Colonel Gustav Pabst, a son of the Mil
waukee millionaire brewer, was mar
ried here -to-day to Miss Hilda Lemp, a
daughter of the millionaire brewer, ot
St. Louis. The ceremony took place at
noon. There were a number of Amer
ican guests at the wedding, and after a
dinner at the Royal Marine hotel .the
couple started for the continent.
The bridegroom was previously mar
ried to Margaret Mather, the actress,
from whuin he was recently divorced.
Colonel Pabst's brother, Frederick, re
cently married Miss Union, daughter of
the head of the Schiltz brewery.
MERIDEN FAIR.
It Begins To-Day and Will Continue
for Three Days.
'The tenth annual fair and races of
the Meriden Agricultural society com
mence to-day and will continue for
three days, September 15, 16 and 17,
To-dny there will be the bicycle races,
for which there Is a very large list of
entries, and there will be some fine
sport. To-day also will be "Cattle
Day."
DIED IN WESTYILLE.
Mrs. Elizabeth G. Martin, widow of
the late William Martin, died yesterday
after a lingering illness at the home of
her daughter on Two John street in
Westvllle, which Is near Main street in
the vicinity of the Pond Lily laundry.
The regimental shooting range Is upon
the land bordering the house. The age
of the deceased lady was seventy-six
years and nine months.
COLORED MASONIC GRAND LODGE
Ansonla, Sept. 14. The unnunl con
vention of the colored Grand lodge, F.
and A. M is being held here to-day
and will continue through to-morrow.
Delegates are present from all the
lodges in the state, and representatives
from' grand lodges In adjacent states.
Two sessions were held to-day, and -an
entertainment was held this evening.
A YALE MAN.
President of Lake Forest University.
. Chicago, Sept. 14. The Rev. James
G. K. McClure has been elected presl
dent of Lake Forest university. He
was born in Albany, N. Y., in 1848
graduated from Yale In 1870, and from
Princeton Theological seminary in 1873.
I. O. O. F." GRAND ENCAMPMENT,
The grand encampment of the Inde
pendent Order of Odd Fellows will be
held in Stamford October 19,' and all
past officers of the order In Connecticut
will be entitled to seats.
EX-EMPRESS OF MEXICO DYING.
Brussels, Sept. 14. Carlotta, ex-em
press of Mexico, is dangerously ill. Her
death is feared at any moment.
Is
AND
Him:;.
The largest stock, the new
est designs, the choicest col
orings, ever shown by any
INew Haven carpet house.
We can please you ; the
qualities and the prices of our
goods are right, and we em
ploy none but competent
workmen.
At present we are showing
an especially large line of car
pet sizes in Rugs, at prices
that speak for themselves.
Try us. -
fiioins
68, 70, 73 Orange Street.
Open Saturday Evenings.
Read Our Offer to All !
Who return to us a bottle wrapper, we will
mail n handsome photograph.
The medicine will do you good. The plio
J?.'UL please you. Address MONARCH
; Kr.iUUiiKS CO., P. O. Box 1193. New Ha-
yen. Conn. Sold by all druggists. Price
: 5(1 eentn
Ve Give Trading Stamps
For Credit or Cash.
FUitmUKE, CARPETS, Etc.
699 Chapel street, New Haven, Conn.
Below the Krldge.
EVEKY ARTICLE GUARANTEED.
See our $:25.O0 Fully Guaranteed Bicycle
aud euquire about instalments.
Character is Credit.
Fall Cm
BICYCLE
SURPRISES.
We have a few hew
standard bicycles that
are slightly shopworn.
These wheels
are fully guaranteed
aud are
offered at the lowest
prices ever known
for such high-grade quality.
New Bicycles.
Prices for this Sale.
One '97 Crescent Racer 47.oO
One '06 Crescent Racer $37.50
One '07 Crescent, No. 1, High Frame,
Price S7;i ou.w
One '07 Orescent, No. 1, 24 Inch
I ra me, Price io
53.00
Three '07 Crescent, No. 4, Ludles',
rnce ;a
One '90 Crescent, No. 4, Lady's $.iu.wi
Ono 'DO Crescent, No. 5, Lady's, 26
Inch wheels .....fJ.ou
One ".W Crescent, No. fi, Girl's, 24
luch wheels . $18.00
One '97 Crescent, No. 5, Girl's, 20
Inch wheels "
One '97 Crescent, No. G, Girl's, 24
Incli wheels $30.00
Ono '97 Crescent, No. 8, Little Girl's,
HO inch wheels ..... -u.m
One '97 Crescent, No. 3, Roys', 24
Inch wheels $32.50
One '97 United States, Lady's wheel,
regular $100; this sale $59.00
One '97 Sterling, Lady's wheel, regu
lar $100; this sale $io.00
One '97 Princeton, Lady's wheel, reg
ular $.r.0.00; this sale $39.a0
One '97 Sterling, Men's, slightly used,
this sale SOo.00
One ''.! Sterling, Men's slightly
used $4i.00
One '96 Sterling Racer, regular S12o;
slightly used $9.00
About a dozen Second-hand Wheels
of different makes, at from $5.00
to $50. Hargains, every one.
REMEMBER
These bicycles are
of standard makes
that always
command their full price.
H,
6 Church Street.
OPEN EVERY EVENING.
Telephone 852-3.
jewelers.
Ire You Interested
in the
Early Colonial Times ?
We have a remarkably strik
ing "Colonial pattern" in all
the different pieces in Sterling
silver.
C. J. la, Jr., Ko.
861 Chapel Street,
WELLS & GUNDE,
Watchmakers and Jeweler.
Full Mne 8terli.i; Sllrer and
Mirer Elated Hare.
KIMBAL'S ANTI-RHEUMATIC RINGS
No 788 Chapl Strst
fl ISN'T IT CUTE ?
1 PURCHASED
THIS L9VELY
L9RGNETTE
I CflAIN rROM
rne jeweler
55 CiURCM STREET
" OPPOSITE POST OFFICE.
L. W. ROBINSON.
ARCHITECT
Removed lo
No. 760 Chapel Street.
STORAGE.
Furniture, Pianos, Pictures,
Merchandise, Carriages, etc.
Lowest rates and safety
guaranteed. Goods packed and shipped
to all parts of the world ; by
experienced handlers.
SIEDLEY BROS. & CO.,
St-'? State -tree.
171 Brewery Street.
VAULTS and CESSPOOLS
FARNHAM.
l'nces low im toutiiuciiuii guaranteed.
Orders left at
BUADI.EV & LtANN'S. 406 State st
, ,1".V"FV1;1T-'U SON'S. 074 Chapel
LlivbLIiY & LIGHTBOURN'8. 33 iSfwir
will receive prompt attention. P. O
Adtlreau Box bii. Telephone 425-12.
I
gUctjclcs.
Bicycle Barpins.
We have no job lots or bankrupt stock
of irresponsible manufacture or of a ques
tionable guaranty to offer you.
Remember
that u cheaply made machine of any kind
Is dear at any price.
Our Goods
are all made by manufacturers having a
worldwide reputation; who are financially
sound, and whose guaranty Is as good ns
"Klondike Gold."
Our Prices
are Just as attractive ns those of goods of
Inferior quality. Give us a call and decide
for yourself.
The VERU Bicycle & Rub
ber Co.,
156-158 Orange Street,
NEW HAVEN, CONN.
Just North of Chapel Street.
Call and See
our
Alert Special,
Made by Packer Mfg. Co.,
$45.00.
Also agents for
E. Howard, $100. Phasnix. Sf 00.
Packsr, SBll to $103.
Stormer, $30 to $70.
All kinds of repairing en bicycles.
R. J.KIRBY&'CO.,
180 Orange Street.
Handing them down to you
at riffht prices. My guaran
tee is liberal. Fresh stock only.
ARTHUR GRIGGS.
- 7 CENTER STREET.
Three doors from Orange Street.
Tie Triiinni is a Winner.
If yon want to be Id the race, ride a
"BLUE STREAK"
and you won't be long. '
Tribunes, Charter Oaks and Eurekas.
PRICES RIGHT.
JOHN BROWN,
153-107 GKOUOSB STHEET
Open Monday and Saturday Evenings.
THERACYCLE.
WHY NOT RIDE THE BEST?
The Racycle with Its nanrow tread. The
only Wheel on earth with chain and
sprocket pull Inside the ball races. Do you
know what this means ? Come In and ex
amine It at 360 STATE STREET.
SILAS GALPIK -,
UsccUanccms.
JS. LEWIS'
Storage Warehousas,
35 Olive Street and MJt . Whaltoy
Avenue.
Largest and most complete facilities In
the State.
Private apartments securely locked.
Packing and transferring. au7
PureP:
URE JTROVISION JT LACES
Church and Elm Streets.
375 Edgewood Ave.
Woodmont-at-the-shore.
Fast as fall goods show
themselves, we get them.
Fast as Ave get them, you
get them if you order.
We are bound to buy
and sell whatever pure
groceries, pure meats, pure
vegetables and pure fruits
are most seasonable. Any
other course would bank
rupt us.
Telephone J267.
The R. H. NESBIT CO.
New York, Kew Haven and
Hartford II. R.
June ia, iaai.
FOR NEW YOfUC 4:05, '4:60, xC:10,
7:00,. 8:00, "8:10. 8:30, '9:35, xl0:30 a.
m 12:00. 12:05, 1:30 (parlor car limit
ed), 'lo, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, '4:00, '4:17,
:30, 5:10, 5:20, 6:35, 6:30, 7:10. 3:10,
S:15 (Bl'icleeDort Mnmmndi Hni .u.-liY
9:15 p. m. Sundays 4:05, '4:50, 8:00 a!
.ou, xo:io, :io, d:10, 8:15, "3:10
P. m.
FOR WASHINGTON via Harlem
1:05 11:50 P- m- (daily). '
;OR BOSTON via Springfleld-n:10.
xlO:lo, m-.OS a. m., 1:45. 5:62 p. m.
fcundays-l:lo a. m., 5:52 p. m.
FOR BOSTON via- New London ana
Provldence-2:10, '2:20, U:35 (parlor
i kk . d) a' m" 1;i:05, 2:47. '4:20,
4:55, G:55 p. m. Sundays 2:io, '2:20
i -o;o; p, m.
MERIDEN. HATtTTTvmn.
fo-lo S5?-5L& etc'-,l. 6:40. 8:00
flrSfttop WhUe Mountain,.
1-45 t in K-7in U:0d a- m- 12:otf.
NEW LONDON DIVISION '
-Tatew LonJon. etc.-2-10 -"
J edS I ' 11:25 U:35 parlor car lim-'
9 10 (r,l?aybr0k Junc'' :BB.
2 10 .I 20 R KnaCC') m- Sunaayt
AIR LINE DIVISION '
For Mlddletov-n, Willlmantlc. etc-
12:55, 2:33' 6:05 p'
m' Connecting at Mid-
TiUh VaIley division and at
Vvilllmantic with the M. E. R. R. and
h" I V R- R-; 81 '-rumervlUe with Col.
Chester branch
NORTHAMPTON DIVISION
' For Shelburne Falls, , Turner' Falls.
Williamsburg. Holyoke, New Hartford,
and intermediate station 7:50 a. m.
and 4:00 p. m. For Westfield and Inter,
mediate stations. 5:55 p. m.
For Farmington, New Hartford and
points this side 7:50 a. m., 12:04, 4:00.
5:55 d. m.
BERKSHIRE DIVISION
For Derby Junction, Derby, Ansonla,
etc. 7:00, 8:00, 9:35 a. m., 12:00, 2:39,
4:00, 6:35, 7:50, 11:20 p. m. Sundays
8:10 a. m., 8:30 p. m.
,F-Sr Watertury 7:00. 8:00, 9:35 a. m..
12:00, 2:39. 5:35, 7:50 p. m. Sundays
8:10 a. m., 6:15 p. m. (via Naugatuck
Junction.)
For Wlnntod 7-nn o.oie n.n
C or n ' O- ill..
6. 85, 7:60 p. m. Sundays 8:10 a, m., 8:15
i via in augatucK Junction.)
For Shelton, Botsford, Newtown,
Danbury, Pittsfleld. State line 9:35 a.
in., 4:00 p. m. v. .
For Albany, Buffalo, Detroit, Clncin.
natl, St. Louis, Chicago and the West,
via State line 9:35 a. m., 4:00 p. m. -
For Litchfle'ld and points on S., L. Si
N. R. R. (via Derby Junction) 9:35 a.
m., 4:00 p. m.
'Express Trains. xLocal Express.
C. T. HEMPSTEAD,
Cfeneral Passenger Agent
New Haven Steamboat Co.
Summer Arrangement-
Double Daily Service. .
Steauiuis tioui iNew Haveu leave Bella
Dock, Old Line lJler: V. H. NOliTHAM
10:30 a. m., and RICHARD PECK at 12:30
midnight. Sundays 8 p. m. and 12:80 iuld
night.
Steamers from New York leave Piers 24
and ai. East Klver: KICHAKD l'ECK 1
p. m. and C. H. NORTHAM 12 midnight.
Sundays U:80 a. m. and la midnight
Fare $1.00. Excursion tickets, good for
15 days, $1.50. Sunday Excursion, $1.00.
Staterooms and tickets for sale at Peck
& Bishop's, 702 Chapel street, and at Mix's
drug store, cor. Chapel and Church sts.
FAST FREIGHT.
Through ' rates quoted over Express
Freight Lines to points West, South, and
Southwest, and through Bills of Lading Is.
sued in connection therewith.
CHAS. I. FRENCH. Agent.
STAKIN'S NEW HAVKN MtAJfS-
DAILY EXCtiii'x SAlCiiDAVS.
Steamer JOHN H. ST AKIN, Captain Me.
Allster, leaves New Haven from Starln's
Pier, foot of Brown street, at 10":16 p. m.
.Miinlu.v.1, Tuesuays and Thursdays. Steam
er "KUASTUS CORNING." CaDtsIn Rnnnr
I Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. The
BLAlVlit jenveo new xuiu ituiu jrier lo.
North River, at p. in. Mondays, Wednes
days and Fridays. The "ERASTUS CORN
ING" Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays.
Fare 75c; excursion tickets $1.25. State
rooms, $1.00.
Tickets and staterooms for sale at i. B.
Judson's, 867 Chapel St.; Peck'& Bishop's,
702 Chapel street; Tontine Hotel, and A.
Goodman & Co.'s.
Free stage leaves the depot on arrival ot
Hartiora xrain, aim irum comer 01 unurcn
and Chapel streets every half honr, com
mencing ac o:au p.m. lurougn ireigai rates
given and bills of lading Issued to point
West. South and Southwest.
C. H. FISHER. Agent
Order your freight via Starin Line.
ANCHOR LINE.
United Stares Mall Steaniihtpj
Knit from Nnw York ever? Saturtlav t
GLASGOW VIA JAKVDOND4UBY. '
Rates for Suloon Passage
CITY OF KOMlS, 6U. Ocuer rke uuorj, .
Second Cabin
Home. S-00. Furnessl. $37.50. Other
Strs., S35.
9te()vao Passage 1
Rome. 85.50. Furuessla, $U4.S. Other
Strs.. S83.50.
For new Illustrated Book of Tours ajjl
furtuer Information, apply to HENDERSON
BROTHERS. General AtrentS. 1 Bowling
G ieen. Now York; or M. B. Newton i)x, i :
1 urange sc., ur wm. I'uzpatriu, t
i are., or Pooi a Bishop, 783 Ouapel st -eot,
iNew Haven. Jy73m
GLASGOW and NEW YORK
ALLAN STATE LINE.
Tue bteauiurs of tins iuvoriiu Line sail
from New York to Glasgow, calling at Mo
ville (Londonderry, every alternate li'rlduy.
iliiiiibu. 1.111 ijeijieuiuer xi, a. lu.
statu ot .Nebraska October 1, 8 a. m.
1 Mongolian October lo, 2 p. in.
State 01 oiir:iHiv:' ticrooer 1, a u. iu-
CABIN PASSAGE:
Mo to $W5, single; W to $123.50 Return.
SECOND CABIN:
$35, single; $G4.U Return.
Steerage to Glasgow. Belfast, Londonder
ry, Liverpool. London- or QueeiiHtown,
$'23.50. Any Scandinavian port, $28.50.
For tickets, apply to M. B. Newton Sc Co..
CH Orange street ; A. Goodman & Co., 87
Orange St.; Peck & Bishop, 702 Cbapel st;
John D. Cunningham, 73S Chapel St.. New
Haven; or AUSTIN BALDWIN & CO..
au8 tf S3 Broadway, New York.
AMERICAN LINE.
Nr.i Ivjitii tjuUTiiAill'TuN (London
Paris.) Sailing every Wednesday at 10 a. m.
ST. LOLIS, Sept. 22iST. LOUIS, Oct. IS
PARIS. Sept. 2ilPARIS. Oct 20
ST. I'AI'L. Oct. CST. PAVt,. Oct. 27
RED STAR LINE.
WESTERNLAND. Wed'day. Sept. 22. noon
SOUTHWARK. Wed'silay. Sept. 29, 11 a.m.
I XOORIU.AM), Wertppsday. Oct. O. noon
j FBI KM.AXl). Wflm sitnv. Oct. 1:;. noon
I International XavigatlonOompanr,
! I'it;. .oircu i.uer, lion liiig Urei-n,
New York; Peck & Bishop, 7(K1 Chanel st,
M. Zumier & Sous. 2.":i Mate St.. M. B. New-,
: ton. 86 Orange St.. Tims. H. Pease & Son.
' 102 Church st, New Haven.
I

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