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The daily morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven, Conn.) 1894-1907, September 13, 1899, Image 6

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020358/1899-09-13/ed-1/seq-6/

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NEW HAVEN MORNING JOURNAL AND COURIER, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1899.
GOLDEN EAGLE KNIGHTS
VSANTD CA STLE'S annua l meeting
HELD YESTERDAY.
sMetand Dined at Savin Hook Iluslueas
, Season Held aud Officers Kleoteil
Other Work of the Day.
: The Grand castlo of the Knights of
the Golden Eagle, held its eleventh an
nual session in the Hotel Seaview at
Savin Rock yesterday. The castles in
this city are Luxemburg, No. 1; Crusad
ers, No. 3; Rock, No. 8; Columbia, No.
9; Winthrop, No. 10, and Martha Wash
ington, ' No. 2, an auxiliary castle.
The grand officers of the past year
.were: ' Grand chief, Harry Mastln of
Danbury; vice chief, John W. Hutt of
this city; master of records, A. B. Rey
nolds of Bridgeport; chief of exchequer,
George A. Sanford of New Haven.
The business session was opened at 10
a. m. with Grand Chief Mastln in the
chair. The report of the grand chief
was read. He reported that the order
in the state was In the same prosperous
condition as it was when he assumed
the duties of the office a year ago, but
he regretted that the sir knight's did not
attend the meetings In larger numbers
and make a more determined effort to
get new members Into the order.
Among those who were present at the
morning's session were the following;
From Danbury, H. G. Mastpn, John K.
Bliss, Sidney Smith, Jarvis Pugsley, II.
Starr, Wildman and Malcolm Mollan.
, From New Britain S. W. Clark, W.
H. Eoden, Peter Ford, G. W." Hall, Er
nest Niebling, H. H. Doming, A. J. Be
noit, Gua Hart, D. F. Butler, J. K.
Chapman, E. L. Morse and George II,
Norton.
From Bridgeport C. J. Hathaway,
George H. Wood, H. H. Vlckere, Wil
liam Willngton, Fred Eichel, and
Charles W. Lamb.
Several recommendations were made
In the report, such as that the grand
castle should hold semi-annual instead
of annual sessions, and that the per
icaplta be reduced from 60 to 50 cents
per annum. Dlscusison was had on
these matters when adjournment was
taken for dinner, which was provided in
Landlord Cameron's best style and was
heartily enjoyed.
After the dinner the castle reassem
bled and took up the consideration of
the business of the order.
From New Haven present were John
."vWHutt, Charles E. Jones, George A,
Sanford J. A. Walker, A. Lumsden, M.
S. Wadham, J. A. Bishop, F. W. Spen
cer. Eli Manchester, R. F. Green, J. O.
Wick, Edward MacFarlane, James Mac
Tarlane, l3aac MacFarlane, Robert
MacFarlane, W. C. Lambert, T. J.
Smith, Thomas F. Kelly, Ernest A. Gog
ler, Fred O. Simpson, F. R. Burnham,
John Dixon, C. E. Jones, John E.
Thompson, J. A. Bramley, C. W. Ross,
F. P. Co-well, W. C. Foote, Wilbur R.
Davis, H. W. Vanderbilt, C. E. Hen
drickson, W. E. Beardsley, G. W. Short,
Richard W. Kirck, and W. W. Hub
bard. The following grand officers ware
elected:
Grand chief John W. Hutt of Rock
castle No. 8 of this city.
Grand vice chief Eli Manchester of
Crusaders' castle No. 3 of this city.
Grand high priest C. E. Jones of
New Britain, a member of Columbia
castle No. 9 of this city.
Grand master of records John Dixon
of Columbia castle No. 9.
Grand keeper of exchequer W. Wad
hams of1 Winthrop castle No. 10 of this
city.
Grand sir herald John A. Walker of
Bock castle No. 8.
Grand first guard J. A. Hathaway of
Bridgeport
Grand second guard Mr. Benoit of
Srving castle. New Britain.
Past grand chief Mr. Masten of New
Britain.
Trustee G. H. Wood bf Bridgeport.
About two hundred delegates were
present, and at the shore dinner speech
es were made by Grand Supreme Chief
Hunter of New Jersey, Past Chief Lam
bert, Grand Chief-elect Hutt, Grand
iVice Chief-elect ' Manchester, Past
Grand Chief Harry Leigh and Past
Chief Roden of New Britain.
Last evening a large number of the
Helegates, the grand officers-elect and
(past chiefs attended by special invita
tion the regular meeting of Columbia
castle Nt. 9 at A. O. U. W. hall in Fair
Haven. After the lodge meeting an
oyster supper was served in honor of
the guests.
Yesterday afternoon an association of
the past chiefs of Connecticut was
formed, with W. C. Lambert of this
city temporary president and John E.
Thompson of this city temporary sec
retary. Delegates were present at the Grand
eastle meeting from New Haven, Meri
den, Bridgeport, Darien, New Britain
land Danbury.
WAhT.TNnrOliD.
John Kennedy arrived home yesterday
tnorning from Berkeley Springs, Va
nnd reports that the man killed by the
cars at that place was not his brother
Thomas, but a man fully eight years
Older. The body was exhumed and the
Investigation revealed the fact that the
victim was an entire stranger. A
memorandum book was found in his
pocket and on one of the leaves wa9
written the address of Thomas Ken
nedy, Wallilngford, Conn. It is sup
posed that the stranger musit some
where in his travels have met Thomas
Kennedy and that he wrote his address
down in his book. Kennedy found upon
looking at the body that the man had
a beard and was about twenty-four
years of age, while his brother Thomas
is not yet eighteen and fully twenty
live pound lighter than the mnrv kWrd
James McGaughey was successfully
operated on for appendicitis in Hart
ford by Dr. Johnson yesterday morning
and is getting along finely.
Mrs. Hubbard Jones, a lifelong and
much respected resident of the east
feide of town, died at 10 o'clock yester
day morning, aged eighty-nine years.
She leaves a son, Henry Jones, and one
daughter, Mrs. Cortiss Sutlief of Main
etreet. Funeral Thursday afternoon at
2 o'clock.
Yesterday's recorded real estate
transfers were: Warren & Moody of
Boston to C. H. Brunelli, lots Nos. 14,
17, 18, 27, 32 and 33 on Highland park
on the west side of town.
Horace Botsford has the contract for
the mason work and H. B. Sherman the
wood work on the new front on Cur-
ran's block, corner of Center and Col
ony streets.
Quite a delegation of relatives and
friend from here will attend the golden
wedding of Mr. aud Mrs. Norris B. Mix
in Centerville this evening.
Several of those crooked electric light
poles were placed In position on Hall
avenue yesterday.
Rosemary hall and Choate's School
for Boys will reopen October 2.
The total number of pupils in the
schools of the Central district enrolled
was 1,493.
The Wallingfurd saloonkeepers will
go to Branford by 'bus to-day and
play a return gadie of ball.
There was no bund concert last even
ing as at the meeting of the band it
was decided not to give any concert this
week.
The selectmen and town clerk will be
in session Saturday, September 23,
from 9 to 5 o'clock, to make new vot
ers. Mr. and Mrs. Frafray Hale and son,
Fraray, Jr., started yesterday forMa
nilus, N. Y. where Fraray, Jr., will en
ter the military school.
During the month of August there
were fourteen births, fifteen deaths and
no marriages.
There will be a cake sale at the Meth
odist church from 3 to 5 o'clock this af
ternoon. George Carr will on October 1 give up
his position as watchman at Hall &
Elton Co.'s and go to Virginia, where he
owns a form.
WILL LEAVE FOR PLYMOUTH.
Mrs. Charles A. Baldwin, wife of the
assessor, and her daughter, Mips Lena
Baldwin, with Miss "Fannie E. Baldwin,
a niece of General Harmon, will leave
to-day for ten days on a visit to Ply
mouth, Mass.
THE PARIS TELESCOPE OF 1900.
A Gigantic Instrument Making For
the Exposition of the End of the Cen
tury.
One of the most remarkable features
of the coming universal exhibition will
be the gigantic telescope with which as
tronomers in 1900 and succeeding years
will explore the heavens. Hitherto
merely vague ideas have been formed
in regard to this great siderostat which
is of such deep Interest to the scienti
fic world, but last Sunday the writer
chanced to meet M. Eugene Antoniadi,
assistant astronomer of the Juvlsy ob
servatory, who with great courtesy,
placed at the disposal of the readers of
the Tribune such facts and information
as will present a precise and accurate
description of this marvelous instru
ment. It was at the inlative of M. Francois
Deloncle, minister plenipotentiary In the
French diplomatic service, that a group
of amateur astronomers decided to de
vise for the international exhibition an
instrument of exceptional dimensions
and power.far exceeding anything before
attempted. With this end in view, it
was determined to give the object glass
a diameter of 1.25 meters, or 49-2 inches
that is, 9.2 inches more than that of the
celebrated Yerkes glass of Williams
Bay, Wis., and 13.2 inches larger than
that of the Lick telescope, at Mt. Ham
ilton, Cal. In order to utilize such an
aperture to the best advantage, and es
pecially to check as far as possible the
obnoxious effect of chromatic aberra
tion, it was decided not to subordinate,
as usual, the optical work to mechanical
difficulties by a reduction of the focal
distance, hut boldly to give the tube the
enormous length of 60 meters, or nearly
200 feet.
To mount such an Instrument on an
ordinary equatorial foot would be prac
tically impossible, for, to say nothing
of the tremendous weight of the tube
and the consequent instability and flex
ures to which it wosMd be expos:d, the
dome destined to protect it ought to
have a diameter of at least 210 feet, or 72
feet larger than the cupola of St. Peter's
in Rome, and 103 feet more than the
dome of St. Sophia at Constantinople.
But this Is not all. Owing to the ap
parent diurnal swing of the heavens
around the polar star, the dome ought
during the observation to be in constant
motion, so as to have its opening al
ways in front of the object-glass, mov
ing with a velocity of 53 feet an hour.
The eye-piece would, of course, also
move at a corresponding pace, and it Is
obvious that the acrobatic feats the ob
server would have to accomplish in or
der to follow the movements of the in
strument would better suit a vigorous
athelete than the delicate frame of the
man of science.
These difficulties have been surmoun
ted by the wise conclusion of the com
mittee to adopt the siderostat type of
mounting, such as has been perfected
by the French physicist, Leon Foucault,
a man of remarkable mechanical genius.
M. Antoniadi uses the expression "per
fected by Foucault" advisedly, because
he points out that the principle of the
siderostat was known a hundred years
ago, when a clever London optician
named Brown constructed "a telescope
whose tube was always horizontal, and
in which a plane mirror reflected the
image of the object to the eyepiece."
The sierostat thus contest's of a flat
mirror, so mounted that when clock
work motion is applied to it It will
stnd in the same fixed direction the rays
Impinging upon it from a heavenly
body. A telescope directed along the
reflected beam will then enable the ob
server to scrutinize the object without
troubling himself about the motion.
The fixd tube of the great Paris re
flector Is of steel, very slightly less than
inch thick, and weighs some 21 tons.
Its diameter is 59 inches. The cylinder
is formed of 24 seperate parts, screwed
together, and rests on eight cast-Iron
supports, placed on eight stone pillars.
In ordpr to facilitate expansion by heat,
the supports can glide on a system of
rails attached to the piers.
There are two object glasses, the one
for visual observations, the other being
reserved for photographic work. Each
alJoei weight 1600 pounds. They are both
mounted on a truck gliding along a rail
way, thus allowing of their easy trans
fer In front of the tube. The eyepiece
is also movable on a railway, and the
focusing Is affected by a screw 60 Inches
long, uniting the two tubes. Should the
mirror of the siderostat not perfectly
follow the object under scrutiny, then
the corrections in right ascension and
declination can be made without diffi
culty from the eyepiece end 'by a most
ingenious contrivance. The siderostat
proper, which weighs some 45 tons, con
sists of a huge brass foot measuring 26
feet in length and as much in height,
and resting on a marble pier. The dia
meter of the great mirror is 7S inches,
or rather more than 6 feet, and its
weight, mounting included, more than
64 tons. It is held in equilibrium by a
IT TOS1L5 UP YOUR JfERVES
STRENGTHENS YOUR BODY
MPUFtlilffiTIM
EUGENE SANDOW.
" The secret of mv
I use Johann Hoff's Malt Extract, and find that it
greatly aids me in the proper assimilation of food."
Johann Hoffs Malt Extract
is the pioneor and standard introduced in 1847. All others
are imitations. Johann Hoffs Mow York, Borffn, Pari:
system of levers and counterpoises, rol
ling in a well more than 6V6 feet in dia
meter, filled with mercury. The me
ehantcal part of the instrument was
made by the celebrated Paris maker, M.
Gautler; the lenses by M. Mantois.
It was no easy task to grind and polish
the surfaces of the collosal mirror, and
of the two object glasses. Here new
methods had to be devised. The plane
figure of the mirror has been obtained
by the molar action of two flat metalic
sliders. M. Mantois Used the same pro
cess it grinding the object glasses,
with this difference, however, that, ow
ing to the curved surfaces to be given
to the lenses, the sliders, instead of the
disks. The rectilineal motion of the
system thus gave rise to a cylindrical
section of the glass, which, however. In
virtue of the revolution of the lenses on
their axis, was. transformed into a sur
face. The light grasping power of the Paris
telescope, as compared with that of the
most powerful instrument now in ex
istence (the Yerkes glass) ought to be
as three is to two. But this will not be
the case, owing chiefly to the presence
of the siderostat. Under a vertical in
cidence, mercury itself dixs not reflect
more than 67 per cent of the incident
light, and here lies the gain In favor
of the Yerkes telescope. The accurate
figuring, moreover, of disks of such
enormous size as those of the great
French telescope is bese t with formid
able, If not quite insuperable, difficulties,
and we have some reasons for doubting
that the optical surfaces will be a suc
cess. Another point which will t;ll
heavily against the performance of the
giant will be its rather disadvantageous
location in the midst of a vast indus
trial city and at a height of barely 350
feet above the sea level, contrasting in
these particulars so unfavorably with
the pure air, serene skies and high alt
itudes of our great American observa
tories. We are apt to forget somewhat
too readily that we are actuallly living
in the bottom of a dense ocean, in which
currrents of various temperatures nnd
densities are continually streaming In
all directions. The greater the height
we rise above the sea level, the clearer
the air we get, though ws can under no
circumstances shake the yoke of atmos
pheric tremors. When scanning the
heavens with a naked eye or an opera
glass, the obnoxious effect of these un
dulations does not make Itself felt. But
if we take an astronomical telescope of
three inches aperature and examine the
physical appearance of a planet with it,
we will notice that the quality of the
image is not always the same, and that
occasionally it is positively bad.
Increasing the aperature, it Is found
that the blurring of the image from
atmospheric instability becomes a
more and more frequent phenomenon.
With an aperature of 12 inches, good
seeing is rare. The effect is, of course,
much more nugatory in a 24-inch, the
Ready
Heating
Stoves
These chilly mornings and ' nights warn us that cold
weather is coming.
We are prepared to meet any demand for Stoves or
Furnaces.
A large stock and low prices are our inducements.
An elegant No. 8 range, fully nickeled and guaranteed,
for only $19.00.
HENRY H. GUERNSEY,
6 Church Street.
Open Monday and Saturday Evenings, Telephone 852-3
MALT
EXTRACT
The Strongest Man
in the World, says:
strength is perfect digestion.
result being that with nperaturea of 30
36 and 40 inches, there are not five or
six nights in a year when the instrument
can be advantageously used with its
highest powers.
Independently of these considerations
the light grasping power of large
telescopes, Which in the hands of men
like Hall, Barnard, or Burnham, led to
such brilliant discoveries, defeats to
some extent Its own end in the case of
the perception of fine planetary details.
Here small telescopps compete with
large ones, for if we refer to the history
of the discovery of the most evanescent
planetary markings, such as the canals
of Mars and the spots on Saturn, it is
found that they have been almost in
variably made with telescopes whose
apfratures did not Meeed ,10 inches.
When questioned as to his opinion of
the results that may be expected from
the colossal Paris tube, M. Antoniadi
replied: "A careful consideration of all
the circumstances cannot reasonably
render us over-sanguine. Even suppos
ing the surfaces of the glasses to bo
theoretically perfect, which will not be
the case, we might safely predict that
it will never show anything very clearly
on th moon with a power of 4,000, which
would cut down the distance of our sat
ellite to 60 miles a distance, Indeed,
quite different from the poular and sen
sntlonal fallacy of 'La Lue a un metre!'
"There Is, however, one point," con
tinued M. Antoniadi, "in which the huge
Paris refractor will beat all previous in-
1 JML A AAA A AAA AJURft
J Everybody
I Knows
About
PahvKiUev
A
Household
Medicine
Used by millions
In nil parts of the world
A SAFE nnd SIJHK REMEDY
for
Cramps Coughs Bruises
Diarrhoea Colds Cuts
Dysentery Croup Burns
, Sprains and Strains.
Gives instant relief. Cures quickly.
Two slsres, S5c. nnd 50c.
There is only one Pain-KIllcr, Terry Davis' I
Sample bottle mailed
(Mention thie paper.)
Now for
Hot Air
Furnaces
strumenta of the kind hitherto construc
ted,, B,rjii that is the great focal length.
It will enable astronomers to take en
larged photographic views of the moon
at a focus of 22 or 23 Inches in diameter,
and this will constitute a marked pro
gress in the knowledge of the topo
graphy and physical constitution of our
satellite. Paris Correspondence of the
New York Tribune.
MRS. THOMPSON'S SCHOOL,
377 OROWN street, Klndergaton, Primary,
(imiiuntir Department, Reopens Wedaes
day, September, IS. s!2 7tp
HICV. 1R. LOUISA. ALEXANDER'S
"INSTITUTE for Languages," (English,
Gorman, French, etc.,) is fully established.
Classes for ladles and gentlemen, girls and
boys. Pees for .Instruction moderate. Ses
sions from 8 a. ni. to 10 p. m. For particu
lars apply personally or In writing to ALEX
ANDER'S INSTITUTE FOB LANGUAGES,
sl tf 7 WOOSTER PLACE.
F. A. FOWLER'S SCHOOL OF MUSIC,
851 CHAPF.L STREET,
Reopens Monday, September 11th.
VOICE, PIANO, VIOLIN, ORGAN, HAR
MONY. No charge for trying voices, and a strictly
houest opinion given.
An oigun, blown by motor, rented for
practice, at any hour, day or evening, at
low rates. 0 2m
MISS WHEDON'S SCHOOL,
33 WALL STREET,
WILL IlKOPEN hKl'TIiMBKU 80.
PRIMARY. JUNIOR and SENIOR DE
PARTMENTS. Thorough preparation for College.
Circulars sent on application. sO lm
OILlfi GRAMMAR SCHOOL
OrENS September 13. Affords a man's care
for boys. Prepares boys or girls quickly
for High School or C'oIlegdB All kinds tu
toring, sll 14t INSURANCE BUILDING.
MISS CA'I'IjIN'S SCHOOL
FOR boys aud girls will reopen September
20, 18111), ut OS HlSIIOr ST. Apply at
sU tf 012 WHITNEY AVE.
VOCAL INSTRUCTION
J. JEROME HAYES
RESUMES TEACHING
September 20th (Wednesday),
840 Chapel Street,
SO lm HURINGER BUILDING.
MISS LEIGHT0N S SCHOOL,
FOR GIRLS AND HOYS,
Reopens Sept. 28, 154 Grove Street
Prepares for High School. Kindergarten.
Careful individual uttentlon. Established
18S8. 4 lm
MlaS JOHNSTONE'S SCHOOL
FOR GIRLS. Advanced Classes. Prepara
tion Tor College. Primary and Kindergarten
Departments. Opens Thursday. September
21, 1)7 Whitney Avenue. s4 18t
THE DESSAlTEU-TROOSm YK
SCHOOL OF MUSIC,
763 Chanel Street,
will reopen on THURSDAY, (September 7th.
omco no u i-9 daily irom n to i ana 4 to 8
p. U).
s2 tf
E. A. LEOPOLD,
VOICE BUILDER,
Resumes teaching Tuesday. September 5th.
Studio, 55 Insurance Building. Hartford, I
Mondays and Thursdays. s2 tf
MISS ORTON and MISS NICHOLS,
Successors to the Misses Edwards.
Will reopen their OnySchool for
(Jlils at
No. 57 ELM STREET, on
THUKSIA., SKP1KMBKR 28.
Clreulnrs furnished on application.
aul2 10 20 si 2ut
Ciiu. ctuevttsemeuts.
NOTICK TO CONTRACTORS.
GRAVEL ROAD, WOODRRIDGE.
nenicu i'i "iwum jv wu.uiiuiuk ;i grave!
road under the Act of 181 19 for the" "Im
provement of l'ublle Roads," will be re
provriiir'n. "t ""."i"! iu ui re-
rnlved by the Selectmen of the town of
WooiibHilge, at the basement of the church,
until 2 o'clock p. m. Thursday, September
11 I'll, XVi'U.
l'lairs and specifications can be seen nnd
blank forms for proposals can be obtained
at the house of Rollln 0. Newton, First Se
lectman, Woodbrlilue, or at the office of A.
IS. Hill, No. S2 Church street, New Haveu,
Conn. .
. Bond on proposal, one thousand dollars.
Per order of Board of Selectmen,
n7 fit A. B. HILL, Engr.
Notice to Contractors.
City Engineer's Office, No. 17 City Hull,
New Haven, Conn., Sept. 12, 18IH).
SEALED PROPOSALS will be received at
this office until 2 p. m. September 22, 180!)
For eoimtnietlng a Macadam road on Mil
dletown avenue, under the State highway
law for tin1 Improvement of Public Roads.
The amount of the bond to accompany the
bid will be J 1,300.
Blank forms of proposal, nnd any Informa
tion concerning plans, specifications, bonds,
etc., will be furnished upon application.
No proposal will be received after the time
specified, and all proposals not on the blanks
furnished or not properly filled out will be
rejected.
The right to reject any or oil bids Is re
served. By order of tho Director of Public Works.
812 Bl C. V. KELLY, City Engineer.
NOTICK TO CONTRACTORS.
MACADAM ROAD, NORTH BRANFORD.
Sealed proposals for constructing a Mac
adam road, under the Act of 18'JI) for the
"Improvement of Public Roads," will be re
ceived bv the Selectmen of the town of
North Branford, at the office of the Town
Clerk, until 2 o'clock p. in. Saturday, Sep
tember linii, ism.
Plans and specifications can he seen nnd
blank forms for proposal can be obtained at
Hie house of Herbert O. Page, First Select
man North Branford, or at the office of
A. B. Hill. No. 82 Church street. New Ha
ven, Conn.
Bond on proposal, one thousand dollars.
Per order of Board of Selectmen,
87 6t A. B. HILL, Engr.
i gcellatietftis.
AMERICAN LINE. .
FAST KXPKKSS SKKVICK.
NEW YORK, SOUTHAMPTON (LONDON).
Calling Westbouud at Cherbourg.
Sailing Wednesdays at 10 a. m.
St. Louis, Sept. 27 St. Louis, Oct. 11
St. Paul. Sept. 27;St. l'jiul, Oct. IS
New York, Oct. 4'New York, Oct. 23
RED STAR LINE.
NEW YORK ANTWERP PARIS.
Every Wednesday at 12 noon.
Kensington, Sept. 20il'rieslnnd, Oct. 4
Nnordlnml, Sept. iTi'Southwurk, Oct. 11
These steamers carry Cabin and tuird
chss passengers at low rates.
International Navigation Company,
70 Broadway, cor. Rector street, N. Y. ; Peck
& Bishop, 702 Chapel street. M. Zuuder &
Sons. 2M State St., M. B. Newton, 86 Or
ange st.. T. U. Pease & Son, 102 Church St.,
New Haven. 30
MOMAUGUIN
ON THE BEACH,
Recently completed by th
Fair Havsn and Wsstville R. R. Go.
FINEST RESTAURANT ON THE OON
NECTIOUT SHORE.
Regular Shore Dinners, also a la carte.
Dinners served on plasza If desired.
Fine Bathing. Bathing Suits to let.
J. W. DUNNE, Lessee.
Telephone 1068-4.
Take Mansfield Grove car from Ohurch
and Chapel streets every 24 minutes In fore
noon, every 12 minutes in afternoon. Jy3 3m
SWIFT'S HOTEL,
Formerly Hlnmau House, Savin Rock
Now Open for tlie Season.
Our Specialty la Fine' Shore Dinners, served
right.
A. J. SWIFT, Proprietor,
For 12 years In the Branford Point Bouse.
Telephone 1B78-2. je14 tf
1:31!
Intermediate marks: Quarter mile, 21
3-5 seconds! half mile, 43 seconds; three
quarter mile, 1:07 3-5. All are world's
records for the respective distances.
Made at New Bedford, MuSS., June 29t!i,
by Eddie McDuffee, on a ,
COLUMBIA IXSL" GRAINLESS.
McDuffee's feat Is worthy of special
note as the blcvcle he rode was one of
our regular Columbia Bevel-Gear Chain
less Read Machines, Model 59, with rac
ing equipment. Tile superiority of the
Columbia Bevel-Gear Ohaluloss on the
road has been demonstrated over and
over again. McDufifoe's feat proves that
It is superior to other wheels for track
purposes as well.
Chalnless, $GO to $73.
Chain Wheels, $25 to $50.
POPE MFG. CO., Hartford, Conn.
W, P. WEAVER,
Columbia Dealer,
NEW HAVEN, OONN.
Fifty-Seven and Four-Fifths
MURPHY performs the marvelous feat of
ridlug a mllel'i lesa than ono minute on a
Tribune Blue Streak.
MUirilV and the "TRIBUNE"' hold tho
reend for tno fastest time ever made on
eirtu ly human i r animal power.
Ride a BLUE STREAK; nothing can beat
It.
JOHN BROWN, Agent,
153-157 GEORGE STREET.
Open Monday and Saturday Evenings.
Never M
have I been able to offer such
bargains in
BICYCLES.
as now.
Samples at Cost and below
GRIGGS,
7 Center Street.
Cash or Easy Payments,
lift tacetlfuieo its.
Use of
o COKE o
Reduces
Expenses.
Reduces kitchen heat, reduces
kitchen labor, utilizes the set range,
simplifies cooking. Bottom prices :
Bagged quantities, 2 to 9 bushels,
28 cts., to $1.00. Bulk, 36 bushels,
I3.25 ; 18 bushels, $1.87 delivered.
A House
That Has Gas
ought to have the Perfect Gas
Range, 4-hole burner, 16-inch
oven, price $11.50, connected.
Get the names of some of our
hun'dreds of this-summer cus
tomers and see if we are right. .
Look into the light
The Welsbach " Light.
THE NEW HAVEN
GAS LIGHT COMPANY
80 CROWN ST.
Salesroom, 93 Crown Street.
C3A. STO XI. X A.
Bears the 7 T(l9 Kind You Have Always Mf
Signature
of
gvnvtllevs' (Guide,
New York, flew Karen and
Hartford If. If.
Juno 11, 1889.,
FOR NEW YORK 4:05, McBO, x6:10
7:00, 8:00. :Vi, 8:30, "9:35, xl0:30 a. m.',
12:00. 12:05, 1:80 (parlor car limited).
1:35, 2:00, '2:80, 8:00, M:00. "4:17. 4 30
5:10, 6:20, 6:35, 6:30, 7:10, 8:10 815
(Bridgeport accommodation), B;10, 9-16
P. m. Sundays '4:05, i:b0, x8:00 a. m.
2:30, ac4:30. x6:16, 7:10, '8:10, 8:30, !
p. m.
FOR WASHINGTON via Harlem Rlv
er '1:05, 'llO p. m. (daily).
FOR BOSTON via Sprlngfleia-1:10.
10:10, "llS a. m., '1:45. '5:52 o. tn.
Sunday 1:10 a. m., 5:62 p. m.
FOR BOSTON via New London and
Providence 2:10. 2:20, 11:35 (parlor
car limited) a. m 12:05, 2:47, 4:15,
4.E6, 6:65 p. m. . Sundays 2:10. 2:20
a. m., K2-.05, 4:65, 6:65 p. m.
FOR MERIDEN. HARTFOTO),
SPRINGFIELD, etc. 'liXO, 6:40. 8:00.
xl0:10, 10:50 for White Mountains (first
stop Hartford), '11:05 a. ni., 12:10, 1:45.
8:10, 6:00, 6:62, (6:15 to Hartford). 8:00.
10:00, 11:15 (to Merlden) p. m. Sundays
,:10 a. m., 12:10, 5:52, 8:28 p. m.
KBW LONDON DIVISION-
For New London, etc. 2:10. 2:20.
7:55, :30. 11:05, u.-35 (parlor car limit.
ZfK?-"!-; 12:05' '2:i1 s-- " 4:20,
4:55, 6:16, (to Saybrook Junction), 6:15.
6:55, 9:10 (Guilford acc.) p. m. Sunday
-2:10, 2:20. 8:60 a. m 12:05. '4:65.
6:55 p. m.
AIR LINE DIVISION
For MiddJetown. Wllllmantio. eto.
7:45 a. m., 12:55, 2:38. 6:00 p. m. Sun
flays 7:15 p. m. Connecting at Mid
dletown with the Valley branch and at
WUiimantlo with Midland and Central
divisions and C. V. R. R.; at Turnervilto
with Colchester branch.
NORTHAMPTON DIVISION
For Shelburne Falls, Turner's Falls,
Williamsburg, Holyoke. New Hartford
f mediate stations 7:60 a. m. and
4:00 p. m. For Westfleld and Intermedi
ate stations, 6:57 p. m.
For Farmington, New Hartford and
Points this side-7:60 a. m.. 12:04. 4:00.
6:57 p. m.
BERKSHIRE DIVISION
.FIi?ro5LJunotlon' Derby,' Ansonla,
JS;"i:K' 8:00, 8:36 m- M'00. 8:39, 1:67.
CBS. 7:60, 11:20 p. m. Sundays J:10 a.
tn. and 8:30 p. m. . ,
,nr Wftb"ry-T:09' 8:. 935 ,.
12:00, 2:39. 6:35, 50. u:2o p. m. Sun-
days-8:10 a. m., 6:15 p. m. (via Nauga
tuck Junction.) 1
For Winsted-7:00, 9:85 a. m.. 2:89, 6:SS
7:50 p. m. Sundays 8:10 a. m. 6:16 p.
n. (via Nauc. June.)
For Shelton, Botsford, Newtown, Dsn
bury, Pittaneld, State line 9:86 a. m,
:67 p. m.
For Albany, Buffalo, Detroit, Cincin
nati, St Louis, Chicago and the West
Via Bridgeport 6:10 a. m.; via Stats Ilns
9:35 a. m., 8:57 p. m.
For Litchfield and points on LHobfleld
branch (via Derby Junction) 9:85 a. m..
8:67 p. at.
Express Trains. xLoeal Express.
C. T. HEMPSTEAD.
General Passenger Agent
New Haven Steamboat Go.
Depot: Belle Dock, Sew Haven, Conn.
Between New York, New Haven and Prov
idence. Popular Route to aud from Boston Dally
Servieo Sndays Excepted.
NEW HAVEN LINE Leave New Hareo
for New York: CONTINENTAL 11 o. m..
RICHARD fEOK or O. H. NOUTHAM 12:41
night. Returning, leave New York: RICH
ARD PECK or 0. H. NORTHAM 4 p. m..
CONTINENTAL 12 midnight
NARRAGANSETT BAY LINB-Steameri
RICHARD PEOK or C. H. NORTHAM leave
New Haven for Providence 10:30 p. m.; re
turning, leave Providence 4:40 p.m. Timely
train connections for Boston and sll eastern
points. 1
Popular Passenger Rates. Staterooms and
Tickets for sale at Peck & Bishop Co., 701
Chapel street.
Fine orchestra on Bay Line steamers.
CHAS. I. FRENCH, Agent
STARIN'9
New Haven Franportation Co.
DAILY EXCEti SAXllitDAY.
Steamer JOHN H. STAIUN, Captain Mc
Allister, leaves New Haveu from Starin'i
Pier, foot of Brown street, at 10:15 p. m,
Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. Steam
er ERASTUS CORNINO, Captain Thomp
son, Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays,
The STARIN leaves New York from Pier
18, North River, at B p. m. Mondays, Wed
nesdays and Fridays; tbe ERASTU8 CORN
ING, Sundays, Tuesdays aud Thursdays.
Fare 75 cents ; Excursion Tickets 81.25.
Staterooms, $1.00.
Tickets and staterooms for sale at 3. B.
Judson's, 807 Chapel street; Peck & Bish
op's, 702 Chapel etreet. Free stage leaves
tbe depot on arrival of Hartford train
and from corner of Church and Chapel
streets every half bonr. commencing at 8:39
p. m. Through freight rates given and
bl'ls of lading to all points West, South,
and Southwest. O. H. FISHEB. Agent.
Order your freight via Stario Line.
ANCHOR LINE.
United States Mall Steamship
Sail from New York Every Saturday tot
Glasgow via Londonderry-
Saloon Passage 930 and upwards.
Sooond Cabin
CITY OF ROMli .3 . Othsr St'ri, 93J.
Steerage PnmiJ
Rome. jaS.OO. Furaeasla. J1.JJ. Other
Strs., $33.30.
For Bool: of Tours unci information, apply
to HENDERSON BROTHERS. General
Agents. 17 & 19 Broadway, New York; or M.
B. Newton & Co., 86 Orange St., or BlshopiSt
Co., 702 Chapel or Jus. Mustarde, 04
Crown St., or Richard M. Sheridan 865
Grand ave., or J. Ang. Svenson, 828 Grand
ave.. or Thos. H. Pease & Son, 102 Church
street, New Haven. Jy22 3m
RAILWAY.
Four and One-Half Days
to Pacific Coast.
Commencing June 17th and leaving
Hew York dally thereafter uu
til further iiotloo:
"Tha Tmiwiq Timjtfii
lllU llUUUllui JJlUiilUUi
II
Luxurious sleeping and drawlngroont
cars.
Dining cars with unsurpassed cuisine.
Passing through Bannf,; the Switer
land of America, tho Plcturesa.ua
Rockies, to all points on the Puoiaa
Coast. -
Connecting at Vancouver with the
steamers of the Trans-Paclflo aud
Canadian Australian Royal Mall
Steamship Lines for
China and Japan, tin Philipjinss,
Fiji and Honolulu, Australia.
For pamphlets and information
write to
E. V. SKl"-14- i- K-
353 Broadway, New. York City,

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