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The daily morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven, Conn.) 1894-1907, October 01, 1900, Image 1

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THE CARRINGTON PUBLISHING CO.
VOL. LXVI NO. 233. PRICE TIltlEE CENTS.
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Presld
INCREASE IN MINERS' WAGES
JIAISEOF TEN FEU CENT. OFFERED
BY READING COMPANY.
Notice. Fo.ted In AH the Concern's Col
lieries Ye.tertlay-All the Other Com
panies Expected to Take Similar Ac
tion To-morrow Operators Expect
This Increase Will be Satisfactory to
the Men Indications, However, That
the Men Will Not Accept.
Philadelphia, Sept. SO. An offer of an
Increase of 10 per cent, in miners' wages
was to-day inaugurated by the Phila
delphia and Reading Coal and Iron
company, and notices of it were posted
in all the company's collieries. This
move, it is Btated, will be followed on
Tuesday by a similar notice at every
colliery in the anthracite region.
It is expected by the operators that
this Increase in wages will be satisfac
tory to the men and they believe many
of the strikers will take advantage of
the offer and return to work. Mining
operations will in this event be given
en impetus and the operators expect
there will then be a gradual resump
tion until the collieries will again have
their full compliment of employes.
The Philadelphia and Reading com
pany operates thirty-rrine collieries, and
of these twenty-seven have been shut
down owing to . insufficient working
force. ,
Whether the miners will accept the
proffer of the company and return in
sufficient numbers to operate the mines
cannot be foretold to-night. Reports
received from several points in the
Schuylkill region where the Reading
collieries are located rather indicate
that the mine workers will follow the
(Continued on Sixth Page.)
A G VINA EDO'S FOB MER SECRETARY
Sexto Lopez Here to Explain Filipino
Side of the War.
New York, Sept. 30. Sexto Lopez,
formerly secretary and confidant of
General Aguinaldo, arrived here to-day
on the Cunarder Campania. Lopez is
said to have come here at the invitation
of Fiske Warren, and he expects to ex
plain to the people the Filipinos' eide
of their fight with this country.
Lonez gave out the following signed
statement: "My object in viElting the
United States is not to interfere In
American politics, but solely to tell the
American people what the Filipinos de
sire In reference to" the future govern
ment Of our country. It has been said
that my coming to America is in the
interests of certain persons and parties.
We, as Filipinos, know no parties in
the United States. We have only one
desire, viz.: To seek justice for our
country.
"Those who desire to give us Justice
will no doubt be glad to know the
wants and conditions of the Philip
pines. All we want is peace with honor
to both parties and I hope to be able
to show that the conditions of our
country are eueh as to fit us for the
maintenance of that independence."
Messrs. Warren an3 Lopez left at 3
o'clock this afternoon for Boston. Their
address there will be 220 Devonshire
street.
MORE QUIET ABOUT MANILA.
Belief That Amlgos Took Part In the
Recent Attacks.
Manila, Sept. 30. The Filipinos in the
Vicinity Of Manila have been more quiet
of late, although last Wednesday nignt
there were brisk attacks at Las Pinas
and Paranaque, south of Manila, as
well as outpost firing at Imus, Bacoor
and Muntine Lupa. The American offi
cers are satisfied that the alleged aml
gos living in and around the towns in
question participated in these attacks.
Official reports have been received on
insurgent activity in Zambalos prov
ince. Two skirmishes occurred during
the week on the Bicol river, in the
province of South Camarines. It is es
timated that the insurgents lost nine
ty killed in the various districts.
Two civilians, John McMahon and
Ralph McCord, of San Francisco, who
Btarted on a business trip for Vigan
and Bangued, in northern Luzon, have
not been heard from for three weeks.
It is feared that they have been killed
or captured by the Insurgents.
TAKEN VIOLENTLY INSANE.
Prominent St. PanI Man Causes a Scene
In Hartford.
Hartford, Sept. 30. Luther Edgerton
Newport, a son of Colonel Newport, a
wealthy banker and broker of St. Paul,
was taken violently insane at Heu
blein's hotel this evening and had to
be taken to the police station, where
he is confined in a cell under guard.
Mr. Newport and wife registered at the
hotel Thursday. His demeanor attract
ed no attention untU to-nighb, when
shortly after the supper hour he came
Into the office and began to argue with
come guests. He had to be removed,
and being a powerfully built man and
a former college athlete he gave four
policemen a desperate struggle. Mr.
Newport is thirty-five years of age and
prominent socially in St. Paul. He
came to Hartford for treatment and
to-morrow Mrs. Newport will make ap
plication before Judge Wheeler for her
husband's commitment to the retreat
for the insane.
Merlden Man's Fatal Fall.
Meriden, Sept. 30. Daniel Dowd, aged
seventy, a tailor, fell down a fight of
stairs at the home of John I. Carter,
100 Grove street, and was found dead
with a broken neck early Sunday morn
ing. He was visiting at the place and
It is thought that being unfamiliar
with his surroundings he made a mis
step in the dark. He had lived in
Meriden five years.
LORD ROBERTS REWARDED.
He Is Appointed Commandcr-ln-Chlcf
of the British Army.
London, Sept. 30. It is officially an
nounced that Lord Roberts has been
appointed commander-in-chief of the
British army. To-day is Lord Roberts1
birthday. He succeeds Lord Wolseley,
who will be retired.
VAN WYCK AND THE ICE TRUST.
His Answer to Charges Will be Filed
To-day.
New York, Sept. 30. Mayor Van
Wyek's answer to the charges of violat
Ing the law by investing in the securi
ties of the American Ice trust will be
in the hands of Attorney-General Da
vies at Albany to-morrow. The addi
tional time allowed the mayor to an.
swer expired to-day, but according to
custom he got a day's grace on account
of the date falling on Sunday. Owing
to the absence of Governor Roosevelt
from the state the answer of the mayor
will be turned over to the attorney-general.
Governor Roosevelt directed that
this be done before leaving the state,
(notwithstanding the fact that Lieutenant-Governor
woodruff is acting gov
ernor and is empowered to act upon, all
state matters.
MARQUIS ITO SUMMONED.
Mikado Intrusts Him With Task of
Forming New Cabinet.
Yokohama, Sept. 30. The Mikado has
summoned Marquis Ito to form a cab
inet, on the resignation of the Tama
gata ministry. When entrusting the
task to the new premier, his majesty
said that, as affaire in China were en
tering upon the diplomatic stage, the
presence of Marquis Ito at the head of
the government was necessary.
AD BOERS 1ST PAGE
Shah at Constantinople.
Constantinople, Sept. 30. The Shah of
Persia arrived here to-day and was re
ceived by the Sultan with elaborate
and brilliant ceremonies.
GALVESTON RELIEF MONEY
$679,467 RECEIVED BY GOV. SAYERS
UP TO SUNDAY NOON.
An Official Statement Issued This Sum
Only Embraoes Moneys and Remit
tances Sent Directly to the Governor
A Complete Itemized Statement to be
Given Out This Week.
Austin, Texas, Sept. 30. Regarding
the contributions for the Galveston flood
sufferers, Governor Sayers made the
following statement to-day:
"The amount of money received by
me up to lb O'clock noon Of September
30, 1906, for the benefit of the storm
sufferers of Texas coast is $672,476.
This sum includes $3,892 that remained
in my hands of the fund contributed for
the relief of the Brazos river valley suf
ferers last year. It also Includes all
drafts and authorizations to draw and
which are in transit and are yet uncol
lected. "This statement, it must be borne in
mind, only embraoes moneys and remit
tances that have been made to me di
rectly and also amounts for which I
hav been authorized to draw.
"During the present week I will sub
mit to the people Of the United States
a full, complete, itemized statement of
the entire fund that has come into my
hands, giving the amount and source
of each contribution and also the man
ner in which the sum total received by
me has been expended and distributed.
Every portion of the storm-stricken dis
trict is being provided for.
"Joseph Sayers,
"Governor of Texas."
PASSENGERS IN A PANIC.
An Electric Car Coming from Donbury
Fair Grounds Derailed.
Danbury, Sept. 30. As a train of
three electric cars was coming in from
the fair grounds about 7:30 o'clock to
night the middle car, a trailer, contain
ing about forty people, was derailed on
West Worcester street and bb the car
threatened to overturn there was a gen
uine panic in the efforts of the passen
gers to get out. Most of the passengers
Jumped from the car and ae they leap
ed into the darkness there was a con
fused mass of humanity. There were
no fatalities, but several people were
badly bruised and shaken up. The ac
cident was due to the breaking of the
forward axle.
A M ERIC AN SHIP-BUILDING.
308 Constructed During Quarter Ended
Sept. SO-The Gross Tonnage.
Washington, Sept. 80. The quarterly
statement of the commissioner of navi
gation shows that 308 sail vessels of
88,790 groes tons were built in the Unit
ed States and officially numbored dur
ing the quarter ended September 30,
1900. Of the vessels constructed of
wood 160 were eall and 127 steam. Of
the steel vessels four were sail and 17
steam. Of the whole number 190 were
built on the Atlantic and gulf coasts,
28 on the Pacific, 32 on the great lakes
and 58 on the western rivers. The larg
est tonnage, 37,057 was on the Great
Lakes, and the next largest was on the
gulf coasts.
Sunday Ilall Games.
At Chicago First game Chicago 2,
St. Louis 4; second game Chicago 4,
St. Louis 1.
At Cincinnati Pittsburg 3, Cincin
nati 4.
RUSSIA WITHDRAWS TROOPS
LEAVES ONLY A FOUCE OF ABOUT
2,000 AT PEKIN.
M. de Glersj the Russian Mlnlnter, und
the Entire Legation Also Depart-To
Stop at Tien Tsln-Aincrican Soldiers
Preparing to Leave -Gen. Chaffee Dl
rectlng the Movement Which Will
Commence ot the Earliest Possible
Moment.
fCODVrleht. Associated Press, 1000.)
Pekin, Sept. 25, via Taku, Sept. 29, via
Shanghai. Sept. 3d. At the conference
of generals to-day the Russian com
mander. General Lihevitch, announced
the immediate withdrawal from Pekin
of the bulk of the Russian troops and
the legation. He will leave on Thurs
day, Sept. 27, and the legation will fol
low on Saturday. There will remain a
mixed force of about 2,000 to represent
Russia. General Llnevltch asserted
that the despatch from St. Petersburg
transmitting the order to withdraw
contained a statement that all the pow
ers were adopting the same policy. The
other generals replied that they had
received no orders Of that nature.
The German and Japanese columns
are operating to the southward near the
imperial Deer park. Sir Alfred Gaselee,
the British cOmrriander, has gone to
Tien Tsin to inspect the Brttsh troops
there. Friction between the British
and Russians over the railway con
tlnues, each party seizing and guarding
small sections. The repairing is un
systematic and the completion of the
work indefinite.
St. Petersburg, Sept. 30. The follow
ing dispatch dated Pekin, Sept. 27, has
been received from M. de Glers, Rus
sian minister to Chlnft: "In accordance
with orders from the highest quarters
I am leaving for Tien Tsin with the
whole legation."
A MER tCA NS PRE PAR I NO TO LEA YE
General Chaffee at Tien Tsin Directing
the Movement.
(Copyright, Associated Press, 1000.)
Tien Tsin, Sept. 28, via Shanghai
Sept. 30. Orders from Washington di
recting the withdrawal of the bulk of
the American troops were received this
afternoon and preparations to comply
were begun immediately. General Chaf
fee Is here directing the movement.
which will eommenoft at the earliest
possible moment. It 19 understood that
the plan contemplates leaving a regl
ment of infantry, a squadron of caval
ry and ft battery Of artillery lit Pekin
to protect American interests and that
the remainder Of the troops will proceed
to Manila,
The allied commanders had" deelded
to dispatch a, combined land and naval
expedition to Shan-Hai-Kwan, on the
Gulf of Liao-Tung, leaving Taku Octo
ber 1, the total land force being 4,200.
The American detail had not yet been
made nor had 4 decision been reached
as to the naval force. N6w that tha
order to withdraw has been received
from Washington id is possible that the
plans for the expedition will have to be
modified, so far as American participa
tion Is concerned. General Chnfteo,
however, is proceeding on the opposite
lissumptloh and has ordered the Fifth
Marine battalion to prepare to go.
Tho United states armored cruiser
Brooklyn will prObabiy be the only
American warship In the expedition.
The troops will go by water and be
landed south of Shart-Hal-Kwan. They
will co-operate with a large Russia
contingent already on the way. The
news of the American withdrawal Cre
ated a sensation among the representa
tives of the other powers here.
PARTITION OF C IT IK A.
No American Note on the Subject A
Berlin Dispatch Denied.
Washington, Sept. 30. A dispatch
from Berlin asserting a belief that the
United States was about to issue a note
on the question of the partition of Chi
na was repudiated to-day in an author
itative quarter. It was Btated that not
only 19 there no note to be Issued re
specting the matter of the partition of
China, but that there la no note what
ever regarding the Chinese policy now
In process of formulation by this gov
ernment. The views of this govern
ment calling for preservation of the en
Continued on Sixth PageO
Passenger Train Wrecked.
Guthrie, O. T., Sept. 30. The north
bound passenger train for Kansas (iity,
due here at 4:40 p. m., was wrecked at
Waterloo, a flag station fifteen miles
south of Guthrie to-night, and two pas
sengers were killed and a dozen or fif
teen more or leas injured. The dead are
Thomas Mayer, Oklahoma City; Ed
mund Rook, Johana, Tex.
Telegraphic Briefs.
Now York, Sept. SO. A trunk bplonKlag
trv Mr. Mnv Alioe Bonsiin u ilipssmviktT
of this city, and sal to contain tluilalile
k'oods, was selsfd at the Prenc.i lino pier
by customs officials Just after the arrival
of the L'Aqultnlue to-day. Three other
trunks belonging to Mme. R. Abhy, also o
this city, were also seised, who deoliirtul
fine una normug uuuiiiuf. iue uiuumis
the trunks contained goods valued at 3,000
francs.
New York, Sept. 30. Commander I'aiil
Countourlotls, twelve of the ollicers and
tweuty-flve of the wtm of the Ureek train
Ing ship Xavarchos Minnies, now anchored
in this port, attended mass to-day In the
Greek church. The little church was
crowded to the doors.
UlilUllUUlU vii.., v. a., .Tin. u. -n K..IULU
Fe pnssingor train was wrecked at Water
loo, eif.1-i-?2u luin-B (ivini ui iu-uu.
... ' . l.ltl.. n....Ut,, l
X WO JjerBUua wee auicu vuijigui auu luiru
others were fatally a-oundod. Tom Mayers
of OklRhonia ury, a traveling niau, was
on ol the killed.
SHIP FOUNDERS AT SEA.
The Nonparlcl Laden With Oil-Crew of
Twenty-nine Saved.
New York, Sept. 30. The British ship
Nonpareil, owned by the Standard Oil
company, which sailed from here on
September 10 for Sourabay, Java, with
a full cargo of case oil, foundered at
sea on September 22, and her crew of
twenty-nine men were brought to this
port to-day by the British tramp
steamer GlengolJ. The Nonpareil "an
into a hurricane on September 12 which
continued for over twenty-four hours,
and sprung her so badly that she had
to be abandoned. On the morning of
Saturday, the 22tl, the ship was lying
at an agle of forty degrees and the
crew were in constant danger of being
washed overboard. The chief officer
and several men were injured during
the trying times of the past few days.
The cabin was filled with water and no
place was to be had to care for the in
Jured. In the afternoon the Glengoil
was sighted and In response to signals
she hove to and took off Captain Hat
field and the crew of the Nonpareil. The
rescued crew lost all thelf personal ef
feets.
Campania Delayed by Fog.
New York, Sept. 30. The Cunard lin
Or Campania, Captain Walker, arrived
this morning from Liverpool and
Queenstown after a very protracted
voyage caused by a dense fog which
prevailed nearly the entire voyage,
From September 28 until her arrival
this morning the Campania experienced
dense fog, during which time the en
gines were slowed down and for sixty
eight hours and fifteen minutes were
kept under reduced speed. The Cam
pania brought 392 saloon, 348 secOnd-
Cabln and 665 steerage passengers.
Among the saloon passengers was
James J. Corbett, who" traveled aldne
and remained very quiet during the
voyage.
Steamship Arrivals.
New York, Sept. 30. Arrived: Steam
era Campania, Liverpool and Queens-
town: Caledonian, Liverpool; Rotter
dam. Rotterdam and Boulogne; Vic
toria,-Marseilles, Genoa and Naples.
PROMISES MADE CROKER
HANNA STICKS TO HIS CHARGES
AGAINST BRYAN.
Declares the Silver Leader Has Promised
the Tammany Chief the Naming of
One Cabinet Officer Also theDlstrtbU'
tlon of Federal Patronage In New
York.
Cleveland, Sept. SO. Senator Hanna
arrived home from New York thla
morning and left to-night for Chicago.
It is hl9 purpose to return to New York
about the middle of dctober, but he ex
pects tb be in Chicago the closing week
of the campaign. In an interview Sen
ator Hanna said he was pleased with
the outlook in New York, where things
were looking better than a month ago.
Referring to his recent interview in
this city, in which he was quoted as
saying that Mr. Bryan had promised to
let Richard Croker name one of the
members of his Cabinet, In advance,
Senator Hanna said: "I have never de
nied that interview. In fact, what I
said about Croker and a cabinet posi
tion has been substantiated during the
past week. I knew what I Was talking
about when I said that Bryan had
promised Croker tha naming of one of
the cabinet officers. I know that Bryan
has promised to let Croker distribute
the federal patronage In New York, and
if Bryan is elected Croker can put for
mer Senator Edward Murphy in Bry
an's cabinet."
CAVALRY CALLED OUT.
A Serious Itace Riot Threatened at
Georgetown, S. C.
Columbia, S. C, Oct. 1. Thla morn
ing at 12:50 o'clock Governor Mc-
Sweeney received a telegram from
Mayor W. D. Morgan of Georgetown,
S. C, appealing to have the militia or
dered out to suppress a threatened race
riot. The goverrr immediately wired
Colonel Sparkman, of Georgtown, to
have his cavalry troops hurried out.
The trouble was caused by a negro
killing a white man. Georgetown- is on
the coast and the negroes outnumber
the whites overwhelmingly.
International Cycle Races.
Paris, Sept. 80. In the bicycle con
tests at Vlncennes to-day McFarland
easily defeated Huret, the Frenchman,
in a twenty-flve-mlle paced racs. The
Mme was 40:11. The international
scratch race, 1,000 metres, resulted un
satisfactorily. Cooper was beaten by
Vanonl by half a wheel. The crowd
protested against the award of the
urtges, declaring that tn-e race had been
fixed." Cooper himself entered a pro
test, which will be heard next Wednes
day. The time was 1:58 2-6.
Sudden Deuth tu Hartford.
Haftford, Sept. 20. Daniel Barnard,
siged seventy-two, dropped ded of
heart disease in front of his home at
Hockanum to-day. He was a pension
er of the civil war.
Minister's Sou Drowned.
Hobart, N. Y Sept. 30. William
Oliver, son of the Rev. W. C. Oliver,
a prominent Methodist clergyman of
the New York Conference, was drown
ed in Red Kill creek near Pratteville
last night. Young Oliver was employed
as a canvasser for the Home Instruc
tion school of Sprlneaeld, Maws.
At
owe
Correct Dress Goods
lew ' igf
tion. Price list:
Black Dress Goods.
CHEVIOTS AND CAMEL'S HAIR EF
FECTS 50c, 75C, $1.00 to 2.25 yd
POPOLOUS WEAVES In both small and
large design ose of: the new fabrics this
season. $1.00, 1.25, 1,50 to 2.30 yd
POPLINS
59c, 75c, 89c, $1.00, 1.23 yd
ALL-WOOL RHADZIMIR-
89c, $1.00, 1.23 yd
BROADCLOTHS
$i.ou, 1.23, i.5u to z.eu ya
VENETIANS $ 1 .00 to 3. 50 yd
FANCY WEAVES For tailor-made gowns. :
$2.00 to 4.00 yd
1500 Yards of Fancy Silks.
At 29 cents the yard.
Worth 59c to $1.00 the yard.
We will place on our Silk Counters , this morning, 1 500 yards
of really fine quality Fancy Silks odd lots left
ing. Among them you
White Swiss and Green Taffetas, with black hair-line stripes.
Green Peau de Sbie. Striped Changeable Taffetas.
Green-and-white Checks. Corded Silks. Persian Taffetas. .
'TIs safe to say there'll not be many yards left at closing gong
to-night, at this price.
Look at the High-Class Novelties in Silks that we are selling at ridic
ulously low prices.
A Word
If ever this store deserved the distinction of
"The Ribbon Store of Connecticut" it is this Fall.
For the winter of 1900-1901 we have gathered the
most wonderful new Ribbons beautiful shimmer
ing lengths with a satiny
he richest crepe. In fact there is not a Ribbon
want that cannot be gratified here, from the popu-
ar priced Ribbons at 2XA
exquisite French Novelties at $1.50 the yard.
Come prepared to buy, you cannot resist them I
V&myt Satin Ribbons
In all shades
30c yd
89c yd
new this season 4 m.
6 in.
Satin Surah Ribbon A lovely soft rib
bon 6 inches wide, in beauntul colors.
75c yd
Hemstitched Crepe de Chine 8 inehes
wide, in white, pink, turquise suitable tor
scarfs. ' 89c yd
Basket Weave Wash Ribbons 4 inches
wide, in white and staple shades, auc ya
Crystal Velour Ribbons 3 Inches wide,
in white, crimson ana oia rose new mia
season. 30 yd
CORBETT RETURNS
Ruck to Meet Any Charges Made Again it
Him.
New York, Sept. 30. James J. Cor
bett returned from Europe to-day on
the Campania. The only one who met
him at Quarantine was his legal repre
sentative, Emanuel Friend, and he and
the fighter held a conference while the
ship was groping her way to dock
through the fog.
Aa Corbett was leaving the pier he
said to the reporters: "I hvs come
back to mt hy charges wMcb. ratty.
New Haven, Monday,
Thoughtful ones never buy Dress Goods with
out consulting the house , that regulates style and
prices. The selling in this department has been un-r
usually heavy this Fall, but better assortments than.;;
ever, both of standard weaves and of the newest fancies
are here now for your choosing, at very attractive (I
prices. Our special offering s include many of the
most popular fabrics of the season, together, with sl'a
number of exquisite novelties which we show to- i
day for the first time. We invite your inspec
SILK-AND-WOOL LAN5DOWNES
$1.25 yd
HENRIETTAS 50c, 75c, $1.00, 1.29
SILK - AND - WOOL HENRIETTAS
Priestley's only.
$1.25, 1.30, 1.73, 2.00 yd
PEBBLE CHEVIOTS
$1.23, 1.50, 1.75 yd
Colored Dress Goods.
THE FAMOUS BROADHEAD SUITINGS
In the newest styles and colorings .
39c yd
44-IN. ALL-WOOL POPLINS Worth 89c
59c yd
ALL-WOOL HENRIETTAS In evening
and street shades: 50c, 75c, 89c yd
will hnd
;
of the New
velvety softness, akin to
cents the yard, up to the
Velours Fluorescent Ribbons S inches
wide, very like to the Regence Ribbons.
80c yd
Satin Taffetas
tints 8 inches.
In white and the pastel
t 89c yd
nousseline Taffetas 7 inches, in white
and the pastel colors a lovely, soft, lustrous
ribbon for stock and belt. 50c yd
French Novelty Ribbon Black satin with
lace applique very wide for millinery uses.
$1.30 yd
Persian Velvet Ribbon
also a French novelty.
-8 inches wide
$1.50yd
be made against me. That is all I have
to say, and that is all I am going to
say."
"Do you care to speak about your re
ported trouble with George Consldine?"
he was asked. He replied: "Well, we
did but you know how it is I'm not
going to talk now. Its all right. George
and I are friends now."
It is believed that all differences be
tween Corbett and his wife have been
settled. Husband and wife dined to
gether at a restaurant and later appear
ed at a place of amusement. It is now
said that Mrs. Corbett will not press
the divorce suit which she threatened t6
brihg-
Stetson's.
the first day o October, nineteen hundred.
for Fall.
SATIN FACED ALMA CLOTH
$1.23 yd ,
SILK-AND-WOOL POPOLOUS WEAVE.
In all new shades. 73c ya
M-IN. VICUNA CLOTH "
$1.00, 1.23 yf
50-IN. BROADCLOTH Special values at
$1.00, 1.23 y
40-IN. SILK-ANWOOL' PLAIDS- la T
beautiful color combinations; worth 79c.
B9C yd ,
TAILOR SUITINGS- I invisible checl !
and stylish mixtures heavy quality. ,
$1.30 to 8.50 yd 1
i
Also s full line of Coverts, Venetians, ,
Scotch Tweeds, Hjather Mijrttyes, etc,,
i.oo, iias, 1.3d, i.75 y4
from our recent big sell
Ribbons.
Colored Velvet Ribbons 2'A inchef
wide in navy, light blue, pink, cerise, tu
quoise, cardinal, garnet, brown and white. ,
45c yd
Qllt Braid For belts and collars.
1 in. SUcyd. lin 75cyd. '
Polka Dot Satin Ribbons In all colon
pin dots, medium and large embroidered
dots, also ring dots and horse-sbo designs.
25c to 50c yd
Fancy Ribbons In all the newest design
of the season. 25c, 29C, 39c, 59c,
75c, 89c, $1.00, $1.50 the yard J
Hartford Woman Dies Suddenly.
Hartford, Sept. 30. Mrs. Iola U. Mar
ton, aged thirty-seven years, who con
ducted a boarding house on Trumbull
street, died suddenly before midnight.
She was found on the floor in on, un
conscious condition. Medical aid wU
summoned, but it was of no avail. Ai
bottle that had contained sixty grains
of chloral was found in th room. I(j
la not known whether or not the wo-.'
man took the iiug with suicidal intent)
or not. She leaves a thirteen-year-ol
daughter.

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