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The daily morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven, Conn.) 1894-1907, November 24, 1900, Part 2, Image 12

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12
NEW HAVEN MORNING JOURNAL AND COURIER, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24,1 1900.
A PIONEER
Who Supplied All the Early Apple
Orchard of the State.
Of all the quaint characters, one of
'iha most remarkable, and at the same
time most lovable was "Johnny Apple
eee3," by which name wonderful old
John Chapman was known throughout
the state years ago. He was the fath
er of the orchards that have made the
state famous for its apples, and if all
he believed about the virtues of apples
was true he was the father of much of
the healthfulness that blesses the sons
and daughtera of the state. He be
lieved that apples made people healthy,
and he gave to the early settlers of
Ohio all the chance they had in the
early days to get apples.
How well he is loved by the pioneers
of the state is shown by the handsome
monument to his memory that was un
veiled at Mansfield last Thursday. Not
many of those who knew "Johnny
Appleseed" personally are alive now,
liut his work has lived after him to an
extent that makes him the most re
markable penniless philanthropist the
State ever knew. He was as poor as
Job's turkey, as he would have said
himself in his fondness for the scrip
tures and their application to the every
day things of life, but he gave to the
pioneer of the state an endowment of
apple trees.
Cleveland had a share in his pennl-
ieg3 benevolence, for here and there
about the city, notably in Newburg, are
orchards, which are pointed out by old
residents as having been planted vith
trees that were once sprouts from other
tress which had been raised by "John
ny -Appleseed" and given to some pio
neer of the early years of the century.
Mansfield seems to be the only city
Of the state that has recognized "John
ny Appleseed," and what he did for the
Btate in its youth, for nowhere else,
Hot even at his almost forgotten grave
out In Indiana is there a monument to
. him. The monument to his memory
that was dedicated in Mansfield last
Thursday stands in the fine Sherman
tieineman park in that city, which was
the joint gift of the late Senator Sher
man and a wealthy fellow townsman.
The monument was erected by Martin
H. Bushnell of Mansfield, whose father
was one of the pioneers of that part of
the state and a personal friend of the
' quaint "Johnny Appleseed." The lower
part of the monument, which Is of buff
Btone, boars the inscription, "In Mem
ory of John Chapman, best known as
JTohnny Appleseed, pioneer apple nurs-
- eryman of Richland county from 181.0
to 1830." The quaint man for whom the
monument was erected was a hero,as
well as a crank, as he would have been
called had he lived to-day. He roamed
through woods without anything in the
Bhape of a weapon, despite the fact that
the forest were thronged with Indians
and wild animals that were almost
equally hostile and bloodthirsty. Once
he saved a settlement from the Indians
by a thirty-mile trip through the woods
at night, a trip which was as fine in its
way as Paul Bevere's ride.
He was a faddist, a crank perhaps,
but at the same time he was an intelli
gent Christian man In ragged clothes,
end no one who knew him, not even the
children who were tempted to laugh at
him, nor the IndianB, whose companion
he was on many a winter night in the
forests of the state, could help but re-
epect him. He could easily have turned
his philanthropy into money, into
enough money to have made a rich man
among the pioneers, to whome the pos
sessions of a couple of thousand dollars
meant independent wealth, but he did
not care for money, he said.
"Johnny Appleseed" might very
properly be called an apple missionary.
He believed that apples were good for
people, and he undertook to supply ap
ples to the pioneers. His plan was as
eimple as his life, and his life was al
most as simple as that of a squirrel of
an Indian. He had no home, no money,
and not much In the way of clothes.
He would either go on foot or in a birch
bark canoe where there were streams
that made it possible to go by water,
across the line into the old settlements
of Pennsylvania, where there were or
chards. The pioneers who came to Ohio
Were too poor, and it was too difficult
to get themselves and their families
Into the new state, for them to bring
any young apple trees, and few of them
tiad the patience to plant apple seeds
and nurse them to the point where they
could be transplanted to form orchards.
Bo there was scarcely an orchard wor
thy the name in the whole state. The
Quaint apple missionary sam this and
realized how many years it would be
before the struggling pioneers had time
to plant orchards, even supposing they
were able to buy the trees to plant, and
he devoted almost the whole of his life
to giving orchards to the then scanty
population of Ohio.
From the older portions of the older
Btate of Pennsylvania he would bring
back to Ohio bags filled with appla
Beeds. He got them at the cider mills
of the Keystone state. Apple seeds
were of no value to those who had ap
ple trees, and in Pennsylvania no one
thought of eaving apple seeds. So
'Johnny Appleseed" had no trouble in
petting all the seeds he could carry
back through the wilderness to Ohio.
.When he got to a part of the state
where there were no apple trees he
would plant the seeds he had brought.
He had studdied the matter until he
was able to pick out the most favorable
places to plant, so that they would be
most protected from the winter bliz
zards, and get most of the sunshine
that their rapid growth required.
When he found the right spot, he
would clear away the trops nnd ohvyiho
plant as many seeds as he thought
proper, and build a rude fence about
his nursery in the wilderness. When
he had done this, planting sufficient
peed in each nursery to supply the
farmers in that vicinity with young
trees, he would go to another place and
etart another little grove. This he
would continue until his supply of seeds
was exhausted. Then he would either
go back to Pennsylvania for more seeds
or, when the tree he had planted was
large enough, begin to distribute the
saplings. When they were grown a
few feet above the ground they were
ready to be transplanted into the or-
chards of the pioneers. Sometimes
"Johnny" sold the young trees for
clothes, old shoes or something else he
could wear or use. More often he gave
the young trees away, presenting to
each of the pioneers enough trees to
make a fairly large orchard. In this
way ho started almost innumerable or
chards, He carried on the work for years, and
there are still many thousands of ap
ple trees in the state that grew either
from little trees raised by "Johnny
Appleseed," or else from older trees
that he raised. His work supplied the
state with apples many years sooner
than the struggling pioneers would
have done It, without his quaint, but
beautiful benevolence.
It is said of him that he lived a life
of almost conceivable simplicity and
gentleness. Innumerable anecdotes of
him are told. One chilly night in tllte
woods, when he was huddled over a
little lire ho had built to keep himself
warm, he noticed that Insects were be
ing attracted to the Are by the light
and were falling into It. Never to
harm a living' creature was one of his
principles, and when he noticed that his
fire was causing the death of some of
Cod's creatures, as he called everything
that had life, he put out his fire and
spent the remainder of the night In
.cold and darkness. His life was full of
such acts as this. He crawled into a
hollow log one night to sleep and when
he found that there was a chipmunk
and her family in the other end and
that they were frightened by his pres
ence, he went away, and slept in the
snow because he could not find another
hollow log. '
Living in the woods as he did when
he was making his trips to and from
Pennsylvania, he came to be an adapt
in woodcraft, and this may have had
something- to do with the high esteem
in which he was held by the Indians,
who never molested him. As he came
from the places where he got his ap
ple seeds, he used to stop and pay vis
its to the orchards ho had created,
seeming to have almost the regard for
the trees that he would have for a pet
animal.
He began his apple tree missionary
work as early as 1802 or 1803. He was
less than thirty years old then, and
strong in limb, but far from good look
ing. He was born in Massachusetts in
1775, and came west with his brother in
the first years of the century. First he
began his apple missionary work In
western Pennsylvania, but that coun
try was rather too well settled, and
there were already too many apple or
chards for his work to take lust the
beneficent character he aimed to give
i it. For twenty years he kept up this
quaint work of philanthropy in Ohio,
and then this state, having meanwhile
being transformed from a wilderness to
a farming country, he went on out west
and carried on his apple missionary
enterprise in the still newer country.
His death was as quaintly pathetic
as his life. He loved the trees he plant
ed as he might have loved children of
his own. The last of his life was pas
sed in the neighborhood of Fort Wayne,
where, although a man of seventy-two,
he still planted apple seeds and raised
trees for the benefit of the settlers of
thatpart of the country. He heard
that some cattle had demolished the
fence of brushwood he had placed
about a little cluster of trees he had
planted, and although the place was
twenty miles from where he lived, he
started on foot to go to it and rebuild
the fence.
All the score of miles to where his
trees were he tramped. He worked for
hours repairing the fence about the
trees, so that it should not be broken
down again by cattle and then started
for his home. It was a cold, snowy day
and on the way back the old man be
came so weak that he was compelled to
stop at a settler's house and ask to be
allowed to rest there. It chanced that
he went to the house of a man who had
lived in Ohio, and who had known of
"Johnny Appleseed" and his life work
of giving the state apple trees. He was
very warmly welcomed but would not
accept anything but some bread and
milk and permission to sleep on the
floor. The next morning he was deleri
oub with pneumonia, the result of the
fatigue and exposure of his trip to save
the trees he had planted, and in a short
time he was dead. He was buried near
where he died, and the rude headboard
that was placed over his grave long
ago rotted away, so that the exact lo
cation can only be guessed at.
But if it were left to him to choose
there is little doubt that "Johnny
Appleseed" would have said that he
wanted no better monument than the
thousands of apple trees all over the
state of Ohio that have sprang from
the seeds he planted. -Cleveland Leader.
XOJITITFORI).
Nov. 23. Rev. William Lusk of North
Haven conducted the services at St.
Andrew's church last Sunday and will
probably continue there until a rector Is
elected.
Chester Lord was a visitor in the vil
lage last week.
Rev. Mr. Beach, pastor of the Con
gregational church, officiated at the fu
neral of Charles Ferguson's Infant
child.
The Northford Social and Whist club
met at Carl Norberg's Tuesday evening.
The first lady's prize was won by Mrs.
B. J. Maltby. Frank S. Davis won the
first gentleman's prize, and Miss Nellie
Trice and De Witt Maltby took the
cake and the "booby" prizes. Miss Price
won first prize last week, but owing to
the elegance of her "booby" she is not
at all downhearted.
Professor W. L. Marks has opened
thj season with a good number of pu
pils for piano, organ and violin, as well
as vocal training.
Mr. Birdsey of Meridcn has been the
guest of Morelle Cooke.
Toe Three Jolly Fellows will give a
soiree in Association hall Friday night.
Music will te furnished by the Marks
orchestra.
The remains of Mis. Miles Ives, who
'was aged ninety-four years, were in
terred in the old cemetery here last
Sunday, D. P. Griswoid of Wallingford
being the undertaker.
"Women, as a class, have no regard
fur punctuality."
" 'Tisn't so at all. I know plenty of
women who, if they have an engage
ment at 3 o'clock, are all ready and sit
ting on the edge of a chair by half-past
one." Indianapolis Journal.
For a Cold in the Head
Laxative Bromo-Qttlnlne Tablets.
QUEER JOHNNY APPLESEED.
A MOXVXEAT TO THE MEMOItT Oli
A J'EXMLESS I'll I LAM II ROP 1ST.
The Father of Orcliuid. In the State of
Ohio The Work of an Eccentric
aiun Who Was Widely Known and
Thought Well of hy All.
Of all Ohio's quaint characters, one
of the most remarkable and at the
same time most lovable was "Johnny
Appleseed," by which name wonderful
old John Chapman was known, through
out the state years ago. He was the
father of the orchards that have made
the state famous for its apples, and if
all he believed about the virtues of ap
ples was true ho was the father of
much of the healthfulnoss that blesses
the eons and daughtera of the rftate.
He believed that apples made people
healthy and he gave to the early set
tlers of Ohio all the chance they had in
the early days to get apples.
How well he is loved by the pioneers
of the state is shown by the handsome
monument to his memory that was un
veiled at Mansfield last Thursday.
Not many of those who knew "Johnny
Appleseed" personally are alive now,
but his work has lived after him to an
extent that) makes him the most re
markable penniless philanthropist the
state ever knew. He was as poor as
Job's turkey, as he would have said
himself in his fondness for the Scrip
tures and theh- application to the eve
yrday things of life, but he gave to
the pioneers of the state an endowment
of apple trees.
Cleveland had a share in his penni
less benevolence, for here and there
about the city, notably in Nowburg,f
are orchards which are pointed out by
old residents as having been planted
with trees that were once raised by
"Johnny Appleseed" and given to some
pioneer of the early years of the cen
tury. Mansfield seems to be the only city of
the state that has recognized "Johnny
A.pplefeed" and what he did for the
state in its youth, for nowhere else, not
even at his olmost-forgotten grave out
in Indiana is there a monument) to him.
The monument to his memory that was
dedicated In Manetlold last Shursday
islands in the tine Sherman-Heineman
Park in that city, which was the joint
gift of the late Senator Sherman and a !
wealthy fellow townsman. The monu- !
ment was erected by Martin B. Bush- j
nell of Mansfield, whose father was one '
of the pioneers of that part of the i
state and a personal friend of the
quaint "Johnny Appleseed." The lower
part of the monument, which Is of buff i
stone, bears the inscription, "In memo- j
ry of John Chapman, best known as i
Johnny Appleseed, pioneer apple nur- '
seryman of Richland county from 1810 j
to 1S30." The quaint man for whom the
monument was erected was a hero as
well as a crank, as he would have been ;
called had he lived to-day. He roampd
through the wooda without anything in i
the shape of a weapon, despite the fact)
that the forests were thronged with In- '
dians and wild animals that were al- ;
most equally hostile and bloodthirsty. ,
Once he saved a settlement from the ,
Indians by a. thirty-mile trip through
the woods at night, a trip which was ae
fine in its way as Paul Revere's ride, j
He was a faddist, a crank, perhaps,
but at the same time he was an intelli- j
gent) Christian mn in ragged clothes, t
and no one who knew him, not even the
children who were tempted to laugh nt
him, nor the Indians, whose companion
he was on many a winter night in the ,
forests of the state, could help but re- j
epect him. He could easily have turned
his philanthropy Into money
Into enough money to have made a rich
man among the the pioneers, to whom
the possession of a couple of thousand
dollars meant independent wealth, but
he did not care for money, he said.
"Johnny Appleseed" might very prop
erly be called an apple missionary. He
believed that apples were good, for peo
ple, and he undertook to supply apples
to the pioneers. His plan was as sim
ple as his life, and his life was almost
as simple as that of a squirrel or an In
dian. He had no home, no money, and
not much In the way of clothes. He
would either go on foot or in a birch
bark canoe where there were streams
that made it possible to go by water,
across the line Into the older settle
ments of Pennsylvania, where there
were orchards. The pioneers who came
to Ohio were too poor and It was too
difficult . to get themselves and their
families into the new state for them to
bring any young apple trees, and few of
them had the patience to plant where
they could be transplanted to form or
chards. So there was scarcely an or
chard worthy the name in the whole
state. The quaint apple missionary
saw this and realized how many years
It would be before the struggling pio
neers had time to plant orchards, even
supposing they were able to buy the
trees to plant, and he devoted almost
the whole of his life to giving orchards
to the then scanty population of Ohio.
From the older portions of the older
state of Pennsylvania he would bring
back to Ohio bags filled with apple
seeds. He got them at the cider mills
of the Keystone state. Apple seeds
were of no value to those who had ap
ple trees, and in Pennsylvania no one
thought of saving apple seeds. So
"Johnny Appleseed" had ho trouble in
getting all the seeds he could carry
back through the wilderness to Ohio.
When he got to a part of the state
where there were no apple trees he
would plant the seeds he had brought.
He had studied the matter until he was
able to pick out) the most favorable
places to plant, so that they would be
most protected from the winter bliz
zards and get most of the sunshine that
their rapid growth required.
When he found the right spot he
would clear away the trees and shrubs,
plant as many seeds as he thought pro
per, and build a rude fence about his
nursery in the wilderness. When he
had done this, planting sufficient seed
in each nursery to supply the farmers
in that vicinity with young trees, he
J would go to another place and start an
other little grove. This he would con
tinue until his supply of seeds was ex
hausted. Then he would either go back
to Pennsylvania for more seeds or,
when the trees he had planted were
ltrge enough, begin to distribute the
saplings. When they were grown a
few feet above the ground they were
ready to be transplanted into the or
chards of the pioneers. Some times
"Johnny" sold the young tiees for
clothes, old shoes or something else he
could wear or use. More often he gave
the young tret away, presenting to
each of the pioneers enough trees to
make a fairly large orchard. In this
way he started almost innumerable or
chards. He carried on the work for years, and
there are still many thousands of apple
trees in the state that grew either from
little trees raised by "Johnny Apple
seed," or else from older trees that he
raised. His work supplied the state
with apples many years sooner than
the struggling pioneers would have
done It without his quaint but beautiful
benevolence.
It is said of him that he lived a life
of almost Inconceivable simplicity and
gentleness. Innumerable anecdotes of
him are told. One chilly night In the
wood?, when he was huddled over a lit
tle fire he had bullt'-to keep himself
warm, he noticed that insects were be
ing attracted to the fire by the light
and were falling into it. Never to harm
a living creature was one of his princi
ples, and when he noticed that his fire
was causing the death of some of God's
had life, he put out hie fire and spent
j the remainder of the night in cold an
darkness. Hie life was full of such
acts as this. He crawled Into a hollow
log one night to sleep, and when he
found that there was a chipmunk and
her family in the other end and that
they were frightened by his presence,
he went away and slept in tin snow be
cause he could not find another hollow
log.
Living in the woods as he did when
he was making his trips to and from
Pennsylvania, he came to be an adapt
in woodcraft, and this may have had
something to do with the high esteem
in which he was held by the Indians,
who never molested him. As he came
from the places where he got his apple
seeds, he used to stop and pay visits to
the orchards he had created, seeming to
have almost the regard for the tree
that he would have for a pet animal,
He began his apple tree missionary
work as early as 1802 or 1808. He was
less than thirty years old then, and
: strong In limb, but far from good look
! lng. He was born 1n Massachusetts In
1775, and came west with his brother in
the first years of the century. First
he began his apple missionary work In
i western Pennsylvania, but that coun
(try was rather too well settled, and
! there were already too many apple or-
i chards for his work to take just the be
1 nefieent character he aimed to give it,
i For twenty years he kept up this
; quaint work of philanthropy In Ohlo4
and then, this state, having meanwhile
l been transformed from a wilderness to
! a farming country, he went on out
I west, and carried on his apple mission
! ary enterprise in tne mm newer coun
: try.
I "Johnny Appleseed" was tall and his
black beard and hair were long and
; unkempt. His eyes were small, plerc
lng and clear; to the latest days he was
; remembered. He dressed in rags, of
ten In what seemed less than enough to
! keep hi in warm. Usually he ' went
l bare-footed, and often he tramped long
, distances through the snow with noth
, nig on ms reet. sometimes he wore
sandals made of pieces of wood or bark
and fastened to his feet with thongs cub
i from the skins of animals. He was so
I welcome everywhere he was known
thnt he needed no money for food or
; lodging and he literally, as the Bibje
says, "took no heed for the morrow
He carried no money, and when he was
in the woods ho lived, as the animals
did, on what nuts, berries, roots and
other food he could find. Whenever he
went to a farmhouse he was supplied
witli whatever to eat or wear he need
erl, and sometimes he would be given
enough food to take him to the next
clearing.
He was almost as fond of children as
he was of apples, and although his ner
vous, jerky way of talking amused
them very much, they were too much
awed by his odd appearance to let hifti
see them laugh at him. He was al
ways clothed in rags, not very many of
them in summer, either. Often he wore
on his head a tin stew pan that he used
to cook much in. The settlers thought
from what he had told them that a
part of his peculiarity was due to his
having been jilted by a fickle maiden.
The story was that he had taken a poor
orphan girl from the most meagre sur
roundings, educated her, given her all
the comforts he could command and
then found that she was receiving th
attentions of another young ban. This
must have been when he was a young
man, for he was not known to be able
to care for himself, to say nothing of
any one else, during the time he was In
this part of the country. Although he
did not talk much except about his be
loved apple trees, ho was eloquent when
he talked of them, and he was fond of
making grandiloquent) addresses about
the virtues of apples. At such times
he had command of a very fine fl.ow of
language that indicated an excellent
education.
After going further west, he came
back . to portions of this state from
time to time to call on his old friends
and his apple trees. The last time he
returned to Ohio was In 1815 and that
year he died. He had many relatives,
his parents' family having been a large
one, but little Is known of any of them.
It Is to this quaint, lovable character
that M. B. Bushnell, a prominent citi
zen of Mansfield, raised and dedicated a
monument which will irlake him better
known, although there is little doubt
that) his gentle soul would care for no
other monument than the hundreds of
thousands of apple trees all over the
state thnt have sprung from the seeds
he brought through the woods from
Pennsylvania.
It was during the war of 1812 that
"Johnny" showed, more pronounced
than ever before, perhaps, that there
was the heart of a hero under his rag
ged shirt, a shirt which was never
fastened at the throat, no matter how
intense the cold. A rumor came to
Mansfield that the little settlement was
to be attacked and word was pent to
as many people nfl could be reached,
warning them to assemble in the block
house in the center of the square.
There were no soldiers' at the block
house, the nearest being at Mount Ver
non, thirty miles away, where Captairt
Douglass had a troop. It was a terri
ble journey, for there was only a new,
untraveled road through the forest and
the country was alive with- hostile In
dians. When volunteers to go to
Mount Vernon were called for, "John
ny" stepped forward and said he would
go. He did go, made the journey In
safety, and brought back the troops
with him in the morning, saving the
settlement fromifWhatever threatened
It.
His death was as quaintly pathetic as
his life. He loved the trees he planted
as he might have loved children of his
own. The last of his life was passed In
the neighborhood of Fort Wayne,
where, although a man of seventy-two,
he still planted apple seeds and raised
trees for the benefit of the settlers In
that) part of the country. He heard
that some cattle had demolished the
fence of brushwood he had placed
about a little cluster of trees he had
planted, and although the place was
twenty miles from where he lived, he
started on foot to go to it and rebuild
the fence.
All the score of miles to where his
trees were he tramped. He worked for
hours repairing the fence about the
trees, so that it should not be broken
down again by cattle, and then started
for home. It was a cold, snowy day,
and on the way back the old man be
came so weak that he was compelled to
stop at a eettler's house and task to be
allowed to rest there. It chanced that
he went to the house of a man who had
lived in Ohio and who had known of
"Johnny Appleseed" and his life work
of giving the state apple trees. He was
very warmiy welcomed, but would ac
cept nothing but some bread and milk
and permission to sleep on the floor.
The next morning he was delirious
with pneumonia, the result of the fa
tigue and exposure of his trip to save
the trees he had planted, and in a
short time he was dead. He was buried
near where he died, and the rude head
board that was placed over his grave
long ago rotted away, so that the ex
act location can only be guessed at.
But if it were left to him to choose
there la little doubt vthat "Johnny Ap
pleseed" would have said that he want
ed no better monument) than the thou
sands of apple trees ail over the state of
Ohio that have sprung from the seeds
he planted. Cleveland Leader.
"I've given a little attention to that
new clerk of yours," remarked the man
who wanted to do the clerk a favor,
"and I want to say that I consider him
a youth who will succeed. I notice he is
the kind who puts something aside for
a rainy day."
"Dear me! And I've missed two um
brellas already," returned the merchant.
"Much obliged for your tip. Ill watch
him." Chicago Evening Post.
THE PURE
GRAIN COFFEE
Some people can't drink coffee ;
everybody can drink Grain-O. It
looks and tastes like coffee, but it
is made from pure grains. No
coffee in it.
Grain-0 is. cheaper than coffee
costs about one-quarter as much.
All grocers lflc. and 25c
The Underwood Vislblo
TYPE WHITER
Leads in speed, convenience
and ease in operation.
Come and try it
GRIGGS, 7 Center St.
About a dozen reliable
Bicycles going at the price
of trash.
GRIGGS, 7 Center St.
Wells & Gunde,
Jewslen and SilvarsmilH
are
showing
an
attractive
of
selection
Wedding Presents
-IN-
Sterlinj Sitor and Silvar Plate.
788 Chapel Street.
High Grade
Optical Work.
We wish to invite
It'
your attention
fine line of
to our
optical
goods.
Not only do we
furnish perfect frames
and lenses, but our eye
specialist has every fa
cility for fitting the
eyes, together with
more than usual skill.
C. J. SOTSOtf JR.
&C0.,
859 Chapel Street.
SK3
)sSs
m
;
fife!
hotels
HOTEL GARDE,'
Opposite Union kJepofc,
NEW HAVEN, CONN.
Connecticut's Largest hit
American Plan. Strictly Transient.
Mi
itte! Jefferson,
102, IU4, IDS En! 15th St., IT.,
2 DOORS EAST OF UNION SQUARE,
(4th Avenue.)
In the midst of the business, amusement
and shopping district. Take 4th avenue
car from Grand Central Depot to 15th
street, only 10 minutes' ride.
Single Rooms, $1.00 up.
American Plan, $2.50 up.
Rooms with private bath, $2.00 up. A
quiet, homelike hotel for ladles and fami
lies doslrinj! to spend a few days in town.
Write for Illustrated Guide to New York.
J. o.iAi tf'iiiAiU, .Proprietor.
628 Tu Th Sut tf
-RICHMOND
Ho Water, Hot Air
and Steam.
Easily Managed, Durable.
ECONOMICAL OF FUEL.
THE BRADIEY CO,
15S Orange Street.
PLUMBING AND HEATING
CONTRACTORS.
1 m
ly.lilUU, AIL
Succeeding
The New Haven Steam Heating Co.
Manufacturers of tfi3 "GOLO"
Shset Im Haiiatr and Bailers
Contractors for Keating,
Plumbing, Sheet Metal Work
83 COURT STREET,
S. E. Dibble,
6u9 Grand Avenue.
Perfect Comfort
Is to be warm In winter. There are
four apparatuses that can lo It, they
being Hot Water, Hot Air, Steam, and
Stoves. These we sell and all under
the name of HUB.
Kach system has been
so constructed as to
use a small amount of
coal and deliver a great
quantity of lieat. These
sell up fl'OJ
00
CHICHESTER'S ENGLISH
raiieiAL fills
SS-fe'Tu. u .!'!Bl""1 'n,y Genuine.
It.lrvNSAPE. Always rt-Ii i,Id. I.,,!!,. nrairtlt
ArtJS. cmciuasTEiMs E.Ntiusu
Y4 - ,J w th bine rihhnn T..l. K- I,
' aKCTOUs Kubrttlttitloni
In
Hi Backindam, Eontu CowA)
(
1 ') lIQna B"y or yo-ir UriiKmst. or pnd 4e. io
i 5i ft '"""P.; ''r lrtlcnlnr, TcatlmonlaU
w f-J n "Kellef for Ladlea," in utter, by re-
A tun 10.000 Tr.Hmonia!.. Sold b
' alt Drueci.ts. C'hlehoBti rhpml.al '..
KuUoa ttli papai. iiaUlaaa buu, l'UiiA.. j
Sixxtixttovu
1(1 Institute of
Languages,
Classes In Gieolt LatlnGorman
343 GEORGE STREET. 1
E. A. LEOPOLD
VOICE BUILDER, '
Resumes Instruction Wednesday. SeDt 1!)
, 65 INSURANCE BUILDING. '
Mondays and Thursdays, Hartford. 18
TIIK 241st YICAR OF THK
111
WILL BEGIN
.THDHSDAY, SEPT. 27, 1300.
The school prepares thoroughly for Yale
Coiiege and the Sheffield Scientific School
Earnest aud able boys are often prepared
for college in three years,
Tho Rector, Mr. GEORGE L. FOX, will
be at his home, No. 7 College street, from
10 a. m. to 1 p. m.( for consultation with
Parents. sxjitf
THE DESSAUER-TBOOSTW IK
SCHOOL OP MUSIC,
j tii Chapel inroot,
will reopen oa THURSDAY, September 7tk.
Office hours dally from 13 to 1 aud a to I
si a
THE
Lev? C. Gilbert
Co..
114 CHURCH STREET
Lumber.
Rough and dressed, of every
description.
Also, COAL.
LOUIS A, MANSFIELD,
Successor to Austin Mansfield & Son.
505 GRAND AVENUE,
CABINET AND HARDWOOD
WORK,
AtSO SAWING, TURNING
And JOBBING IN WOOD of all kind.
EDWARD P. BRETT, Builder,
It) AK'i'iSAiV STKEBT.
Telephone 258-1X. ;
SHEAHAN
& GROARK.
Practical Mlki iqmm.
Practical ?Mihn ail Gn Fithn
Tin, Sheet Inn, Goppar Wortars.
Galvanized Iron Comis)
Manufacture.
Church Army Coffee-Bar
33 GREGSON ST.
CLEAN AND ATTRACTIVE).
Try our 5 cent Lunches.
Ten Cent Dinners Specialty
PHILADELPHIA
DENTAL EOOIS,
781 Chapel Street,
NEW HAVEN, CONN.
lelephone.
Best Set of Teeth on Rubber
Plate, $8.00.
There can be NO better made, no matter
how much Is paid elsewhere. '
Those living at a distance can come In
the morning and wear their new teetu
home the same day.
L. D. MONKS. D. D. S.
Ollice open from 8 a. m. to 6 p. m. a!3 '
DR. KELLY,
Specialist.
30 Years' Kxporloujo
Skin, and Private Diseases of
Men ana women.
RUPTURE and PILES cured without cut
ting or confinement.
739 CHAPEL ST., cor. State, Room 9.
Hours: 9 to 12 and 2 to 5.
Evenings, 7 to 8:30.
Sundays at residence, 115 York street.
jc25 eod
WAGONS,
TRUCKS,
HARNESS. -
TAIM lYAGON'i mit.k, GROCERY, J
BiKEKSWA(iON8.
DUMP CAKTS, CONCORDS, RUNABOUTS
and TOP CARJIIAUKS.
HARNESS, BLAMiETS, R013B8 and COI
LARS. .. , '
Cur Wagons were all nouRht prevlont
to the raise In prices, but will be sold with
int anv advance.
S MEDLEY BROS. & CO.
154 to 177 BREWERY STREBT. ,
COMPRESSED All?
Carpet Cleaning Works,
No. 106 Court Strsat.
Carpets called for and delivered.
Carpels Cleaned and laid, also made overs
In fact, everything done lu the Carpet line.
All work satisfactorily aud promptly dona.
Velcpnone call 1314-2. Give us a call.
ujlO VVM. V, K.NAPP th CO.
In Blood.

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