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The daily morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven, Conn.) 1894-1907, September 02, 1902, Image 2

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020358/1902-09-02/ed-1/seq-2/

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NEW IIAVEN MORNING JGUBNAL AND COURIER. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER J2, 1SC2,
THE BRANFORD RACES.
ST FISK'S DRITISG PARK
SPECIAL TRA1X OF 12 CASS.
Threa Raoei Decided So Prote.U and
No Accident First CIih Patronage
Baacra Had to Paea a 9111a In Ssl8 1.3
to Win The Sammarlaei
The patronage was first-class at L.
'A. FIsk's Branford driving park yester
day afternoon when the races were de
cided to the evident satisfaction of the
large number of spectators on the cov
ered grandstand, the bleachers and the
comfortable shade of the club house
verandah. Other patrons were seated
in stylish teams in favorable locations.
Patronage could have been more exten
sive but couldn't have been better in
duality. The long train of twelve cars
that left New Haven at a convenient
hour (130) after the usual dinner time,
was taxed to the number of seats in
the coaches. Stylish girls in gay sum
mer attire and pretty ladies in attrac
tive summer colors were numerous on
the train both with and without escorts.
At the park the grandstand was soon
occupied by an audience that was
largely composed of women while the
gentlemen present were in various lo
cations. - Frank L. Newton gave the word to
the drivers and acted as one of the
judges. Other judges were Louis A.
Fisk and Robert H. Meachen. The de
tails of the race were recorded for the
.National Trotting Association by D. B.'
Ambler. One hundred dollars was won
by C. O. D., $50 by Paper Boy, $30 by
Wallace L. Wilkes and $20 by Mary
Tracy. Further particulars are indi
cated by the summary:
2:27 Class Pace Purse $200.
C. O. D. ch g by Anderson Wilkes 111
Paper Boy b g by Petrel, J. Fer-
gersuon 223
.Wallace L. Wilkes g by Wm,
Everett A. F. Davis 4 3 2
Mary Tracy b m by Bermuda 3 5 4
Wayne Wilton b g by Wilton. T.
if
Summer Piano Thoughts.
Perhaps you have settled the matter of possessing a new Piano this
fall, and are thinking over the question of selection during these sum
mer days.
. The matter of cost has less to do now than formerly.
The "LOOMIS NEW EAST PAYMENT SYSTEM" makes It easy to
buy the very best Pianos without paying any excess price for the ac
commodation. THE EMERSON PIANO.
If you own an EMERSION PIANO you have the gratification of pos
sessing a PIANO that has no shortcomings, no limitations, a PIANO
with a perfect tone, action and case deslgnA
Think of the Emerson,
See It, hear it, try it, and save yourself the possibility of future loss or
discontent, which so often follows when the EMERSON Is not chosen.
THE EMERSON PIANO
SOLD ONLY IX
CHARLES H. L00MIS,
Chapel
We are also agents for the Mehlin, Strich & Zeidler, Gramer and oth
er first-class makes of PIANOS.
Also the wonderful
SIMPLEX PIANO FLAYER
Acknowledged by the world's greatest artists as being the very best
PIANO PLAYER obtainable to-day.
SCHOOL SHOES.
Most time for school to open and,
as a matter of course, the Boys and
Girls will need new shoes. The
fact is not so appalling as it might
seem at first, as we can give you
good sensible School Shoes, in sizes
8 to 10 1-2, $1.00 and $1.25; 11 to
,2, $1.25 and $1.50; Ladies' sizes,
2 1-2 to 7, $2.00. For Boys who
wear Men's sizes, our special shoe
at $1.98.
ONLY GOOD SHOES:
ft HI Bill SHOE COMPAWY
842 and 846 CHAPEL STREET.
W, Bassett 5 4 5
Time. 2:31 1-2. 2:27 1-4. 2:23 1-4.
The winner of the foregoing race waa
sired by Anderson Wilkes,-2:22 1-4; he
by. Onward, 2:25 1-4, by George Wilkes,
2:22. . The dam of the winner was by
Masterlode, one of the creditable sons
of Hambletonian.
The judges took advantage of the
new rule of the National Trotting As
sociation which allows them to sand
wich three races. The winner of the
first heat surprised the judges when
they examined their stop watches at
the finish of1 the mile which was made
in 2:16 1-2, a creditable performance
for half mile track. Summary:
Sunera by m by Colbert W. J.
Rosenberg -.1 1 1
Scott b g by Ben Ethan, M. T.
Hayes 223
Rosy Wilkes blk m by Alcuin,
Rowland and Perry 3 3 2
McGavock b s by McEwen, C. E.
. Minor 4 4 4
Time, 2:16 1-2. 2:18 3-4, 2:18 1-2.
The winner of the foregoing race is a
young horse that can go faster when
j more speed is wanted.
As there were four horses from Der
by at the track Mr. Fisk generously of
feed a purse of $130 for the quartet.
Summary:
Conroy b m T. W. Bassett 1 2 11
Foxie ch g Louis Bronson 2 12 2
Crescendo b W. B. Brown 3 3 3 3
Prince bg T. E. Donovan 4 dr
Time, 2:35 1-2, 2:34 1-2. 2:36. 2:36 1-2.
The next races at the park will be In
connection with the Branford Fair to
be held on the 18th, 19th and 20th of
this month.
LEAVE TO-DAY
For a Six Weeks' Pleasure Drive.
In an Interview last evening with Al
bert C. Coe, late treasurer of the L.
again. It bears a decidedly Webber
said that he had no definite programme
yet arranged that he could announce at
present All that he could say at pres
ent was that he would take a six weeks'
vacation and would together with his
wife leave to-day for a leisurely car
riage drive through Litchfield county
and the Berkshire hills, which would oc
cupy the greater part of that time.
NEW HAVEN BY
St.
YESTERDAY'S BALL GAMES
XEW HA VEX H'O.V IX AFTERXOOX
LOST IX SIORXIKG.
Tblrly.fivc Hnadred Paapla Wltnened
Horn Came Blues Batted Heavily
Basalts of Other Camei.
New Haven bunched their hits in the
afternoon game with Hartford on the
Savin Rock grounds yesterday and
won the game by the score of 6 to 2.
Kenefick, the Hartford pitcher, was
batted hard at times. Bannon and
Connell each made two-baggers and
Braun bit the ball for three bases,
while Bannon lined out two three
base hits. Tuckey pitched superb ball
for the Blues and won the game with
ease. He struck out six men, gave but
one man a pass to first, and assisted in
a double play. The entire New Haven
team played championship ball and
their work was most enthusiastically
applauded by the 3,500 spectators.
Truby, Hartford's second baseman,
did an over-abundance of kicking and
was ordered out of the game by Umpire
Ashe. The score by innings:
R.H.E.
New Haven 1 0 0 1 2 1 0 1 x-6 8 4
Hartford 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 02 4 3
Batteries Tuckey and Connell; Hen
efick and Reisling.
BRIDGEPORT 4, MERIDEN 2.
Bridgeport. Conn., Sept 1. Bridge
port had Meriden shut out up to the
ninth inning here this afternoon, then
Corcoran gave the first two men up
bases on balls and both scored off
Weisbecker's two bagger. The game
ended 4 to 2 in Bridgeport's favor.
Score by innings:
R.H.E.
Bridgeport 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 x 4 7 1
Meriden 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9-2 8 1
Batteries Corcoran and O'Rourke;
Dunbar and Theisen.
SPRINGFIELD 5, WATERBURY 2.
Springfield, Mass.. Sept. 1. Llndeman
with a two bagger in the ninth inning
prevented the Waterbury team from
being shut out In the afternoon game,
bringing in two men on bases. Llnde
man .was hit hard by Springfield at op
portune times while Hoffman kept the
hits scattered. Score by Innings:
R.H.E.
Springfield 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 1 x 5 8 1
Waterbury 0 0000000 2241
Batteries Hoffman and O'Connor;
Llndeman and Seanlon.
NORWICH 7. NEW LONDON 4.
Norwich, Sept. 1. Norwich outplayed
New London in the afternoon game and
won handily. Sullivan lined out a
home run for Norwlch.wlth two men on
bases. New London could do nothing
with Qulnn's patching after the second
Inning. The score:
Norwich : 0 0 3 2 0 1 1 0 x 7
New London .....0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 04
Batteries Quinn and Manning; Long
and Armbuster.
MORNING GAMES.
Hartford's Pitcher Defeated New Ha
venOther Contests.'
Hartford, Conn., Sep. 1. Hartford de
feated New Haven in a pitcher's battle
this morning. Walker's work was
especially fine and the home team's
hitting was opportune. The scores by
Innings:
R.H.E.
Hartford 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 x 6 5 8
New Haven 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 02 8 1
Batteries Walker and Relsltng;
Deering and Connell.
BRIDGEPORT 11, MERIDEN 1.
Meriden, Conn., Sept 1. In a most In
teresting game this morning Bridgeport
defeated the home team by the score of
4 to 1. The game was a battle between
the pitchers until the eighth. An er
ror by Welsbecker and a fumble by
Drew followed by two hits scored four
rune for Bridgeport. Hodge then struck
out the following three batsmen. The
feature of the game waa a double play
by Altlzer, unassisted, In the seventh
inning. Score by Innings:
R.H.E.
Bridgeport 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 04 9 3
Meriden ...0 0 0 0 00 0 1 01 5 3
Batteries Lyman and O'Rourke;
Hodge and Thlesen.
TEN INNINGS IN NEW LONDON.
New .London, Conn., Sep. . 1. New
London won the morning game in the
tenth Inning to-day. Errors by O'Brien
and Landey gave Norwich three runs
in the first inning. McLean was hit
freely all through the game and New
London managed to tie the score In the
seventh. In the eighth, ninth and tenth
Norwich could not score. In New Lon
don's half of the tenth Rising reached
first on a single, took second on Ban
non's out at first and was scored on a
single to left by O'Brien. The score by
innings:
R.H.E.
Norwich 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 05 8 2
New London ..0 10200200 16 12 4
Batteries McLaughlin and Armbus
ter; McLean and Manning.
SPRINGFIELD DEFEATED.
Springfield, Mass., Sept. 1. Water
bury practically defeated Springfield
this morning in the fourth inning when
the home team went to pieces. Two
flies were misjudged, two erros and a
number of hits bunched allowing six
rune to come In. Springfield played a
good uphill game but could not over
come the lead. Score by innings:
R H E
Springfield 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1-6 10 4
Waterbury 0 0 0 6 0 1 0 0 07 12 3
Batteries Bowler and O'Connor;
Llnderman and Scanloh.
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
At New York New York 4, St. Louis
6.
At Brooklyn Brooklyn 3, Pittsburg 4.
At Boston Cincinnati 6, Boston 7.
At Philadelphia Philadelphia 11, Chi
cago 3.
Afternoon Games.
At Boston Boston 4, Cincinnati 7.
K. W.GKOVK
TUIs name must appear on every box of the
genuine Laxative liroiuo-(juIulue Tablets,
the remedr that cures a cold In ana dn.
25 cents
Said Russell Sage: "T he cheapest thing
to eat
Is Ready Bits: away with trust made
meat:
Packages 15c. All grocers.
At New York New York 2, St. Louis
. '
At Philadelphia Philadelphia 1. Chi
cago 6. .
At Brooklyn Pittsburg 8, Brooklyn 7.
AMERICAN LEAGUE.
Morning Games.
At Detroit Detroit 4, Washington 2.
At St. Louis St . Louis 5, Philadel
phia 1.
At Cleveland Cleveland 10, Boston 0.
At Chicago Chicago 8, Baltimore 4.
Afternoon Games.
At Cleveland Cleveland 8, Boston' 0.
At St. Louis St Louis 4, Philadelphia
At Detroit Detroit 13. Washington 1.
At Chicago Chicago 5, Baltimore 5.
(Nine innings;: darkness.)
EASTERN LEAGUE.
Morning Games.
At Jersey City Jersey City 3, Newark
4.
At Buffalo Buffalo 8, Montreal 7.
At WorcesterWorcester 14, Provl -dence
6.
At Rochester Rochester 1, Toronto
12.
Afternoon Games.
At Newark Newark 0, Jersey City 5.
At Providence Providence 9, Worces
ter 4. ; . .
At Rochester Rochester 7, Toronto 3.
At Buffalo Buffalo 11, Montreal 10.
EXTERTAINXEXTS.
flrperloa Theater.
WARD AND VOICES.
Anyone who saw Ward and yokes'
production of "The Head Waiters"
last year will remember with pleasure
the rich burlesque on the war drama
"Shenandoah." In the new edition of
this vehicle which Ward and Vokes
will show us at the Hyperion on Satur
day next, September 6, matinee and
night, this burlesque feature has been
retained and will be well worth seeing
again. It bears a decidedly Weber
Field flavor and as the closing half
hour of an evening which has been de
voted to music almost entirely. It is a
most decided treat. Almost every
theatergoer has seen some one of the
many plays anJ: though this burlesque
Is more particularly aimed at Senan
doah It smacks' of all of them. Happy
Ward, Harry Vokes, Margarey Daly
Vokes, Lucy Daly, Allan Curtis, Joe
Kelly. Tony Williams, and the entire
company are seen to excellent advant
age. There wilt be a bargain matinee
at which prices will be 25c, 35c, 50c, 75c
and $1.
Daniel Sully appealed at the Hyper
ion yesterday afternoon and evening in
"The Parish Priest" written by Daniel
Hart. The play Is one which by the
graphic lesson It teaches of faith, hope
and charity draws out the finer feelings
of all who witness It Mr. Sully was
supported by an excellent company.
The attendance was not very large, as
It was so warm yesterday that the ma
jority of the people patronized the short
resorts. ;r'
- ,
Urn ii (I Opera Haute.
"The Minister's Daughters," a most elab
orate scenic production from the pen of
Leonard Grover, nve-nct i)ly with a
prologue, opened A three days' engagement
yesterday afternoon with a matinee, and
will also give a matinee on Wednesday.
The play Is very exciting and holds tbe
feeling of the amllMir to the highest reu
nion from start to finish. The story Is a
most Interesting one and the prologue por
trays the house of the Drayton's In the
country. The father, a minister, has re
cently died, leaving a wife and two daugh
ters, one totally blind, and with a heavy
mortgage on the farm.. Oil has been dis
covered In the vicinity, and the experts
predict that the main snrlnes are on the
farm property An unscrupulous New York
uneenlator, who knows these facts and that
Millie, the older daughter, will some time
be the owner 6ft .the property, hires hor
away to New York. She consenting In the
hope that she may thus earn money enough
to pay the mortgage on the farm. Act first
portrays Millie singing In a concert saloon
on the Bowery, wliere her sister and her
Irish lover finally find her. As they are
about to take here away, a "pal" of her
enemy has hr lover eomnromised In a
forgery they are committing, and he Is
taken to prison, and the blind girl stolen
from her sister. The next act portrays the
prison and scenes surrounding It. The third
act gives a most vivid picture of a pool
room In which Millie's lover, John O'Malley,
wins $4,000 on a horse race, which he pro
poses to usa to pay off the debt on the
farm. The nt act consists of three scenes,
the most important of which la that of the
Totlow Oil Yards, where O'Malley is iurpd,
robbed and locked In the yard otBce. The
fdace Is then wt on lire. The whole .yard
s In llamas, Robin Is about to perish, when
Millie dashes through the flumes, break
open the door, saves her lover, who Is lust
In time to save the blind sister from helm?
dashed to pieces by the oll-holsters. In the
last act they are all back on the farm.
It Is about to be sold. The villains amr
with the stolen money, Which by n clever
piece of acting O'Malley recovers, tliey are
arrested and the farm Is saved. Juliette
de Grlgnou, as "Millie Drayton," by her
clever acting captivated her audience, us
did Kathleen Barry as her "blind sister."
Mary E. Johnson, as the widow, was also
excellent. Hoblu O'Malley, the Irish lad
of fickle fortune, portrayed by Domilcl Meek,
was trne to Ufa and showed clever work.
Clnrence T. Piper, as "Handsome Harry,"
was very good, as was Nat Letllngwell as
"Lyman Coykendall. May Noble was also
worthy of especial notice. Performances
repeated to-night and to-morrow afternoon
and evening. Popular prleea prevail.
A cargo full of African lions is a
feature of the production of "The Man
Who Dared" by Howard Hall at the
Grand opera house Thursday, Friday
and Saturday, September 4, 5 and 6. The
hero, a gentleman from France, when
dared to the act by a rival who desires
to see him killed, enters the cage and
kicking the lions who are spirited ani
mals and have made much trouble,
picks up a glove and then retired. The
play, a five act melodrama, of which he
is the author, has been the most suc
cessful he has ever produced, and has
broken the records for attendance in
many of the theaters in which It has
been seen in this as well as all of last
season.
The drama Is well put together, the
incidents cleverly grouped and the lines
strong and pertinent. Howard Hall
assumes the character of the wronged
count who seeks revenge. In the third
act when wooing his own wife under
his brother's name, she drops her
glove containing a note. Paul Gira
deaux snatches it up and throws it Into
a cage of Hons In a zoo at Monte Car
lo, daring the count to get It. With
nonchalance, a silk hat on his head and
a cigar in his mouth, the man actually
goes into the cage and picks up the
glove. There will be a matinee Satur
day. Poll's Wonderland Theater
The bill presented at Poll's for the
opening afternoon on Labor day met
with an enthusiastic reception. The
house was filled and despite the warm
Make Ready Bits the food pro tern.
(D. V.) A. D. at 6 p. m.
Packages 15c. "A11 grocers.
weather the theater was kept comfort
able and cool by the numerous electric
fans.
The leading feature of the bill was the
famous Piccolos midgets in a very re
markable acrobatic act These little
people present a very clever feat and
the wrestling match kept the audience
on the anxious seat They give a fine
exhibition and won constant applause,
which waa acknowledged by the mem
ber who does the least of the acrobatic
work, causing thereby no end of amuse
ment The next feature was the one-act
playlet by Will M. Cressey and pre
sented by Francesca Redding, assisted
by a capable company, including the
following:
"Her Friend from Texas."
Captain Tom Carrington. U. S. A.
(perhaps) Frank Helland
Willie Wilkins, a society bud
Arthur Larkin
James, a butler Ralph Morse
Mrs. Knickerbocker, a rich widow
from Denver Miss Redding
Place, New York city. Time, 8:30.
The action is rapid and snappy and
keeps the interest lively. It deals with
a Denver widow who inserts an adver
tisement in the papers that she wishes
a husband. A dapper little young man
calls and between his embarrassment
and fright tells her his papa sent hln:
as he was tired of supporting him and
though he could land the widow. Wil
lie Wilkins gives a good idea of Just
what such a young man ought to be.
Everything looks serene for Willie until
a Captain Carrington appears on the
scene. The captain is a bully and
frightens Willie almost into hysterics.
The fact of these two being on the
same errand causes no end of amuse
ment. One insults the other and a duel
is proposed, but before taking place the
bully Is scared and Willie stands the
better show of securing the widow. It
is a bright little sketch.
The Twins Nice do a neat little danc
ing and singing act. Corbly and Burke,
the Irish noblemen, have one of those
lively acts which keeps one In roars of
laughter and ha-e with them some of
the latest Jokes. Their work is wook.
The Wangdoodle quartet of black face
singers are 'exceptionally good and had
to respond to several encores. James F.
Kelley and Dorothy Kent have a pret
ty little sketch.
The singing of Warren and Blanchard
are one of the good features of their
act. Edward Estus, the famous gym
nast and wonderful equilibrist, also ap
pears. The theater presents a very fine ap
pearance and the patrons were pleased
with the new mosaic floor which has
replaced the wooden floor in the lobby.
Prices at matinee, 10c and 20e. Even
ing 10c, 20c and 30c. Ladles at mati
nee, 10c.
VISITING IN TOWN.
Captain Charles E. Demmlng, brother
of George F. Demmlng. of 129 Nash,
street, is visiting him for a few days.
Captain Demmlng, who has followed
the sea nearly all his life, is an old New
Haven boy. and at one time was a
member of the Second company, Gov
ernor's Foot Guard. He Is an elocu
tionist of a high order of merit, and
yesterday favored many of his friends
with numerous selections from the fa
mous poets and literature writers of
the day. (He; waa warmly congratulated
on his versatility and efforts to please
his uiany friends In this city, who are
legion,.
TROLLEY CARS MEET.
Two trolley cars of the Fair Haven
and Westvllle road met yesterday morn
ing aboutl0:30 in West Haven. The
cars came together en Elm street at
the corner of Washington avenue. Sev
eral cars were coming up Elm street at
the time and one of them stopped sud
denly shortly after Washington avenue
was passed. The big car which follow
ed this one could not be stopped In time
owing to the breaking of the brake
chain, and It bumped Into the first one
with little force. Two men who were on
the front platform of the second car
Injured. One man's leg was spilt open
and a little girl was slightly Injured.
THROWN FROM A CAR.
James Welch Painfully Injured Last
Night on -Congress Avenue.
James Welch of 137 Scranton street
was thrown from a Sylvan avenue car
last night at 9 o'clock and his right
ankle was broken. He was thrown at
Congress avenue and Hallock street and
was taken to Dtmock's drug store and
later was removed to his home where
Dr. Sweet reduced the fracture.
HOUSE BOAT WILL MOVE.
It was stated last night that the pro
prietor of the house boat which has
been at Morris Cove for some past, and
of which the residents of that resort
complained, has decided to move, and'
his boat will probably be towed ajway
some time to-morrow.
CHOCOLATES, BON-BONS AND
SPECIATLIES, fresh every day or
two. Candies expressed everywhere.
Telephone and mall orders promptly
filled. Purchase your Huyler'g . at
CITY HALL PHAHMACY. and see
how delightfully fresh they are.
Security Insurance Go.
of New Haven.
OFFICE) 37 CENTER STREET.
Cash AsaeM Jan. 1, IUJ4, l,0sT,3USQ
JLUUIiCTOUS:
Charles S. Leete, Chan. B. Curtis.
James D. Dewell. H. Mason,
Joel A. Sperrj, B. O. Stoddard,
8. E. Merwlu, William B. Tyler.
John W. Ailing, John T. Mansou,
Cbai. E. Sheldon.
CHARLES S. LEETB, H. MASON,
President. Secretary.
3. D. DBWKLL. H. O. FULLER,
L If lea Prtaldeat Au't Secretar '
"What have you ready," asked old Mr.
Sprightly.
"Ready Bits, sah," said the waiter po
litely. (The world's best quick lunch.)
9StStSSfSSSStSffSStfSfjrfSSfSffSffftttfSSSS9gfgff9
Want Good Peaches?
Tuesday and Wednesday finds us well stocked with the favorite
"Mountain Rose" and "Champion" brands. Splendid peaches minus ex
tortionate prkes.
Drink Pure Water !
Mt Rego Spring Water, H2 O. That symbol does not mean water
loaded with minerals. It's nothing but water, flowing pure and cold the
year round, 8 gallons a minute, led directly into glass vessels. Sold by
the case or bottle.
BOSTON GROCERY CO.,
Chapel & Temple Sts, Branch Store, 1231 Chapel.
Telephone 941.
THEIR TRIENNIAL ASSEMBLY.
Bassett Family WrH Convene at Colo
nial Park. -The
triennial assembly ot the Bassett
family of America will be held In Colo
nial Inn, Colonial park. West Haven, on
Friday, September 19, 1902. Frank G.
Bassett, of Seymour, is seoretary of the
assembly and all membera of that large
and old family who are to attend are
desired to notify him as soon as possi
ble. Notices and invitations have been
sent to all the family. An excellent
dinner will be' served.
Aa the notification says: "It is one of
the great duties of tbe members of the
Bassett family to be present at roll call
and answer to- their names' and take
JOHANN HOST'S
EXTRACT
is not a stimulant
it has no re
action. You retain what
you gain by its use.
A wineglassful
with meals. '
INSIST upon JOHANN IIOFP'S and
you will not bo imposed upon. No subtil
tutt il "just good." w
EISNER MKNDELSON CO.
of New York. Sols Agtnti.
Watts. Watte. Waties
Wells & Gunde,
The Old Reliable Jewelers.
788 Chapel Street.
We
Mend Clocks.
We can make your
clock keep good time.
Our clock man will
call and get it, and re
turn it to you in good
running order, if you
will write us or 'phone
to 1 637-4.
Prices are reasonable.
C. J. MONSON, JB. & CO.
857-859 Chapel St.
Straight as an
arrow, free from defects
that is tlie way the
sight should be and can
be unless tbe eyes, bare
been neglected.
Tests are made free by
a crfiflnnte nntlnlnn.
. . . . . ..... imctQ
headaches caused bv eve
strain. Our stock of OPTICAL GOODS is
So large that 'we can flt glasses for any
ordinary case.
DURANT,
JE4WELEB, AND OPTICIAN.
71 Church Street.
Opp. Post Office.
Crisp Ready Bits is ready ail the time
A breakfast,, dinner.supper for a dime.
All restaurants.
m
m
w
a
a
at
1
m
m
0
at
m
m
(
at
m
a
part in the festivities of the day, which
will be Interesting and Instructive to a
Bassett mind."
IS HEARTY AT 102.
Mrs. Ellen Hunt, of Brooklyn, Looks
More Like a Woman of Sixty .Than a
Centenarian." - - v
Meriden, Sept. 1. Mrs.. Ellen Hunt,
102 years old, Is as hale and hearty as
a woman ot dxty. She is visiting Mrs,
F. W. Homan, of Antonia avenue, hav
ing come here from Brooklyn. . En
route she stopped: at Middletown, and
while there fell down a flight of stairs,
breaking one of her legs, but soon re
covered. Mrs. Hunt is piecing. a bed
quilt. She has two children and eight
great-grandchildren,
'gxovtisltms, 'Stc.
COM. PEAGHES.
CONECT1CUT PEACHES are' the finest
In the world. We are receiving large quaa
titles daily of the luscious fruit. ,
, Be to 10c per quart. 1 '
50c to $1.00 per basket,-
. ACME? and PARAGON TOMATOES by
the cuart or basket. . Good time to can
Peaches and Tomatoes.
MASON'S FRUIT JARS, quarts. BOc'doe.'
pints, 48c doz.
MASON'S and LIGHTNING JARS" rub
bers, tops, etc.- -
FAULTLESS JAVA and ! MOCHA' COP
FEE, only 23e per lb. , . .
Hundreda of . New Haven.! families ar'
using lt.- TRX IT. ., f ... - c
. , GOODS DELIVERED, ' '
S. S. ADAMS,
Cor. State and Court Sts.
515 8s.arfA2 .55I.i;dv W
ZH iv r ' 1 oumra Avenue.
87S Bernard Avenue. 148 Rosette Btret
NO NEED OF IT.
tion't stand over a hot fire and bakej
try our Genuine Home-made Baking;
We don't pretend to give you more than
you can got anywhere else. , QUALITY
is what we lay claim to. PURITY of
Ingredients .and that fine old-fashioned
home-made flavor. . '
WHEAT BREAD .,; 9 . m,
RYE BREAD ...... .10 a. rn,
ENTIRE WHEAT ....:,... 10 a. m.
CLARK'S CRULLERS 9 am.
PARKER HOUSE and FINGER ' ,
I ROLLS , 2 p. m.
The Celebrated BRIGGS' CAKE 3 p. m.
A specialty, BRIGGS' CELEBRATED
ANGEL CAKH, to order only. Once tried
wilt convince' you of its superiority. A
tender, delicate cake rightly named. ,
Old time RAISED LOAF CAKE.- . ,
Orders for Extra Cake and Rolls on day
in advance. ' - . ,
E. E. Nichols,
Telephone 608-12. 378 STATU STREET.
- 1 11 .1 1 . ' 1 1 11 i- mi-f 1 11 iT mm mi.
QQ UinOQUTl t
TO-DAY. J - " ;
FINE RIPE PINEAPPLES, 7c each,
4 for: 25c, ' Last chance to buy them
cheap this season. .
CONCORD GRAPES. Very sweet
large clusters, 12c basket. . ..
BREAKFAST MELONS, fine cutting,
60 up.
100 Baskets Fancy PEACHES, price
low. . ,; -
FANCY EGG-PLANT. .70 each, i tot
25c. ', '
Chickens and Fowls. ,
We have them to-day, full dressed,
18o and 20c per lb.
New Crop CANNED PEAS; eaual to
the fresh picked. The finest 12c per can;
Splendid Peas, 3 cans for 25c.'
ABSOLUTELY PURE FRENCH
OLIVE OIL We have It as imported
in 1 qt. tin cans at $1.25. If you want
the best buy this. . 7 " -
D. M. WELCH & SON,
28 and 30 CONGRESS AVE.
BRANCHES: - '
FAIR HAVEN and WEST HAVEN.' '
9c Legs of Mutton 9c
AT
E. SCHOENBERBEjR & SONS, -
Palace Market, 88-90 George St., 1-2-3
I Central "Market, Congress Ave. -

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