OCR Interpretation


The daily morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven, Conn.) 1894-1907, December 20, 1906, Image 7

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020358/1906-12-20/ed-1/seq-7/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 7

NEW, HAVEN MORNiyQJQURNAL AND COURIER, THURSDAY DECEMBER 20 1906
',1
!
!
t
i
z
t
Rehabilitated.
The wonderful rehabilitation of the building so long
occupied by the M. Sonnenberg Piano Co. has given to
J the central portion of ths city a magnificent st ructure.
After many months of work and many disappointments,
caused by the inability to obtain proncr materials to fill
specifications, the building is completed. It is safe to say
that no building in the business section of the city can
approach it for magnificence. The interior is nearly
done, only the finishing touches are needed to enable us
to say: It is finished. We invite the public to visit our
new building, the home of fine pianos, and see the com
pleteness of every detail which has transformed an old es
tablishment into a modern business building-.
M. SONNENBERG PIANO CO,
TWO ARE INCORPORATED.
t
t
Christmas Pianos.
We take pleasure in directing the attention of all
prospective piano buyers of discrimiation to the unsur
passed excellence and variety of our stock of pianos for
Chrhtmas. The well known makes repiesented include:
CHICKERING, GABLER,
KRANICH AND BACK,
STERLING and HUNTINGTON.
We might say much in describing them in detail, but
you would not get half as much of an idea of the richness
of tone and beauty as you get in ten minutes spent iri our
store. Select a piano now and we will deliver when you
wish.
Local Concerns Formally Organized for
Eusineuss.
The two following local companies
have been granted articles of Incorpor
ation by the secretary or srate:
Aetna Construction company of New
Haven; general construction business,
build and equip steam railroads, etc.
Capital stock, $200,000; divided Into 2,
000 shares of $100 each. Commence
business with $200,000. Incorporators:
Samuel C. Morehouse, A. William Sper
ry, both of New Haven, and John M.
Walton, of Norwich.
iGallagher & Mueller' Co., of New
Haven; 210 shares subscribed for. be
ing 160 shares preferred and 80 shares
common, on which $2,500 cash and $6,
000 property, have been paid. President
and treasurer, John S. Bradley, 100
shares preferred; vice president, James
R. Gallagher, 30 shares preferred, 40
shares common; secretary, Franz H.
Mueller, three shares preferred; 40
shares common, all of New Haven.
PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD CHRISTMAS TOUR
-TO
Leaves New York, December 26.
(12 or $14.50 cover necessary expenses from
York, according to hotel selected.
New
A 3-day Outing to the National Capital
Detailed itineraries and full information may be secured upon applica
tion to C. Studds, Eastern Passenger Agent, 2G3 Fifth Avenue, New York City,
or
J.R.WOOD,
Passenger Traffic Manager.
GEO. W. BOYD,
General Passenger Agent,
Broad Street station,
Philadelphia.
SAILED FOR FLORIDA.
A merry party of New Haveners sail
ed Tuesday for Florida on the popular
steamer Arapahoe, of the Clyde line.
The members of the party were Harry
Leigh, Mr. and Mrs. V, J. Leigh, Harry
Welch, Harold Moulton, Mr. and Mrs.
W. J. Ward and daughter, George M.
Adams and R. S. Thompson.
Captain P. J. Fraser, of the Berniu
dlah, was in the city yesterday calling
on friends.
GR1AND
ISLAND
SERVE.
GAME PRE-
SONNENBERG
PIANO CO,
801 CH DEL STREET.
t
OlllTVAHT AOIE.S.
FRANKLIN MILES LUM.
Franklin Miles Lum, a well known
traveling salesman, died early this
morning at his home, 63 Center street,
west Haven, from a
diseases. Mr. Lum was in poor health
for some months, but was able to con
tinue his business up to last Monday,
when he was, stricken in Naugatuck.
He was sixty-seven years of age, and
was one of the oldest commercial sales
men in this section. For a number of
years he was employed by E. G. Stod-
ernoon.
chargi).
W.
H. Graham Co.l is in FUNERAL OF HARRY C. HOTvCOMB.
j Thursday afternoon, funeral cervices
GEORGE W. HUNGERFORD be heM for Harry Clifford Holeomb
George W. Hungerford, a carpenter, 'the hom.e of Mrs- Margaret Manson,
wno was in business on Washington
complication of avenue, this city, died yesterday at his
home in Orange of heart disease. He
was seventy-four years of age, and is
survlvedy his wife and one daughter,
Mias Minnie Hungerford. i
No. 31 Dwlght street.
HANGED HIMSELF.
South Norwalk Grocer's Body Found in
Barn.
Korwalk, Dec. 19. Lorenao Dibble, a,
prominent. South Norwalk grocer and
well-known resident, ' while suffering
MRS. COCHRAN.
Yesterday funeral services ' were held
for Mrs. Elelsheba Cochran at th
dard. but for twentv vears nast hn woo nf ,. j, ,,,. ... fn.i -i . .... .
----- v -- . . uauft.no., .ma. sumner c. Kewy .u aumauun or mina, the result
employed by the J. J. Eager company, of No. 37 Rosette street. 0f ill health and 1mflIi u .
wholesale merchants of New York. He1 . This afternoon .the body will be tak- troubles commuted .ufcMo th. ",nMB
is survived by his wife and several j en to Owega, N. Y., for interment! Mrs. InTTMmK t'T
children. The funeral arrangements I Cochran died Mondav at th. vZ i "!'f 'J16 barn "
have not been completed, but the fun-1 eiehtv.five vM.r "M ' VL "v"'e ttl soutn Main
eral will probably be held Friday aft-
street.
Specially
egistered
to You
I
Consider how the United States Government protects a letter registered
to you, guaranteeing its delivery safe and in good order.
The NATIONAL BISCUIT COMPANY" exercises
even greater protecting foresight in delivering its
Biscuit and Crackers to you. Fresh from the oven,
they are enclosed in a dust tight, moisture proof
package, on each end of which is affixed this trade
mark in red and white.
ZuZtJ ClNCER SNAPS-Crisp, delicto as, golden-brown
morsels of sweetness and spice that everyone loves.
CHEESE SANDWICHES Thin crackers enclosing layer of
creamy cheese a delicate bite to tempt an epicure.
Elk, Moose and Caribou, Pheasants and
and Grouse Found in Native State.
Excepting only Yellowstone Park,
Grand Island, In Lake Superior, is the
largest and most complete game in
the United States. Nesting in the wa
ter of the great inland i:,ea, this pic
turesque native woodland, with its
rockbound enures, is a veritable gem
of nature.
Grand Island resembles in shape a
transposed outline of the State of
Louisiana, but here the similarity
ends. The Island contains but 13,000
acres, or about twenty square miles.
It is ten miles long and four miles
wide.
Its unbroken forests of pine and
hardwood have been converted into a
game preserve in which nearly every
species of game animal and bird na
tive to this latitude can how be found
in its native State, says the Muskegon
Chronicle. ; The physical nature of the
project.
Over half the coast line is bounded
by perpendicular cliffs rising to an
elevation of from 40 to 350 feet above
the level of Lake Superior, forming
a perpetual barrier against escape. In
some places along the coast line thei;e
miniature mountain rctnges are broken
by deep ravines and gulches, which in
most cases are sequestered valleys of
singular loveliness. l!"
Where three valleys open an exit to
the lake, game fences' have been built
to prevent tho animals' from gaining
access to the mainland by swimming
the channel in summer or crossing the
ice In tho winter peason. At a point
two and a. half miles north of the
southern extremity of the Island a
game fence twelve feet in height and
extending east and west, to the ishoro
line has been built, fnclosing an area
of about 8,000 acres over which the
animals is roam at will.
Between ' two lofty ridges that
traverse the Island from north to the
sout'h Is a dense cedar swamp, three
miles long and one mile wide at ltu
broadest point. This Is the natural
home of the caribou, which feed upon
the dry, gutllnous mixture commonly
called muss and found in great quani
tlties in this region. .
The original herd of caribou was
brought to the Island three years ago
from Deer Lake, Newfoundland. There
were five animals in the herd. Like
their near relatives, the moose, they
are ilow breeders, but grow to enor
mous size. There are probably a
score of specimens of the moose fam
ily on Grand Island, one of which has
attained its full growth, nnv being
about 15 years old, and weighing 1,000
pounds. The moose . were imported
from Canada and northern Minnesota.
Other big game In., the Grand Island
preserve in a herd of elk. Originally
it numbered eleven, but since brought
ij the island three years ago it has
largely Increased, the elk being a pro
lific breeder.
During certain seasons of the year
men are employed by the company to
carry on a war of extermination
against the fox, mink and other small
animals whlra prey upon the game
birds. The beaver, wnvever, is allow
ed to propagate, and many .frpeclmenn
have been brought to the island and
given the freedom of Its several
streams. The native or ruffed grouse
arn plentiful in nil parts of the pre
serve, and the spruce hen, a bird now
almost extinct, is present in great
number?.
From Scandinavia twv years ago the
company imported 130 game birdu, also
members of the grouRe family, and
from Manitoba it secured a number of
sharp tailed grouse. The birds se
cured from the Scandinavian peninsula
are known as the capercailzie and or
rie. The former is possessed of habits
much like tlwe of the partridge to
the ' native to the Lake Superior re
gion. There are many other speci
mens of game birds ion the island,
among them the English ring neck
pheasant, a bird of highly colored
plumage, and the wild turkey. The
latter were obtained in the Indian Ter
ritory and are the most difficult of all
game birds to propagate.
The capercailzie, ur "black game
bird of Norway," is one of the largest
species of game birdsin the world, be
ing very hardy and frequently attain
ing weight exceeding fifteen pounds,
but when the birds are young they are
eai?y prey of hawks. The birds are
known as "rangers," for. the reason
that while in quest of food they cover
a wide expanse oi territory. During
periods of heavy snowfall they burrow
Into the snow and remain until the
storm subsides before venturing out
again. Their food In winter consists
chiefly of birch buds and In summer
they catch mice and other ismall ani
mals. They are rated .is members of
the grouse family and in habits are
much like the partridge.
SPLENDID
Stocks of furs that ws are selling at a 10 per cent,
discount. The holiday season, the w nter weather,
the fact that this discount is based on a very low
price to start with makes this a . -
FUR
OPPORTUNITY
of exceptional value. Assortment represents every
kind of fur and at a wide range of prices, from the
most modest to the richest selections.
841-843 Chapel Street.
111 1 1 111 1 1 1 11 'Win hi urn 11 11 11 in 11 1 1 ii linn n i l wpmiiiiiihuii iiiiimi
CHRISTMAS BELLS
Will rina; Impplnes' Into hundreds of
homes this yenr, nnd to make the hhr
mony perfect you (iliotild mingle with
Ihc music, the tinkle of a telephone bell
to "Ring In the New" era of progre.
Then you will have a perfect Rift
when you nsher In your family to see
their gifts nnd wish them a
MERRY X-MAS
The Southern New Eitlaid Telephone Co.
SEW HAVEN, COJW.
f
tic. ' '
I
1
r 1
Colden Brown '
DelicJousIy a.ppetlzlrt tooLgt is made with speed
and nicety In the broiling oven of tv
CAS RANGE
There is no danger of a smoky kitchen or smoky
tasting toa.st. Under the medium hea.t, easily possi
bio by reguleition of gtxs burners, tho surface of tho
bread is quickly browned, whilo its subst&nce is not
dried to nothingness. There is nothing theit adds so
much to a good breakfast as a plate of toe.st theLt is
lust right. A Gas Range is as convenient in spring
as in summer. Get one now
THE NEW HAVEN GAS LIGHT CO.
Prices $10 to $27.
SALESROOM
03 Crown 81.
i
The Chatfleld Paper Co. I 2883-
Xntntainmtnts.
SATURDAY, December 22.
Matinee and Night.
"LITTLE JOI1XXY JO.E
xt. u' Seat Sale Thursday,
Night, 2Be, 50c, 75c, $1.00, a few $1.50
Matinee, 25c, 50c 75c
X"MAS ATTRACTION,
"THE VOLIM'EEII OHGAVIST."
POLI'S NEW THEATRE.
ALL THIS WEEK. , :
KARBfO'S
NIGHT IN LONDON'S SHOWS
0 Other Big; Acts 0 .
POLI POPULAR PRICES.
BIJOU THEATRE
6Tvrter Z. Poll Proprietor
WEEK OF DECEMBER 17th,
THE STOCK COMPANY.
in
The Two Orohatrs.
Polis popular prices, 10c-20c-S0o.
Ladies' Matinee Daily.
Beats reserved in advance. Tel. 3099.
Try on of tht-m 1
Cafe Boulevard's
Z3G DINNERZOG
HEAL C!iiMAJf KPTCHKM.
1 67-69 Orange St.
i ' . ':,
j ,
nu -
I KOF BRAU HAUS.
Mi m Ugh clam .
GERMAN KITCHEN .
Bad tba following tmmn
FOUR IMPORTED BEERS :
Knrgtr Inn Pllsea 1 ;
V nncbe nr flof-Braa,'
NnrabcrKr Tncber Brao, '
Wanbarcer Bartrer Brafe - '
Enou"h Said i?c"
1 1 A
HOTEL &ARDE
Opposite TJnlB Depot,
HEW HAVEN, COW1T. '
Connecticut's Largest Hotel
The Slioreham,
Washington, D.C
American and European Plan, r' v"
Metropolitan Standard, of Excellence.
JOHN T. DEVINE, Prop.
AIRSHIP PROBLEMS.
Most Comple te Line ot hapcr and Twine in State
' . Of , course the airship- hasn't arrived'
a.3 yet. Santos Dumont haa skimmed.
ovr the surface of France for a few
hundred yards find our own Wrlfrht
brothers tell remarkable stories of
even greater achievements In this: linj
but for the present nobody is fiylng.'
Lots of people are busy with aeroplanft'
models and everybody' Is prophesying
but beyond an pecaslonal balloon, the
upper air still belongs to the birdis.and
man travels on the earth's surface just
as usual. Tills doesn't mean, of cburs$
that the airship isn't coming. Indeed,
It means exactly the opposite, for thig
general interest, together with the few
qualified successes in flying, demons
strates that it's only a matter of time
until the problem will be solved. -So
reasons the world, which regards thS
airship as a certainty of the immediate
future, and is already turning to th
Important questions which it is bound
to raise.
Will it, for instance, have free right
of way? Boundary lines hitherto have
been very deep, but no higher than the
houi?etops. The title to your ljt makes
you owner of a' solid "chunk" of
ground that reaches tj the earth's cen
ter. If there are gold mines or coal
mines or oil reservoirs or any treasures
whatsoever under the 25x100 feet on
which your house stands, they belong
to you as much as the wheelbarrrow
or rose-bush that are out in the back
yard. No one can burrow into them
with impunity any more than he can
break through your fence. But how
about the realm above? Have yon
title to 25x100 feet of air clear to the
dome of the universe? Does the air1
ship trespass when it sails above as
the miner would were he to drive a
tunnel underneath? ' ' '
The same question, ;but in Its larger
aspects, has to do with nations, and
brings up a -world of puzzles for the'
statesmen who frame tariff, immigra
tion and other legislation growing cut
of international association. We have
custom houses and receiving stations
now that answer every purpose, but .
when men begin to fly over boundary
lines there'll be some mighty interest
ing problems for the officials. How
high up do these international boun
dary lines reach, anyway? An Immi
grant is here when he lands on Ellis
Island, but is he here when he is 4000
feet a'bove Wall street, say? And what
about the pocketful of diamonds that
an airship traveler may bring in when
his vessel lands in Kalamazoo, Alic'h.,
or Bodunk., Ok.,? Who owns the up
per -air, anyway, and by that means is
he to keep this property of his out of
tho hands of trespassers? These are
problems that follow the airship, and
they're nearly as difficult, too, as the
ainshlp itself. 'Newark News.
The New Haven National Interstate
bowling team arrived home yesterday
from Elizabeth, N. J., where it went
Monday night to play a postponed
championship match of three games.
New Haven landed two, and elimbeij
a peg toward first place thereby.

xml | txt