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The daily morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven, Conn.) 1894-1907, January 05, 1907, Image 5

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NEW HAVEN MOUSING JOURNAL AND COUPJEIU SATURDAY JANUARY 5 I'JOl
te&fopi
jA MILIARY
This great Sale is sailing along with irresist
ible force. The Muslin Underwear, White Goods,
Handkerchiefs and Men's Furnishings represent
ed in this sale are exceedingly good bargains.
All first-class merchandise and our own regular
stock offered at greatly reduced prices.
Muslin Underwear.
Every Corset Cover, Drawer, Skirt, Gown and Chemise Is
reduced as follows :
Every 25o Garment now $ .19
Every EOc Garment now .S
Every 75c Garment now 69
Every 89o Garment now ...... .75
Every $100 Garment now ....... .87
Every 1.23 Garment now 95
Every 1.50 Garment now 1.29
Every 1.75 Garment now 1.37
Every 2.00 Garment now 1.69
Every 2.25 Garment now 1.89
: Embroideries 25
I " ' 7..; j. , Bl. J
from 1 1-2 to 18 inches wide; also Allover Embroidery!, , This
is a splendid opportunity for those making waists or under
garments to buy embroideries at a big saving. , ,
Special Sale ol Sample Hosiery
For Men and Women.
We have secured 1,000 pairs of samples from
our best manufacturers, a large quantity of Men's
and Women's SAMPLE HOSIERY and will place
them on sale Saturday morning.
Men's Sample Socks
17c a Pair,
3 Pairs for 50c
800 Pairs of Embroidered Lisle,
end cotton, also plain colors of Ital
ian silk and plain black lisle with
double soles and high spliced heels.
Positively 25c to 39c.
Values.
Another Day
. a Yard
$1.50
The materials offered in this sale are very desirable
for tailored suits all heavy cloths, in checks, plaids and
mixtures. There are designs and colors suitable for
misses' and children's suits as well as women's. All high
class goods from the best European manufacturers, and
not a piece in the lot worth less than $1.00 (n
a yard while many are worth $1.50. , O V
Sale Price, w
Tl?eosfop-
Every 2.75 Garment now Z,tJ
Every 3.00 Garment now ...... 2.49
Every 3.25 Garmont now ...... 2.75
Every 3.G0 Garment now ...... 2.95
Every 3.75 Garment now 3.19
Every 4.00 Garment now ...... 1.85
Every 4.25 Garment now S.E5
Every 4.50 Garment now ...... 3.75
Every 4.75 Garment now ...... 4.00
Every 6.00 Garment now 4.25
Per Cent. Oil.
t?J! A 1 IJ.f
Women's Sample Hose
29c a Pair.
400 pairs embroldorod lisle, lace
ankle, and lace allover and plain
black lisle, In a wldo variety ct pat
terns, Positively a 50c.
value.
of the Great
for $1.09 and
Goods.
OBITUARY AOTKS.
Rev. William T. Fitch Dead.
Rev. William T. Elton, a former New
Havener and son o fthe late Lewis
Fitch of this city, died suddenly at
his home, 44 Hancock street, Brook
lyn, Thursday morning of heart dis
ease. Rev. Mr. Fitch was long- prom
inent in the Protestant Episcopal dio
cese ot Long Island. During the civil
w ar iMr. Fitch was in the south and
studied there for the ministry. He
r:lrilstered to the soldiers there, and
at the close Kit the war came north. He
had parishes at different times in Fall
River, .Mass., and In Nausatuck.
His last service was at Grace church,
Brooklyn, in Conselyea street. Of late
years he had been in failing health.
. Rev. Mr. Fitch is survived by one
son. Lewis F. of Boston, and two
daughters, Mrs. Barnard .of Boston
and .Miss Adelaide Fitch, who made
her home with her father in Brooklyn.
The funeral services will be hald at
this morning. The body will be
brought to this city and the burial will
be in Grove street cemetery at 3
o'clock this afternoon. '
DEATH OP MRS. AMY RISLEY.
Many will learn with sadness of the
death of Mrs. Amy Elmore Risley, the
loved wife of David Risley. of 203 Lloyd
street, Fair Haven, which occurred on
Thursday evening at the age of fifty
two years. Mrs. Risley had been a
great sufferer from cancer of the stom
ach for nearly two years. All that
could be done for her had been done.
The best medical aid was summoned,
and everything that lovlnpc hearts could
do failed to relieve her sufferings and
she found relief only in death. She
leaves, besides her husband, four chil
dren and a mother and sister to mourn
her loss, and her loss will be keenly
felt. Many Fair Haven people will
miss her kindly face and will long re
member her many acts of kindness.
The funeral will be held from her late
home to-morrow afternoon at 2 o'clock,
Rev. E. C. Tullar, of the East Pearl
Street M. E. church officiating, and the
loved wife and mother will be laid to
rest in the East Haven cemetery.
.CAPTAIN HENRY PALMER,
Captain Henry Palmer died at hs
residence, 641 Qulnnlplac avenue, "Wed
nesday 'afternoon 'He was in his
eighty-fifth year, having been born
April 5, 1822, at Mlllplaln, Branford,
Ccr.r..
During the early days ha remained
at home about the farm, but :on be
came engaged in shipping and finally
commanded his own vessel. For many
years he was interested in the oyster
business with the firm of Luddlngton
& Palmer until some seven years e;o,
his health falling, he retired from busi
ness life. '
He married January 15, 1846, Ireve
Avcrlll of Branford, who survives him,
tcgether with five children: Halph A.
Palmer of Braldentown, Fla.; Mrs.
Smith Grannls of Morris, Conn.; Mirs.
William R. Hendricks of Brooklyn, N.
Y.i Mrs.; Charles W. Scranion srtd
Mrs. Henry Cook of this city.
Funeral services will be held from
his late residence Saturday afternoon,
January 5, at 2 o'clock.
.Interment in Branford upon arrival
of the 3:05 p. m. train from New Ha
ven. HENRY P. KENNY.
Henry P. Kenny, one of the oldest
members of San Salvadore council, No.
1, K. of C, In this city, died Thursday
at his home in Bridgeport. Mr.' Kenny
was for several terms deputy grand
knteht of San Salvador council.
He was a veteran of V.m civil war,
serving with Admiral Farvagus on the
Wechawken, where he saw some ot tho
most strenuous naval work recorded
In the war between the north and the
gruth. He enlisted from Boston. Ke
was born In Providence, R. I.' After
the war he came here to New Hnven
to reside and here married Miss Mar
garet Leonard, a daughter of one of
the first Catholic settlers In this sec
tion of the state. For the past, twenty
five years he resided in Bridgeport.
For fifteen years he was foreman for
the Plumb & Wlnton Co., and for ten
years the foreman for McElroy Broth
ers. He is survived by a widow and
one daughter, Mrs. George "Weddell of
New York. The funeral will be held
Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock from
St. Augustine's church In Bridgeport.
The body will be brought to this city
Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock for
burial In St- Bernard cemetery.
MRS. CHARLES H. FLYNN.
The death of Wate E. Kllloy, wife of
Charles H. Flynn, a well known busi
ness man of Derby, occurred at her
home In that city Wednesday after
noon after a short illness. Mrs. Flvnn
was the daughter of Mrs. Anna and
the late Michael Kllloy, a teacher In
the local public, schoola.
She is survived by her husband,
Charles H. Flynn; three children,
Mary, Francis and Charles, Jr.; her
nother, Mrs. Anna Kllloy, and one
brother, John Kllloy, all of New Hal
Von.
The funeral will take place this
morning from her late residence, . 330
Olivia street, at 8 o'clock, and at 9
o'clock from St. Mary's church, Derby.
VALENTINE P. PUIRLEY.
Valentine P. Farley, who died at his
hemejn Westville Thursday was the
s.in of the late Michael and Catherine
Farley, and had been employed as a
teamster and hackman. He was thirty-live
years old.
.M. J. CUMMERFORB.
Michael J. Commerford of Walling
ford, who ha been ill for some time,
died at his home in East street early
Thursday morning. Mr. Commerford,
who was twenty-six years of age, Is
survived by a widow, mother and five
sistters. The funeral will take place
at the 'Holy Trinity church at 8 o'clock
this morning, the Rev. J. J. Carroll
officiating. Interment will be In the
Holy Trinity cemetery.
FREDERICK McGANN KELLY.
The funeral of Frederick McGann
Kelly, the young man who was shct
Tuesday night on Church street, was
yesterday morning from the residence
of his mother at 201 Congress avenue
and was largely attended. The body
was taken to St. John's church where
a solemn requiem high mass was cel
ebrated by Father Keating, Father
Coyla was deacon and Father Ford
sub-deaeon. Many floral tributes were
sent by friends, among them a laia
piece from shopmates in the Seamless
Rubber comnany.
The pallbearers were Harry Rey
nolds, Thomas Holdwright, Francis
Holdwrlght, William Dunn, John Shee
han and Thomas McGann. The, Cow
ers were carried by George Cook, John
Cronan, Charles O'Neill and William'
Beoley. Interment was , In the family
lot In St. Bernard cemetery.
MRS. -MICHAEL COX.
The funeral ot Mrs. Michael Cox took
place from her late residence, 167 I3e
wit7t street, yesterday morning, and a
requiem mass was held at Sacred
Heart church. The Rev. Father Regan
officiated and spoke very feelingly of
the deceased., The funeral was one of
the largest attendel in a long while.
The flowers, which were , numerous,
covered the casket and were borne by
Thomas Kelly, James Wheeler and
John Reynolds-
The pallbearers were Bernard Kelly,
Thomas Cain. John McGill, Patrick
Bannon, Philip Flood and John Cain.
Interment was n St. Lawrence cem
eter PATRICK McGRATH.
The funeral of Patrick McOrath, who
who died Thursday, wHl take place
this morning at 8:30 o'clock from his
late residence, 282 Peck street. Solemn
requiem high mass will follow at St.
Francis' church.
Mr. McGrath had been ill for about
three weeks. He was employed at the
National Folding Box company.
The interment will be in St. Law
rence cemetery. ,
THE CONGRESS AND PANAMA.
Profit for Members-Elect in a Trip to
the Isthmus.
It is reported that a number of members-elect
in the next house contem
plate a visit to Panama, for the pur
pose of Inspecting the work on the ca
nal and Informing themselves generally
as to the situation. Many should go.
The time could not be better spent.
The visitors would tnjoy the opportu
nity the president did to appraise mat
ters under the guide of those compe
tent to explain not only what Is now
In hand, but what tho future will call
for It to an ordinary thing for mem
bers of congress, senators and repre
sentatives alike, to visit about the
country looking Into tho improvement
of rivers and harbors,' and inspecting
propositions for new work of that kind.
In such way congress has greatly ben
efited in imaklng Its applanations; has,
Toted large sums with :f clearer Idea of
where the money was oirg- and how
and by whom It would jbe.an41liel. No
appropriations are morfc- popu'ar, and
few yield such large returns. All sec
tions and both parties. -riirilte In sup
porting the policy of keeping pur wa-'
terwaya In good shape!' for Interstate
commerce. jr.: . ' .
'Now, the Panama cahftl when com
pleted will be an American waterway--our
most Important waterway. Con
gress will be appropriating momy for
It, not only during the digging, but for
keeping It In order after the last shov
elful of earth has heoji.,removed and
shps are passing through from ocean to
ocean. Congress, therefore 'the next,
and the next, and straight along
should keep thoroughly Informed as to
the progress of the enterprise and what
Is demanded at the hands of the gov
ernment v
All of us easily recall the fruits of
the visit of a congressional party to, the
Philippines under the escort of Secre
tary Taft. Some of the, party left horm,
n a doubtful frame of mind about t'n?
situation in the Islands, but nearly all
returned home after a personal Inspec
tion satisfied that the heavy American
responsibility there was being met
American fashion, and of the opinion
that while we remained we owed It
both to ourselves and to the Filipinos
to give the people of the archipelago
the best governmrnt possible.
There !, when they are properly con
sidered, no politics in either our Philip
pine or our Panama problem. Both are
dfflcult. The credit of th country Is at
stake In both. A change of party con
trol would not start the country on the
back track, and for that reason both
proimg gftcrsri be considered and pro
vided for by congress solely with the
view of advancing the national credit
In handling matters of great magni
tude and of world-wide interest.
Washington SStar.
"I was afraid in church this morn
ing," said a lady to a bishop.
"Why?" he asked.
"Because," said the lady, "there 'was
a canon at the reading desk, a big gun
In tho pulpit, the -Mr was murdering
tho anthem and the organist was try
ing to drown the choir." Army and
Nttvx Life.
THE NATIONAL NEW HAVEN BANK,
Incorporated 171)2.
The annuiil meeting of the stock
holders of this bank will b held (it
their Banking Houso on Tuesday, tlie
8th day of January, 1:107 for the elec
tion of directors for the ensuing year
and to consider and act upoii a propo
sition to amend the third section of
the Articles of Association of said bank
so that It will read us follow?: The
Board of Directors shall consist of not
less than seven nor more t an twelvo
stockholders.
Polls open from It t. m. to 12 in.
d6 to Jg EDWARD E. MIX. Cashier.
3ffew MAVKV COUNTY NAT'I BANK.
New Haven, Conn., Jan. 2, 1007.
The annual meeting of the stockhold
ers of this bank for the election of di
rectors for the ensuing year, and for
anv other business that may legnllv be
brought before it, will be held at their
banking house on Tuesday, January S.
Polls open from 11 o'clock a. m. to
12 m.
H. G. REDFIELD.
J3-8 d Cashier.
VIM
Champagnes
for those
lucky ones who can
afford such luxur
ies. Case it auirts
fcwuiil Pol-Roger,'98, $34.50
1900, 34.50
'93, 60.00
Krug, '93, 46.00
Ruinart, '84, 53.00
In original cases only
no allowance for ullage or
breakage.
THEO. KEILER
runil Director and Eimbali..
4M Stat Street, ear. Elm.
BRANCH OFFICE 1
438 Campbell Aveaae. West Tl.
Now is the time to buy the
Best Grade Bulbs for Fall
planting at
CHAMPION & CO.,
1026 Chapel Street,
DEATHS.
FITCH Suddenly In Brooklyn, Janu
ary 3, 1907, Rov. William T. FUcli.
Interment in Grove street cemetery,
New Haven, on Saturday afternoon at
hslf-piist two o'clock. J6 1t
PALMER In this city, January 2, 1907,
Henry Palmer, in the 85th year of his
ape.
? Funeral services wlli be held at No. 641
Quinnlplac avenue, on Saturday af
ternoon at 2 o'clock. Friends are In
vited to attend. Interment in Bran
ford, Conn., on arrival of trnln leav
ing New Haven at three o'clock.
J4 2t
WILLAKD In this city, Janary 2.
1907, Maria V., widow of Josepn W.
Willard. ' :
Funeral services will b held at No. 121
Ivy street, on Saturday afternoon at
half past two o'clock. Friends are
invited to attend. ji 2c
MINIATURE ALMANAC.
' ' JANUARY 5.
H Rises 7:18 Moon Rises f H'h Water
B Sets 4:36 10:29 2:42 p. m.
FOR RENT.
RENT five rooms, 112 Plymouth. j4 6t
FOIl SALE 1,000 eet patent Store
Briek. Every set wnrranted one yean
Ordtre received 703 STATE STREET.
MONEY TO LOAN
Money obtained on first mortgage se
curity on city property only, at current
rate 0 interest. Call at Room aio, Ex
change Building, 865 Chapel Street.
Frederick M. Ward
District of Now Havpn, ss. Probate
Court, January 4th, 1907.
EST AT K OF CHARLES OOLDSBOR-
OUOH. Into of New Haven, in said
District deooasert.
The Administrator having exhibited
bin administration account .with said
estate in this Court for allowance, it is
ORDKREO, That the 11th day of
January, 1907, at ten o'clock In the
forenoon, at a Court of Probate to bo
hold at New Haven, In said District, be
appointed for a hearing on the allow
ance of said, account, and that notice
of the time and place of said hearing:
be giveii by publishing' this order three
times in some newspaper having a cir
culation In said District.
Bv the Court.
GEOROE W. CRAWFORD, Clerk.
Clark, Hall & Peck, 152 Orange street,
New Haven, Conn., Counsel for tho
Estate. d5 St
District of New Haven, sa. Probata
Court, Januarv 3rd, 1907.
ESTATE OP FRANCIS E. SPENCER.
late of Now Haven, in said District,
deceased.
The Court of Probate for the District
of New Haven hath limited and ap
pointed six months from the date here
of for the creditors of said deceased
to bring In their, claims against said
estate. Those who neglect to exhibit
their claims within said time will bo
debarred.
All persons Indebted to said estate
are requested to make immediate pay
ment to
HENRY C. SIIELTON, '
15 3t ' Administrator, c. t. a.
THE SECOND NATIONAL BANK OP
iKV If .IV FIN.
' The annual meeting of the stockhold
ers of The Second National Bank of
New Haven, for the election of Direct
ors, and the transaction of other law
ful business, will be held at its bank
ing house in the City of New Haven on
Tuesday, January 8, 1907, between the
hoars of 11 a. m. and 12 noon.
CHARLES A. SHELDON, Cashier. .
New Haven, Conn., Dec. 7, 1906. - -(115-22-29-jS
5t
Importance
of the Mitlng of
Mining Stacks on the
N.K. Produce Exchange
IS FULLY DISCUSSED IN
fur Januarv. suhiUTiptinn price, Jl.uu per
annum, 5KVD FOR SAMPLE COPY.
, McDovvatZ's Magazine
68 Wall Street, New York
m
It!
f 71
I a -ill
ti- -Lai
Immm I
ORCHai-iu SIHtt.1 w830C
OneofthemoBt comfortable and hoir
uuuscs in me western pa't cf 1
cily. Not a new house but
modern; Tierfect rqir- nep,r
WHALLEY AVE. $7400
A well built frame house of thirteen
rooms with all modern improvemens.
Two families paying J6oo a year. Near
University and easy walk to the center.
JAMES STREET $3200
situated on a corner near Grand Avenue.
The pi ice is reasonable and a thrifty man
can buy it with $500 cash.
STEVENS HEIGHTS; $1900
A good, one-family house of seven rooms
in West Haven, near Campbell Avenue
trolley. Lot 146 x 175. Considerable fruit
Easily used by two families.
To Let.
Three' New St ores'
1102-1104-1106 Chapel Street
APPLY TO
Ben). R. English,
630 CHAPEL STREET.
BUILDING LOTS
For Sale on W hitoey Ave.
W. D. Judson,
Room 402. 902 Chapel St.
UaUey nalidixic.
FIXE OFFICE
TO LET.
All Improvements. Outside windows.
39 CHURCH STREEJ,
Cor Crown.
Inquire JANITOR.
CANNON, MORSE & CO.,
Succeeding1
(nrtlner Horn A Son
4 Chai. T. Cannon.
Genera! Insurance & Real Estate
102 CHAPEL STREET.
West Haven
Building Lots
Price nusf from II.M to UM
front foot Bin ot iot to uU Fu
dun?.
H. V. RICHARDS,
Real Estate Broker
141 Orange St.
FOR SALE.
A FEW desirablo butldins lota In the
best part of Sherman avenue.
J.C HJWDERFURD,
110 ChorcU Street.
Ten Acres of land, wth small house,
barn, also shop suitable for light man
ufacturing; for sale cheap to close an
estate. .
Chas.A. Baldwin,
87 Cuurch Street.
FOR RENT
The finest eight room la Nevr Haven,
all modern Imiirovemente, furnace,
heat, leunary.
MONEY TO LOAN IN SUMS TO SUIT.
l: g: HOADLE.Y.
Room 214 Washington Building.
8 CHURCH STREET.
Open Svenlngs.
J5Slqan7
One Family
House.
all Improvement
$6,500
ft. B. MAM.OBY. Auctioneer.
SELLS at 95 St. John street (near
Chestnut) Friday, 2 p. m., nice goods.,
Larse rug. carpet, linoleum, dining
table, chairs, Morris chair, rockers,
tables, chamber suit, iron couch,
graphophono and records, pictures,,
range, refrigerator, crockery, etc.
j3 Zt
Plants.
One cut word tot each laeertioa,
NEW HAVENIfnTplment Ag.nc,
Phone iVA-fl8" av"ae- JB
wora. Ui Livingston St. . j5 It .
sm,.m WANTED.
SITUATION by competent girl to dn
general housework or second work
44 bperry street. . . Ti ll '
Ht A i 71 v.-. ' I
WArWn , " "U"" WANTED.
WANTED Largo lirst-clss house of
twenty-t,ve years" standing T manu,
faoturinng a staple line of goods In
constant daily use, wants a good ma
lllfr7!lS!abnrrCh hole busings
salary 1,800 per year, payable month.!
y, together with all expenses lnJ l it :
tra commissions. Applicant must fur
niah good references and $1,000 cash
which is satisfactorily secured Ad
dress "President," 612 S. 6th strtet,
St. Louis. -Mo. d29jB12-3t
ABT 5 pnnrm s A.KM'Y,
AliUih-BOUlhD unmarried men bs
fT?tj oT r 00 citizens ot
iHS. d tat?3Vof sood character and
temperate habits, who can speak!
read and write English. Apply Raj
cruiting Officer, 890 Chapel street
ford- oJIV56 aIr A H"l
lli T?ni?2 ?Ialn street- Bridgeport!"
19 1 Bank street, Waterbury, CoSn.
' 1 tf
iS i.. iJiacea ana always
ukL ferse, numbers. Sleeman's Re
liable Employment Agency. 763 Chap.
l Open evenings. mU-tl
BIpAN.'& RELIABLE KMPLOY-''
tabllahed 20 years. Largest, best la
the State. Best male and female help
for any and all kinds of work. Sent
anywhere. Open evenings. T. 1322.
THE New Haven Employment Agenc? 1
supplies neat efficient help, also caters
to opening' and cleaning houses.
0?s?efe??lns PPerly attended to.
lei. 1684-14. o5 7t
AfNCY. 23 Church street Telephone
Kunneciions. largest Agency
male and female help supplied fop
mercantile and domestic service for
any and all kinds of work. Sent any
where.Open evenings.
Xt5CUltJttccrxtg.
U. U. UAl.ORY
AUCTIONEER and Appraiser, lit!
Chapel St. Telephone 2360. House- '
hold sales a specialty. ait 9
Watstein & Mellion,
LADIES)' TAILORS.
HIGH class fit and workmanship at lotsj
prices. We also do repairing.
Court .cor. Orange St. 1 Open evenlnngs. -
e-ON-
Inventory
Sale Prices
on all small quantity lots.
Regular Now
) per pair, per pair.
Nottingham $ .66 $ ,38
" , i-35 -.98
Ruffled
i. oo ,69
i. so .98
3-o 1.98
5oo 2.98
3-75 2.75
5.25 3.98
10.50 7.50
575 4.50
3 75 2.50
7-5 5.50
Organdy
Irish Points
t
11
Cluny Lace
u
i
I
Extra SveciaL
35 Pair Scrim and In
sertion Laces, $7.50 to $9
values at $5.98 per pr.
Window Shade
Company,
75-81 Orange Street
0 TO LOAN
On Real Estate at 5.nsr "csnL.
IN SUMS TO SUIT.
SAVE DOLLARS
Fine Lace
Curtains
B. F. ESS, 340 Chapel SI I
Uublnger duildlBSt
Stoem W

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