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The daily morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven, Conn.) 1894-1907, March 29, 1907, Image 7

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KEW HAVEN HORNING JOURNAL AND COURIER. FRIDAY MARCH 29 1907
709 CHAPEL STREET.
Offers the advantages of a well equipped and efficient organ
ization in successful operation.
ACCOUNTS of Institutions, Trustees, Firms and Individuals are desired, and
the same care and attention is given to Small as to large deposits.
LETTERS OP CREDIT and Travelers' Checks.
INTEREST ALLOWED on deposits subject to check,
AUTHORIZED to Act as Trustee Agent, Guardian, Administrator, Executor.
WE ALLOW 4 PER CENT ON SAVINGS ACCOUNTS.
Safe Deposit Boxes.
OPEN SATURDAY EVENINGS.
HENRY G. Newton, Pres. FRED C. BOYD, Vice Pres. R. D. SIUIR. Treaii.
WALL STREET METHODS
ATTACKED BY CARNEGIE
(Continued from First Page.)
nurse, seamstress, washwoman, ' cook,
angel and saint with no servant be
tweenthe boy whose father is his
guide, philosopher and friend. No
teacher, except at school. It's in the
liome that the boy gets his teaching.
I am honest. I have lived both lives.
There are men who say that riches are
corrupting, but they only know one
side of the shield. I have lived both.
"There Is very little in weath adding
to the sum of human happiness. I
think that wealth rather decreases hap
piness. tVs I said once before, a mil
lionaire who laughs Is rare."
At the guests' table with David Hom
er Bates, the toastmaster, and Mr. Car
negie, who began his career as a mlli
ltary telegrapher, were General Thom
as. Eckart, a former president of the
Western Union Telegraph company;
Colonel Jtobert C. Clowry, present
chief executive of the Western Union:
William R. Plum, historian of the corps
all of whom served with the federal
troops during the stirring times be
tween 1861 and 1865. Also at the
guests' table were Clarence H. Mackey,
president of the Postal Telegraph com
pany, and Major Albert K. H. Johnson,
who was private secretary to President
Lincoln, and originally a military tel
egrapher. ATTACKS ' ON. VACCINATION
(Continued from First Page.)
that the smallpox argument of the vac
cinists was all rot. He implored the
committee to save the children of the
state "from the curse of this compul
sory law."
. "No law can compel me to have my
children vaccinated," he said, "and the
state had no right to pass it. It ought
to be repealed." !Dr. Dobson said that
vaccination had already stamped itself
on the people of this state in a num
ber of wretched diseases, and that new
born babe should not be sacrificed. He
said it was God's death blow to the
English house of commons, "and as we
were fashionable we probably would
have to follow the act of the house of
commons, and continue as we are."
, The speakers for the retention of the
present compulsory law argued that it
was for the best interests of health in
as much that records showed that con
tagious diseases were checked by .no
other means, in many cases, than by
vaccination. There were strong argu
ments on both sides, and the interest
taken Jn the hearing was keen, as the
supreme court room, where it was held,
was crowded, many women remaining1
during the entire afternoon.
FELL DOWN ELEVATOR SHAFT.
William L. Smith Badly Injured of F.
S. Piatt's Store.
"William L. Smith of 55 Judson ave
nue, employed at the Frank S. Piatt
company, florists, 350-556 State street,
accidentally fell down the elevator
shaft at the store yesterday afternoon
about 2:30 o'clock, breaking his arm and
receiving a slight concussion of the
brain. ,
While Smith was talking with Mr.
Piatt near the elevator he raised the
small gate which Is in front f the
elevator well and thinking the elevator
was in front of him, unconsciously step
ped off into the open and fell down the
shaft into the cellar. Mr. Piatt did not
know where Smith had disappeared to
until he heard h'is moans from below.
Several of the employes went down
stairs and brough him up into the store
when It was""found that his condition
was serious. The Grace hospital ambu
lance was summoned and Smith was
hastily dispatched there.
How Smith ever came to step off Into
what he thought the elevator is not
known, except that his attention was
distracted from the elevator to Mr.
Piatt, with whom he was In conversa
tion. The gate in front of the elevator
shaft at the first floor works automat
ically, and is only down when the ele
vator is in motion or is at some other
floor. The elevator was at the third
floor at the time f the accident.
The hospital authorities stated last
evening that the injured man was rest
ing comfortably and would recover.
Smith Is thirty-three years of age and
single. He has been in the employ of
(Mr. Plat for some time.
TELEPHONE OFFICIAL INDICTED
Secret Cheat Fonnil in Former Home of
Mayor Sehmlt.
San Francisco, March 28. Louis
Glass, vice-president of the Pacific
States Telephone and Telegraph com
pany, was arraigned before Judge Law
ior in the superior court to-day on nine
grand jury indictments charging him
with having bribed supervisors. T. C.
Coogan, counsel for Glass, asked for
one week in which to plead. This was
allowed, and $9,000 bail bonds, on whlcui
Glass is at liberty, were allowed to
stand.
Superior Judge Lawlor to-day, im
mediately , after the arraignment of
Glass on the nine bribery counts re-
turned against him, issued; thirteen
fresh bench warrants for the arrest of
Detwiler, and fixed bail at $10,000 on
each of them, a total required surety
of $130,000.
He continued the thirteen cases un
til April 4, the day set for Glass to
plead, and Abraham Ruef was to-day
removed from the St. Francis hotel to
the restlence formerly owned and oc
cupied by Mayor Schmitz.
A somewhat sensational incident in
connection with this house came to
light to-day through an announcement
by Burns that while minutely examin
ing the premises for possible loop
holes of escape he found, by turning
back the carpet in the chamber once
occupied by the mayor, a secret plush
lined chest. The roof of. the recess was
a section of the floor, and upon prvlng
this uo the plush lined box was dis
covered, set In between two sills of the
floor.
"It was about 2 1-2 by 3 feet and
nearly one foot deep," said Burns.
"This may have been a depository, the
use of which perhaps saved the mayor
from many a banking transaction. We
found the chest empty."
The grand jury adjourned until Sat
urday afternoon.
WILL KOT ISTERl'ENE iYOttr.
Thl Country and Mexico to Let Cen.
trnl American Hostilities Proceed
Washington, March 28. The moment
has not yet arrived when America and
Mexico can intervene to stop the spread
of war in Central America. This was
the decision arrived at as the result of
a conference between Secretary Root
and Ambassador Creel at the state de
partment to-day. The secretary also
had the benefit of the advices received
by the diplomatic representatives of
the Central American states from toelr
own governments.
The absence of definite information
from the seat of trouble is embarras
ing to the officials, who are desirious of
bringing about pece. It is feared that
the collapse of the Bonilla government'
In Honduras and the consequent in
stallation of the provisional govern
ment in accord with that of Nicaragua
will result in a combined attack by
them upon otiier Central American re
publics. The apprehension of such a.
movement has greatly alarmed all of
the other states, and it -is said that
Central America, after an unusually
long term of peace, is now being rap
idly turned- into an armed camp, in
readiness to repel attack from any
quarter. It is said that there is no dis
position on the part of this government
to play the part of policeman toward
toese sister republics, but It would wel
come any proper opportunity to restore
peace.
HEPTASOPHS' LADIES' NIGHT.
VVery Successful Entertainment,
New Haven Conclave, No, 323, Im
proved, Order of Heptasophs, gave a
ladies' night on Wednesday evening U
their lodge room In G, iA. R. hall on
Court street. The regular meeting
took place at 7:30 o'clock, after which
the entertainment was presented to a
good sized audience of members, their
wives and friends. After the enter
tainment excellent refreshments were
serve!. The songs and recitations
were much enjoyed by a. 11 Harry
Tighe, who gave his sketch now run
ning at Poll's, Is a member of the New
Haven Conclave. '. v
The programme follows:
s Overture Twentieth Century Mando
lin club.
Recitation Miss Ethel Welch.
Selection High School Glee club.
Tenor solo Charles Zimmerman.
Selection Mandolin club.
Wocal solo Master Freddie Welch.
Selection High School Glee club. (
Plana solo Harry Cowles, Jr.
Tenor solo Charles Zimmerman.
SelectionMandolin club.
Recitation Miss Ethel Welch.
Sketch Harry Tlghe and Co., (from
Poll's theater.)
SelectionMandolin club.
PLAN BIO FIELD DAY.
New Haven Eogles Aerie, 242, to Sur
pass Worcester Event.
The Eagles' Aerie, 242, of New Ha
ven, are .planning for a grand field day
to be held In this city on July 22. The
members of the local order Intend to
even surpass the New England field
day held in Worcester last year. There
were six thousand in line at that event,
forty-eight hundred of whom were aut
siders. The local branch of the riotlon-
al order of Eogles Intend to
ecllpse
that number. They are planning to
have a big parade and all the necessa
ry functions accompanying it. The
plan is to outdo the tjig Worcester
event and they are working hard to do
It.
MOUNTAINEERS NE-ED
FIEIjDS.
NEW!
Peaks of Alps Nearly All Accessible by
Rail Road Up the Matterhorn.
It is possible that in the course of a
few years ambitious mountain climbers
will be compelled to transfer the scene
of their efforts to the mountains of
North and South America, for the
peaks of the Alps are nearly all acces
sible by rail at the present time, and
the engineers have designs on these
which are yet untouched toy ties and
tracks. Of course, the presence of the
railroad does not Interfere with those
who desire to climb to the top of a
mountain, but the experience is robbed
of its charm when one is compelled to
cross and recrosa railroad tracks con
stantly, and the trip is robbed of the
element of danger, excitement and
thrill by the knowledge that the ama
teur climber may stop and wait for a
car when he has tired of the climb.
The latest engineering scheme of this
kind 1s that which is proposed to the
top of the Matterhorn. "The Philadel
phia Record" says. It was thought,
j because
of its precipitous slopes and
jugged structure, that this peap would
be free from rails for all time, but two
engineers have made application for
permission to build a line to its top.
The view from the top of this moun
tain is so grand that there is a con
stant stream of visitors during the sea
son, notwithstanding the difficulties
, an 3 the cost of the climb,
j The only oppression which has devel-
! oped to the scheme is from the Alpin-
' ists who reap quite a harvest acting as
guides for tourists, but this is hardly
of sufficient importance to prevail in
the face of the pressure which is being
brought to bear by the projectors.
The line will extend from Zermatt to
the top of the Matterhorn, and the
company will erect all the necessary
buildings for the accommodation of
guests at the summit. It will be oper
ated electrically and will cost two mil
lion dollars. Four years' time will be
required in its construction. The trip
now requires at least twenty-four
hours, and costs about forty dollars for
guides and other expenses. With the
new railroad in operation the time of
the trip will be reduced to two hours,
and will cost ten dollars. i
REPORT AGAINST MECHANICS
BANK.
Hartford, March '28.The finance
committee of the general assembly has
reported unfavorably on the petition of
the Mechanics bank, of New Haven, to
raise its capital from $300,000 to $500,000,
and the number of directors from nine
to twenty-one. It seems that the bank
was exempt from taxation on tiie $300,
000 capital because of Its connection,
many years ago, with the Farmington
canal affair. The bank did not want
the increase unless it could be exempt
on the full $500,000. The committee
would not recommend this, and so the
measure failed. ,.
It was a quiet day in both the house
and senate.
"Well, I finally summed up the cour
ageto speak to her father last night.
I tell you, it was a great relief." "Gee!
What did he sayj"; "Oh, you misun
derstood me. He wasn't in." Phila
delphia Press.
"It takes a great deal of Intelligence
to amass a colossal fortune." "Yes,"
answered Mr. Dustlh Stax "and a lot
moreto know Just what to do with. It
when you've got it." Washington Star.
STOCK MARKET FEATURES
STREET PERPLEXED BY FALL
IN G. N. RIGHTS.
Decline Comes. After the Favorable De
cision in Minnesota Two Radically
Different Opinions us to Effect of
Western Railroad Strike if Declnred
Anouncement of Failure of Small
Bunking Firm Hn Little Effect Ex
change Open To-Day.
Great Northern rights on the curb
declined S points from 13H to 10ft,
while tho stock on, the exchange rose
! nearly 5 points on the decision of the
supreme court yesterday permitting
the issue of new stock. It perplexed
the street to explain this. But the
fact that under the original plan four
installments amounting to $24,000,000
are due on April 9 may have explained
the pressure to get out of the rights.
Many seemed td fear that it would be
difficult to raise the desired amount of
money by the date mentioned.
Discussion of the possibility of A
great western railroad strike brought
forth two radically different opinions.
One group contended that It had never
paid to sell stocks on a strike, because
supporting orders were usually put In,
and when the trouble Is over the shortu
are driven In. The other side urged
that a strike at the present time would
be only one of various unfavorable fac
tors, which, as a whole, tended to de
press values.
The heaviest buyer of stocks yester
day was reported to have been a firm
that put our several large selling or
ders right before the close AVednes
day or, in any event, It was alleged
trat many of the buying orders eman
ated trom the firm in question. Trad
ers set this down to short covering.
While the selling was going on Wed
nesday it was rumored that some con
cern was In trouble. A small suspen
sion yesterday probably furnished the
basis for the talk.
After an early irregularity stocks
rallied quite sharply, with Great North
ern pf. lending, because of the Minne
sota supreme court decision, permitting
the company to iRSue $60, 000,000 new
stock. This issue had been blocked for
about three months. Great Northern,
which, opening 2 points up at 136,
rose quickly to 139, but later eased
oft to 137.
The announcement of the suspension
of a small banking concern had little
effect on stocks.
Standard Oil stock declined 5
points by early in the afternoon to 494,
the lowest price in about seven years.
The high price In the spring of 1901
was 842. The weakness of this stock
attracted a great deal of attention and
probably checked buying of other
stocks to some extent. The offerings
were quite. large.
Erie common and preferred shares
worked in opposite directions. This
Indicated different points of view of
the speculator and the investor. The
shorts bought up the common on the
official statements that dividends would
be continued and notes met at mntm-U
i ty. while Investors sold on the reason
able idea that a corporation whoso
credit Is so weak as to end Instantlv
work absolutely essential to future
growth has no right to be paying div
idends on second preferred shares, even
though the amount required is small.
Trading in stocks was very desultorv
in the last hour. In the closing half
hour the shorts made another attack,
but their covering operations caused
the market to rally sharply before the
close. The principal selling was in
Union Pacific, Reading and Copper,
which were the stocks generally pick
ed out for attack.
The stock exchange will be open to
day. The opposition to closing came
from the banks. They said that with
a double holiday loans would carry
over from Thursday until Mondav. In
that case they would be forced to call
some loans that otherwise would not
be disturbed In order to have sufficient
ease reserves on Friday and Saturday.
YESTERDAY'S STOCK MARKET.
Period of Dullness Such ns Ha Not
Been Seen for Many Weeks.
New York, March 28. There was a
rather desultory contest waged between
the opposing elements In the specula
tion for a small part of the stock ex
change session of to-day. When It was
demonstrated that neither side was
gaining any marked advantage the pro
fessional element which had been car
rying on the contest practically aban
doned it. After that the market fell
Into a period of dullness such as has
not been seen for many weeks. The
quietness was accepted as a grateful
relief from the recent turmoil. The pro
fessional testing operations seemed to
be largely on the short side. The re
sistence which .these efforts encounter
ed was attributed to the activities of
the party of bankers and capitalists
said to have been organized for ti
purpose of supporting the market and
was supposed to be responsible for
Tuesday's rally. The action of vestcr
day's market aroused some speculation
as to its reslstence. When the market
was seen to have gained some degree
of eullibrium many brokers left the
street intending to be gone until Mon
day in the enjoyment of what they re
garded as a much needed rest. Active
operations were in progress at the sub
treasury to-day in the working of tiie
treasury's relief measures for the
money market. If preparations were
in progress also for the large interest
and dividend payments on Monday,
tney were Daiancea oy these relief
forces and the money market failed to
show any reflection of them. When
stocks advanced early in the day, Great
Northern Df. was a conspicuous loader
on account of the decision of the Min
nesota supreme court in ravor of the
legality of its $60,000,000 stock issue.
There was, however, an abrupt fall in
me quotations ior me subscription
rights to the new stock in the curb
market. While the issue of the new
stock has been held up by the litigation
periods have accrued for the pavnient
of three 10 per cent, installments of
the subscriptions and another falls duo
on April 8. These installments, if
made payable all together on April 8,
would call for some $24,000,000 and
might prove troublesome in the pres
ent condition of the money market.
There is a general feeling of hopeful
ness that money conditions will im
prove after the 1st or April. Reports
of a deadlock between oflicials and op
eratives of western railroads, which
threatened a strike, had a depressing
effect and helped the heavy tone of the
later trading. The marking up. of
prices at the end of the day was on a
small volume of transactions. The
market closed, however, fairly steady.
Bonds were steady. Total sales par
value, $1,910,000.
United States bonds were unchanged
on call.
NEW YORK STOCK MARKET.
Reported over private wires of Prince
& Whltcly, members of the new
York and Boston Stock Exchanges,
New York office 52 Broadway and 15
Center street New Haven Conn.
New York, March, 28.
' High. Low Bid. Asked.
Amal. Copper . 83 86 83 85
Am. Car 33 '4 4Vi 3314 34ta
Am. Cot.. Oil .. 27 2814.-27 28
Am. Loco 5S'2 50 58 y2 59
do pfd ....103 103 103 , 103
Am. Smelter ..112 11 lllfe 115
Am. Sugar .'.1914 122 119 122
Am. Woolen .... 25 2614 25ft 2Vs
A. T. & S. Fe.. 86 88 86 87 )
do pfd 93 93 ' 93V4 93
B. & 0 95 96 95 95
B. R. T 50 50 4S 4914
Canadian P. ...166 167 166 16714
Cent of N. J. ..175 175 175 175
Cent. Leather . 27 27 27 27
do pfd 91 91 9l)a 9014
Chos. & Ohio... 38 40 38 40
C. & Gt. W. ... 13' 13 13 13
C, M. & St. P. .128 129 127 128
Chi. & North... 144 147 144 145
C. C. C. & St. L 69 69 65 66
C. F. & Iron .. 31 33 31 33
Del. & Hudson.. 177 178$ 177 177
Brie 23 24 ' 23 24
do 1st pfd. 67 68 i74 68
Gen. Electric ..144 144 143 144
Qt. North, pfd.,136 13914 135 136
111. Central ...141 141 141 141
Inter. Met 2314 24 23 24
do pfd 56 67 56 5G
Louis. & NaalL.lHli 116 114 U 11614
M. K. & T. pfd. 62 63 62 63
Mo. Pacific .... 72 72 72 72
N. Y. C. & Hxdil4 116 114 115
N. Y. O. & W.. 36 37 36 37
Nor. & West. .. 75 75 75 75
Northern P., ..121 124 121 124
Pnc. Mail 23.,, 24 25 24
ienn. k . it. ..izu nift iiJ7s Jzi
Peo. Gas
88 88 87 88
99 104 99 102
24 24 23 24
Reading . ...
Rep, I. & S. . .
do pfd ..
Rock Island .
do pfd . .
Southern P., ..
Southern Ry.,
do pfd . . ,
Tex. & Pac,
Union' Pacific
, do pfd . .
U. S. Rubber
do ptd . .
U. S. Steel ..
do pfd . . ,
Wabash pfd ,
HI 8 J 7S 79
10 ...20 .. 19
20
45
: 45
45
46
78
21
71
26
131
77
20
79
77
20
73
78 XI i
. 26 26, 25
..130 133 ' 129
. 82 86 86
86
. 40 4114 39 41
.100 J01 100 100
. 335i::.84 33 34
. 96 97 95 96
. 23 23 23 23
. 79,n so
West. Union
-.f
Bolton Stock Quotations.
.
Keported over private wires of Horn -blower
& Weeks', 'members of the
New York and Boston Stock Ex
changes, New Haven office, 27 Centef
Street,; .,
J'i Boston,1 March, 28.
"High, Low. Bid. Asked,
Adventure ...4,4 3 4
Alloucz .... .. B3" 152 52 54
Arcadian .. . . , . - 7 7
Atlantic 14 14 . . 11 14
Bingham 18 18 i8 18
Boston Cons. .. 23 .23 .
Cal. & Hecla.. T. 825 830
Centennial . .. 31 30 81 32
Cop. Range ... 78 76 77 77
Daly West 16 16 16 IS
Franklin 17 18
Granby 120 124
Greene 22 22
Isle Royal 18 18
Ma'ss. Cons. ... 5 6
Mohawk 76 76 76 77
North Jiutee .. 86 84 85 86
Old Dominion . 47 46 4 7 47
Osceola 129 125 129 130
Parrot 21 ' 21 21 21
Qulncy 115 .114 112 115
Shannon 17 17 17 17
Tamarack . ...105 .101 104 105 '
Trinity 18 . 18 .19 19
II. 8. Mining... 53 53
Utah Cons. ... 59 58 r,R 59 ,
United Copper 57 67 57 58
Am. T. & T. ...119 119 118 119
Swift & Co. ...105 104
Un. Shoe com... 69 69 58 60
do pfd .... 27 26 26 27
Un. Fruit 108 108 .
New Haven ...174 174
Mass. Gas 5S- 58 58 58
Cotton Marktt.
Reported by Dick Bros. & Co., lum
bers of the Near York Stock and
' Cotton Exchanges. Branch office
No. 32 Center street. New Haver
Conn. ,
New York, March, 28.
High. Low Last.
Mar ... 920 .924 929
Apr 934 924
May 950 940 950
July 955 948 965
Aug 957 957
Sept 963 955
Oct 985 978 985
Doc 989 988 989
F. S. Butlerworth
& Co.
Brokers
Private Wires to New York
EXCHANGE BLOB: Tus. 3100 3101
INVESTMENTS.
$10.000 Connecticut Ry. & Lgt. Co. 4fa
per cent, Bonds.
$10,000 Groton & Stonlngton St. Ry.
Co. 5 per cent. Bonds.
$10.000 Uanltury Bethel St. Ry. Co.
5 per cent. Bonds,
R.OOO New Haven St. Ry. Co. 1st Mg.
5 per cent. Bonds.
5,000 New Haven St. Ry. Co. (Edge
wood) 5 per cent. Bonds.
5,00(1 So. N. Eng. Tel. Co. 5 per cent.
Bonds.
.1,000 Walllngford Gas Let. Co. 5 per
cent. Bunds.
l.OOO Norwich St. ny. Co. 5 per cent.
Bonds.
So. New Enp. Tel Co. Stork.
New Haven Water Co. Stock.
C. E. Thompson & Sons
610 Chapel Street
SECURITY FOR OUR DEPOSITORS
As well as for this institution is the aim of cur Offi
cers and Directors in every transaction.
New accounts invited.
THE YALE NATIONAL BANK
745 Chapel Street.
DICK
BANKERS AND BROKERS, SO ERCAD ST., NEW YORK. '
KB BIKERS,
Sew Tork Stock Exehaae. Philadelphia Stock Exchange.
Wew tork Cotton Esrhnng. New Tork Coffee Eicbanga,
Ner Orleans Cotton Exchange. Chiracs Board of Trade.
Aacoctate Member Live pool Cotton Bxcbcngs. Stocks,
Bon da, Ccttos, Grata and Coff ee.
EDWARD B, EAMES, Mgr.
NEW HAVEN "M1AHCH, ' T iS CENTER STREET.
HORNBLQWER& WEEKS
27 Center Street
SHORT TERM NOTES
Members of New York and
NEW YORK
Direct Private Wire.
James B. Smith
INVESTMENT
BONDS
141 Oran; St., KewHavsn, Conn
Buy Nevada Stocks low
They Are at Bottom
CATLIN & POWELL CO.,
35 Wall St., New Yorfc
Commission Brokers,
Phone 4487-8 Broad.
BRANCH OPFICB
B o orly J.I cUllan & Co.,
BANKERS AJfD BROKERS,
7 Broadway, New York.
MEMBERS OF
New York Stock Exchange
Bonds and Stocks
Bought and aold on eonunUalon for coin
or carried on margin) alao Cotton,
Grain and Provision.
Investment Securities
A SPECIALTY.
New Daren Branch, 20 and 31 Center ft
A Clean Record
of Sixty-Four Years.
No Law Suit or unpnid losse under
any policies Issued by the North Agen
cy since Is was established in 1843.
Should this mean anything to a
property holder who wants to get the
benefit of an experienced and reliable
agency to look after his Insurance
business?
Our rate are exactly the same as
those charged by others.
Why not look Into this matter a lit
tle? Perhaps you take less pains In
selecting your insurance than you da
your cigars.
'i'CHNCJCMH,
70 CHURCH STREET.
First Building North of the Post Office,
AValuafts Protectiin.
Every home, every family pos
sess pnpers, jewels or other val
uables, that may tempt burglars
or perish in fire. Their loss is
Irreparable Do not assume the
risk, vthen you can rent a box
in our modern Fire and Burglar
Proof Safe Deposit Vaults, and
be secure.
T?f NEW HfoTEI? w
?aXJS' COMPANY
40 Church St.,
NEW HAVEN, CONN.
BROS. &, CO
Bwton Stock Exch
anges
BSTON CHICAGO
T. D. WETMORE, Mnniier.
NON-TAXABLE BONDS.
Rockvllle, Dronil lirook ntid East Wind
sor street Railway First Mortgage
5 per cent. Bonds.
GUARANTEED principal and In
terest by the Hartford and Spring
field Street Railway Co.
Price to net nearly 5 per cent.
Lomas & Nettleton
HANKERS AMD BROKBiii,
137 ORANGE STREET
SECURITIES FOR SALE.
Lake Shore B. It. G p. c. Notes, 1910.
N. Y. N. H. & II. R. It. a per cent. Note.
New Hnven Water Co.
Conn. Railway A Light. 4U'a of 1031.
Mllilkln Bran. lt fl'a, 1921.
N. H. Gaa Light Convertible.
New Haven Wnter Co. Convert. 4'.
International Silver, lt Mtrc 6 p. . '
Consolidated Ry. 4', lrs!. Endorsed. '
............ 1. B,
International Silver Co., Pref.
Mlddletowa Street Railway Co. Bs. j
KIMBERLY, ROOT & DAY,
Tel. 1101. m Oranca Street.
rrivat. wir. Nw xork and Botoa.;
H. C. WARREN & CO.,
BANKERS
Dealers in Investment
Securities
108 ORANGE ST.
IUnion Trust Co;
NEW iJAVEN. 't
CHARTERED by the State of Con.
neoticut with authority to act aa
Executor, Administrate, Guardian Re
ceiver, or Trustee, under will or deed.
Is legal depository of money paid
into Court and publlo Trust Funds
Acts at Trustee for Municipalities, Cor
porations and Individuals, and admin
Isters trusts of all kinds. Empowered
to act as registrar of stocks, bonds or
other evidence of Indebtedness, manage
sinking funds, and do all business such
It also does a general banking bus
iness, collecting checks, notes, coupons
and receives deposits. The prinolnal of
i.i.w ......rara Uy iib.il ana Kept
separate and apart from the general
assets of the Companv.
This Company is by law regularlv ex-
alumni uy lhw i, aim examiner or the
State of Connecticut.
l,. HUTCHKISS, President.
EUGENE S. BRISTOL, Treasurer.
James H. Parish & Co.,
tieeeedinaj"
NEWTON 4 PARISH.
Stocks and Bonds
Dealers in Investment Securitie
86 Orange Street,
THE
MERCHANTS NATIONAL
BANK
EVERY FACILITY AND CON
VENIENCE IS OBTAIN
ABLE HERE.
SIAKEYOl'R DEPOSITS WITH
IS AND BE CONVINCED.
276 STATE ST.
Op. Woosisr St
JtixUxtziitimxvts,
HYPER 10
Sara S. and Lee Shubert, inc., Manager
MONDAY AND TVESDAY,
April 1 and 2.
( (
The Tourists"
with
RICHARD GOLDEN
50 Beauty Chorus-50
Prices $1.50, $1.00, 75c, 60c, 25c.
Seat now selling;.
FRIDAY NIGHtTMARCH 23.
iiiimiuy JHntfnee.
Gordon & Gilbert In "Hans & Nl3," tho
Comedy SucceNg. Regular Popular
Prices. Matinee prices same as night.
Saturday, iHureh 30, matinee and night.
Farewell Appearance of the World's
Greatest Magician, Kellar.
Seat sale now open. Prices: Matinee,
25c, 35c, 50c; night, 25c, 85c, 60c,
BIJOU THEATRE
Sylvester Z. Poll... Proprietor
WEEK OF MARCH 25th.
THE STpCK COMPAN5
in
"Oat, of the Fold."
Holiday Prices Friday.
Poll's popular prices, 10c-20c-30c
Seats reserved In. advance. Tel. S01
POLI'S NEW HiEATRE
ENTIRE WEEK OF MARCH 18th.
Lasky-Rolfe's Big Production
THE MILITARY OCTETTE.
12 PEOPLE 12
JACK LORIMER
The Breeder of Scotch Smiles.
8 Other Big Star Acts 8
Poll's Popular Price Prevail.
UNITED STATES MARINE-BAND;"
WOOLSET HALL.
.THURSDAY, APRIL 4th, at 8 m.j.
Concert Given Under Auspices of
YALE SCHOOL OF MUSIC.
Seats all reserved. 25c. 50c, 75c, $1,
On sale onlv at Th M stAlnort S2
Co.. beerinnine Mondav Anril lot .
10 a. m. ' .
Automobile Show.
Armory, Match 21-30, I to 1 1 p.m.
ADMISSION 25 CENTS. '
Beautiful Exhibits. Band Concerts.
Admission, 25c, Season Tickets, ,60c.
PAINT AND CLAY CLUB
EXHIBITION
Y. M. C. A. BLDG., 1B2 TEMPLE ST.
Q"r rHilv from 10 to 5, until April 13.
ffitmtictat
NEW HAVEN
COUNTY
NATIONAL BANK
317 State Street.
ESTABLISHED 1834.
Capital, 35 ,000
Surplus and Profits, $350,000
This bank offers to de
positors every facility for
business-and invites the ac
counts of corporations, firms
and individuals.
EZEKIEL G. STODDARD,
President.
HORATIO G. REDFIELD, ,
Cashier;
WILLIAM G. REDFIELD, '
Asst. Cashier,
March 22, 1007,
(Condensed)
THE NATIONAL
TRADESMENS BANK
OF NEW HAVEN,
RESOURCES :
Investments $1,868,122.61
Cash and due from Banks. 358.211.8S
Total $2,226,384.43
LIABILITIES: "
Capital $ 300,000.00
Surplus 317,828.91
Circulation 200,000.00
Deposits 1,408,505.53
Total $2,226,384.49
ESTABLISHED 185S.
Accounts Invited.
Prince t Whitely
Bankers and Brokers,
52 Broadway, New York,'
and
15 Center St., New Haven?
Members N. T. and Boston Stock Ex
changes. Produce Exchange, and
cnicago isoaru 01 Trade.
C. B. BOLMER,
Manager New Haven Branch.
ALL CLASSES OF RAILWAY
STOCKS AND BONDS, ALSO GRAIN.
PROVISION AND COTTON BOUGHT
AND SOLD ON COMMISSION.
Investment Securities,

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