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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, October 03, 1894, Image 1

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THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN.
FOURTH YEAR. PIKENIX, ARIZONA, WEDNESDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 3, 1894. VOL. V. NO. 115.
RIVAL STILLS.
How Two Girls Made
Moonshine Whisky
And. How They Got Into
Trouble.
Betrayed Into the Clutches Of
The Law By Rivals.
The Other Firm Composed of Men
Who Were Jealous of the Success
of Their Female Rivals.
By the Associated Prefs.
Louisville, Ky., Oct. 2, Among a
batch of moonshine prisoners that were
brought to the county jail laBt evening
by Capt. Ponch were two women from
the mountains.
They were Tennessee Eden and
Pauline Whitt. The former is the eld
est of three children that her father left
her mother to support when he died a
year ago. He lived in Breathitt coun
ty, and owned besides a small and thor
oughly unproductive mountain labora
tory, or, according to the legal way of
putting it, a moonshine still. When he
was laid away Tennessee took np the
business and went to making
whisky to support her mother
and brother and sister. She suc
ceeded very well and hired Pauline
Whitt to sell the whisky. In the
neighborhood there was a rival still run
by Bob Link, Preeton Gilly and Henry
Buckner. The latter were jealous of
the success of the female concern, and
they laid a scheme to have it raided by
the officers. They notified Captain
Punch, and when he went out to raid
the itill of the girls he raided that of
the men as well, and they were all
brought to the jail together.
Neither of the girls la over eighteen
years of age and they are not of comely
appearance, to out it mildly. They ad
mit their guilt and say they will try
and get light sentences. They will
testify against the men, though, for be
traying them and endeavor to get them
as long sentences as possible. The only
regret of Tennessee was that her
mother and brother and sister would be
deprived of a means of livelihood while
she was in the jail. She said if they
had only broken up the still and left
her liberty she might have worked on
the farm this winter and kept them in
something to eat. Her mother is ill
and the other children are too little to
do anything
NOT A TRADE MARK.
Any One May Call Himself a
Populist.
That Is a Judicial Decision Handed
Down by Judge Seawellin
San Kranclsco.
By the Associated Press.
San Francisco, Oct. 2. Superior
Judge Seawell rendered a decision this
morning in an action brought against
P. A. Dolan and other Oregon organ
izers of an alleged Populist party which
put a municipal ticket in the field to
enjoin them from using the name
"Populist Party," and to enjoin the
registrar from issuing a certificate to
Dolan. The action was brought by J.
N. Webster, People's party nominee
for governor, and others. The court
decided in favor of Dolan and said there
is no such thing as a proprietory right
to the name of a political party.
COLD BLOODED MURDER.
The Assassins, Surrounded by 200
Armed Men.
Tacoma, Wash., Oct. 2 The country
absut Payallup is greatly excited over
the cold blooded murder last night of
Constable Jeffrey.
Two hundred citizens, fully armed,
are on the trail of two tramps who
committed the murder and this after
noon they are surrounded in the thick
woods near McMillan. Three blood
hounds brought ovor from EllenBburg
were put on the scent early today.
About daylight one party of pursuers
came up to the fugitives who opened
fire, both beiog armed. Deputy Sheriff
Harry Moore was shot throuzh the side
and is not expected to live. Every
avenue of escape is guarded.
A WILL CASE.
The Wootton's of Fresno Likely to
Become Celebrated.
Fresno, Cal., Oct. 2. Another sensa
tional incident was added today to the
record in the case of William Wootton,
the missing Reed ley rancher. An Eng
lishman, giving bis name as William
Wootton, and claiming to be a son of
the missing man ai rived here with a
will, which he will offer for probate dis
posing of the estate in his mother's
favor.
The new claimant is about thirty
nine years of age and says that Wootton
married his mother in England forty
years ago. The Newcombers claim will
be opposed by the attorney for Thomas
Wootton, the rancher's brother, who
has already filed suit to quiet title.
PENNOY2R AGAINJ
A Characteristic Letter to Montana
People.
Portland, Or., Oct. 2. Governor
Pennoyer in a letter declining an invi
tation to fill an engagement of one
week for the PopuliBts in Montana,
said: "If the preeent ruinous depres
sion in business and Rvalues, resulting
directly from demonetization of silver,
and not in any tariff taxation or change
in such taxation, will not persuade the
people of Montana to vote against both
old political parties dominated by Wall
street and equally responsible for such
demonetization, then no persuasion of
mine would be availing, neither will
they be persuaded though one rose
from the dead."
COCONINO REPUBLICANS.
A Winning Ticket Named at
Flagstaff.
Prominent and Substantial Men are
Named as the Leaders of the
Republican Party.
By the Associated Press.
Flagstaff, Ariz., Oct. 2. The Re
publicans of Coconino county held a
convention today. The following nomi
nations were made: Council, Dr. A. M.
Johnston; assembly, E. F. Greenlaw;
sheriff, R. H. Cameron ; probate judge,
N. G. Layton ; district attorney, John
W. Robb; recorder, Charles A. Bush;
treasurer, H. C. Hibben ; surveyor,
James A. Lamport; board of supervi
sors, C. H. Schulz and F. R. Nellie.
THROUGH A DRAW BRIDGE.
A Bad Accident Occurs to a
Railway Train.
A SmoKlng Car Jumps the TracK
and Goes Into the Water
With Its Occupants.
By the Associated Press.
Oakland, Cal., Oct. 2. As the local
train on the Narrow Guage railroad was
approaching the Weboter street draw
bridge at 6:30 o'clock this morning, the
la?t car which was a smoker, jumped
the track.
Before the engineer was able to stop
the train the forward part was on the
draw and the smoking car was being
dragged over the ties. The coupling
broke just as the car reached the
bridge and it rolled down the bank into
the water. Nearly all the passengers
jumped from the car before it went
over, but a dozen or more were severely
braised.
Only, two persons went down with
the car, one of them, J. C. Wilson, of
San Francisco, having his nose broken
and some internal injuries, the other,
name unknown, was also injured.
There were about twenty in the car
when the accident occurred.
A similiar accident occured at the
same place four years ago, in which
thirteen people lost their lives.
The Whlttler Reform School.
Whittier, Cal., Oct. 2. J. E. Coffin
has succeeded Walter Lindley as
superintendent of the Whittier reform
school.
HALT! HANDSUPH
Command Given by a
Lone Highwayman.
A California Stage Coach
Is Held Up.
Wells, Fargo & Co.'s Box With
Treasures Taken.
The Stage Driver One of the Oldest
on the Coast A Posse of Men
In Hot Pursuit.
By the Associated Press.
Yreka, Cal., Oct. 2. "Halt and all
hands up," was the command of a lone
highwayman this morning at 30 o'clock,
ai the old stage coach with its eight
passengers reached the foot of the grade
just the other side of the divide be
tween Yreka and Fort Jones, en route
this way.
The highwayman who appeared was
armed with a wicked looking revolver
and with genuine coolness, which
stamps the old time knight of the road,
he demanded the Wells, Fargo & Co.
box and then told the driver to move
on.
It ia rumored the box contained con
siderable treasure, and in some mys
terious way the highwayman learned of
the fact. :t
Dan Crawley it the. Oldest stage
driver in northern California, having
driven the first stage that ever left
Yreka between thirty and forty years
ago, and this is the first stage robbery
that ever occurred on this road.
There is great excitement over the
affair and small grcnpi oaw. iine the
streets discussing the whys and where
fores and a posse of officers are now on
the road to the scene of the .robbery.
CARGO OF WHEAT.
Sending That Cereal From the Pa
cific to the Atlantic.
Portland, Or., Oct. 2. The ship.
Reaper, is loading wheat at Victoria
dock for New York. This vessel was
the first chartered to carry barley from
this port for the Atlantic coast and she
was likewise the first to make a similar
voyage with wheat.
Much speculation has been indulged
in as to why this cereal is teing shipped
to New York where it can only be sold
at a loss. The reason can be attributed
to the big fire of Sept. 22, when the
Pacific coast elevator and its contents
were burned.
The Repear was chartered by the
elevator company to take barley to
New York and the grain with which
she was to be loaded waB in store at the
elevator. This was destroyed and as
the ship's charter would not allow her
to wait until another cargo of barley iB
accumulated she took a cargo of wheat.
It is possible that there is not an
other cargo of barley in this country as
the ship, Iroquois, which has a similar
charter to the Reapef, will also load
wheat for the Atlantic sea board.
MR. JENISON'S DAM.
It Solves the Problem of a Canal Be
tween Duluth and Minneapolis.
Duluth, Minn., Oct. 2. President
Jenison, of the Altomonte Water com
pany, which proposes to furnish water
power from a dam in the St. Croix river
above Cloquet, is in town. He now has
five engineering crews out, and in the
past two weeks they have surveyed
over 40 miles. He feels very good over
results and says that with five miles of
ditch-digging he can bring water into
Duluth from almost 35 miles away.
Mr. Jenison has discussed what may
prove to be a solution of the problem for
a ship canal between Lake Superior
and the Twin Cities. When his 80-foot
dam is built, the water will back up in
to the east Savanna river to within six
miles of the Mississippi. By puting his
dam six feet higher, the water will flow
from the St. Louis over into the Missis
sippi. He says it would be an easy
thing to cut a ditch between the Sa
vanna and Mississippi, to give a good
depth of water for vessels.
An Open Switch.
Delane, Cal., Oct. 2. A narrow es
cape from what might have been a
terrible accident occurred at Hunt
Siding, six miles south of this point a
7 o'clock this morning. Being a trifle
late the north bound morning train was
passing the siding at a speed of about
40 miles an hour and an open switch
was encountered. The entire train
passed, but two Pullmans were thrown
off and badly smashed up. A great
many of the passengers received a
severe shaking up but no one was fatal
ly hurt.
CAPTAIN HOWGATE.
He Is in the District Jail at Wash
ington. Washington, Oct. 2. Captain How
gate is expected in Washington tonight.
He will be taken to the district jail.
It will be nothing of a surprise to him
when he arrives to find that ChaB. H.
Deming, one of the guards who let him
escape ten years ago, is again a guard
at the jail having been appointed today.
TROUBLE THREATENED.
Mexico and Guatemala In a Bound
ary Dispute.
Washington, Oct. 2. There are pre
monitions of trouble between Mexico
and Guatemala growing out of a dispute
over the boundary between the two
countries. Guatemala has overtaken
to assert sovereignty over a considerable
piece of territory lying within the
borders of Mexico state, according to
the latter's report.
President Diafe has made a strong
representation of the case to the Mex
ican congress, and indicated his inten
tention of vigorously upholding Mex
ico's claim of jurisdiction, but still ex
presses a hope that the matter may be
peaceably Bettled.
TWO CHILDREN CREMATED.
While their Parents are Unable to
Effect their Rescue. '
Bristol. Tenn., Oct. 2, The resi
dence of James Couchenour near Gate
City, Va., was burned yesterday and
two children met death in the flames.
An effort was made to rescue both of
the children, but juet as their mother
was entering the house a crash came,
burying them under the burning tim
bers. Mrs. Couchenour was seriously
if not fatally burned and her husband
was badly burned about the hands and
face.
k DASH FOR LIBERTY.
Two Federal Prisoners Make
Good Their Escape.
A Story That the Warden and the
Guards Were Poisoned and
That Others Are Free.
By the Associated Press.
Tacoma, Wash., Oct. 2. Two prison
ers escaped from the federal peniten
tiary on McNeil's Island last Thursday.
They were Wade and Brooks, both
serving terms for smuggling. Thurs
day they were ordered to carry some
garbage outside the prison walls.
When outside they made a sudden dive
for the brush and succeeded in success
fully escaping from Guard Jack Keat
ing. Wade was doing a five year term
and had once escaped. Marshal Drake
has men stationed at the boundary line
to capture the fugitives in case they at
tempt to cross into British Columbia.
It is thought that they may not yet
have left the island. Marshal Drake
denies the published story to the effect
that four men had escaped after poison
ing the warden and all the guards. A
resident of the island says the poison
ing occurred later in the week and was
partially successful, allowing two other
prisoners to escape. Some think an in
vestigation of the penitentiary manage
ment will result.
The Trans-Continental.
San Fkancisco, Oct. 2. J. C. Stubbs,
third vice-president of the Southern
Pacific company, is en route to Chicago
where he will join General Traffic Man
ager Gray and Assistant Passenger
Agent Horsburgh, who have been in
Chicago for several weeks, and assist
them in their efforts to patch up the
troubles in the Trans-Continental as
sociation. Accidentally Shot.
Oakland, Cal., Oct. 2. Albert Gen
try, a newspaper carrier 16 years of
age, was shot in the Bide and probably
fatally injured thie afternoon by Hoyt
Govent, aged 13, who accidently dis
charged his shot gun. The boys were
bunting in the hills back of Berkley.
Dr. Price's Cream Baking Powder
World's Fair Highest Medal and Diploma.
BETRAYED.
Conspirators to Wreck a
Train in Custody.
A Member of the Band
Gives Them Away.
Plan to Blow Up a Train Finally
Abandoned.
The Would-be Robbers of a Rock
Island Express Arrested Charg-
ed With the Crime Now In Jail.
By the Associated Press.
St. Joseph, Mo., Oct. 2. Lee Jones
and "Scar Faced Charley Frizzle" were
arrested here today charged with coa
spiracy to rob a Chicago, Rock Island
& Pacific train.
They were betrayed by one of their
band. A week ago it was planned to
rob the west bound Rock Island train
and to blow it up if necessary.
' This was postponed and last night it
was finally abandoned, the would-be
robbers learning that the police was
after them.
LEAVES THE DEMOCRACY.
Hon. Irwin B. Hockaoay, of River
ton, the Convert.
Riverton, Ky., Oct. 2. Irwin B.
Hockaday, a prominent and influential
and wealthy Democratic politician and
orator, this day severed his connection
with the Democratic party and joined
the Republican club. This is significant
aB Mr. Hockaday was the secretary of
the late Democratic committee, and his
action will have a great influence in the
coming election. This is one of the
many political, changes that have oc
curred in Kentucky.
Will Simpson's Name Go? -Topeka,
Kan., Oct. 2. The Democra
tic convention of the Seventh district ,
decided by resolution to make do
nomination. Wednesday, two month
later, the district committee met and
indorsed Jerry Simpson, the Populist
nominee. This is not satisfactory to
the stalwart Democrats and Chairman
Richardson of the state committee, has
decided that Simpson's name may not
be certified to the secretary of state as
the Democratic nominee, and it will
thus not appear on the regular Demo
cratic ticket, unless the courts decide to
the contrary. Richardson holds that
when the convention decreed that no
nomination should be made, that ended
the matter, and the committee has no
right to act.
Plead Not Guilty.
Woodland, Cal, Oct. 2 The Americas
Railway Union men charged with hav
ing wrecked a Southern Pacific train at
a trestle west of Sacramento on July &,
when five men were killed, were ar
raigned in the superior conrt this after
noon and all entered pleas of not guilty.
Worden, who has secured a new coun
sel, had his case set for trial Oct. 17.
The cases of the other defendants will
be set for trial later.
Hanged Himself to a Balcony.
City of Mexico, Oct. 2. Juan Uda
rez, a Spanish banker, committed sui
cide by hanging himself from the street
balcony of his house on Torro street.
Early pedestrians discovered the body
swinging in midair above the sidewalk.
A chronic disease, from which he bad
been Buffering for years, was the cause.
A brother in Spain put an end to his
life in the same manner.
Y. M. C. A. Meetings.
The Young Men's Christian Associa
tion will begin their regular gospel
meetings Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock.
Gymnasium classes are being formed
and drill will begin in a few days. Dr.
Purman is the examining physician.
He gives a thorough physical examina
tion to everyone before going into the
years work so that each may know his
weak points to be developed. The As
sociation is now having printed a hand
some folder which will be put into the
hands of every stranger who aarives in
Phoenix this year, which contains var
ious iteniB of interest to new-comers.
This serves as an introduction to the
Information Bureau, which the Associ
ation will carry on regarding rooms and
board. They have already on hand a
list of nearly 200 rooms for selections by
strangers. They invite any one who
has rooms and who has not already put
them on the register to do so at once at
the Association rooms. The annual
business meeting will be held next Fit
day evening at 7 :30 o'clock in the halL
It will be followed by a social. AH
young people are invited.

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