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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, October 04, 1894, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020558/1894-10-04/ed-1/seq-8/

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THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN: THURSDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 4, 189J
Ilardiraret
STEEL
mri'i'-"
A Full Stock of Hard
ware at EZRA W.
THAYER'S.
THE QDAIL SEAS1N
Is now here. He sells
that new smokeless
Ammunition and rents
a good Gun fo 50 cts.
a day.
is
OPPOSITE CITY HALL, g
SONGS OF WAR.
Japs March With Music
on Their Lips.
But it is Full of Hatred
for China.
Will Plant the Flag of Japan on
Pekin's Walls.
The War Will Not Interfere With In
ternal Improvements and the
Building: of Railroads.
By the Associated Press.
Washington, Oct. 3. The officers of
the Japanese ligation have received an
euteresting budget of news and eossip
from the last mail from Japan. The
spirit of the people in shows in war
songs sung by the Japanese troops as
they march toward Pekin. SongB were
officially compiled by Prince Arisugawa.
They breath great bitterness against
China and declare that now is the time
to plant the flag of the rising son on
the walls of LPekin and to illuminate
its darkness.
Each verse of the song begins and
ends with "Strike and Chastise." Va
rious verBes describe the Chinese as ar
rogant and insolent with an army of
cowards.
The Chinese troops' war songB say of
the Japanese: "They are undisciplined
rabble, and however fine their aams
look they are useless like fine ladies in
pictures."
The Japanese minister of finance has
officially made announcement that the
war will not be allowed to interrupt
the internal improvement of Japan.
Consequently railway construction is to
proceed with the same vigor aB in peace
ful tiaaes.
A FRIGHTFUL STORM.
An Arkansas Cyclone Creates
Great Havoc.
Several Lives Are Lost and a Mil
lion Dollar's Worth of Prop
erty Is Destroyed.
By the Associated Press.
Little Rock, Ark.. Oct. 3. A fearful
cyclone struck this city today and un
roofed many building and the peniten
tiary, killing one and injuring four
Awarded
Highest Honors World's Fair.
MOST PERFECT MADE.
A pure Grape Cream of Tartar Powder. Free
from Ammonia, Alum or any other adulterant
YEARS THE STANDARD.
guards; it also demolished the male
ward of the insane apylum, Killing Dr.
Ingate and severely injuring several of
the inmates. Many residences were
damaged. The roofs were blown off
the telephone and telegraph offices and
the wires twisted. The Martin build
ing was demolished. Many substantial
brick structures were demolished.
There is no estimate of the number of
killed and dozens of hair breadth es
capes. Torrents of rain fell. The
streetB are filled with debris. The
storm proper did not last over three
minutes.
Losses of last night's storm will ag
gregate nearly $1,000 000. The damage
to the state insane asylum is $200,000.
Dr. Ingate, assistant superintendent,
was killed between falling walls and
.two patients are missing. The state
penitentiary sustained a loss of $100,
000. A convict named James was killed
and several others injured. Jackson
Yoyd and his three-year-old child were
crushed to death in their home by a
falling wall. When taken from the
ruins the child was clasped in its
father's arms.
A Kind Act.
Ventura, Cal., Oct. 3. A. J. Har
rington, who lost a band firing 6alutee
of welcome to Budd and Phillips laet
night, was visited at the hospital today
by Mr. Budd who left a $100 check for
him. Mr. Budd instructed the super
intendent of the hospital to take the
best care of him and send the bill to
him. Harrington formerly worked for
Budd's father.
For general house cleaning, window
washing, address J. W. Williams, cor
ner 13th Avenue and Jackson Street.
SMALL-BOAT VOYAGES.
Stories of Foolhardy Men Who Havt
Crossed the Atlantic
The record of adventurous persons
who have crossed the Atlantic in crafts
of small dimensions is, comparatively
speaking', a long one, but nothing has
been accomplished beyond fame for a
few, and almost repulsive stories of
privations of various kinds and failure.
The latest effort of adventure in this
direction is that of Capt. Freitsch, a
Finn, who is to try to cross the Atlantic
in a forty-six-foot flat-bottomed schooner-rigged,
skiff, constructed by himself
at Milwaukee. He started from that
city recently crossing the lake and
coming through the Erie canal to Troy,
thence down the Hudson to this city,
says the New York Tribune. He pro
poses to start at an early day, going
first to Southampton, thence to port?
on the continent, and later return to
the United States.
Voyages of this kind in such small
craft are evidently more remarkable
than those of clippers, yachts and
schooners, on account of the perils of
the ocean, the paucity of the crew to
manage the helm and sails during a
period measured by months and the
spirit and pluck of the individual. But
it cannot be said that such voyages
really accomplish anything for the
science of navigation. In July, 1866,
Capt. Hudson and F. E. Fiteh, the
latter acting as mate, and a dog, in a
twenty-six-foot lifeboat called the Red,
White and Blue, and rigged as a
schooner, started from Sandy Hook on
a voyage of unknown duration and un
certain vicissitude across the Atlantic.
The boat had several narrow escapes
from capsizing, and thirty-seven days
after leaving New York she entered
Margate harbor. The boat and her
crew were exhibited at the Crystal
Palace, where the story of the voyage
was oft-told. The hardy navigators
did not return in the same way they
had "had enough of it." In the same
year a small yacht of twenty -five tons
made the voyage from Liverpool to
New South Wales, reaching there in
one hundred and fifty days, a distance
of sixteen thousand miles. In June,
1876. Alfred Johnson started from
Gloucester in a small boat, manned
only by himself, and sixty-seven days
later he reached Liverpool. The voy
age was a perilous one, and when
about three hundred miles off the Irish
coast his boat was capsized, and he was
providentially assisted by a huge wave
in righting it.
Another bold adventure was that of
Capt. Thomas Crapo, who, with his
wife, crossed the ocean in a twenty
foot boat called the New Bedford. The
adventurers sailed from New Bedford
in June, and fifty-four days later
reached Penzance and were right glad
to end the voyage. The experiences
were most bitter and heart-rending.
Jn July, 1888, Capt. Andrews sailed
from Boston and crossed the Atlantic.
The story of the voyage was like that
of many others deprivation of com
forts and food, loss of sleep, hair
breadth escapes, dangerous hurricanes
and newspaper notoriety.
ALL EUROPE READY FOR WAR.
The Great Nations Prepared for a Decla
ration of Hostilities.
After the dreadful Franco-German
war of 1870-1871 the principle of pro
longed military service and of dimin
ished annual contlctrents was given up.
says McClure's Magazine. The mon
strous principle of universal service
was adopted instead. By this prin
ciple the whole nation is under arms.
A country is no longer a country, a
people is no longer a people; a nation is
now nothing but an army, and a coun
try is only a barrack. Everybody wears
the uniform. Everybody is sur le qui
vive. If war breaks out to-day all pro
fessions become deserted, all function
abandoned; the life of the nation stops
so that national activity may be said to
begin again only with the blood that is
shed. Moreover, before two hostile
armies, that is, two nations which are
enemies, join in combat, each of the
two armies, that is, each of the two in
finite hordes which traverse their sev
eral countries to meet eventually on
the field of battle, will leave behind it
a country in famine, its factories silent
and its trade paralyzed. Again, enor
mous stocks of food supplies must be
accumulated on the frontiers where the
two armies are likely to meet; but be
fore reaching these inexhaustible mag
azines the armies must be fed while
crossing their own territories, and that
requires money. So, that, before even
the first gun is fired, each army will
have expended enormous sums and left
in its train towns and villages stripped
of men and beasts, the cities in famine,
the country without a single tiller of
the field.
Carnot and the Figrnre Seven.
The French papers have been noting
the curious way in which the career
of President Carnot was connected
with the figure "7." He was
born in 1837, was admitted to
the Ecole polytechnique in 1857, was
elected by virtue of article 7 of the
constitution to the office of president of
the republic in 1887, was assassinated
at the age of 57 years, in the seventh
year of his presidency, in a carriage
containing seven- persons (four inside
and three outside, a coachman and two
footmen), on the seventh ;day of the
week, by an Italian (a word of seven
letters) named Cesario (also formed of
seven letters). Finally, lie was borne
in triumph to the Pantheon on the first
day of the seventh month of the year,
seven days after his death.
PETER MINU IT'S "M ISTAKE.
He Lost Money When He Bought Man
hattan Island for Twenty-Four Dollars.
History tells us that 268 years ago,
or in 1626, Peter Minuit bought Man
hattan island from the Indians and
paid for it 824 in merchandise.
It has usually been thought that
Peter took advantage of the ignorance
of the untutored savage and made an
excellent bargain for himself.
No doubt but that Peter thought it a
good trade, particularly when he con
sidered the value of lots after the
streets would be laid out, Central park
improved, Brooklyn bridge built and
the island had a population of two
millions; for Peter was a shrewd real
estate speculator , and looked a long
way ahead with a correct, prophetic
eye.
Notwithstanding all of Peter's
shrewdness and foresight he made the
mistake of his life and lost millions of
dollars by his purchase. He didn't stop
to figure interest. . t-
Since 1626 the rate of interest in this
country, where money has always been
in demand, has ranged from six per
cent, up to highway robbery. It will
be conservative to say that eight per
cent, is a fair average.
Now, if Peter had loaned his $24 at
eight per cent, compound interest, from
then until this date, what would its
value be, compared with the value of
Manhattan island?
At eight per cent, compound interest,
money will double once in about nine
years. Now, there have been twenty
nine times nine years, and seven years
more, since Peter made his purchase.
Then, if he had loaned his $24 he would
have had nearly 8400,000 at the end of
the first one hundred years, and more
than 8200,000,000 at the close of the sec
ond century, while in 1894 his principal
of $24 would have grown to be 320,000,
000,000 the value of Manhattan island
many times over.
So, in fact the Indians got the best of
the bargain, and no doubt they
chuckled over the situation as they
walked through Baxter street with the
824 worth of merchandise in their arms.
THE WALLS OF SEOUL.
How a Party of Travelers Scaled Them
' After Nightfall.
Seoul, like Pekin, and, what is more,
like all the cities of Corea and China,
says a traveler, writing in the New
York Herald, is surrounded by im
mense walls; and the gates of the city
are closed each evening at set of sun.
The latter had been replaced by the
moon when we arrived at the foot of
these great walls, which must be all of
fifty feet in height. Not wishing to
leave us to pass the night outside the
city and exposed to numberless dan
gers, the minister had had the happy
idea to have us conveyed to a secluded
spot where we were assisted to climb
over the walls.
A score of Coreans sat astride the top
and lowered strong ropes. The ascent
was perilous and very difficult. It took
at least a half hour to hoist one of our
friends, who being enormously stout,
gave to the Coreans an immense deal
of difficulty, and, besides, he, terrified
to find himself swinging in space at
the end of a rope, to our great delight,
uttered howls of fright. Thus was our
entry into Seoul something less than
triumphant.
Tailoring.
PERSONAL
The blonde lady accompanied by
a little girl who sat behind a gen
tleman in church last Sunday, is
informed that he will sit in the
same place every Sunday hereafter
until further notice, and will wear
the suit she admired so much and
that it was made by
NICHOLSON THE TAILOR.
a&aa&aaaaaAAaai
ISoarti 1 n u.
Happy and Content are the
Boarders at the
IVY GREEN
RESTAURANT.
WHY?
Because tt eir appetites are first cul
tivated to a condition of natural
Health fulness and then regularly
nourifhed and satisfied by choice
viands, fresh vegetables and all
palatable and wholesome foods in
season.
MRS. A. WILLIAMSON,
Adams Street, Between Center and First.
Hiodftmir House,
The Windsor
CENTER STREET,
BET. ADAMS AMD HONSOI,
A.
Owner and formerly manager has re
sumed charge. Every comfort of clean
liness and order will be furnished.
Reduced Rates During the Summer.
on.
WOOL IS ON THE FREE LIST,
But the price of Navajo Blankets will not
be raised for 30 diys. If you want one,
and you certainly do, you had better in
vest at once. By the way,
OIL AND GASOLINE
are Btfll selling at the same low prices.
Coal oil, 11.50 per 5 gal can; gasoline $1.75
per 5 gai. can. A faucet furnished free.
PflffiNIX OIL CO.,
28 S. CENTER ST.
DresgmaklnK.
MRS. M. FORBES,
t snni QTC Second Street, 8outh of
IVI W U I C. Hartwell's Photograph
' 1 Gallery, is prepared to guar-
------- antee style, fit and prices.
Ladies wishing dressmaking, cutting and fit
ting will make a mistake if they do not call.
PHCENIX. ARIZONA.
PHffiNIX BAKEEY
EDWARD E1SELE, Prop.
This popular establishment has been refitted
and renovated throughout. Every
thing in the way of baking
STRICTLY FIRST CLASS
all orders attended to with promptness and
to the utmost satisfaction of our pat
rons. Free delivery to any part
of the city.
PH(ENIXBAKERY Porter Blk.
E. fc. BURLING AM E'S
CHEMCAL
d LABORATORY
Established in Colorado, 1866. Samples by
mail or expresB will receive prompt and care
ful attention.
Gold and Silver Bullion St
Address. 1136 and 173$ Lawrence St.. Denver, Colo.
Corral.
N. W. corner First
Ave. and Adams St.
burger n
HEATH, Prop.
the old reliable
Corral, s
d corral where
teams are well cared
for and where everv-
body receives fair
and honest treatment.
Baths.
Electric, Vapor
and
Medicated Baths
FOR
LADIESandGENTLEMEN
s 229 E. JEFFEKSON ST.
Druse Store.
AT BRISLEY'S
"Mountain City"
DRUG STORE.
Special attention is given
us! Send in by mail or
otnerwise
PRESCOTT, ARIZ.
I7RINTINQ
I
Well that is just
what we do, and
for the next
30MB30
we will do
it FOR COST of
labor and stock.
33i PER CENT
off our regular price
and one-third less
than that asked
by any of our
pretended
rivals.
This is to keep the
money jingling
and means
5P0T CrUll!
Tt is impossible to
enumerate all the
work which we can
do. Below will be
found a few of the
many "classes of print
ing executed by us:
Blank Books, Bread Tickets,
Folders of Various Shapes,
Constitutions and By-Laws,
Letter Heads, Hangers,
Announcements, Posters,
Bills of Fare, Reports,
Statements, Rent cards
Mourning Stationery,
Prescription Blanks,
Announcements,
Commercial Work
Wedding Cards,
Programmes,
Blank Work,
Agreements,
Rent Cards,
Newspapers
Cards Business, Personal,
Contracts, Certificates.
Hand Bills, Invitations,
Dodgers, Diagrams,
Envelopes all Sizes,
Insurance Blanks,
Admission Tickets,
Transfer Cards,
Wedding Cards,
Badges, Slips,
Shipping Tags,
Sale Cards,
Postal Card's,
Dodgers,
Headings,
Briefs,
Tickets,
Tags,
Etc.
TRY US !
THE ARMQM
REPUBLICAN C2.
FLEMING BLOCK.

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