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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, October 27, 1894, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020558/1894-10-27/ed-1/seq-8/

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THE ARIZONA REPLBLICAN: SATURDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 27, 1894.
Hardware.
a
Cassidy Sulky,
Bonanza Gang
Oliver Mled m
nows
AT
Wk W. THAYER'S.
THE PIL SEASON
Is now here. He sells
that new smokeiess
Arrfmunition and rents
a good Gun fo 50 cts.
a day.
OPPOSITE CITY HALL. A
522
Too Much for Him.
Atlanta, Ga., Oct. 26. Harrison
Smith, of Augusta, Ga., was an humble
citizen of that city before there was
an increase'; n6w-his funeral will occur
tomorrow afternoon. Last night Harri
son Smith was the father of eleven
children. He was happy. There was
but a single cloud upon the horizon of
his future, but be was not worried. This
morning! his, wife presented him with
twins. Without a word, Smith walked
into his room, took up a pistol and
shot himself through the heart. It is
said by his friends that he was a man
of great superstition, and when the
fact that he was. the father of 13 chil
dren was thrust upon him it was too
much. .- '
TWO PIECES OF SILVER
How They Saved the Life of a
Mine Manager.
"Muerte a los gringos'"
Black Rosa.'s small, angular form
shook with rage." Her black face grew
blacker than its natural hue, if that
were possible. Trembling in every
nerve, she glared viciously, and shook
a long, bony finger in the faces of the
group of miners who with jests and
jeers had met her supplications for
charity.
"Get out of this, you black devil!"
one shouted. "We have had enough
of you."
"She's got plenty of money," cried
another. . . -. .
"Wears diamonds in the city,"
sneered a third. .
"Get out! No beggars allowed!" they
all shouted.
"Muerte a los gringos!" repeated the
woman, with a shriek which would
have chilled the -blood of men unused
to her vicious ways.
Manager France, of the Bull Domin
go, heard the disturbance between the
miners and the miserable old woman
as he came up the gulch,- ;
"Here, my good woman,"! said he,
,:here are two silver dollars. You had
better not stay around here," he added,
kindly, as she took the money and
called the blessings of the saints upon
his generous soul. "The men are not
used to giving alms, and they will only
treat you unkindly." ,
"He'd better be savin' them two dol
lars to help out the payroll of the Bull
Domingo who has been keeping a slate
for nearly three months for the ac
commodation . of 'wortcmen on that
property."
Senora Rosalina Ortiz once enjoyed a
happy home in the City of Mexico, her
birthplace. r She had all the opportu
nities of education, both in Spanish
and English, and in her early married
life had traveled much. But misfor
tune came to her in the death of her;
husband and two of their three chil
dren, after the loss of all the property
they possessed. They had for several
years made their home in the United
States, where Senor Ortiz had died,
leaving his widow penniless. Poverty
and sin wej her undoing, and when
the Colorado mining fever filled the
mountains with fortune seekers of
high and low degree Senora Ortiz
drifted to Durango. She had sunk so
Awarded
Highest Honors World's Fair.
'DRr
MOST PERFECT MADE.
A pure Grape Cream of Tartar Powder. Fret
from Ammonia, Alum or any other adulterant.
O YEARS THE STANDARD.
low in vice and crime that she was ac
counted well fitted for anything from
begging to petty thieving, even to the
cutting of a t.hroat. .
She was living as his mistress with a
hardened character known as "Robber
Dan," an American, whose life both in
and out of the penitentiary was a
series of misdeeds. He had earned his
title as she had earned hers. They
were well matched in their criminal ca
reers, although the woman ha 1 thus far
known no more of prison life than is
afforded by county jails, ner only
child, a boy of twelve years, had, like
his mother, became a professional beg
gar and thief.
The ill treatment she had received
at the hands and tongues of the
miners at Rico had burned into her
soul like a hot iron, though the wound
was largely healed by the soft words
and the silver so kindly bestowed by
John France. But, since she was not
likely ever to be able to carry out her
threat of death to all save her own
race and equally incapacitated to in
sure the blessings of the saints which
she had invoked, neither her curses
nor her prayers were heeded. How
ever, none who knew her had any
faith in Black Rosa's possession of
goodwill toward any one of American
or European blood.
Even Robber Dan and his male com
panions in crime-who formed the
most notorious and daring band of
robbers in southern Colorado did not
escape the vindictive spirit of Black
Rosa. But the woman was useful to
them, and when plentifully supplied
with drink there was no crime too
black for her wicked heart nor scheme
too deep for her cunning brain. If
she possessed a single redeeming trait
no one had been able to discover it.
Durango had been ablaze with the
glory of frontier life a glory which
comes but once in the lifetime of a
new town. But there was then li ttle
regard felt for the future by the for
tune hunters who swarmed the streets
and filled up the hotels and held high
revelry in the saloons and dance halls
of that camp.
Honest men with capital, seeking to
double their investments in a fort
night, stood on the same level of as
sociation with the horse thief and
the road agent. Mine promoters and
gamblers drank over the same bar.
The crack of the stage driver's whip
was but the echo of the pistol shot.
Business conversations and ribald
songs, laughter and curses inter
mingled in a wild hurrah chorus.
"Going back to the mine in the morn
ing?" asked the clerk of the hotel a
minute later, as France approached
the desk and asked for writing ma
terial "Yes, sure!"
"Stage leaves at two o'clock." .
"Well, call me a half hour earlier,
and don't, for your head, let memiss
the stage. I must be at the mine to
morrow by all means. By the way, I
have lost a white silk hankerchief
with a black border. Look out for it."
A few minutes later, while France
was stiU busy writing. Sheriff Barney
approached him and presented a little
Mexican chap in whose possession had
been found the silk handkerchief.
"What shall I do with him?" asked
the sheriff.
"Lock him up," said the manager of
the Bull Domingo hotel, "lock him up!
That is the little rascal who came to
mfc a few minutes ago begging for
money. I gave him two bits and he
shows his gratitude by stealing my
handkerchief."
The attention of the loungers about
the hotel office was attracted by these
loudly spoken words of John France;
but they did not hear what he said in
a hurried undertone to the sheriff, so
there was a murmur of indignation
against the man who would seek the
punishment of a child for stealing a
silk handkerchief and that after it
had been returned.
John France laughed and went to
his room, while the sheriff smiled, as
he always smiled in danger and out,
and fed the boy away. The crowd
looked puzzled.
"He had my boy locked up, did he?"
shrieked Black Rosa, when the details
of this little episode were related to
her. The black face of the little Mex
ican woman seemed ablaze with indig
nation. "He shall pay for this!"
"Senora forgets the two silver dol
lars," taunted Robber Dan; "I thought
the senora might feel sorry that we
had planned to rob this fine Ameri
cano. But it's all right now is it,
dearest?" he added, mockingly.
"Rob him! murder him!" yelled
Black . Rosa, and she staggered from
her chair, as if she would carry out her
own command, but fell on the floor in
a heap.
Dan and his pals lifted the woman
to a bed, and the leader remarked that
she would sleep till morning, and be
neither help nor hindrance. It had
been known for twenty -four hours that
the money some ten thousand dollars
for the Bull Dimingo pay roll had
been received, but until announced by
Manager France it was not known
when that gentleman would start for
thejnine.
At twelve o'clock that night four
men, heavily armed, rode out of Du
rango. Two hours later the stage followed
them, with one occupant on the in
side and the driver alone on the front
boot. Bloomer, the driver, might as
well have been unaccompanied so far
as th6 inside occupant of the coach
Tailoring.
I HASSAYAMPER
Is onewho drank from Ariz
ona's famous river in very
early times.
He is tall, rugged, strong of
voice, long of beard and clad
in rough boots, slouch hat and
bine jeans.
We never see one without
wondering how he would feel
and look in a handsome new
suit made ty
NICHOLSON THE TAILOR
TAILOR.
was concerned. But he was used to
these lonely rides, and when a passen
ger preferred to be exclusive it simply
exhibited to Bloomer tlie poor taste of
the passenger. So he talked to his
horses and sang to them and passed
the lonely hours as comfortably as if
he had been surrounded by a half
dozen passengers, and soon forgot the
fellow on the inside.
Coming to a bend in the road, where
the ascent of the first steep mountain'
is begun, Bloomer fell into a reflective
mood and remarked to the nigh wheel
er that the fellow on the ' inside
might possibly "rise to an apprecia
tion o' the society of a stage driver
and his hosses if the muzzle of a
double-barreled shotgun should hap
pen to appear at the window of the
coach." '
Of course Bloomer was not really ex
pecting such a surprise for his unso
ciable passenger; so when the shotgun
appeared, with three others, and ac
companied by an order to "throw
down them ribboas and throw up them
hands," he was himself so completely
surprised that he obeyed without a
word of protest. - : '
If he was surprised at this sudden
appearance of "road agents, he was
really dumfounded at what followed.
For five minutes there was a rattle of
shotguns as if a miniature battle were
being foug'ht. When it was all over,
two stage robbers were fatally
wounded and the other two surren
dered to Sheriff Barney and the man
of straw on the inside was literally
shot to pieces. And this is the way it
all happened, as Bloomer himself was
fond of telling it:
"1'ou see, they didn't put me on.
Never seen a sheriff yet that thought a
stage driver had nerve enough to play
out his hand in a game like that; an'
I don't know but a feller woald git a
little bit rattled a-wonderin' how he's
a-goin' to come out at the end o' the
game. It's purty ticklish bizness to
be a-sittin' on a stage through the
long, dark hours o' ,the night 'n'
a-guessin' whether yer (join' tar drive
back er ride in a box. But the way it
all happened was like this:
" You see that kid what stole the
handkerchief done that for a blind.
Hisol' woman she put him on. She
writes a note tar France 'n' tell the kid
ter drop it in his pocket' 'n' steal his
handkercher, er anythin' else he could
git his hands on, 'n' then kinder loiter
'roun' so"s to git caught. Well, sir,
that ol' Black Rosa was a corker. She
gives the whole snap away in the note,
V she tells France ter have the boy
put in jail, 'n' that'd be a tip for her
that he gets the note. Then she sets
up a howl 'n' throws the gang off, an'
havin' bin drinkin' considerable an'
feelin' a leetle bit skeered that her
f lay wouldn't win, she was knocked
clean out excited 'n' fainted on the
dead square.
"So France, w'en he gits the ol' wom
an's note, he just quietly lets Barney in,
'n' Barney he tells him his system, 'n'
they piays it to win.' W'n france he
goes up to his room, Barney he goes 'n'
gits his team 'n' meets France at the
back door 'n' they goes out 'n' lays for
the gang. 'S only one place on the road
where a job o' stage fobbin' could be
done 'n' the robbers git away, an' Bar
ney he knows the place, an' that's
where they camps 'n' waits for the
.gang an' they gits 'em dead to rights.
n "That inside passenger 's w'at
knocked me cold. They puts the stage
agent onto the play, 'n' he fixes up a
straw man w'atye calls a dummy 'n'
he loads him into the stage so's to fool
me 'n' the road agents both.
"I reckon Black Rosa didn't know
how near she was a-callin' the turn
w'en she prescribed death for gringos.
She didn't git the ones she was after
in the fust place, but I reckon the
death of her ol' man 'n' Pete Johnson
suited her notions better, w'en she
comt to size up the job, fer they was
both gringos one was American 'n
t'other a Swede.
"They say them Mexicans has al
ways got a grudge ag'in somebody, but
never remembers a kindness; but the
way that play was made it looks like
ol' Black Rosa didn't fergit John
France's kind words to her w'en the
miners was a-joshin' her-
"Yes; perhaps the two silver dollars
did have somethin' to do with it sil
ver was a great power 'n Colorado 'n
them days." Lewis Eddy, in N. Y.
Advertiser. - 1
Subscribe for The Republican. De
Rvered in any part of the city for only
25 cents a week.
STOVES.
TOVB
Lowest in Price.
Standard Manufacture.
Largest Stock
GREAT HEAT.
A cold snap may some any night. Our
$9 No. 7 COOK STOVE
is a perfect gem. It throws a great heat and gives
perfect satisfaction as a baker, fryer or broiler. A
full line of
Rood, Spare or Open-Grate Heaters.
HENRY UEIP& CO.,
First Street, Opposite City Hall.
BEAL ESTATE.
GEO. B. PEEKIIS
- Corner Wasfa ton and Wall Sts. ;
P. 0. Box
Phoenix, - - Aviz.
I want a list of your property. It makes no
difference where it is, so that it is in the Salt
River Valley. I can sell all grades, whether
cheap lots, choice residence lots, business lots
or acreage. It costs you nothing if I do not
sell. Carriage at door. No trouble to show
property.
I now have buyers for both city and country
property
IMPROVED and UNIMPROVED
and can guarantee satisfaction to both prop
erty owrners and investors.
IVToney Loaned.
on first-class security at reasonable rates.
Borrowers and lenders are invited to give me
a call.
GEO. B. PERKIIS,
Flioenix, - Ariz.

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