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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, October 31, 1894, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020558/1894-10-31/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN: WEDNESDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 31, 1894.
THE ATOM REPUBLICAN.
DAILY AND WEEKLY.
MEMBER OP THE ASSOCIATED PRESS.
OFFICIAL CITY PAPER.
PUBLISHED BY
THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN COMPACT.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS:
Lewis Wolfley, Clark Churchill, J. A. Black,
T. J. Wolfley, Edward Butt, Jr.
Entered at the postoffice at Phcenix, Arizona,
as mail matter of the second class.
Publication Office: 18 North First Avenue,
Fleming Block. Telephone No. 47.
BY CARRIER:
The Daily Republican is delivered by car
rierier in Phoenix at 25 cents per week or ?1 00
per month In advance.
Subscribers failing to get The Republican
regularly or promptly should notify The Re
publican business office (not the carrier) in
order to receive immediate attention. Tele
phone No. 47.
BY MAIL:
Daily, oueyear '. $ 10 00
Daily, six months 5 00
Daily, three months 2 50
Sunday Republican, one year 2 50
Sun lay Repablican, six months 1 25
Weekly Repu riican one year 1 50
Weekly Republican, six months 75
Terms : strictly in advance.
All communications relating to news or
editorial matter should be addressed to Editor
REPUBLICAN.
X-A11 remittances and business letters
should be addressed to The Arizona Republi
can Company, Phcenix, Ariz.
THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN CO.
ADVERTISING RATES.
Rates of advertising in the Daily, Sunday or
W eekly edition made known on application at
the publication office. Or ring up telephone
number 47, and a representative of the business
department, will call and quote prices and
contract for space.
BOOK AND JOB PRINTING.
The Republican is fully prepared to do all
kinds of plain and fancy Job printing in all the
latest styles. Complete bock bindery and ruling
machinery iD connection with the job depart
ment. Work perfectly and promptly done.
AGENCIES.
The Republican can be found on sale at the
following places :
Monihon Corner News Stand Phoenix
Pratt Bros "
Irvine Co "
Postoffice News Stand "
B. J. Stedler. 24 W. Washington St "
Parlor Cigar 8rore '
NOTICE TO BUSINESS MEN.
No bills against The Arizona Republican
Co., or its employes will be paid by the com
pany unless they were contracted upon the
written authority of the management.
g&F. J. O'Brien, advertising manager,
Harvey J. Lee. superintendent of circulation,
A. Meyer and Bert KuPLEare the only aphor
ized solicitors for the paper. Edward Butt, Jr.
and Harvey J. Lee are the authorized collect
ors for the company.
T. J. WOLFLEY, Geneial Manager.
For Delegate to Congress,
N. O .MURPHY.
For Council man at Large,
A. J. DORA.N.
COUNT! TICKET.
For Coucilman Henry E. Kemp
(J. A. Marshal
For Aaeemblvmen. . E- HT0N
I Ferry VVildman
W. S. Johnson
For Sheriff. V. F. McNulty
For District Attorney Jerry Mlllay
For Recorder "Winthrop Sears
For Probate Judge C. W. Crouse
For Treasurer M. W. Messenger
For Assessor H. B. St. Claib
For Surveyor W. A. Hancock
For Supervisors J- Priest
IF. H. Parker
OTJR MOTTO:
PHCENIX. OCTOBER 31, 1894.
THE TIME FOR WORK.
Next Tuesday the people of the vari
ous congressional districts of the coun
try will say at the polls what they
think of twenty months of Democratic
control of the government, and notably
what they they think of the industrial
legislation of the Democratic congress.
Already every state election which
has been held since Cleveland went
into the White House, has shown a de
cided tendency to condemn the Demo
cratic regime.
The Republicans of Arizona never
had a better opportunity since the or
ganization of the party than they have
REPUBLICAN TICKET.
16 TO 1.
this year to serve their party and the
people. There is not a county, city or
town in the territory where Democratic
dissension and disapproval of the course
the Democratic party has pursued is
not patent to the eye of the most casual
observer and now is the time, therefor?,
for the Republicans to make a legiti
mate, but red hot, campaign that will
show the world that they are in earn
est and ready to carry out the reforms
demanded by the people regardless of
politics.
Let every Republican understand
that he has been appointed as a com
mittee of one to advance the good
cause in every way that is proper and
legitimate. The news comes from
Mohave, Coconino, Apache and Yava-'
pai counties that N. O. Murphy and A.
J. Doran have made a splendid canvas
of that portion of the territory
and those who are best capable
of judging say that the pros
pects of their triumphant election are
indeed bright and encouraging.
This is admitted by friend and foe to
be a Republican year, and every Repub
lican in the territory should take pride
in seeing how much he can advance the
interests of his party in this contest. A
large number of the Democrats are dis
gusted with ths coarse their party has
pursued in congress and do not hesitate
to hold the organization responsible for
ths present deplorable hard times.
They realize that their own party pro
mised everything in its platform and
did nothing, hence they are ripe for
revolt. Let us labor with energetic
zeal to elect Mr. Murphy to congress
and to elect every man if possible on
the legislative and county ticket. Here
tofore it has been next to impossible to
elect a Republican congressman in the
territory and Republican officers in
Maricopa county, but the chances are
now equal and if each Republican will
do his whole duty the result is sure to
prove of a most satisfactory character.
Let us take a long pull, and a strong
pull and a pull altogether and the vic
tory is ours.
THE CONCERN OF ALL.
That was a most remarkable demon
stration that was witnessed by Gov
ernor McKinley as he passed through
the manufacturing district of Wheel
ing, when workmen rushed out from
their places by the furnace fires to
wave greetings to the great champion
of their interests. 2iot only the men
from the mills, but the female opera
tives also were gathered along the
tracks to cheer the tariff leader.
They were there because they recog
nized in him the leadership of princi
ples that vitally concern them. They
had felt the pinch of hard times result
ing from Democratic tariff policy; it
had become clear to them that work
would be less certain in the future than
in the past and that wages would be
far below the standard that was for
merly maintained. Therefore they
gathered to greet the representative of
protection, knowing that their inter
ests lay in success of the cause in which
he was enlisted.
There are those who tell us that the
tariff is a local isBue. We have no
patience with such a narrow yiew.
Leaving out of account every direct"and
indirect benefit disseminated over the
entire country by a reign of prosperous
conditions in such a city as Wheeling,
there is no American citizen who should
overlook the fact that the interests of
those toilers at the forges and in
the factories of that city are, in
some measure, the interests of all the
people.
We have in this country a labor or
ganization whose motto is, if we recall
it correctly, "The injury of one is the
concern of all." It is in the light of
the spirit of that motto that such ques
tions must be considered by every pa
triotic citizen. Those men and women
in Wheeling are engaged in legitimate
occupations and their injury is the con
cern of all.
There is no man who has a proper
appreciation of the relations of men to
each other who can held that the inter
ests of those West Virginia toilers do
not reach beyond the shadows of their
own places of employment who can
claim that the protective tariff npon
which their hope of prosperity rests is
a local issue. It is the concern of all ;
and wherever there are men who real
ize what the benefits of steady employ
ment at good 'wages are, there hearts
should go out responsive to the wishes
of those who, in countless communities,
are aeking that conditions of assured
prosperity may be restored as they ex
isted before tha Democratic party was
installed in power and the menace of
free trade suspended above the heads
of the people.
WHO OWNS THE COUNTY?
For some years the people of Phoenix
and Maricopa county have heard of cer
tain Democratic bosses in local politics
to such an extent that no campaign
seems to be complete without evidence
of their presence. They have been fac
tors in every election to such an extent
that it has become a recognized fact
that these people must be cared for at
the expense of the public.
While it is generally considered that
the laborer is worthy of his hire, it
must be confessed that the people of
Maricopa county are becoming tired of
furnishing pay for personal political
work, and when it is publicly known a
week before election that certain candi
dates have already provided places for
these men it causes a wave of indigna
tion. The fact that candidates on the Demo
cratic ticket have decided to make
members of these gangs assistants
needs only to be mentioned to set the
people thinking, and when the people of
Maricopa county think the result will
not be the election of this ticket which
for years has furnished places for cer
tain persons at the expense of the tax
payers.
One can't understand the cigarette
being so universally reviled why the
novelist perpetually puts one in the
mouth of his or her hero. Now the cig
arette smoker is regarded by a majority
of the public in exactly the same light
as the girl who eats onionB or the old
woman who chews assafoetida. Yet
Sarah Grand follwing in the footsteps
of a bostoi others, when she introduces
us to her artist in the first page of her
new story in the Cosmopolitan, had
him smoking a cigarette the vile,
ill spelling cheap things 1 Why doesn't
she at least let him smoke a cigar like
a man ; cigarettes are more for badly
trained little boys, and sickly, young
young men.
Every Republican who has the good
of his country at heart should set to
work to the beat of his ability and to
the full extent of the time allowed him.
to help the wage earners of the manu
facturing section of the people to under
stand that to vote the Democratic
ticket would be to invite a further blow
to their interests and encourage the
Democratic leaders to carry out to the
full their program for bringing down all
wages in this country to the European
level. If the toilers once could be made
to understand this they would give their
support to the Republican ticket and
party and not to their worst enemies
the Democrats who solicit heir votes.
A young professional woman at Kan
gas City who comes of a good old Irish
family, has grown ashamed of the
Emerald isle and writes her name
"Kelli ;" some time ago a young man
was visiting in Phoenix, who had his
name spelled Macklness: but this
couldn't conceal the fact that it was
plain McGinnis.
The princes and potentates of Europe
are aptly described, as men with all
kinds of orders on their breasts and all
sorts of disorders in their blood.
Only one candidate for the Kentucky
legislature has been instructed for Col.
Breckinridge for United States senator
so far. This is encouraging.
MAKING GOOD BUTTER.
The Secret of Success, It Is Claimed, Lies
in Proxer Working.
Working the butter is where the fine
art of butter-making comes in. Noth
ing but practical and deep study will
master this part of the work. Given a
single lot of butter out of the churn
and divide it between two people, one
an old-fashioned butter maker, and the
other a modern expert, and if the but
ter came out of the churn all right one
will make twenty-five and the other
fifty cent butter of it, such being the
importance of proper working.
To work butter correctly we must
begin in the cbura. Stop it when the
butter breaks, say the size of bird shot.
Draw off the buttermilk, skim off the
granules of butter tli'at have run into
the churn. Now carefully lift the but
ter all out of the churn with a tin or
wooden dipper. Don't for your life
touch it with your hands. Place it as
tenderly as a baby on the worker and
press it gently but firmly into a flat
cake. Then with the wooden paddle,
fold it together and again gently but
firmly press it flat. Do this over and
over a;;'ain until all the water is out
of it, but stop as soon as you can.
BANKING.
James A. Fleming, President. P. J. Cole.
PII NATIONAL MI,
THE ONLY
United States Depositary
IN ARIZONA.
Paid Up Capital,
U. S. Bonds to Secure
Depositary for tb
Theon) y Steel-Lined Vaults and
Interest Paid on lime Deposits.
Drafts Issued on 111 the 'Principal Cities of the World.
Phcenix.
RESTAURANT.
Pioneer Restaurant..
Jast Opened. Everything 1Jew. Th Best Meats and Vegetables
MEALS 85c; TWENTI-ONE MEALS S4.60,
Miss F. M. Carnahan, Prop.
Directly Opposite Gregory House.
REAL ESTATE
WM. S. HADLEY & CO.,
Real Estate, Mines and Mining Lands.
North Center street, next door to Chamber of Commerce. We will bny or develop nv
good, paying, dry ylacer mines. Bring us samples. p r
The danger to butter is in overworking-
it.
The skilled hand will get all the
butter out of it with two or three
working's, while the clumsy hand will
make a salve of it before the water
leaves it. The trick is to preserve the
grain so that it will break a piece of
cast steel. The churn should bo
turned at the proper number of 1 evo
lutions per minute, which will depend
on the shape and size of the chum and
the amount of cream in it.
Never put a churn more than a third
full, so as to give the cream, full
chance to fall or allow the dashar a
chance to agitate it You can soon
learn to tell by the sound when the
cream "breaks," that is, forms in lit
tle pellets like shor. Then stop, draw
off the buttermilk and add a bucket of
clean fresh water at the tempera Hire
of sixty dejraes. il p'.'.rtioi:i.,v about
this if you w?.c t tiao km tier. Turn it
slowly in this watvr cvviite; then draw
off the water and add cuothe? bucket
ful and repeat the process. Do this
until the water rury; iro:n the clt:;ra
perfectly clear; t'aoa t-its butter is
ready for the working table. Home
and Farm.
An exchange says that if a cow gets
choked with an apple or potato, hold
ing up its head and breaking an egg in
its mouth is a sure cure. The same
remedy is recommended for horses
under similar cir cuius t ances.
Shoe Store.
Is What
We are Talking About.
We do not claim to carry the biggest
Stock in the world, but the DUCT
Shoes for the Monev . . n ViS I
THE NEW SHOE STORE
In the Fleming Block.
GODWIN & CO.
Quantity
Vice - President. A. H. Harscher, Cashier.
$100,000
Deposits, 50,000
Territorial Feds.
Steel Safety Deposit Boxes in Arizona.
General Banking Business.
i
Arizora.
JlTXX MINES. ,
Dealers in
Hoarding.
Hapry aud Content are the
Boarders at the
IVY GREEN
RESTAURANT.
WHY?
Because their appetites are first cul
tivated to a condition ol natural
Healihfulness and then regularly
nourirhed and satisfied by ehoiee
viands, fre.yi vegetables and all
palatable and wholesome foods in
season.
MRS. A. WILLIAMSON,
A damn Street, Between Center and First.
Meat Market.
0. K. MARKET.
CHOICE CUTS OF MEAT
AT LOWEST PRICE. i
A. WEILER. PROPRIETOR.
Corner Washington and Third Sts.
Opp. Lemon Hotel. PHCENIX, AEIZ.
BEE!
And all kinds of
Fresh and
Cured Meats
and Sausage.
Kepi in Cold Storage.
Family orders promptly delivered.
Chas. Kraft,
Washington Market, Next the Dairy.
DressmaMng,
MRS. M. FORBES,
MnniRTP Second Street, South of
' Hartwell's Photograph
-1 W""" Gallery, is prepared to guar-
- - antee style, fit and prices.
Ladies wishing dressmaking, cutting and fit
ting will make a mistake if they do not call.
PHCENIX, ARIZONA.
Groceries .
Never complains
about the food I set
before him since I
began trading at the
Cash Grocery of
W. F. McNulty.
On the contrary he often
remarks the superior qual
ity of the Teas, Coffee, Ba
con and groceries in gen
eral we are now using.
My
Husbands

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