OCR Interpretation


Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, November 22, 1894, Image 3

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020558/1894-11-22/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 3

THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN: THURSDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 22, Ifc94.
3
A LION ON THE LOCOMOTIVE.
He Was Only a Mountain Lion. But No
body Disturbed Him.
Last winter 'when the snowstorms
"were so fearful throughout the moun
tains in Utah and the earth was cov
ered with snow to the depth of five to
ten feet and remained hidden so long
the wild animals were forced to desper
ation. The wolves, sa3Ts the Detroit
Free Press, were starved and weak,
and what is known as the mountain
lion almost perished from starvation.
Its great strength failed it and a man
with a knife could soon take the life
of an animal that a short time before
could hold a powerful ox or horse and
make a meal of his flesh.
The hungry animals after awhile dis
covered that food was to be had along
the railroad track, where passengers
threw bones and scraps of victuals
from passing trains. Often two starv
ing coyotes would engage in deadly
combat over a chicken bone that had a
short time before been ridden of its
last vestige of nourishment by some
economical person who did not care to
pay seventy-five cents for a meal. This
was the condition of things.
Engineer Gast had charge of engine
No. 151, which was known as "the
helper," from the fact that it helped
trains up the mountain and when at
the summit cut ofE and dropped back
down to the bottom ready to help an
other. One night when business on
the road was slack Gast noticed some
thing wrong with the gearing under
the tender and remarked to the fire
man that they would get oS and repair
it. . When half way down the moun
tain side he brought the engine to a
standstill, and the two men went to
work at what proved to be a twenty
minutes' job packing a hot box on the
tender. The tallow pot was left at the
boiler's head.
After completing the repairs the men
were mounting the engine again, only
to see a huge mountain lion devouring
the tallow and holding full possession
of the engine cab. It was a cold night
and the snow drifting. The men had
already remained outside until they
were very cold, and the chances of dis
possessing Mr. Lion were very meager,
as he snapped his teeth and flashed his
eyes and fast stored the tallow out of
sight. The only consolation the men
had was that the tallow would not
last long at that rate, and even this
thought was not entirely satisfying, as
they had no way of determining that
one of them would not go the same
way at the conclusion of the tallow
feast. Finally, after fifteen minutes'
further delay, the tallow pot was
empty, and giving a growl, as much as
to say: "I am very thankful, gentle
men, and you ought to be," the animal
leaped from the cab and disappeared
in the hills.
SAMOAN FUNERALS.
The Profuse Ceremonials Observed When
Death Occurs.
In Samoa it is impossible for a chief to
die in peace and quiet. As soon as he
is known to be near death, the people
for miles around hasten to pay him a
farewell visit. On one such occasion,
according to a writer in Outing, the
visitors, all of whom had to be enter
tained, devoured seven hundred pigs.
When death finally occurs, the rela
tives and friends come with their offer
ings of fine mats. Singly, or in small
groups, they present the tokens of their
sorrow to some old woman, deputed to
receive them. The mats are spread
over the corpse, until in some in
stances a hundred or more are piled up,
entirely hiding the body from sight.
They excite more attention than the
dead chief, and after the burial are
hung up for inspection.
Every mat has a name and history,
and though the outsider could not
easily distinguish one from another,
yet the elderly people recognize them
at first sight, and relate bits of history
about each, as it is exposed to view.
After the funeral is over, within a
day or two, there is grand meeting
for a division of the mats. Every one
who brought a mat expects to take
away one a better one. All hands are
seated in a circle, and the mats are
piled up in the center.
The head of the family, who is al
ways a high chief, opens a folded mat.
All look at it carefully, discuss its mer
its and value, mention its various own
ers at different times and the great oc
casions at which it has figured, and the
name of the donor on the present oc
casion.
Then the head of the family calls the
name of some person who is in the
circle, to intimate that the mat is given
to him, or her, as the case may be. The
recipient takes the mat, lifts it, and
presses it to the top of the head, at the
same time expressing audible thanks.
The entire heap of mats is parcelled
out in the same manner
One ol England's Oldest Trees.
One of the oldest trees standing in
tnglana is the lort worth ' chestnut,
which, as far back as the reign of
Stephen, in 1135, was so remarkable for
its size and antiquity that it was recog
nized as the terminal boundary of the
manor of Tortworth m Gloucestershire.
The wondrously old tree was cited by
Dr. Ducard in his controversy with
Daines ISarrington as a convincing
proof of the chestnut being indigenous
to Great Britain. It is supposed to
have attained its maturity in the reign
of Egbert. In 17G6 the Tortworth chest
nut was fifty feet in circumference and
fifty-two feet high, and many more
centuries of tranquil existence were
predicted for it.
RESTAURANT.
Delmonico Dining Hall.
ONLY FIRST-CLASS RESTAURANT iN TEMPE.
Game and Oysters in Season. Private Rooms for Families and Parties.
L. W. JIMMIE, Manager.
11 l:STAUKA"T.
Pioneer Restaurant.
Just Opened. Everything We w. The Best Meats and Vegetables.
MEALS 25c; IWKNII-ONB MKA1.8 84.50,
Miss F.
t Directly Opposite Gregory
FOUNDRY.
FOUNDRY.
THE STANDARD IRON
Southeast of Capitol Grounds.
P.O. Box 458. Tel. 57
Flour.
When in CI f". I I P
Need of rLUUnr
Don't fail to ask your grocer for a sack of
Gardiner's Extra Family
Which is guaranteed to be equal to Kansas,
Colorado or any otner r amny s iour
now shipped in here.
Patronize Home Industry.
CAPITOL MILLS,
Phoenix, Arizona.
Saloon.
The Palace,
60S. I HUSCMUVup.
Imported and Domestic
WINES, LIQUORS AND CIG1RS,
PHCENIX. ARIZONA.
Barber t$hop.
The Fashion Barber Shop.
FRANK SHIRLEY, Proprietor.
LADIES' WORK DONE
AT THE SHOP OR RESIDENCE
NEATE8T BATH RO0M8 IN THE CITY
0PP08ITE THE OPERA HOU8E.
w
The Idea
Asset
Is
Real
Estate
In the
City of
Phoenix.
T
EN
tripled
TV"E
that if
know
L
M. Carnahan, Prop.
House.
WORKS.
ft
I?HielHniiT li.
W. M. WILSON'S
First Ave. and Jefferson St.
Is the place
If
Yon
Want
Your Horse
Rightly Shod
By a Skillful Workmen
Or Any Kind of BLACKSMITHING.
GOLDEN EAGLE
Livery Stable.
When in need of a good team or place
to keep your horse call on us
C. M. STURGES & CO.
Third St., rear of Lemon house.
TSrloR.
B
RICK
CHEAPI
WM. REILLY & BRO.,
At Wm. Cox's Old Yard South of Depot,
Phoenix. Give us a chance to figure before
purchasing elsewhere.
mht niDnc rrr
E are hare to stay, and have unlimited confidence in the future oi Phoenix
and of the Salt River Vallev.
"1 TONTGOMERY'S Addition is, as you know, our specialty, but we are with
you for all thines benefitting the Territory, and we are also with you
heart and eoul for etatehood.
years aeo, Denver, "the Queen City of the
way,) was not so far ahead of what Phoenix
in five years, and Phcenix has advantages
did our share perhaps a little more in building up Denver, and we'll
do the same here. We want your cooperation, however, and you will find
we all work for the same end, that end will be accomplished before you
it.
"OETWEEN Denver and San Francisco, on the line of the Santa Fe Road the
road that builds ud cities wherever it extends there will be one large and
thrivine city, and that city will be Phoenix, the Rose of the Valley.
COMMON consent, its resources, its climate, its central position and its people
will make Phoenix a city of 50,000 SOULS IN FIFE YEARS FROM NOW !
Mark our prediction ! We'll Btake our all on it.
rpHE Santa Fe is nearly here. Watch out for the Rock Island. She has her
eye on this section, and a line through here to the coast. Don't give your
realty away. It will bring a hundred per cent profit in less than a year.
Call and see us.
KITTREDGE, HEDGES & DOBBINS,
Commercial Hotel Block.
par Waits.
FOR RENT A nice suite ol rooms suitable
for offices, near postoffiee. Apply Baker
& Abrams, 26 West Washington St.
FOR RENT Desk and desk room in a well
lurnished office in a desirable location.
For particulars call at this office.
FOR RENT Desirable three-room new house
on N. Fourth St., Very reasonable. Apply
P. 0. box 127.
FOR BALE, CHEAP Two large cook ranges
one almost new. suitable for hotel or
rertanrant use. Apply Sam Purdy, Pacific
Grotto.
FOR SALE A good paying, well established
millinery business. Apply Mrs. E. Lisen
bee, 241 E. Washington St. '
GENUINE Spanish drawn work, consisting of
doilies, lunch, tray cloths, handkerchiefs
and everything made in linen. The work is
done under a microscope and is exquisite. Mrs.
A. M. Lee, Phoenix.
FOR SALE A good cash paying lunch busi
ness, owner going into another line, must
sell at once Apply to L. V., this office.
WANTED A young man between 16 and 25
to learn the barber's trade, must have
some money; will furnish board and lodging.
Apply I. X. L., this office, between 5 and 6 p.m.
FOR RENT A brick house of seven rooms
opposite the Bacred Heart academy. Ap
ply at 343 east Monroe St., corner of Fourth.
WANTED By young business man to
purchase half interest in old established
fire insurance business. Address P. I. this
office.
Timber Culture Final Proof Notice
for Publication.
United States Land Office, (
Tucson, Ariz., Sept. 27, 1894. j
Notice is hereby given that Perrin L. Kay of
Phoenix Ariz., has filed notice of intention to
make final proof before the Clerk of the District
Court at his office in Phoenix, Ariz, on Friday,
the 16th day November, 1894, on timber culture
application No. 982, for the northeast quarter
of section No. 19, in Township No. 2 north,
Range No. 2 east.
He names as witnesses Renry H. Wilkey,
Daniel F. Wilkey, Alfred M. Jones and Samuel
S. Green, all of Phoenix, Ariz.
EUGENE J. TRIPPEL, ,
Register.
First publication Sept. 30. 1894.
lilverv.
Chas. W. Stevens
Cor. First Adams Sts.,
LIVERY FEED 11 SALE STABLE.
Good Turnouts on Bhort notice
at all hours of the day and night.
Buy, Sell and Trade, Horses,
Special attention to boardinehorsea.
Hack Stand, Conn Bro. Clear Store,
Telephone. 25:
lottiilriu:.
25c
BEDS
50c
AT TBE
STAR LODGING HOUSE
No. 47 Jackson and First 8ts.,
Two blocks south of citv hall.
H. RIXEN, Prop.
dacgac 1?
Plains," (we were there, by the
is today, and its population was
never possessed by Denver.
PROFESSIONAL
XJxys5lcians.
DOCTOR H1BBARD, -Late of Denver, Colo
rado, Graduate of Harvard Medical Col
lege. Formerly memberof Colorado and Rhode
lBland State Mf dical societies. Specialty, dis-
eaesof the throat and lungs. Offices Monihon
DIOCX.
DR. KIRKWOOD Physician and Surgeon.
Ground floorj Washington St., next door
to Keystone pharmacy. Diseases of nose, throat
and lungs a specialty.
D
R. FRANK D. D A RC Y Physician and Sur
geon. Koom m f lemmg diock.
R. SCOTT HELM Physician and Surgeon.
secona St., opposite city nan piaza.
DR. D. M. PURMAN-Oflice Cor Adams and
Center Sts. Office hours 9 to 10 a. m., and
2 to 4 and 7to 8 p. m. Night calls left at
DeWitt's hackstand will receive prompt at
tention. Dentists.
DR. H. JESSUP, DENTIST ALL WORK
guaranteed nd prices reasonable. Roomi
14 and 16 Porter Building.
etertnarv
JC. NORTON, D. V. M,, VETFRINAKY
. physician, surgeon and dentist. Residence
No. 127 N. Fourth Av. Ofne, eround floor, Mo
nihon block. No. 44 W. Washington St., Phoe
nix. Office hours. 10 to 12 a. m., 1 to 4 p.
m. Territorial Veterinary Surgeon.
FO. RICHMOMD, M. D. C, Phcenix, Ari-
zona, Veterinary Surgeon and Dentist,
Diseases of all Domestic Animals Scientifically
Treated. Residence 537 West Van Buren street
Office at the Golden Eagle stable. Third near
Washington 8t. Telephone No. 51. No Charge
For Consultation.
Attorneys-at-l.aw.
CI M. F RAZ IE R Attorney and Counsellor
y . at Law. Room 7 Fleming block, Phcenix,
Arizona. '
M
H. WILLIAMS Attorney and Counsellor
a at Law, 28 Wall street, Phoenix, Ariz.
1 H. LYMAN Attorney at law. Office
a rsoms 1 and 2, Fleming block.
PORTER W. FLEMING, Attorney at Law.
Rooms 20 and 21, Fleming Block, Phoenix
Arizona.
H. N. Alexander. W, H. Stilwell.
ALEXANDER & STILWELL ATTORNEYS
AT LAW' Office in Hartford Bank build
ing, Phoenix. Aiiz.
DAMRON & CRENSHAW, Attorneys at Law.
Rooms 13 and 15, Porter block. cornerCen
ter and Washington streets, Phcenix, Ariz.
J W. (,'RKNSHAW. J. M. DAMROM.
WEBSTER 8TREET, Attorney at Law, room
8 Fleming block, Phcenix.
Willis J. Hulings. Wade H. Huxings.
HULINGS & HULINGS, Attomeys-atLaw.
Rooms 9 and 11 Porter building.
rITCH & CAMPBELL, ATTORNEYS AT
Law. Over National Bank of Arizona
FRANK COX ATTORNEY AT LAW rooms
1, 3 ai.d 5, Thibodo building, Phoenix,
Arizona. .
B. J. Franklin. alfbkb Feanki.in.
F FRANKLIN & FRANKLIN Attorneys and
Counselors at Law. Rooms 11 and 12, Moni
hon block, Phcenix, Arizona.
Joseph H. Kibbkt, 0. C. Israel,
KIBBEY & ISRAEL,
Lawyers.
Rooms 2, 4 aud 6, National Bank of Arizona
block.
Phoenix. ------ Arizona.
Francis J. Henky. Rochester Foso.
HENEY & FORD,
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSESLLORS AT LAW.
Office souihwest corner Church and Penning
ton streets, Tucson, Arizona.
B
ARNEH & MARTIN , ATTORNEYS-AT-LA W
Tucson, Arizona.
JERRY HILLAY. WALTER BENNETT
M
ILLAY & BENNETT, ATTORNEYS-AT-
LAW Rooms 16 and 17 Fleming block.
W.
LVAN HORN,
Attorney and Counselor at law.
Tempe, Arizona
WR. NORTON, AKCHITECT.Porterbiock,
. Phoenix. Ariz Careful and exDsrienced
supervision given to the construction of brick
and stone buildings.
FRED HEINLEIN Architect and Superin
tendent. Room 11, Fleming Block. Fif
teen years ex oerience. Architect and superin
tendent of the Fleming Block.
Ennineer.
w
E. CONDON, Civil Engineer. Surveys,
. maps and plats. Room 15 Wharton Blk.
Dressmalclntr.
MRS. A. L. PENCE, fashionable dressmaking,
stylish cutting and perfect fitting. Greg
ory House block, East Washington St., Phoenix.
Metallurgist.
LW Morgan Metallurgist the Harcuvar
Copper Co. Office. Room 10, Fleming
Block.
Pensions.
I HAVE opened an offlce in room 1, 18 West
Washington St., with Riddle & Gray, real
estate dealers, where I will attend to pensions
business. If you hae a claim pending and
need help come and see me. G. D. G ft A Y.
I I n 1 II S iHngineer.
HENKY s. DUNN Civil and mining en
gineer. U.S. deputy mineral surveyor,
Rooms 12 and 14 National Bank of Arizona
building, Phoenix
Assaver
A J. PORTERIE, AS8AYER, WASHINGTON
. street, east of P. O. Phoenix, Ariz
PRICE FOR ASSAYS:
Gold.Silver, Cop'r, J1.00 I Copper. fl.00
Gold, Silver, Lead, 1.00 Lead 1.00
Gold and Silver 50 ! Tin 5.00
JSloyoles.
H9. GR1SWOLD Manufacturers' agent
and general commission merchant
dealer in bicycles and cycling sundries. All
kinds of difficult bicycle repairing skilfully
done. 32 South Center St.
Machine Kliop.
LD. COPE LAND, First avenue, opposite
court house. Mining, agricultural and
all other kinds of machinery built or repaired.
Models and paterns made. Soldering, brazing
grinding or any other work in the mechanical
line. Engines remodeled.
Piano Tuner.
WA. BREMER, tuner and regulator of
pianos and organs, Phoenix, Arizona.
References Behr Bros. & Co., New York; A.
Weber, New York; Lyon & Healy, Chicago;
Grunewald & Co., New Orleans: A. Redewill,
Phcenix. Leave orders at A. Rede will's music
store.
Corral.
BURGER CORRAL. Northwest comer First
Ave. and Adam St., G. W Heath, Prop., is
the old reliable feed corral where teams are
well cared for and where everybody receives
fair and honest treatment.
Prlntinst.
THE REPUBLICAN HAS THE BEST JOB
Printing office in the territory. Goad
Wort at reasonable prices our motto.

xml | txt