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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, January 03, 1896, Image 1

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THE
ARIZONA- REPTU
SIXTH YEARiton'!l1 Lii..a,7, j ' PIKENIX, ARIZONA, FRIDAY MORNING, JANUARY 3, 1896.
VOL. VI. NO. 191.
-A
ICAN.
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It may bo the winter ot your discontent ;
So do not let your money be mis spent.
But bring it to Goldberc Bros., with good intent
And we will give you goods we represent.
We have
from 75c up
for the hundreds, both rich
up. This is the finest line
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-' Captures the British Ex
pedition. Financial Uneasiness Overthe
Situation.
The Home Government Will Not
Support the British South
Africa company.
CAPE TOWN, Jan. 2. Dr. Jamieson,
commissioner of the British South
Africa company, who marched into the
Transvaal republic Tuesday, was today
met near Johannesburg by a large
force cf Boers and defeated.
Jamieson's forces consisted of 1,000
men, largely Kaffirs, with six Maxim
guns. His mission was ostensibly, to
make a demonstration before Pretoria,
the Transvaal capital, for the purpose
of securing equal political privileges
in the Transvaal for British subjects
with the citizens of the republic.
The Boers had been expectant of
the raid and a large force was in read
iness at Johannesburg under General
Joubert, The attack of the Boers was
in the nature of a surprise and a sharp
engagement resulted in the rout of the
British column and the capture of a
.large part of its strength, as well as
the cannon.
LONDON Jan. 2. The Colonial of
fice has received a confirmation of the
reported defeat of Dr. Jamieson. After
sustaining a great loss of life he sur
rendered. Secretary of state for the
colonies Chamberlain, telegraphed
President Kruger asking for generous
treatment- for the prisoners and
wounded.
Secretary of state for the colonies,
Chamberlain, has issued the following
statement regarding the events in the
Transvaal: The high commissioner
is leaving Cape Town this afternoon
for Pretoria to deal with the situation
in the furtherance of a peaceful and
satisfactory settlement in obedience
to my requisition.
(Signed) "CHAMBERLAIN.'
The chartered company directors
have 'telegraphed to the managing di
i jctor at Cape Town directing him to
immediately inform Dr.- Jamieson that
the company dissents from and objects
to the action he has taken and requires
him to return immediately to .'the com
pany's lands.
THE USUAL DEFICIT.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 2. The
monthly comparative statement of
ill ill iir Hi ill ill in iir ill
For the Winter
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All colors.
and poor from $1 apiece
we have ever carried.
lT1 aLIKaijtp Dunn!?
ICLOTHINTt store.
Office
St
receip ts and expenditures of the United
States shows that during December
the receipts aggregated $26,288,937.
The figures for the first half of the
present fiscal year ended December
31, shows a deficit of S15.394.707.
as against $27,564,465 during the first
half of last year. For the last six
months the receipts from customs
show an increase over the correspond
ing period of last year of $12,377,000.
There was during the same months a
loss in returns from internal revenues
of about $5,276,000.
THE SUPERVISORS' CLERK.
No Choice
Succeed I. N.
There seems to be tribulation around
the court house these days. The board
of supervisors was in session yester
day, the first meeting of the new year,
ana made great destruction in the
piles of county bills that awaited their
attention. Assistant Clerk Brent
Kirkland was the only member of the
clerical force present. Clerk I. N. Cox
had tendered his resignation. The re
constructed board has two Republican
members and the G. O. P. is conse
quently now in control; Major Cox
is an old-time, dyed-in-the-wool Jef
fersonian Democrat. It is said his res
ignation was asked by Chairman
Priest. Yet. somehow, the board did
not accept it when It materialized and
as yet there is no other clerk.
As candidates for the office there are
but two individuals apparent. One is
Phir Sheridan, late deputy county
recorder, and the other is 'Deputy Clerk
Kirkland. But there is some hitch in
the business and the appointment, if
there be one at all, will be made in the
opaque futurity.
A TOTAL LOSS.
Quick
Destruction of a South Side
Dwelling.
About 2:30 yesterday afternoon the
residence of W. S. Hadley on Center
street, a half mile south of the city,
was totally destroyed by fire, together
with its contents. The loss on the
building is $1,000, with insurance in
the Phoenix of Brooklyn of $500; loss
on contents nearly $1,000, insured in
in the Scottish Union for $450.
The cause of the fire is unknown.
Mrs. Hadley had left the ibuilding but
a few minutes before and was at a
neighbor's. She- states that the blaze
first appeared in an inside room,
wherein was a heating stove that had
been in use during the morning. The
house was a four-roomed frame struc
ture and burned as would a mass of
shavings. Nothing could be taken
from it and the distance was too great
for any results from the fire depart
ment, though an alarm was turned m
and the fire companies responded.
Made to
Cox.
TO MARK THE BOUNDARY
The
Venezuelan Com
mission's Plans.
Justice Brewer Interviewed on
the Subject.
Fred Couclert Chosen a Membei
The Commission Is to Be En
tirely Unfettered.
'WASHINGTON, Jan. 2 Justice
Brewer, who heads the Venezuelan
commission, was seen today by a rep
resentative of the Associated Press.
In response to inquiries, Mr. Brewer
said he had no doubt the sessions of
ihe commission would be held in
Washington, as it was the most acces
sible point and moreover much of the
documentary evidence, maps, etc.,
which would initiate the inquiry, "were
here.
Justice Brewer when asked if the
commission was likely to go abroad to
pursue its investigation, said it might,
but that the state department had pre
pared certain features of 'the evidence
regarded as essential and which would
serve as a groundwork for the investi
gation. In any event, doubtless this
would be gone over, and the commis
sion would determine what further
steps were required to ascertain the
facts. It might be that Venezuela and
England would be asked to present
their respective cases. Certainly in a
question, of this character there would
be a desire for the fullest information
from, all available sources. When this
documentary evidence was all in hand
the question might then arise as to the
desirabiity of verifying certain feat
ures of it by a personal inspection of
the original of the documents in the
archives of Holland, Spain and other
countries. This would involve a trip
abroad and there wa3 the possibility
that it might become desirable per
sonally to view the locality of tie con
tention along the Guiana line.
OUR PET FIGHT.
An. Independent Commis'.u Fred. B.
Coudert a Member,
WASHINGTON, Jan. 2. It is au
thoritatively stated in behalf of the ad
ministration tha't the Venezuela com
mission will be absolute master of its
own procedure, fixing time and place
of its meetings and determining for
itself whether or not it shall go to
foreign countries, what class of evi
dence may be taken into consideration
and how the interested governments
may be represented before the tri
bunal. This independence of action is
deemed necessary to secure the com
mission's finding of that degree of
weighlt and respect among other na
tions that can be attained only through
a knowledge that the body is free from
any restraint or obligation to the
United States government. Our gov
ernment will occupy the status of exact
neutrality in the proceedings.
NEW YORK, Jan. 2 Frederick B.
Coudert, Jr., said today that his father
had formally accepted the Venezuelan
commissionership tendered him by
President Cleveland.
The committee on foreign relations
of the chamber of commerce today
adopted a strong resolution appealing
to the common sense of those interest
ed in both nations to arbitrate the dif
ficulty between the United States and
Great Britain.
BREWER FOR PRESIDENT.
Kansas Brings Him Forth as a Candi
date. KANSAS CITY, Jan. 2 A special
to The Star from Topeka says:
ExIhief Justice Albert H. Horton
has entered Associate Justice Brewer
in the. Republican race for the presi
dency. He says, "He is a big man and
his appointment by the president to
be the head of the Venezuelan commis
sion makes him a bigger one. It is a
proper recognition of his worth. He
is decidedly the biggest man Kansas
has ever given to public life and you
will find that he will distinguish him
self in the Venezuelan investigation."
IMPRESSIONS OF PHOENIX.
What an Eastern Visitor Thinks of
the City.
PHOENIX, Ariz., Jan. 2. Approach
ing Phoenix from the wastes of south
ern New (Mexico, the barren wilderness
of the Pecos, and the stretches of
cactus fields east of Maricopa, the
stranger is not encouraged to expect
much of his destination. The stories
of unfortunate victims of the desert
and the occasional carcasses of cattle
which he can notice en route through
JMew Mexico, along with the heat,
often sickens 'him, and destroys what
little illuminated ideas he may have
had regarding the two territories.
iBut striking north through the 10,
000 acres of waving alfalfa and corn
between Maricopa and the capital, and
seeing the orange groves and semi
tropical trees of Salt 'River valley, his
fallen estimate experiences sudden rise
and iris illuminated hope3 re-illuminate.
He is surprised to behold a
metropolis of brick business houses,
trim cottages, shady -walks and broad
smooth, streets. j
He sees freighters of six-in-hand, j
bringing bales of alfalfa into town, he ;
hears of new enterprises, new church- j
es, new schemes of various kind and J
business, all evidencing a phenomenal
and steady growth in every depart
ment of life.
He meets the miner, the farmer, 'the
capitalist and the merchant and im
bibing the spirit of enterprise finds
himself unconsciously interested in
their affairs.
A city's future is in herself; and the
wandering northerner, especially if be
is a iChicagoan, feels a sort of fellow-
snip in company with Phoenicians
feels that they are cf a type like those
at home and having the same bustle
characteristic of the Garden City.
Personal effort of the citizen as an
individual builds-Tip the city at large.
As the citizen prospers so prospers the
city. Unity of purpose will do all
things. Here is the territorial hub;
the distributing center of Arizona;
here are the moonlight nights, the
sunny days, and the happy climate:
here are the benefits of irrigation, and
here is the future metropolis. Metro
politan by nature, born with the spirit
of a Spartan, supplied at birth with the
features of modern life, 'her history is
a tale, the half of which has 'never been
told, nor ever can be.
There is a play called "Phoenix, or
Rising From the Ashes." Milton
Noble plays it, it is a drama of carn
age and .final success. And Phoenix
though subject to the adversities which
nurture the infancy and bother the
maturity of all cities, may though
risen from the ashes, and a child of
the desert, become one of the first in
the great sisterhood of American cen
ters. C. V. FRARY.
ADVANCING INSURGENTS.
The News That Leaks Through Span
ish News Bureaus.
HAVANA, Jan. 2. An engagement
botweon Spanish troops and insurgents
has taken place at El Estante, south of
Alfonso, not far from the frontier of
the province of Havana.
An official announcement says the
troops captured the insurgent position,
but the loss to the enemy is not known.
It is admitted that two Spanish officers
and four soldiers were killed and nine
teen wounded. The insurgents, fol
lowing their usual tactics, did not at
tempt to come to a decisive engage
ment, but proceeded westward devas
tating the country.
The authorities here in announcing
this skirmish added the significent
statement: "The troops were moved
closer to the province of Havana,"
which would indicate that the Span
ish forces are once more in retreat.
Later in the day it was announced
here that further fighting between the
Spaniards and Cubans is taking place
m the vicinity of El Esitante, which
leads the people here to believe the
insurgents have been in pursuit of
the Spanish troops in that vicinity.
It is announced that Felipe Rod
riguez, the insurgent leader, has been
killed in the battle.
REAVIS CONSPIRATORS.
To Be Prosecuted aa Guilty With Their
Principal.
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 2. The
United States district court officials
are preparing to bring to trial one of
the greatest criminal cases ever
known.
It is the prosecution of the countless
conspirators and perjurers who aided
and abetted James Addison Peralta
Reavis in his mythical Arizona- land
claim.
Two special attorneys from Wash
ington will conduit the trial.
A BLACKMAILER CAUGHT.
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 2. In the
police court this afternoon Mrs. Mary
A. Davidson was arraigned on a charge
of blackmailing Rev. Dr. C. O. Brown,
pastor of the First Congregational
church. Mrs. Davidson is still in -the
city prison and has relinquished all
hope of obtaining bail.
THE SILVER MARKET.
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan.
bars, 66; Mexican dollars,
2. Silver
NEW YEARS PARTY.
Miss
Lizzie 'Burger Entertains a
Friends at Her Home.
Few
Miss Lizzie Burger on New Years
night gave a pleasant party at her
home, and at which the following per
sons were present and passed an en
joyable evening:
Misses Ina Davis, Floy Kurtz, Eva
Sands, Elsie Bicknell, Eva Bicknell,
Roberta Rembert, Manuela Miller
Margaret Kahrs, Josie Stuart, Annie
Buckley, Kate Buckley, Ellen Morrell,
Annie Williams, Ollie McDonald,
Frankie McDonald, Ida McCullough,
Lizzie iBurger; Messrs. Coe, Robinson,
Stewart, Burger, Hamilton, G. Kahrs,
H. Kahrs, Buxton, Graff, Branch, Col
lins, Sparks, Morrell, Belden, Suther
land, Ragsdale, Buckley.
Her Prowess with the
Pigskin.
Yet the Bays of Prescott Played
Wall,
Details of One of the Hardest
Fougnt Games ct tha
Season.
The game of football between Pres-
cott and Phoenix, which 'has been ad
vertised for some time past, came off
on New Years day before an enthusi
astic audience of 500 spectators.
The lineup of the two teams wa3 as
follows:
.Prescott. Phoenix.
Pace center .... Byrnes
Ternon r. g Sullivan
Giles 1. g Wynkoop
Ballenger r. t Evans
Campbell 1. It Smith, J. E.
'Desmond r. e McLaughlin
Meyer ..... 1. e Cooley
W. DoLanty .. q. b . Butt
Court r. h Robinson.
Allen 1. h Fowler, H.
Capt. DeLanty .. f. b .'...'Capt. Willis
Substitutes, Prescott, Haltcher, Boul
der, Ferguson; Phoenix, Linville, Pin
ney, Hughes, (Rock, Hanny.
Mr. Hall of Prescott acted as um
pire, Mr. Siston of the Indian school
as referee, and Mr. Reno of Prescott
and Mr. R. iFowler of Fhoenix as lines
men. Phoenix won the tos3-up and
chose the western goal. Prescott took
the ball at kick-off and DeLanty
kicked. Butt dropped on the ball.
Phoenix kicked the line for ten yards
gain and ithen ran around left end by
Willis for twenty, yards' gain. De
Lanty 'tackled Willis so hard that the
ball was lost to Prescott. Prescott
bucked 'the line for a few yards' gain,
until the 25-yard line. Court then
took the ball for a left end run, but
was tackled and downed on the la-
yard line. Court again went around
left end, but was tackled by McLaugh
lin on the a-yard line. Prescott then
lost iuhe ball on the fourth, down, and
it went to Phoenix. Phoenix-r went
through the Prescott line for ten, yards
when the ball was given to owler,
who brolte through JPrescotft's line,
upset DeLanty and had a clear field
for a touchdoiwin when he was tackled
on the foot by a Prescott mavoilp
went down after a thirty. f . )
Prescott was penalized ,
yards for foul tackle. Ro " " Q(
through the line for six js.
for five and then Evansby i :
cent struggle went through: ten jflii
for a touchdown. Willis kicked a goal.
Score, 6 to 0. Prescott again kicked
off. McLaughlin secured the ball in
touch and Phoenix carried it out fifteen
yards. Willis went around left end
for six yards, Robinson through cen
ter. Cooley made five yard run.
Time was called for the end of the first-
half. Score, 6 to 0 in favor of Phoenix.
In the second iha.lt Phoenix had the
kick-off. Willis kicked to right field
and W. DeLanty secured the ball, gain
ing five yards. Prescott lhammered at
the line, but gained but little. The
ball went to iPhoenix on fourth down.
Willis goes around left end for three
yards, Robinson through the line for
four. McLaughlin goe3 around left
tackle for five yards. Willis goes
around left end and Iose3 two yards.
Fowler goes through center for five
yards. Ball goes to Prescott on fourth
down.
Prescott worked its wedge, but
gained little. DeLanty kicked on
third down. Ball secured by Willis.
Phoenix bucks line for four yards.
when time is called. Phoenix, 6;
Prescott, 0.
The teams averaged almost the same
m avoirdupois. Prescott averages
about 173, Phoenix 175. The game
was hard fought, but clean and manly.
No serious injuries resulted to anyone.
Fhoenix excelled in line bucking, the
Prescott team seemingly unable to
prevent the making of holes to crawl
through. Prescott line held up well
and ttheir interference was good.
Fowler's playing was wonderful in
view of the fact that he went into tie
game with a Came leg. Butts' playlng
at quarter was perfect. Willis and
Robinson made good gains- through,
the line and under interference Willie
cleared the end twice for a good gain.
Evans and Smith played at tackle
splendidly and to Evans belongs the
honor of the only touchdown. Byrnes,
Sullivan and Wynkoop proved too
much for Prescott and made havoc
with them. Cooley and McLaughlin
played end tackle like veterans and
stopped end runs successfully. Mc
Laughlin saved a touchdown at one
time after Willis fell off in tackling.
Willis was dazed by DeLanty's fierce
tackle and partially lost the power of
his arms. The game was well fought.
Phoenix has much to be proud of and.
Prescott nothing to be ashamed ot
Dandruff is due to an enfeebled state
of the skin. Hall's Hair Renewer
quickens the nutritive functions of the
skin, healing and preventing the for
mation of dandruff.

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