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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, February 07, 1899, Image 7

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4&KtOTvA BTMJBLlCAT: TTJESDA ST MOH2mja, FEBRUARY 7 1899.
TEE EXCELLENCE OF SYKIT OF HCS
is due not only to the originality and
simplicity of the combination, but also
to the care and skill with which it is
manufactured by scientific processes
known to the California Fio Sykup
Co. only, and we wish to impress upon
all the importance of pvrchasing the
true and original remedy. As the
genuine Syrup cf Figs is manufactured
by the California Fie Syrcp Co.
only, a knowledge of that fact will
assist one in avoiding1 the worthless
imitations manufactured by other par
ties. The high standing of the Cali
Pobkia Fio Sriscp Co. with the medi
cal profession, and the satisfaction
which the genuine Syi up of Figs has
given to millions of families, makes
the name of the Company a guaranty
of the excellence of its remedy. It U
far in advance of ail other laxatives,
as it acts on the kidneys, liver and
bowels without irritating or weaken
ing them, and it does not gripe nor
nauseate. In order to get its beneficial
effects, please remember the nanie of
the Company .
CALIFORNIA FIG SYRUP CO.
AS rHAIf CISCO. CmL
LOOTS VIIXE. St. NEW YORK. If.T.
WALES TO YISI
iT
11
CZAR OF RUSSIA
Tn view of the circumstance that the
Czarina is expecting to become a moth
er in the month of May, it is perfectly
evident that there can be no truth in
the stories recently promulgated con
cerning her future movements, and ac
cording to which she was to accom
pany her husband to the south of
France next monfh, and in March to
take part in the gathering of royal per
sonages who assemble every spring on
the Rivera.
The question of furnishing an heir
to the throneof Russia is of such mo
mentous importance, not only to the
Muscovite dynasty, but likewise to tho
nation, that the czarina would certain
ly not be permitted to incur the risk
of a trip right across Europe at a mo
ment when,- she is in such delicate
health as at present. Nor is it likely
that the emperor would permit her.
In. fact, I hear from St. Petersburg
that all arrangements have been made
for. the. czar and czarina to spend the
winter; and spring quietly at Tasar
koe Zelo, all court festivities and state
To Buy Cheapo
is to buy in quantities Everything by the
carload.
To Sel
is
to sell in
that fully carry out the
We are loaded down with goods, yet
our sales are ahead of previous records. We
propose to make this year a record breaker
by making prices that can't be beat.
B. HEYMAN FURNITURE CO.
functions having been abandoned out
of regard for the health of the em
press. The imperial couple are, however, to
receive a visit from the prince of
Wales, their favorite uncle, either be
fore or immediately after his sojourn
in the south of France. He has not
been in Russia since the time when hp
traveled to Livadia for the purpose of
attending the deathbed of his brother-in-law,
the late czar, and neither the
present emperor nor yet the Russian
e have forgotten the manner in
he stood by the side of his grief -
riclcen nep'hew during the trying
s that folio wl his ascension to
the th
throne.
The prince of Wales is a very clever
and cautious diplomat, with a far
shrewder head upon his shoulders than
might be imagined by those who see
in him nothing but a frivolous and
pleasure-loving leader of English fash
ion. The relations between England and
Russia are of paramount importance in
everything that concerns the preserva
tion of peace in the old world, and this
being the case, the prince's visit to
Russia is regarded all over Europe as
an event of great importance, and des
tined to influence the course of future
event9 in no small degree.
Another consort or an old world rul
er who is expected to shortly present
her husband with an heir to his throne
is Ikbal Hanem, the wife of the khe
dive of Egypt, who has hitherto given
birth to nothing tVt girls. Unlike her
husband's mother, the dowager khe
divia, who is a princess by birth, Ikbal
Hanem was originally a slave, or an
odalisque In the harem of the young
ruler of Egypt, and was advanced to
the dignity of a wife as a reward for
having been the first cf the inmates of
his seraglio to present him with a
child. She is a woman of little or no
breeding or education, and is still com
pletely overshadowed by her once
beautiful, but now terribly obese moth- ,
er- in-law. :
Incidentally, I may state here in re
sponse to the inquiry of a correspond- j
ent that the meaning of the word khe-
dive is not viceroy, but king, at is a
title that was purchased by the grand
father of the present ruler of Egypt
from the sultan for an immense sum
of money.
iStrictly speaking, therefore, the khe
dlve and his consort ought to be ad
dressed as "majesty." But the foreign
powers have refused to see in the ad
vancement of old Hsmail from the rank
of pasha to that of khedive anything
more than a species cf purely Ottoman
transaction between the sultan and one
of his vassals, or rather provincial
governors, who, at Constantinople,
takes rank after the chief eunuch.
Consequently while the rulers of
Egypt are accorded by the powers "the
style of khedive, they have to content
themselves with the predicate of
"highness," which is the same that is
conceded to the chiei eunuch and to
the grand vizier at Constantinople.
With regard to the sultan's Inten
tion of conferring the order of the
Chefkat upon the wife of Senator
Cushman Davis, chairman cf the com
mittee on foreign relations at Wash
ington, it is a mistake to imagine that
she 'Will be the only American lady
to share this distinction. There are
quite a large number of American la
dies, who possess the Chefkat, includ
quantities.
Cheapo
We are the house
above plan.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
ing the widow cf the late Sunset Co:
who was United States envoy at Con
stantinople; Mrs. Whitelaw Reid, wife
of the editor of the New York Tribune:
Mrs. John Evans, and Miss Evans, the
wife and daughter respectively of the
late American dentist at Paris, who
sometimes concealed his good Ameri
can name under the papal title of Mar
quis d'Oyley. In addition to theso
there are several others, and the most
that can 'be said about the order is that
it is a rather pretty ornament to the
ball gown or dinner dress of a lady.
With regard to the sensational flight
from England of Canon Eyton in or
der to avoid arrest for the same species
of crime that led to the analogous
flight and exile of Lord Arthur Somer
set, how odd it is that the only digni
taries of the Church of England whom
we ever hear as guilty of shortcomings
sufficient to 'warrant the interference
of the law are invariably Canons. Thus,
I can recall the case of Canon Baines
who got into trouble in connection
with some fraud while three years ago
Lord Salisbury's chaplain was forced
to fly the country. How is it that one
never hears of a bishop, a. dean, or
even an archdeacon going wrong?
True, there is a story to the effect
that some men were arguing at a club
of St. James' Square one night about
the question as to whether every man
had not some skeleton in his closet
something or other, in fact, in his an
tecedents which would not bear th
light of day. With a view of provok
ing the truth of his assertion, the
leader in the discussion, on the spur of
the moment, and at pure hazard, ad
dressed an unsigned telegram to one of
the most universally respected deans
of the United Kingdom. The telegram
bore 5he words, "All is discovered. Fly
at once."
The following day the dean in ques
tion, scared evidently out of his wits
had left the country, although up t-j
that moment no one had ever been
aware that he had anything unsavory
to his credit.
I have known a couple of Russian
bishops to be convicted of crime, and
alter degradation from the eccle3ia
tical office, to be sentenced to penal
servitude; and there is likewise the
.case of the Roman Catholic monsignor
not oishop, however who died in
penury in New York. a few weeks ago,
after having served a term cf penal
servitude in Italy for fraud and black
mail.
It is a relief on the whole to be able
to feel that while canons the small
Ad Prince of Wales to Visit Rus
artillery, so to speak, of the church
are apt to go wrong, the bishops and
archbishops, on the whole, remain re
spectable.
'Let me add that I can never remem
Haer seeing a more slovenly figure on
'norseDacK tnan canon Eyton. He is
passionately fond of riding, but pre
senteo more or les3 of a caricature
with his back bowed almost double,
ana ms trousers more than Half way up
to nis Knees.
There are few Americans who have
had occasion to approach President
Faure who have not met his private
secretary, M. le Gall, who has just been
promoted to the rank of knight com
mander of the Legion of Honor. Of
all the officials who have ever been at
tached to the presidency in any capac
ity since the foundation of the repub
lie-, now near thirty years ago, there
ia no one who has won more deserved
and universal popularity.
Entirely free from any official stiff
ness or arrogance, and with nothing of
that tack-ia-offlce nature which so
often distinguishes members of the
staffs of rulers and ereat dieni taries
of state, he fulfilled his difficult dufle3
with unrivaled tact, courtesy ana dis
cretion, welcoming rather than repell
inz those wno nave naa occasion to
visit the Elysee. Marquise de Fonte
noy in Washington .Post.
:o:
GERMANY'S SUGAR INDUSTRY.
Competition Threatened From the
United States a Serious Danger.
(Berlin. Feb. 6. The ever-recurring
sugar question was debated in the low
er house of the Prussian diet today
Baron Erffa traversed the views of
Baron von Thielmann, secretary of the
imperial treasury, and others who con
tended that the German sugar industry
was net threatened by American com
petition. Such a view, he said, did not
take into account the enormous finan
cial resources and energy of the Amer
ican sugar trust.
Baron von Hanimerstein-Loxten,
minister of agriculture, concurred with
Baron Effra in the opinion that the
danger threatening from the United
States was most serious. He said that
now that active, intelligent American
capitalists were about to exploit Cuba,
the competition from that island would
greatly increase in the immediate fu
ture. The danger to Germany from
the production of beet sugar in the
United States was constantly growing.
The exports of beet sugar from Ger
many to the United State3 amounted
to 4.S0O.00O hundred-weight less than
the export to Great Britain, but, never
tbeless, they constituted a large part of
tec total exports.
The minister urged that the only
remedy was to increase the home con
sumption of sugar. He referred hope
fully to the experiments of serving
sugar to the army, whieh Increased the
marching power of the troops, and also
to the fact that sugar was usefully em
ployed in fattening iigs.
RELATIONS WITH ENGLAND
fir. Balfour Sees in Them a Guar
antee of Peace and Progress.
.London, Feb. G. Speaking of Man
chester one of the parliamentary di
visions of Which he represents in the
ljouse of commons, Mr. Arthur J. Bal
four, first lord of the ticasury and gov
Cjinment leader in the hous3, declared
mat the greatest safeguard of - peace
was probably mutual comprehension
and sympathy between nations.
There might be difficulties in realiz
ing such a comprehension even among
the most civilized nations, he
went on, but surely, there 'A as ona
country that was in every way fitted
to understand aud sympathize with
Great Britain. He need not say that
he meant the United States. (Ap
plause.) Some foreign cynics pro
fessed' to believe that the existing re
lations between the two countries were
a growth of the moment, depending
upon a transitory community of inter-
ets, with the disappearance of which
their friendship would disappear. His
observation cf the world had taught
him that cynics were always wrong.
During the dark days of the Vene
zuela controversy he had expressed
the conviction that the time would
come whan all English speak
ers and sharers in Saxon civili
zation would be united with a sym
pathy which no political controver
sies could permanently disturb. He
now saw such sympathy established by
tne marvellous change in realtions
which for more than a century had
been disturbed by uninterested dis
cord. If that sympathy was of the
character he believed it to be, there
could not be a greater guarantee of the
future peace, progress and civiliza
tion of the human race.
' ' ' :o: .
PATRIOTISM IN NEW JERSEY.
The State Senate Votes a Sword to
Admiral Sampson.
Trenton, N. J., Feb. 6. The senate
this imorning adopted a resolution of
fered by Senator Keteham, that a com
mittee of five toe appointed to purchase
a sword and have it suitably inscribed.
to be presented to Rear Admiral Wil
liam T. Sampson, as a token of the ap
preciation of New Jersey to this dis
tinguished officer, who resides within
her boundaries. The preamble to the
resolution states how Rear Admiral
Sampson, "by his consummate ability,
aided by his associate officers and the
men of the ships, 'was enabled to bring
renown to the nation and the state of
his adoption."
MR. PORTER'S MISSION.
To Gather Information About
the
Cuban Soldiers.
Washington. Feb. 6. Tne disoatch
frcm Havana saying tha;. Robert P.
Porter has taken to Cuba $3,000,000 to
pay the Cuban army is a mistake. Mr.
Porter did not carry any government
money with him, nor has authority to
negotiate for the payment cf the Cu
ban soldiers. The object of Mr. Port
er's visit to Cuba is to investigate the
number and condition of the Cuban
soldiers and report to thi3 govern
ment. Senor Quesada, secretary of
the late Cuban junta in Wa?h'ngton
accompanied Mr. Porter to consult
with Gea. Gomez about the Cuban
soldiers. The result of thesa investi
gations may determine the policy cf
the administration.
Certain friends of the administra
tion have been advising the president
that the best way to quiet the Cubans
was to pay the insurgent army a sum
of money. The administration, how
ever, is not going to commit itself un
til it has all the data.
:o:
DISSIPATED A FORTUNE.
The Heir of a Syracuse 'Millionaire
Dies in France.
Syracuse, N. Y., Feb. 6. A cable
gram received in this city announces
the death of heart disease at Nice,
France, of Alonzo Chester Yates, the
only son and heir cf A. C. Yates, who
in this city and Philadelphia made a
fortune of millions in ; the clothing
business during and after the civil war.
Mr. "iates was 26 years old and died
a comparatively poor man. "lounz
Yates was left heir to more than $1,-
000,000 at the time of hi3 father's death
in 1880, his mother and sister being the
only other beneficiaries of the estate.
He was reared in luxury and with his
mother spent much time abroad. Yates
castle, on University Heights, in Syra
cuse, a magnificent old dwelling, was
their home When here. They also had
a residence in New York. The stylish
turnouts brought back from Europe
every year 'were a nine days' wonder
and as Yates was a splendid whip he
never appeared to better advantage
than behind his 'tandems and four-in-
hands.
Yates was sent to Harvard at 19, and
later to Hobart, but was . obliged to
leave both institutions bacause of his
sporty inclinations. In London five
years ago he married his cousin, Miss
Lelia Yates of Milwaukee, and for a
time wenit a slower pace. But about
eight months ago they quarrelled and
separated. At the outbreak of tho
Spanish war Yates wanted to join the
Rough Riders, but was prevented by
his mother, who is said to have inter
cepted his telegrams. Several months
ago litigation over the estate, which
the young man's habits of living had
transfer of all rights to others and the
receipt by him of a lump sum of money
pitifully small in comparison to his
fortune when he became of age. With
his mother he 'went to Europe, and the
stay ended at Nice today.
:o:
A FILTRATION PLATT.
One to Be Put in for Both Wines
the Capitol.
Washington, Feb. 6. The houss
committee on public buildings and
grounds today ordered a favorable re
the port on House bill 4756, providing
that the architect of the united states
capitol building is hereby authorized
and directed to have erected and con
nected at such points as may be mu
tually agreed by and between the rep
resentatives of a responsible filtration
company and said architect an! the
engineer of the United States senate
and the engineer of the house of rep
resentatives to be the most advantag
eous, on a bypass, a complete filtration
plant, to have a guaranteed capacity
to deliver not less than 300,000 gallons
every twenty-four nours or bright,
clear water at the senate end of th
capitol building and a like amount at
the house end. The cost is to include
the filter, tanks charged with filtering
material and all valves, piping and
fittings and plumbing connections
necessary to complete tne plant
for operation. A system of fil
tration shall be selected in which the
water shall be double filtered through
two separate filter beds at a rata of
not more than five eallons per snuara
foot of bed per minute, without the
which a thorough and efficient method
of cleaning and areating the filter beds
shall be employed; and the work shall
be completed in a manner acceptable
to the architect and engineers within
four months arter the execution and
delivery of the contract therefor.
:o:
BECOMING ALARMED
Manufacturers Concerned Over the
Invasion of Our Trade.
Washington, Feb. 6. Consul Hal
steaa or .Birmingham, .England, re
ports to the state department thit
there is a great awakening going on
among English manufacturers ove
the disastrous possibilities of American
trade competition. A new trade paper
there has met with a most cordial r
ception, he says, and the news columns
of both daily and trade papers are
filled with facts about American trade,
while the matter is given serious edi
torial discussion, which in English
daily papers means much more serious
consideration than the same editorial
space devoted to a like subject in the
average American newspaper. In this
week's issue of the particular trade pa
per referred to Mr. Halstead says that
fully twelve 900-word columns are de
voted to American trade matters about
one-half taken from the American con
sular reports.
In fact, he continues, I think the
United States consular reports are of a
greater service to Great Britain today
than thev are to America, becausj the
British trade publications are giving
more importance to them and quotin
them more fully than is done at
home."
In support of this statement Consul
Halstead sends clippings from the pa
pers in question, showing the large ex
tent to which they are drawing on the
American consular reports fDr their in
formation.
The British press exnrasscs great
concern over the rapidly dwindling
supply cf reasonably cheap iron ore
for their blast turnaces. ine cniy
mines of any consequence that are
supplying the British demand today
are the Cleveland and the West Cum
berland mines, six otter formerly im
portant Scotch and English districts
being quoted as practically exhausted.
The British blast furnaces are , now
drawing their chief supplies from Bil
boa, Spain, 1,100 miles distant, and
from Swedish Lapland, 1,600 miles
off. Even these supplies, it is said, are
being rapidly drained, and the future
supply is looked for from even more
remote parts of Spain, and from mines
within the Arctic circle, that can be
worked only six months in the year.
The great increase in the sale of
American steel rails in Canada is al30
attracting attention. In 1898 this
trade was so small as not to receive
specific mention in the United States
export statistics. In the first nine
months of 1S98, however, 83,340 tom
were sent across the border, while the
total export of steel rails from the
United States from January to Septem
ber, 1898, were 222,973 tons. This, the
British paper just quoted says, with
anxiety, indicates that the Americans
are pushing into e.vcn mora distant ex
port fields than Canada, and points out
the exportation of 42,417 tons to
Japan up to September, 1893, as tear
ing out this proposition.
Attention is also paid by the British
journals to the importation cf Ameri
can slate to London where it um'e;--
sells the Welsh product by 9 shilling
per thousand.
Governor J. C. Brady of Alaska ar. a
child was a homeless waif in New
York city. He was sent to a farmer in
Iowa by the Children's Aid society and
when he was grown his way to college
was paid by the society. He went to
Alaska ss a missionary and i3 new
governor of the territory.
The London clothing Store
Will not carry over any old stock. Our Immense Stock of Clothing and
Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods must b e sold while fresh.
WE HAVE MADE A SPECIAL CUT IN PRICES that has to be seen to
be appreciated. Call early, as the goods are going off fast.
142 E. Washington Street,
Opposite City Hall.
PHOENIX FOUNDRY
23 to k7 North
N. P. McOALLUM, -
Machinery, Supplies and Castings.
Machinery of all Kinds Built and Repaired. ,
Weber Gasoline Mine and Mill Pumps
ALL SIZES. FOR ALL
Economy
and Efficiency
ADDRESS, STATING CAPACITY AND
WEBER GAS AND
449 S. W. Boulevard, Kansas City, Mo.
FOUNDRY AND
AOSES HUGHES, Prop. "
Ringr Up Telephone 63
Or call at 38 North Center street when wanting something alM
to drink. We are headquarters for the best in our line and mU
agents for Pabst, Lemp's and the San Francisco breweries, Ltd., thrM
of the beat breweries on earth.
JUST RECEIVED.
elements of all kinds.
Two carloads of the
Celebrated Studebaker
Wacmns. Carts. Buo-o-ies and
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION.
Homestead Application No. 2013.
Department of the Interior, I.nd Office
at
Tucson, Arizona, January :S0, 1KW9.
Notice is herebv eiven tha: the foHouine
named pettier lias filed notice of his intention
to make linal proof in support of his claim.
and that said proof will be made before the
Register and Keeciver at meson. Arizona, on
Saturday. March 18. l.s!!. viz : Charles V. Padcl-
ford, or triia liend, Arizona, tor un , anu sw1
of nrl t of see 4, and lot 1, and sel4 of nej of
sec 5, f 5 s, W. 4 w., li. A S R. M.
He names the following witnesses to prove
his continuous residence upon and cultivation
of saiil land, viz: Charles II. Millard, Robert
nlcli. Julius Krneeer, and Daniel Noonaii, all
of Gila Bend, Arizona
-MILTON K. J1MUKK,
Register.
First publication, February 1, 1899.
NOTICE FOR BIDS FOR AN ADDI
TION TO THE HIGH SCHOOL.
The board of education will receive
bids for building an addition to the
union high school in the city of Phoe
nix, Maricopa county, Arizona, bpeci
fications may be seen at the office of
the architect. Mr. J. M. Preston, Room
3, Monihon block.
Bids will be received until February
9, 1899, at my office, 201 W. Washing
ton. The said board reserves the
right to reject any or all bids.
B. T. GILLETT,
Clerk Board of Education.
DELINQUENT TAX NOTICE.
Of City of Phoenix, Maricopa County,
Arizona, for the itear Beginning July
1, 1898, and Ending June 30, 1899.
Territory of Arizona, County of Mari
copa, ss:
I, T. J. Prescctt, assessor and tax
collector of the city of Phoeaix, Mari
copa county, Arizona Territory, do sol
emnly swear that I have made a true,
full and correct account and lists of
all persons and property owing taxs.
after the 26th day of January, 1899, to
the city of Phoenix, as appears from
the assessment roll of said city, for the
year beginning July 1, 1898, and end
ing June 30, 1899, on file in this office.
T. J. PRESCOTT,
City Assessor and Tax Collector City
of Phoenix, Maricopa County, Ari
zona Territory.
Subscribed and sworn to before me
this 30th day of January,' 1899.
seal T. A. JOBS,
City Recorder.
NOTICE.
In accordance with Act No 58 of the
Nineteenth legislative assembly of the
Territory of Arizona to amend Act No.
84 of the Seventeenth legislative as
sembly of the Territory of Arizona,
notice is hereby given that the real
property as shown by delinquent tax
list of year beginning July 1, 1898, and
ending June 30, 1899, upon which such
taxes are a lien, will be sold at public
auction as required by law, and
Notice is further given that said sale
of real property will be held at the
side door of the city hall of the city of
Phoenix, Maricopa county, A. T., on
the 1st day of March, 189.9, between
the hours of 10 o'clock a. m. and 3
o'clock p. m., commencing with the let
ter '"A" and continuing alphabetically
until complete.
Phoenix, A. T., Januarv 30, 1899.
T. J. PRESCOTT.
Assessor and Tax Collector City of
Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona
Territory.
First published in The Arizona Re
publican, official city paper, February
1, 1899.
Via the Southern Pacific, going east,
we will assist you in selecting a lou-c
and secure you the best connection
and accommodations. If west, use the
shortest and quickest line for seaside
points. For further information call
on M. O. BlcknelL C. P. A,
BERNARD HARRIS, Proprietor.
and MACHINE WORKS
Second Street.
- Proprietor.
DUTIES.
Guaranteed
CONDITIONS,
GASOLINE ENGINE CO.
RON W
MACHINE SHOP.
OR S
MELCZERBROS.
One carload of the Can
ton Clipper Plows, Har
rows and r arming Im-
& CO.
Stirries.
THE PIONEEfiS OF ARIZONA
Grand Avenue
Corral
and
Horse Market
Mountain rigs, nice Driving
rigs for city use, comfortable
phaetons, saddle ponies for rent
by the day or month at reason
able rates. (
J. W. AMBROSE.
STAR DYE WORKS
GLEANING, ,
REPAIRING,
PRESSING, Etc.
No. 31 South First Ayenne
DRESSMAKING
Twelve rears' experience.
S. T. Taylor feystem.
3SIRS. BRIEK.
No. 312 CAST ADAMS STREET.
m
4
.f
I
, Don't
Be Afraid
To Send the Children
When you want anything In
Groceries from our store. They
will be waited upon Just as
promptly and Just as carefully
as you would if you camo your
self. They will get Just as much
for the money at-
RIEBELING'S,
The W. Washington St. Grocer.
GILBERT D. GRAY
Notary Public, Pension Agent
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE
No. 30 South Second Ave., Phoenix
MDONGtSS?SS
TSTRTY-TtlFTH TEAK.
GOLDMAN
24 Pages : Weekly j Illustrated.
INDISPENSABLE
TO MINING MEN.
53 PER YEAR, POSTPAID.
bexd For sampi.3 copt.
MINING Scientific PRESS
330 MAKTTET ST., SAH FSAKCI3C0. CAI

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