OCR Interpretation


Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, November 23, 1899, Image 3

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020558/1899-11-23/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 3

TILE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN, THURSDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER ?At 189C.
f Arizona Day by Day
Live News Tfliscn From
The Yuma Arc department is making
preparations to sire a grand masquer
ade ball on Cbvistmas night.
The Ocotilla. Tennis club will give a
sranel masquerade ball at Lake hall
in Kingman on Thanksgiving day.
Mrs. j. Cohenour of Kingman has
gone to Los Angeles, where she will
lilac- herself under the care of phys-i-ii
ns.
Kingman was visited twice last we k
"with heavy showers of rain. The Wal
laial mountains are covered by a
heavy coating of snow.
The Kingman school has received
two dozen new seats for use in the
whool rooms to accommodate the rap
idly growing attendance.
The Santa Fe Pacific railroad is put
ting in five or six hundred feet of new
tracks in the Kingman yards. Another
r.ide track wi'.l probably have to be put
in right ayay.
The Ca tholic church of Yuma !s near
ing cu.ipletion, the roof having been
linisbKl and the bell placed in the st'?e
lle. It Is one of the handsomest eeli
lic s in the territory.
A Mexican while engaged in cleaning
ut a well at Signal in Mohave county
the other day foil a distance of forty
f-rt. Aside from a Flight cut and a
few trilling bruises he escaped serious of recovery.
injury. I party of eight men who are inter-
Mulford Winsor this week receive! a ested in the Cibola canal enterprise ar
shipment of fine Delgian hares from a rived Wednesday night from Califor
leading rabbitry in Los Angeles. The nia and left by wagon for the Cibola
little animals are standard bred and valley, says the Yuma Sun. The object
art? perfect beauties. Two of the best of their visit is to investigate the prop
Tines cost Mr. Winsor $100. Yuma Sun. ' osition thoroughly and determine
Yuma county boasts of two wonders
The first is the Wonder cf the World
mine recently discovered near the King
r Arizona, and the second is a stage
ririver on the line between the King
and Mohawk, who never sptaks until
spoken to. Yuma Sun. j
'. A. Hartman has disposed of his
1 , 1 1 lil'in;! .1 In Ti'lin-.-n n ami t , . rr 1 . li i .
M ith his wife hu departed for Fresno, abandoned for the present at least A
ial., where he will go into busings. 1 "mail number of farmers who have
Mr. Hartman during his short resi. ! can be imgated a port.orf of
lence in Kingman made manv friends j the year .ih Present canal are mi
who regret to have him leave the town. rrLvmR thelr 'a"1 and Heparins to
-Kingman Miner. make Perman-nt mes.
The expected appearance of the me- ! ' Hnlhrook Argus has opened a.
lours did not materialize in this por
tion of the world. A. E. Douglas of the
trowel! observatory obtained pho'o
jjraphs of six meteors, notwithstanding
the cloudy weather and the meteors
failing to appear in the numbers ex
pected. Flagstaff Sun.
Sam Crozier came down from Trnx
ton early this week and remained sev
eral days. He reports Thomas linker,
who Is at Mr. Crozler's home, gradual
ly growing weaker. Mr. Halter's illness
i:s a cause of sincere regret among his
many friends in Kingman. Kingman
Miner.
Thomas Tyrrell, who is just in from selection you can easily repair the
Wallapai mountain, informs us that damage. If you have other troubles,
the wagon road to Wallapai mountain eomc to me and I will help you. My
is fast assuming reality. About six terms are 'ten days or ten dollars.' I
miles of road have already been built will sell a lot for you or rent your
and the remaining part will be finished houses to desirable tenants. My occu
to a connection with the old road next I rations are various. Joe B. Henry, jus
week. Kingman Miner. tice of the peace, matrimonial angel.
City Attorney Pierce Evans returned rpaI es'at apnt and general handy
Wednesday evening from Los Angeles. I man- P- S.-I live on Hull avenue,
where he has been for the past month ' Qui,e a ripple of excitement prevailed
ngaged in perfecting his water wheel. ! in Winslow for a short time Monday
Mr. Evans is quite enthusiastic over over tlle n"nt between Deputy .Sheriff
ihe ultimate success of his invention Hogan and posse and six or seven Nav
and now proposes to settle clown and i "jos. who were off the reservation on
reap the rewards of the same Yuma j a liunt, says the Mail. People wers
Sentinel. cleaning their Winchesters, shot guns
, . , . and six-shooters in every part o: the
L. K. A exandrew, a mming man of ,.Uy AVium is th(1 , v ow.ne,. f an
Los A nge.es. in company with 1 eler , muy7Ap ,. llin,oclt n.itrl
Mailers, discoverer of the pollen Cross , statf.s nuJsk(.t. ,. as wm ,,,.
i.nne, arrived in Yuma yesterday, hav- ,nf? th(, rovl)lut ionary war Ile hrousht
ing made the . trip from Needles in a . ,,,,, RUn )llt ,.u.ano(, it ni,ely
small boat. Hie object of the til;, was bl ht pnme (1ve )ounds of un mv
to examine some copper properties in j .. omJ waB ba(,k of ,hf, parIoi. a
v.h.chMr. Walters is interested.- , ,,, In;l,lin., u He first poured down
uniaun. jian,r f powder, then about two
Judge S. II. Spooner. special Vniie l ounc es of brass tacks. mor- pnv. ib r on
States attorney, is in Kingman taking them, four-penny nails on the powder,
testimony in several Indian depreda- , more powder followed and ten-penny
tion cases, says the Miner. V. E. nails. He was in the act of pouring
Grounds of Hackberry has a case of i out more powder when h? happened
long standing that will probably be i to look at the muzz.e of the gun and
adjudicated at this time. Mr. Grounds
hal a large number of cattle stolen
Removal Sale!
California Can Good
it). I
Pie Fruit
Table- Fruits
1 '.lae:klnrrics
California Jam
California Jelly
l'.ot Mustard
Table Sauce
Olives, pint
Tickles, pint
7 bars Soap (Fairbank's) ...
Drown Soap, 0 for
Valley Raisins
Can Cream T
Mackerel in olive oil
3 pounds Clam Chowder
3 pounds White Label Soups
s l-r,u
11.;
v.: vie
10c
10c
20c
10c
25c
2--.C
5c
10c
15c
20c
25c
i
Kelliier? Cash S(ore,
HE SI AS FAITH-
T. B. Taylor, A. M., M. D., a physician and surgeon 36 years,
writes: Electrozone I consider a specific for Stomach trouble, Kid
ney and Bladder ailment and Rheumatism. -I use it in my practice
and recommend it. Dr. T. B. Taylor, Los Angeles.
Price of Electrozone only $1 a bottle at Keefer's Drug Store.
Territorial Exchanges.
(from him in 1X72. Fre.l Nobman of Los
Angeles lost cattle by Indian forages
and has a claim against ths govern
ment for the same.
W. W. Hill, brother of George Hill
of this place, died in Phoenix Wednes
day. Mr. Hill has been sick for the
past three years, suffering from min
eral poisin. He was a prominent min
ing man and one of the finest machin
ists in the territory. He has held posi
tions of trust with the United Verde
at Jerome, the Old Dominion at Globe,
and with other Arizona mining com
panies. He was at one time a resident
of Flagstaff and has many friends here
who will regret to learn of his death.
Flagstaff Sun.
J. L. Ward left Tuesday morning for
San Luis Oblrpo. where his son J. L.
Ward, a deputy of San Diego county. Is
lying at the point of death, says the
Yuma Sentinel. Mr. Ward was taking
a convict by the name of Ross to San
Quentin on the steamer Santa Rosa
and thinking there was no chance of
escape had gone to sleep, but in the
meantime the steamer put into a small
harbor and Ross, thinking to escape,
pounded him over the head with a
heavy water bottle, fracturing the
skull. The convict did not. escape and
Mr. Ward is still alive with chances
i whether or not they will build a new
canal. The canal built last year was a
failure, as it would furnish water only
during the overflow season. A survey
for a new canal, however. h;'.s been
made and if. in the judgment of these
men, the project Avill justify the ex
pense, work will be commenced on it at
once, otherwise the scheme will be
iLuuiiixniiui avui ill c . ill n. c. i .Oil Willi
t the printing business. G. 13. and L. P.
advertise for wives and M. S. wants a
husband. M. S. lives at Woodruff and
the first to c ome will be first served.
I A Jerome justice of the peace aOver
. tises thusly in the Hustler: "If there
j is a crusty old maid in this town who
. desires to fly to the arms of an equally
crusty old bachelor, and the two of
them will call on me or send for me, I
will help them over their troubles in a
few minutes. During my life I have
joined together hundreds of couples
. and nearly all of them are now eli
! vorcees; so you see if you make a bail
saw that it was full. Looking un he
remarked: "I wish she was about
eight inches longer. T wanted to get
in those four screws. When I turn that
charge loose on those red devils there
won't be one left to tell the tale. Why.
1 can go to the line, shoot aeros the
reservation and kill every Indian on it
and if I could have only g,it those
screws in. there wouldn't be a tree left
j en the reservation. Now let them
I SI-; DAMPENED PAPER.
Paper is far ahead of salt as an aid
on swee ping day. For an oidin:iry car
pet take one newspaper, souk it in
warm wate r, wring it out until It does
not drip and then scatter it about in
small pieces. The damp paper will col
lect the dust from the carpet as it is
driven along by the broom. Large
pieces of paper thus dampened are bel
ter in the case of matting. Going
ahead of the broom they gather up the
elust and lint that would otherwise
t'nat in the air. New York Sun.
o
SICK HEADACHES.
i
I The curse of overworked woman
j kind, are quickly and surely cured by
Kails c lover Root Tea. the great
blood purifier and tissue biinner.
Mmioy refunded if not saiisfacleii'V.
Price 2S ents and 50 cent?. Dr. G. H.
Keefer, Drugs lit.
WANTED A RAILROAD.
More Facilities Needed for Yavapai's
Development.
That a railroad from preseott via
Senator to Crowned King and thence
back to terminate at Mayer, making an
ideal circle line, is the most important
industrial move that can be made at
present to insure permanency and pro
gress to Prescott's future, cannot suc
cessfully be disputed, says the Prescott
Prospect. When it is considered that
mining is the sustaining resource of the
territory and that Prescott's future de
pends significantly upon the develop
ment of her contributing mining camps,
in conjunction with the fa- t that rail
roads are the most important factors
in sustaining faith and encouraging
investment in a mountainous mineral
section, no ground Is left for substan
tial argument against such an enter
al !eo. The territory to be tapped by
the proposed railway is notable for its
mineral bearing possibilities, being one
continuous ore producing belt from
Prescott to Crowned King, and ap
proved unanimously by experts and
practical opinion. The favorable pros
pect for a big ore output from the re
gion in question is undoubted, but the
present need is to Induce capital to
take hold so that the extensive low
grade ore bodies of the country to be
so traversed by rail can be properly
and economically handled. It is true
a railroad cannot be built in a day or
a month, and not often in a year, but
organization and surveys for such a
project would in itself be a stimulus to
an interested estimate of the resources
of the various localities that would be
affected by such an effort, and the enn
summation of such an undertaking
would be much sooner realised by im
mediate and proper unity of action to
give headway to the enterprise, than
to wait until the ordinary course of
events forc es such an undertaking into
existence. To enumerate the properties
that would be- helped by the undertak
ing referred to, or to specify the prob
able influences upon the various camps
interested, is not within the scope of
this article. It Is to sum up generally
the basis for an enterprise, the urg
ency for which will grow In the com
prehension of our people, with the pro
gress of home purposes and develop
ment. The business interests of Pres
cott c annot take a wiser step, nor one
the paramount influence of which upon
the welfare of this community would
be more surely realized in the future,
than to make a united move to inaug
urate and promote the railway enter
prise suggested at the beginning of this
article.
A GOOD INDIAN.
"Araoo, an Apache belonging to the
reservation, was killed twenty miles
from Geronimo on the 10th instant,
says the Safford Arizonian. The In
dian by some unknown means secured
a quart bottle of whiskey and after
drinking it proceeded to a sheep camp
near by and demanded a fight. The
Mexican herder told the Indian that
he didn't want to fight, and had no oc
casion to fight with him, but Amoo
said. "Fight Injun for fun: Injun much
drunk and, damn, he want fight." and
he drew up his rifle and fired. The aim
cf the Apache was faulty, owing to hi3
drunkenness, and he shot wide of uis
mark, but the sheep herder didn't wait
for him to sober up. but seized a club
and pounded the Indian to death. The
assault upon the herder was without
provocation and his act in kliling the
Apache was justifiable, but the friends
of Amoo are very angry, and the sheep
herders ill that vicinity all came to
town.
HOW IS YOUR WIFE ?
Has she lost her beauty? If so, i'uii
stipaiion. indigestion, sick Jiejidauhe
are the principal causes. Karl's t'lover
Rout Tea has c ured these ills for half
a century. Price 25 cents and TiO cents.
Money refunded if results are not sat
isfactory. Dr. G. H. Keefer, Druggist.
NOT RKYPjnSinLE.
In the gooil old days when Judge
Gaslin sat upon the bench in a district
that comprised the western half of Ne
braska, the rustler, the horse thief and
the killer abounded. Judge Gaslin was
aware that there was but one way to
rid the country of these pests, and that
way was to make it too hot for them.
Accordingly Judge Gaslin. when one of
them was put on trial, admitted evi
dence that was sometimes "incompe
tent, irrelevant and immaterial." but
as it was generally true that if the
prisoner was not guilty he had been
guilty of something equally bad Judge
Ga!in let it go at that, and clinched
the prisoner on general principles. The
result was that the supreme court re
versed a good many of Ihe judge's
cases.
During these perilous times an atro
cious murder was committed in Adams
county and the perpetrators were soon
captured. The evidences of guilt were
plain, and the two prisoners were soon
pronounced guilty and sentenced to be
hanged. But as several notorious c har
acters had recently been allowed to es
cape by the supreme court, the people
of Aeiame determined to forestall any
thing of that kind by quietly lynching
the prisoners. The two men were tak
en from the jail and hanged to a rail
road bridge east of town.
The bodies were left hanging to the
bridge, and next morning Judge Gaslin
sauntered out that way to take a look.
He gazed on the swaying bodies for a
few moments without saying a word.
Then he turned to a friend and re
marked: "I sentenced tho;-e two fellows to be
hanged. Thai's one decision that d d
ruprenie court won't reverse." Omaha
Wcrld-Htrald.
JU.ST HOW IT WAS DONE
The Green-Goods Slory Trom the
Viewpoint of a Purchaser.
A very excited man paced up and
down the floor of Max Lizotte's office in
Lewiston Wednesday morning. His hat
was cn the floor in a corner, anil he
hugged a little tin box with a brick in
it under one arm, and good round
Aroostook adjectives came in between
every few words of hot English that
came from his lips. He was a friend cf
Mr. Lizotte's, a farmer from the land
of big potatoes and the sunrise, who
had dropped off at Lewiston on his way
from New York, where he had acte?d as
the confidential agent of three or four
of his friends. After considerable
soothing from Mr. Lizejite, he stopped
walking long enough to sit down and
tell over his story to a newspaper man,
who transcribes it here:
This Aroostook gentleman is the town
clerk, or was a . year or two ago, of
Aroostook town.
"Two years ago," he said, "I got a
letter from a New York man who in
closed a dollar bill which he said was a
counterfeit. He and iiis friends were
making them in New York, and he said
that this bill had been in circulation,
and that I woulel have no trouble in
passing it. Ke warned me not to an
swer the letter. In a few weeks he
wrote again and this time he sent me a
five-dollar bill, which he saiel was also
a 'wrong one.' I passed both of them
at the bank and found no trouble. Act
ing under the advice of the New York
man, I talked the matter quietly over
with three of my neighbors, and after a
while they decided to send me to Ntv
York after some of the money.
"The folks up there were giving $1000
for $100. and we raised $1,600 in cash to
buy a lot of it with. I was to go to New
York to a certain hotel, and occupy a
certain room. At a certain hour a man
would tall with a card, and I was to
ailmit him. and take his guidance. I
was in the hotel at the appointed time,
and at the hour exactly the recogniz
able knock came at the door.
"I admitted the man and he tfjld me
more of the plan. The money was all
like that which we had received
through the mail. It could be passed
and it looked all right, and had been
passed, but was not all right.
"He was minute in his explanations,
and gave me a lot of advice. I had
never been in a city before, ami was
not sharp enough to keep my mouth
shut. We got into a cab and rode about
for an hour, and then stopped at a res
taurant. There were two other men,
v. ho took me and carried me away
again to Jersey City. At 10 o'clock that
night we found our way into a yard
with a high brick building and a good
big brick wall around it. Here two
more men met us, and the others went
away. They escorted me into a room,
where they explained the system more
carefully. They acknowledged that
they were doing wrong, and that they
knew it, but it was their business, and
if thoy wire caught I should not suffer,
but they woulel.
"In another room, where there were
four or five men around a table, they
showed me the money, about $10,000, I
should think. It was all good money.
It looked well, was worn by circulation,
and had ail the appearance of good
money. I was a little scared, though,
and I said that I would take only $400
worth of it. They counted out $1,600
and handed it to me for inspection. It
was all right.
"Then I handed it to them, but they
he-Id out the tin box for it, anil I put it
in, and they sealed the box up before
my eyes and handed it to me. As I was
going out the door my courage again
rose, and I went back and said: 'Darn
it all, I guess I might as well take it
all. I have $1.4''0 to invest in it.' At
that they grew excited and said: 'Of
course you want to invest it all.' and
fool like i did. They took the box and
put the money into it right before my
eyes, and again handed it to me, and I
went out with two of them. I was
conscious of a good trade and was hap
py. I hugged that darned tin box for
dear life, and was as happy as if I hail
a pair of steers for double price. It was
a wonder. The two men told me that
now there was danger that I might get
caught and that the thing was for me
to buy a ticket to Bangor at eir.ee. They
went with me to a restaurant and wo
ate supper, and then went out and got
one drink of beer around, and they
went with me to the depot. I didn't
know just where I was, but one man
bought a ticket for me and gave it to
me. It was from Jersey City to Dangor.
Me., and I took it and got aboard, still
hugging the box. On my way through
I remembered that I had a brother-in-law
in Massachusetts and thought I
would stop off there and get a look at
hi:n and at my money at the same
time.
"i went to a hotel in Lawivne-e and
hired a room. 1 was hungry and tired,
and needed a shave and wash, but the
first thing I did was to sit down on the
bexl and undo the wrappings of my
heavy tin box. I found that it was
locked and that I had not the key. They
had not given me any key, and for the
first time I felt it was a little crooked.
I burst open the iron lock of the box
and in a lot of tissue wrappings was a
one-dollar bill on top and under that
a common red brick with tissue paper
all around it to keep it from rattling.
".My heart oozed out my boot heels.
"I sat down on the bed and stared at
the brick, and then I rushed out to tei
egraph to New York to set the police at
work. It was a wicked old sensation
for me. 1 went back without li.degruph
ing, and after a little took the train for
home, but when I got to Brunswick last
night I stopped off here to see Mr. Liz
otte, to try and see if there was any
thing I could do. I met him a few years
ago in Aroostook when he was cam
paigning there.
"What I dread most of all is the go
ing home and facing my neighbors,
though." ,
The man felt very bad, but was not
ready to have his name attached to
the story, and wanted to get home
quietly before it came out. Mr. Lizotte,
of course, told him that there was noth
ing to be done. He left on the morning
train for the east. Lewiston Evening
Journal.
o
HE RAISES ONLY WATERMELONS
T. D. Lee of Grant's Pass Is proba
bly the only man in Oregon engaged
exclusively in watermelon raising. It
Is an occupation whose success de
pends on hot weather, for which the
present season has not been remarka
ble. Mr. Lee has ssventy-five acres of
big, juicy- melons now ripening on the
fertile bottoms of Rogue river valley.
Ke finds no difficulty in disposing of all
he brings to the city at $1.73 a dozen,
though the market is weaker in the
metropolis than in the towns of the
Willamette.
Mr. Lee has been in the melon rais
ing business a number of years and at
one time had considerable opposition,
but now remains alone in his particu
lar field. Fort land Orcgonian.
MARKET REPORTS.
LOCAL PRODUCE MARKET.
Wholesale Selling Prices Current.
EGGS Ranch, $7.503?S; eastern,
$7.251 7.50.
BUTTER Ranch, per lb, 20c; Mar
icopa creamery, 2-Sc; Tempe-Mesa Pro
duce Co., 2Se.
CHEESE Eastern, full cream, per
lC?fl7e; home, 14c.
BEANS.
BEANS Per lb, small white, $3.40;
pinks per cwt.. $3.50; Lima $5.50 5.75.
FRESH FRUITS AND BERRIES
Bananas. $3.755 4 Per bunch.
LEMONS rancy. per case, $44.25;
blackberries. 15c per basket: strawber
ries, 20 25c; peaches. 80cff$l per box;
pomegranates, 2!ifj3,4c per ib: Bartlett
pears, $1.60Sfl.75 per box; Winter Nel
lis, $1.25 per box: Salt River valley
na-el oranges, per case, $".50(54; Ari
zona Fomoioes. $161.50 per dozen; per
simmons, 12'Ac per lb.
DRIED FRUITS, NUTS. RAISINS
DRIED FRUITS Apples, evapo
rated fancy, per tb, 13c; peaches, fancy,
8Vjc; choice, TSc; plums, pitted,
choice. 8c; prunes, choice, 7V4; fancy,
91'S10c: apricots, fancy, 12c; choice,
11c.
NUTS Walnuts, fancy soft shells,
13c; paper shell, 16c; soft shell, 15c;
hard shell. 11c per lb: pecans,
lOV-c: California, 12c; filberts, 15c;
Brazils, 14c; pinones, 14c; peanuts,
eastern, roasted, ll12c; raw S10c;
home raw, 7Sc; roasted, 12'c; chest
nuts. 17C320c per pound.
RAISINS London layers, per box,
$1.S02.25; loose, per lb, 45c: Thomp
son Seedless. 6ft 7c; Sultana, 5c.
COFFEES AND SUGARS.
COFFEES Rio 1315c; Central
American. lS?T20c; Peaberry, 20JT22C;
Mocha and Java, 3055 31c; Arbuckle's,
$12 per case; Lion coffee, $11.50.
SUGARS Granulated cane, per cwt.
6Vic: cube, $G.50g6.75; powered, 7c; C,
6v4c per lb.
FRESH MEATS.
BEEF Per lb. Sc; veal per lb, SVic;
mutton, per lb. 10c; fresh pork, 9c.
HAMS Medium, 12c
BACON Breakfast, per lb, 10c.
HIDES. WOOL AND TALLOW.
HIDES Dry. 12 per lb: kip, 10c;
calf. 14c; bull, 5c.
WOOL- Nominal.
TALLOW Per lb. No. 1, 2c.
FRESH FISH.
Southern California varieties. 12',c
per Tb; Columbia River salmon, IT'tjC
per lb.
POULTRY AND GAME.
POULTRY Hens, good heavy, per
doz., $4.755.50; Pekin ducks, live, per
doz., $5.30; spring chickens, live, $3.75
GRAIN AND HAY.
WHEAT Per cental, for shipping,
$1.10val.3O.
HAY Per ton, loose alfalfa, $S;
baled alfalfa per ton. $S.
BARLEY SI. 05 per cwt.
ROLLED BARLEY $1.15.
ONIONS AND VEGETABLES.
VEGETABLES Beet3 per cwt.,
$1.65: evaporated chilis per lb, 5c;
green onions, per dozen bunches, 25c:
radishes, per dozen bunches, 25c; spin
ach per doz., 25c; tomatoes, per box,
$l(al.l0: string beans, 121,ic; cabbage,
$3.23i? 3.73 per cwt.: green chili, 6c per
lb; potatoes, $l.S5t5J2; green corn, 10
15c per doz.: carrots, $1.50 per cwt.;
green peas. He; wax and lima beans,
iOc; sweet potatoes, $1.25?? 2 per cwt.
ONIONS Valley, Silver Skins, $2.23
2.50.
FLOUR AND FEEDSTUFFS.
FLOUR Per bbl., local extra roller
process, $4.50; graham, $2.50 per cwt.;
whole wheat flour, $2.50 per cwt.
CORN HEAL White, $2.25 per cwt.;
yellow, $2.50 per cwt.
FEEDSTUFFS Bran, per ton, $15;
rolled barley. $1.10 per cwt.
DRY SALT PORK Per lb, S9c.
LARD Kettle rendered leaf, 3s,
$5; 5s. $5.45; It's, $3.40.
HONEY AND BEESWAX.
HONEY Strained, pe-r case, $7.30.
BEESWAX Per lb. 2224c.
METAL MARKET.
New York, Nov. 22. Silver certifi
cates ,Wu; bar silver 5!i; Mexican dol
lars 471-1..
Copper quie-t; line-hanged.
Lead steady; unchanged.
LIVE STOCK MARKET.
Los Angeles, Nov. 22. Cattle per
cwt., $3.75fi 1.23: calves. $4.5n.fl5; sheep
per head, wethers, $3.75!fi4; lambs,
$2.50?f2.73.
SH4KE INTO YOUR SHOES,
Allen's Foot-Ease, a powder for ihe
feet. It cures painful, swollen, smarting
nervous fret and instantly takes the sMng
out of reirns and bunions. It's the frrrst
et comfort diseovrry of the ago. Allen's
Foot-Mas makes ticht or new shoes feel
easy. Jt is a certain cure for sweating,
callous and ho, tired, achine f-t. Try
it today. S-Mel by all dnurgisis and shoe
storo. By mail for in MHmps. Trial
pae-kafte FREE. Address Alien L!. Ulm
ttead, Le Roy, N. Y,
COM PAUL'S DOORPLATE.
John G. Thomas of Chicago is prob
ably the only man in the northwest
who has ever sold any merchandise to
Oom Paul Kruger, president of the
Boer republic. In conversation last
evening, he said: "I owned a glass
doorplate manufactory a few years
ago. A year ago last July I got an or
der from him and forwarded it by mail
to his address. It was about fifteen
inches long and six Incnes wide, and on
it. in plain, gold letters, was the in
scription: 'Paul Kruger. Staats Pres
ident." I have no doubt that the plate
is now doing duty on his front door,
and that if the government goes under
it will be found among the assets."
Milwaukee Sentinel.
TELL YOUR SISTER
A beautiful complexion is an impossi
bility without good pure blood, the
sort that only exists in cor.nectiein
with good digestion, a healthy liver
and bowels. Karl's Clover Root Tea
act directly on the bowels, liver and
kidneys, keeping them in perfect
health. Price 25 cents and 50 cents.
Dr. G. H. Keefer, Druggist.
PROFESSlOiN AL
PHYSICIANS.
OWING TO THE INCREASE IN Busi
ness in the last two years DR. CHILDS
has been compelled to seek more com
modious quarters. His friends and
pa.trons will now And him at No. 16
SOUTH SECOND AVENUE. All Dis
eases Treated Scientifically to a cure.
Consultation Free. DR. GUILDS is the
best diagnostician in Arizona.
MUSICIANS.
TUB PIANO. Mis Mary KiizibeMh llalsey
New En(fli rl ConsorvHtorv Motfcods. Ad
dress llij Kiul Vnn Kuren titreet.
VETERINARY.
F. O. RICHMOND. M. D. C, Phoenix,
Arieosa. Veterinary Surgeon and Den
tist; diseasos of all domestic animals
scientifically treated. Offico and resi
dence. 337 West Van Buren Btreet. No
charge for consultation. Agent for the
Horse Review
DENTISTS.
DR. JOHN A. LENTZ," DENTIST?GAS
administered. Rooms over PostofBce.
W. G. LEXTZ. DENTIST. SPECIALI?T
in Crown aod Bridge work. Gas ad
ministered. Office Fleming Block, rooms
201, 202, 203, 201, 205. 2l.'C.
II. J. JDSSOP Dentist. Office Porter
building, corner Washington and Cen
ter streets, rooms 11 and 16.
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW.
JOSEPHH. KIBBEY ARTHUR J.
EDWARDS. Lawyers. Steinegger block,
21ij S. First Ave., Phoenix, Arizona.
LAW OFFICES OF LOGAN, DEMONS
& HARRY, 7 William St,, New York.
Walter S. Logan, Charles M. Demoad,
Marx E. Ile.rby, Norton Chase, Fred C.
Hanford. Represented In Arizona by
NORTON CHASE, Adams Hotel. Phoe
nix. EDUCATIONAL.
FRENCH LESSONS MADAME A.
GUYOT, ex-principal of school, Paris,
France. 522 North First Avenue.
O. r. THOMPSON' CIVIL ENCIN'EER, rilOE
nix, A T. 2"i years in municipal and rail
road work. Exiiert llraitanian .
AGENTS FOR THIS PAPER.
C'L'RTIS-XEHALL A DVEP.TISIXO COMPANY
Established 1895
San Francisco Ofliee, 510 Montgomery Street
Los Angeles Ofticc. 223 est Second Street.
GARDEN CITY RESTAURANT
TCS? OLDEST IN TTTTT TT-
Enjoys the best standing with trades
men. Buys everything at spot cash price
and gives the best 25c meal.
TUCK Hi.NO & CO
22 and 24 Washington St., east of Ja
cobs & Co. Priavte rooms for families.
Tickets. $4.30: single meals. 25c.
THE CALIFORNIA LIMITED.
On the Santa Fe. is now in service
for the season, and Phoenix people will
appreciate the convenient hour this
palatial train passes Ash Fork 10:25 a.
m. and passengers can make connec
tions with same by leaving Phoenix
via the S. F. P. & I. at 8:30 p. m. (city
time) any Sunday, Tuesday, Thursday
or Saturday. Get full Information at
city ticket ofliee, 44 West Washington
Street. 10. W. GILLETT.
General Agent.
EXCLUSION KATES FOll THANKS
GIVING Will be one fare round trip between
all points on the S. F. I & I'., tickets
good groing November ami :!0, and
pood rcturnliiK until December 1, in
clusive. Get full particulars of agent.
E. W. GILLETT.
General Agent, Phoenix.
The eastbound Limited will leave
Los Angeles on the same clay
that the westbound leaves Chi
cago, but the exact leaving time
has not yet been definitely fixed,
but will be announced soon. This train
will carry nothing but Pullman palace
cars of the latest make and style and
wiil be the most completely eeiuipped
and up-to-date trans-continental train
in America. The S. F. P. &; P. people
are endeavoring: to have arrangements
made so that the eastbound Limited
will make close connections at Ash
Fork to accommodate the Thoenix peo
ple. Through without c-iianse to St. Paul,
Boston. Chicago, Kansas City. St.
Louis, etc., via the Santa Fe; rates via
this line as low as the lowest. Get
full information at city ticket ofHce of
the S. F., P. & P., 44 West Washington
Street E. W. GILLETT,
General Agent.
Kead the advertisements in The Re
publican and learn the name and loca
tion of the houses which are doing the
business of the town. You will find
the name of every successful business
man in the city in the advertising col
umns. Porter & Co.'s first -class Flares
make close connections with arriving
tralop, as also with trains coins to
P.onie. Ppecial itrcommodaf ions pro
vidcil for trips to and from Globe.
ixi Jill
EHOENIX SHORT LINE
a. m. p. m.i
7i0 12.30! Lv..
a. me p.
Mesa. Arl 9.is:
6.00
6.80
6.00
a.
a m
in
7.?", l.ooi Teinpe I g..sij
7 1) i.st)r.... JPhomix ..Lt s.:W
.S'o. I.
NO.
6:1)0
6:
":C0p m 1 .
.1'HUK.MIX.
. . .Ternipe
.. ieterse",D
...Kyrone
...SnextriD
. . Maricopa. . . 1
7: ti p di
7 . 1 i p in
KfOp m
8:2 j p m
t 4 : rq
a ra
a m
a m
a s
6:i5
4:.'.
4 3)
BOCTHKR PAMriU.
Kat Doand from
Kaai
10.30pm I lv Xartuopa ar 6:46a n.
1 : 10 a m I 1 uccon ; - to
9:30am Pcmtn? 6:st - t
U:30p m I 1 Paso J:' rr
ll:d0a m Jinn Antonio. 4:t n
7:05 pm HoiiMton 6:8' a
7:5am .New Orleans 8:2- a
10:2i pm ..Wnahluqtoa 10: n
6:23 a m Sow Vorfc 4-2' b
&ksi iiuuuel fron Ka
S:10p"m Jtl Z .
6:S0? m .DhVm, t c,
7:16 p m .Et.Loe:: a
7 :8o o ar ;hicae It w a
iOL'THRRN
ttum A'en
P,M!ItlV.
Wl OOeac
10:CSp m
6:00 p ra
8:16 a m
S:-M p m
9:00 a m
6:00 p m
9:50 i m
.Marlc'opa.
... .Ynma.
Los AniMet
Frepno.
.Sun Franc-lsco
.. .Portland
.SeR'.rit
Dwe
ll: 9-M ,
11:10
6:46 -
:8T "
B:
Trains stop on elsnai
Pullman Falaee Sleeping ear an ai
trains between Phoenix and Maricopa
Train No. 1 connects with Boutkam T
elf.c train No. 19, eastbound, leaving- M
icopa at 10:30. p. m.
Train No. 2 connect with tloatbara Pa,
clflc train No. 0. wmtbound. teavln
Mttriecpaat 5:45 a. m.
Pacific CoRit Limited pannes Maricopa: East
bound, 2:2fi a. m., Wednesday and Saturday!.
Westbound, a -oo a. m., Fridayi ana Tueaday o
sach week.
Connections mad at Phvmx wltm
F., P. & P. R. R. fi Presoott ana cob
cress.
Connections at Mesa with atac fat
Florence and Globe, TncHJlaya. Thuradaya an'
ttalurelays at 5 o'clock a. ra.
N K. MA STEW. B r rORTKK,
President. Qen'l Snv
M. O. BICKNELL.
nn'l Frt. and Pass. Aft
SCENIC LINE OF ARIZONA.
SANTA FE, PRESCOTT
S PHOENIX RY.
AND
PRESCOTT & EASTERN R. R.
WITH THK
SANTA fE SYSTEM.
Shorten and Quickest aervlce between Phoenli
Kanaaa City, St. Louie, Chicago
and all Eastern Point).
From the :
West !
DityBl
Hon i T imp ly .
Wed ' 4Sfplv.;
Tlmr lO.lua
Tli u r"1 tJ.i lv..
THROUGH
TLME TABLE
to me .
Weat
I Daya
. . Feirtland
San Francisco.
.Mojare
. San Diego....
. . Loa Anelea .,
. ... Baratow
....Ash Fork...
ar' 6 UOa Tbur
.r 6.4pTuea
jr a.l.Tn Tuea
..arl.20i.Tuet
. .ar 8.2niTue
..ai l2.3JiTuea
..It ViJH)y Mon
I To tn
I Eaat
.ar 9eJi. Wed
.ar 6.16pWed
ar 7.00a Wed
,.ar S.OopTuea
. ar 10.ir. Mou
. .lv 7..veMon
Tim
P. tfia.lv.,
Tiiur
Fri
2.n5plv..
7.:l"ikar.
Froni the I
East
Bon lO.Ojplv..
Mon lO.SOplv..
Tues li'.SOjiv..
Wed t 3.20alv..
Wed 9.05flv .
Thu lj.l'ijiar.
Chie-aeto...
tit Louie. . .
..Kansas City .
. . . Denver
. Allmqn'que..
.. Ash Fork. .
LOCAL
TIME TABLE
Mountain Time
l'2.35p'
No. 3 2.:v.p;
Lv.. ASH FORK. ..Ar
...Jerome Junction.. .
Lv...... Jerome Ai
10.4;a
1 IT 1
U. V.l
pl
3.15p
l40pj
No. 21 1
12.30p
l.OOp
1.2.i.
?.2flp
.10p
ar.Jcromc Junctlon.lv
..TF7t F.T JunvtionT-
Ar Presrntt Lv
Lv Mayer Ar
Huron...
Cherry Creek
Lv..F. & E. JnnuU.Ar
Ar... Prescott Lv
w
3.2dp lv Presi ott ar
4.40. ar..3knll Valley... lv
5.0plv.. 61tull Valley., .ar
5.2ep Kirkland
6.5upj .Congress Junction.
7.2.Ti Wie-ke.nbur
3.60
2.16a
2.16a
1.51a
12.11a
H.2sp
7.6p . ' Hot Springs Jet
9.01p ceoria
9.12ol Glen.lale
9.2lpi AU ambra
9.4'jp'ar PI oenix ...lv
10.5 p
S.47J,
9.7p
9.24TJ
.U0p
Diuinj? Room
I
f Thrnutrh tickets to all point to the Pnltac
states, e iin.Tan nnu aiexico.
CONNECTION'S: Jerome Junction with V. V
& P. Ky lor Jerome; P. & E. Junction with P, A
E. R. K. for Huron ami Mayer; Mayor with
Binge to Crown King and othe r mining pointa;
Prescott with ataKO linens for all principal
mining camps; Cougresa Junction with Btage
lines for Congrefi , Hiirqua Hala, Stanton and
Yarnell; Hot tiprintra Junction with-he C. C
H. 8. I. Co., for Castle Creek Hot Springa, th
all-year-roiini! health report; Pheemx with the
M. A P. 8. K. V. B. K. tcr pointa on the B. t
System.
E. W. GILLETT,
H. P. ANEWAI.T, General Agent,
Actiug f4n. Pasa. Agt. PUoenix
Preacott. Arizoi.
Arizona aad Soat 'W Rj
iorikarb
a.m.
tfurii a-aro
IP.
UTATIONS
:0C !
:06
4:12
ILt.
.. Blebeo
. South Bisbea
,. Don Luis
Naco Junction.. ..
.. ..Packard ,
.... Banning
.Water Tank
...Charleston
. ..Fairbunk
. .. Fairliar.k
M. A A. Crossing.
..Contention
Lend
..BerBcn Lt
..Arl 1:
1:13
!:M
:25
6:32
13:61
11:41
6:52
113:9
111:0
7:0J
7:!
I.
11:4a
7:1
7:45
Ar..
ILt..
I
..LvU:li
..Arll:ll
, I
.. .!11
....M:
a.mU:M
N,
7:6.--
8:!0
10
I
;r..
Tram run on Pacific time.
SUN WILiJAMB. ut
Southern Paeific to
Comrnpiioioa; November !", trains Till
leao Aluncu) a uh followe:
O. A, O A. M. DAILY NEW ORLEANS EX
preset for 1uc4ud. B-jdsod, lermDir,
El I:is Saa Antonio, Houbtoa. New Orlon.
oDiiectin? at New Orleans for Cincinnati and
Chicatfo; also for Waali'Tton, Ilaliiniore, Phila
delphia. New York actl limton
1 .fW-l A.M. DAILY MIXED TRAIN FOU
1ho, and intermediate elation.
- . I M. DAILY MIXED TRAIN FOB
c, A I'. U DAILY MiX ED TRAIN FOB
(jjn P M. DAILY PACIFIC EXPRESS
-i A for l.a Anfr!e, Fresno. Sacramento
and San Francisco, i-onncrtina at Sacrna.ento
or t Frnncie?o for pojpts in Origon. Nevad
owl V ati.
. T. 13 r-TODMAV,
qn. tao. Agt, 1
South
bound .NoT"!
I Pads.
Norm
bound
NoTi,
Paaa.
7.00a
4.56alNo.
t . T.I J.Jm
A P. 7.0U
4.0th :WQ.i&
10.06a
y 9.40a
I.'6a
W 8-20
S.OOt

xml | txt