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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, December 10, 1899, Image 2

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TUB ABIZOITA KEPTJBIilCAN: STJXDAT JIOBNXNGK DECEMBER 10. 1899,
Thi Arizona Republican.
THE ONLY NEWSPAPER
IN ARIZONA
THAT IS PUBLISHED
EVERT DAT
IN THE THAR.
CHARLES C. RANDOLPH,
Editor and Proprietor.
Exclusive Morning Associated Press
Dispatches.
The only Perfecting- Press in Art
sons. The enly battery of Linotypes In
Arizona.
Publication efflce: 88-38 East Adams
Street. Telephone No. 47.
Entered at the postofflce at Phoenix.
Arizona, as mail matter of the second
SUBSCRIPTION BATES.
By mall, dally, one year 9.00
Weekly, on year 2.00
Cash In advance.
BT CAHHEEK.
Sally, per month $ .76
' Washington bureau, E00 Fourteenth
street, N. W.
PHCENIX. DECEMBER lO. 18BO.
Trusts and their pernicious Influence
. upon the publifwelfare have caused
I Viderable comment
A I Vis country during
FUTURE Lp Vat year. Those in
REMEDY, favor W the combina
tion t A industrial inter
ests have put fortlMtlausible argu
ments, in an effort to soothe the agi
tated public and distract attention
from the practices of the trusts. On
the other hand, the opponents of the
combinations have sounded a note of
alarm against the oppressive methods
of a number of capitalists, who seem
determined upon the absorption of the
industrial concerns of the country.
Every fair minded person is willing to
concede that the present rage for trusts
Is working harm, not only to consum
ers but also to capital.
Today trusts capitalized at JS 030,000,
000 are supposed to represent nearly
$3,000,000,000 of actual value, or on?
fourth of the entire manufacturing
capital of the country, which, accord
ing to Prof. E. W. Bemls, was value 3
in 1S90 at $6,500,000,000, and must now
exceed $10,000,000,000. Even the advo
cates of trusts predict the universal
spread of combinations, unless checked
by legislation.
Various remedies for the trust evil
have been suggested by those who
earnestly believe that the people are
suffering on account of the methods
adopted by the combinations. But
there is one remedy which, we believ,
has not yet been put forth by those
who, while desiring that the public
Shall not suffer, are also earnest In the
hope that capital shall not be diverted
from legitimate channels. This rem
edy Is, the teaching of the younger
generations against avarice. "We hon
estly believe that the people of thi3
country have gone too far in the wor
ship of the Mighty Dollar. Our chil
dren, almost from the cradle, are
taught the power of money, and arj
Impressed with the importance of get
ting rich at the earliest opportunity.
The good old Scoth term "canny" can
be applied to Americans in a broader
sense. The people of this republic are
too shrewd, too "cute" at timeB in their
business transactions. Ben Franklin's
Poor Richard is largely responsible for
the American idea of the dollar and
the manner in which it should be ob
tained. We are teaching our children
all the tricks of trade but are not pay
ing much attention to the quality of
business. David Harum's Golden Rule
do unto others as they would do unto
you, but do It first seems to be the
chief thought of a majority of our pop
ulation. We have heard It said that the oppo
nents of trusts are those who cannot
get Into the combinations. This may
be true. In the case of a number of
selfish persons; but that there are
thousands who earnestly and consist
ently oppose unlawful combinations,
and who would scorn to profit by Im
positions upon the public, there is no
doubt.
By teaching the youth of today that
money is not the chief aim of life, our
, future capitalists will be inclined to
treat mankind in a spirit of fairness.
Some persons are trying to make
themselves believe that there Is no need
for congress to touch
THE the money question, be
P ARTY'S cause "there is no dan
DUTY. ger so long as the re
publican party is in
power," and, if that party is thrown
out, then those who throw the honest
money people out will be able to re
peal any stronger laws the present
congress may adopt.
This Is plausible, but it leaves out of
account two Important factois. In the
first place, if the republican party is
honest in its advocacy of the gold
standard, and it Is bound to that by
so many pledges that nobody can ques
tion its sincerity, then there can come
no possible harm from legislation that
will reaffirm Its prlnclp'.ts and inci
dentally reassure the business world.
In the second place, it does not neid an
entire overturn of the republican party
to commit thl3 country hopelessly to
cheap money and set It in the way of
practical repudiation.
Suppose a free silver ra.n to be elect
ed president and to make up, a3 he
would, a free silver cabinet. Then sup
pose that the secretary of the treasury,
with his consent, should decide to pay
the Interest on the public debt (and the
principal when due) In silver instead "f
gold. Pay It he would. Congress could
not stop him. Isn't silver "coin?" And
does not the bond nominate coin as the
medium in which payment shall be
made? It Is the claim of the silver ad
vocates that the debt should be pa'.d
in such coin. Naturally, if they came
into power, that is the coin they would
use.
The result would be the repudiation
of half the debt and a financial revul
sion such as nobody now living has
ever seen. This would be impossible,
if the republican party, now that it has
the full control of both houses of con
gress and the president, passes legis
lation that will forbid such action. In
that case, the thing could only be done
after repealing what laws had been
passed and that would require the con
trol of both houses.
The same argument that Is used
against passing stronger financial legis
lation can be used against any good
law that is proposed. It might be re
pealed. That Is no answer at all. There
is an immediate duty to do now what
is the best thing to do and then trust
to the future for the continuance of
such legislation. The fear that out
spoken utterances now might prove in
jurious in the coming election Is not
worth entertaining. Look at Indiana
and Iowa. The governors of those two
states were among the most positive
and strongest advocates of the gold
standard at the Indianapolis conven
tion, and they have been enthusias
tically re-elected and the states have
spoken in no uncertain terms at the
polls. Where stood Iowa last month?
The people are not fooled by evasion
or attracted by cowardica. The oppo
sition of the silverites is already as
sured, and the way to strength is
through positive action that will draw-
all who realize the dangers or repudi
ation.
The governor has named a strong ex
ecutive committee to manage the state
hood campaign. The finance commit
tee also is made up of representative
men. The statehood movement will be
fairly under way in a few days, and by
the time the members of congress re
turn from their holiday vacation the
committee appointed to go to Washing
ton will be ready to begin its mission
ary work. It is necessary to the suc
cess of this committee that an ample
fund be placed: at its disposal. The
east needs to be educated concerning
Arizona. There should be an Arizona
headquarters in Washington, and at
least a carload of exhibits of our varied
resources should be forwarded
there. There should be hund
reds of photographs of Arizona
scenes, and these should be
supplemented by attractive printed
matter descriptive of our marvelous re
sources, our climate, our school system,
our growth and the opportunities that
present themselves here for business.
A headquarters thus equipped would be
a wonderful aid to the campaign of ed
ucation that of necessity will have to
be conducted. It is to be hoped that
the people of the territory will sub
scribe liberally to the end that the Ari
zona delegation may have all the ad
vantages that such a delegation re
quires to carry on such Important and
difficult work.
Every once in a while some philos
ophical writer on economic matters
mentions incidentally that the water
ing of stocks has ceased and belongs to
an era when managers had not the in
telligence and foresight of the pres
ent'day. It would be well for such wise
folk to wake up and read about the
American Bell Telephone company.
The directors of that concern last week
voted to transfer Its assets to the
American Telegraph and Telephone
company and to take two shares of
stock of the new company for each
share of the old. It is added that the
new company is expected to pay 8 per
cent dividends. The present dividend
rate of the Bell is called 12 per cent.
Water? The doubling of the capital by
means of a printing press Is nothing
else. And the "reduction" of the divi
dend from 12 per cent to 8 13 really an
increase from 12 to 16. Is stock water
ing ended or in its prime?
The bluiitncss and lack cf poetry in
the names the Boers have given their
towns are amply suggested by the lat
est that has came into prominence. We
are told the next battle may be fought
at "Spytfontein." Think cf it! A ro
mantic people would at least have de
cided upon Cuspidoria.
COL. WATTERSON PUZZLED.
He'd Like the Mystery of Mis. Aguin
aldo Explained.
This paper has waited patiently, but
in vain, for four days and nights for
some solution of the dispatch from the
Philippines announcing that while we
have as yet failed to bag Aguinaldo,
we have captured twelve barrels of
Mrs. Aguinaldo's wardrobe.
For one thing that was tha first inti
mation we had ever had in this country
that there was a Mrs. Aguinaldo. If
there is any such person she has kept
herself in the background in a manner
entirely inconsistent with the theory
of the existence of a lady of such s ate
as to drop her cljihes by the dczn
barrels in hsr travels. Soldiers return
ing from the Philippines say that they
never heard of Mrs. Aguina'do, and it
does seem unreasonable to expect in
telligent people to believe that Mr.
Aguinaldo has ever stopped long
enough at one spot to marry. Still tha
fact that we have captured twelve bar
rels of Mrs. Aguinaldo's wardrobs is
very strong evidence on the ether side
of the question.
But how are we to interpret the ex
pression, "twelve barrels," in this bit
of Luzon society news?
Some of our hard worked "comic"
papers are given to pictures of savages
arrayed in barrels with the heads
knocked out, and occasionally we see
on the stage a surprised bather hastily
donning a suit of barrel: but who has
ever heard of real savages who affect
ed the full dress habit of barrels?
Considered in this light, the case
seems to resolve Itself into one in which
the barrels were used as receptacles for
Mrs. Aguinaldo's clothes when s'.ie
traveled. In this respect the difference
between the savage and the civilized is
more marked, for what the former
would stow into a dozen barrels cr so,
the latter would put into one Saratoga
trunk.
But how are we to reconcile the fact
that Mrs. Aguinaldo carries such an
extensive wardrobe with the prevailing
ideas of dress in warm and primitive
lands? It has heretofore been believed
that a Filipino lady, instead of requir
ing a dozen barrels for only a part of
her wardrobe, could place her entire
wardrobe, along with that of every
lady In her tribe, in one barrel, if not
one keg. What are we to infr, there
fore, when we are told that Mrs. Agui
naldo drops parts of her wardrobe by
the dozen barrels at a drop? Perhaps
we might hazard the theory that when
she travels she carries with her not
only her bathing suit, but her swim
ming pool; but that seems Improbable
in a land where bathing suits are un
known and when at this season of the
year the whole country is a swimming
pool.
Altogether there is probably nothing
we can do to clear up this mystery ex
cept to wait until General Otis can
throw one of "his fractions In reverse
around Mrs. Aguinaldo and the re
mainder of her wardrobe and issue a
more explicit bulletin. Henry Watter
son in the Louisville Courier Journal.
TWO FATHERS' HAPFY PLAN.
Before Hobart Was Born They Decided
He Should Study Law.
It was an old programme that the
two old friends had mapped out, even.
before Garret A. Hobart was born.
There was only one dependency and
that was the child that was expected
to bring sunshine in the New Jersey
home should be a boy.
Tuttle had moved to Paterson and
had become an attorney at law. His
measure of success was full and his
list of clients became longer and long
er and Tuttle's face and figure were
seen in the courts with remarkable fre
quency. One day in May Tuttle left
Paterson and journeyed over to the
home of his old friend Hobart for a
visit. The companions of former days
laughed and chatted together and then
Hobart told his old chum a happy se
cret. Then the two men grew sentimental
and the future of Garret A. Hobart
was mapped out.
"Make a lawyer of him," Tuttle sai 1.
"It's a great profession. Just see the
men who have become prominent who
have been lawyers. See- my - success.
And say, Addison," Tuttle continued,
his tone becoming earnest, "let us
agree now that he shall come into my
office as a law student as soon as he
has finished his schooling, and then he
can become my partner."
This was a happy thought, and one
that Hobart fully sympathized with.
Both men were in earnest. When Gar
ret A. Hobart was born the father and
Tuttle expressed their delight, and
finally saw their plans carried to a
complete fulfillment. When Garret A.
Hobart left Rutgers college he returned
to Marlborough and for a year was a
teacher in the old Brick Church school.
He left there to study law in Socrates
Tuttle's office. Ey 1S56 young Hobart
was admitted to the bar. By 1859 he
had not only become a partner In his
instructor's firm, but had married Mr.
Tuttle's daughter, Jane. New York
Herald.
o
HIS VIEW OF IT.
She (breakfasting at the summer ho
tel) I never eat a boiled egg but 1
think of that old saying, 'A kiss with
out a mustache is like an egg without
salt."
He It ought to be, "A mustache
without a kiss is like salt without an
egg." Judge.
A VEGETARIAN.
Bronco Bill W'ofs a vegetarian,
Pete?
Grizzly Pete W'y, a feller as lives on
nuthin' but vegetables, served up n
different ways.
Bronco Bill Great snakes! that's me.
I live on nuthin' but applejack, rye
whiskey an' terbacker. Judge.
JUST A FAD.
"Gimp's funeral took place today,"
remarked Barlow to his wife.
"Dear me! is Mr. Gimps dead?" sai.l
Mrs. Barlow.
"No," replied Mr. Barlow, savagely,
"it is merely a fad of Gimp's to be
buried alive." Judge.
Are you nervous, restless,
pale and easily tired? Per
haps the scales can tell you
why. If your weight is
below you.- average, that
explains it.
Scott's Emulsion is a fat
producing food. You soon
begin to gain and you keep
on gaining long after you
stop taking it. For all
wasting diseases, in both
ycung and old, it is the one
standard remedy.
5oc. an.! $'.00, all druggist.
SCOTT i LOWNh, Uuiists,, New York.
jy
K. t Ti- r
m NEXT
COLD SNAP
When you want a
don't forget that TALBOT & HUBBARD I
can suit you in style and
TUfiKEYS! TURKEYS!
Give na your order for ynnrl hanks-
fivini Turkey and y'i wiJl always be
Ihaekfu', Get your order lu now. Do
no wait a v longer ! pick up anr
ohl'thing. Wehareali hinds of poultry.
Thai's our busmetss.
S FISH AND OYSTERS.
W- hve everthine nice 1n the wrof
F esh Kish and Oy ers. Try our Oygter
re -ktatl i'tsap already prepared. Wo
have the COCKTAIL OVSTER.
Yon can find at our place all kinds of
VEGETABLES AND FRUITS.
Genuine Apple Cider.
Genuine Apole Butter.
The Bct Bulk Mince Meat.
Agts. for Golden Gate ComprsuedTsut
C. T. Walters,
22 We t Washington 8U Phone 284.
S20,000
TO LOAN
In Amounts to Suit.
Reasonable Rates.
W. J. MURPHY, O'Neill Block,
Corner Fast Avenue and
Adams Street.
MERCHANTS
ATTENTION !
OUR SPECIALTIES j
Pure Cream
Full Cream Cheese,
The Best Creamery Batter.
You may pay a little more,
perhaps, for our Brand, than
for that which is represented
as JUST AS GOOD, tut
YOU WANT THE BEST,
and you want your orders
filled promptly. You get both
from
The Maricopa Creamery Co.
PHOENIX, ARIZONA.
TELEPHONE 187.
Slippers
Oxfords Sandals
Bicycle Shoes
Buskins
Tennis Shoes
Tennis Oxfords
(all grade )
Shoe Polish
Slipper Soles
Jersey Leggings
Overgaiters
Children's Leggings
Canv2s Leggings
Felt Shoes
Felt Slippers
Satin and Felt Romeros
Rubbers Arctics
Everything in the
Shoe Lire.
f. WILSON & W00LDRIDGE,
Fleming Block, Phoenix, Ariz.
Shoes 4
DON'T SHOOT I
Until you have seen our stock of Guns
and sportsmens' supplies. The only
complete line in the city.
We don't keep our gun store in our
show window, but our racks contain
all the leading makes, beside the
cheaper grades. The gun business is
not a "side line" with us. We have
had eleven years' experience and make
it a specialty.
IjARRY R. KIESSIG,
34 Norlh Center Street.
Sp3r.sm.cn 3 Headquarters.
STOVE
r-;'-
Tne CaliiorBia Wine Mouse
We handle nothing bnt FIRST-CLASS
wwviHS. i;oxnpieie assortment oi
California, French, Italian, Spanish
Wines and Brandy. Whiskey,
Gin, Rum, and Cordials.
Family Trade a Spealalty. 'Phone US.
Bar in Connection and a Fine KRKB
) UN'VH. Anheuset Beer on eianght.
Free Delivery. J. H.BORLX K,
Proprietor
PKOSPEtt B9ED0NE, Manager.
East Vashisgton St. opp. City Ball.
JET O S E S
ARE COMING UP
to RICHMOND & CO.'S
Shop to get cood, comfortable
shoes put on their feet.
235 North Center Street.
CASTLE CREEK
HOT SPRINGS.
New buildings; gvea'ly Improved ac
commodations. For those who are troubled with
rheumatism this is the best time of the
year to take the baths.
Return tickets can be had to the Hot
Springs at any of the Eanta Fe, Pres
cott & Phoenix Railway company ticket
offices.
Good stage and stage road from Hot
Springs Junction to the Springs.
For any further information address
C. M. COLHODN, Manager,
Hot Springs, Yavapai Co.. Arizona.
We have just received a large stock of
pianos, organs and small goods which
we are selling at Eastern prices.
Any person who is thinking of buy
ing anything in our line will do well to
call and examine our stock before pur
chasing elsewhere.
We also have a large stock of sheet
music which we are selling for 5 cents
per copy.
THE PBOENU PIANO AND MUSIC HOUSE,
12 CENTER STREET, NORTH.
Agents for the celebrated Steinway
& Sons, Vose & Sons, and Crown pi
anos. Estey organs and other makes.
ti
A. Ts-eU-kno-wn gentleman relates the following experience : " I was
out yachting on tho Fourth of July and pot very much exhausted, hav
ing to manage the yacht myself in a northeast pale. I did not have an
opportunity to eat properly, conseo.uentlv 1117 stomach was verv tired,
so that when I did eat I ata too much, and tiiat resulted in a condition
which was followed by savera neuralgia in my head. 3!y experience
with
had previously taught me that possible Cig trouble might bo remedied
by treating the stomach. Befo-e 1 had taken the third Tabulo my neu
ralgia had gone, and I was feoling pretty Veil. I had neuralgia very
bad but I could feel thane Tr.bules were working uixra iny digestive
organs, and as they wo'ked ruy head improved in smpathf.'
STOPPING LEAKS
Is not all of our business. We go farther than that and will do any
kind of plumbing or tinning job, large or small. We carry our own
stock and it Is complete. The porcelain goods comprise everything la
MODERN SANITARY PLUMBING.
ESTIMATES FURNISHED accurately and quickly. Come and m
the Btore.
The Scoville Plumbing Company,
114 WEST ADAMS STREET.
Rinar Up Telephone 63
Or call at 18 North Center a
to drink. We are headquarter
agsnta for Fabst, lamp's and tae
oi taa oest breweries on earth.
PiiosMi, Tempe and Mesa Stage
Leaves Phoenix 8:30 a. m.
Return on your own time.
TelaDhone 264, Offca.
L. W. COLLINS. ProD.
Grand Avenue
Corral
and
Horse Market
Mountain rigs, nice Driving
rigs for city use, comfortable
phaetons, saddle ponies for rent
by the day or month at reason
able rates.
J. W. AMBROSE.
36 Nassau St, New York.;
FISK & ROBINSON,
Bankers
AND
Dealers in Investment
Securities.
Deposit Accounts ef Bairka, Rankers,
Pinna and IndirKa&ls received, sub
ject to eight draft. Interest allowed oa
balances. . Corr&.poniience invited
from Oerpo rations, Trustees and ofcker
conservative investors. Orders en Che
New Yerk Stock Exchange executed
on ommisaioa for cash.
HARVEY EDWARD FISK.
GROBGE H. KOBIivSON,
Member New York Stock Exchange:
Tie tfpgres of quality la oat
BBEAD, OAKES end PISS cannot t
measured by words. A guaran&M
stamped on each article could not mke
them any better than they are.
The Bread tB white, light and wholt
some. The Cakes and Pies are ertes,
rich and of delicious flavor. Can we
apply your tabid!
...PHOENIX...
BAKERY AND COKFfCTIQNERY.
CD. E1SELE, Proprietor,
Esabt. 1881. 'Phone 89. 7W. Washington.
treat when wantins soraetlUns adat
s for the beet In our lib ana sale
Baa Francisco breweries, LtiL, i
MELCZER BROS.
CAPITOL ADDITION.
Until further notice the price of
lots -will he as follows:
Oa Washington Street. . . .$500.00
On Adams Street 400.00
On Jefferson Street 400.60
i On Monroe Street 350.00
j On Maottoa Street 300.00
On Jackson Street 300.00
Size of lots, 50 by J40 feet, 20 ft.
alley hi the rear.
M. C COLLINS,
MONIHON BUILDING
BANKS
THE
Valley Bank
C PHOENIX ARIZONA.
Capital .... ... I. ...V.?::.'..IH0.0Qn
Surplus .. joua
WM. CHRISTY, President.
M. H. SHERMAN, Tic President.
M. W. MJESSINSER. Cashier.
Discount Commercial Paper and Do a
OeneraJ Banking Business.
Office Hours, 9 a, m. to t p. m.
BECK1VS DEPOSITS, '
MAKE COLLKCTIGH8,
BUY AJTD SRLL KXCHAK
CORRESPONDENTS.
Am. Echanr Nafl Bank Now Tort
The Anrio-Cailfornia Bank.".";.;....
a u iV San Francisco.' ' CaL
Bank of Arizona Presootr, Aria.
THE
PboBnix National Bant
PHOENIX. ARIZONA.
Paid TTp Capital tIM,Ooa
Bnrptai and undivided Profit 30,00
E. B. GAGE. President.
C. J. HALL, Vlce-Preeldent.
E. B. KNOX. Cashier.
Steel-Lined Taalts and
Steel Safety Deposit lnt$
General Banking Business
Drafts Issued on all the principal cities of
the world.
DIRECTORS.
JAS. A. FLEMING. C. J. HALL
G. B. RICHMOND V a uptidikb
I B. HETMAN. p.' M. mITRPh
L. M. FERRT. E. B. GAOE.
T. W. PEMBERTON.
National BanMrizona
PHOENIX, ARIZONA.
CAPITAL PAID UP J190.000
SURPLUS 20.0UO
EMIL GANZ. President.
SOL LEWIS. Vice-President.
& OBERFELDER, Cashier.
Directors: Emil Ganz. Sol Lewis 3. T.
T. Smith, Charles Goldman, S. Ober
felder, E. M. Dorris, J. D. Monlhon.
CORRESPONDENTS.
The Bank of California San Francisco
Laidlaw & Co ,. New York
National Bank of Commerce St. Louia
Nat'l Bank of Commerce Kansas City
First National Bank Chicago
Farmers' & Merchants' Nat'l Bank...
Los .Angeles
Consolidated Nat'l Bank Tucson
Hank of Arizona Proscott
Messrs. N. M. Rothschilds A Sons
Londaa
Visitors are Cordially Invited to fall

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