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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, August 15, 1900, Image 8

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THE ARIZONA EEFTJBLICAN WEDNESDAY -ATJGUaT 15, 1900.
TO-DAY
SpeciaS Sa
Blue Flame Wickless - 2 B
le Oil St
urner
ove
- $6.00
i
I
! eyesight by the aid of the camera, in
I vented by a Wisconsin man, will bo
I demonstrated heforp the convention.
Today was occupied with the reception
of the delegates and preliminary work
of a routine nature.
KANSAS FARMERS FORM A TRl'ST
Blue Flame Wickless - 3 Burner - - - 8.00
Gasoline - I Burner - - 3.00
Gasoline - - - 3 Burner - - - 500
WHILE THEY LAST,
Ezra "W. Thayer,
124-126 East Washington
Street.
Topeka, Kas., Aug 14. The plan of a
farmers' trust, as reported by the com
mittee and as outlined last night, was
adopted by the farmers' conference here
i today. Fifteen thousand dollars in
I cash was subscribed today and the
irusi win open , an omce in ivansas vuy
and begin business at once. Walter X.
Allen was elected president of the trust.
He is one of the men who assisted in
the organization of the Farmers' Alli
ance ten years ago. He says he has
pledges of over $1,000,000 for the farm
ers' trust and anticipates no trouble in
getting the entire $20,000,000 of stock
subscribed. Offices and warehouses
will be established in Chicago, New
York and Galveston as soon as the
trust gets thoroughly in operation at
Kansas City. The object is to keep up
the prices of agricultural products.
o
SIX-MASTED SCHOONER.
GREAT ARE OUR PEACHES
Fin Quality of Fruit Coming From
the Verde Valley.
t -
That Arizona can prc.duce peaches
far In excess of the quality of the Cali
fornia product is a fact being given
daily illustration by the fruit s?nt to
Phoenix from the Verde valley. Every
morning, from 500 to 1.000 pounds of the
finest peaches that ever grew, come
Into this city. Great, luscious fruit, of
a red and cream blend of hue, and a
flavor that is ff: for gods and mon, it
is in heavy demand on the local mar
ket. The peach crop in some places
was a failure, and even in the Verde
valley many growers lost over half
their crop through the droufh. A few
escaped and one of the most fortunate
was J. Page. His crop was a big one
and as a result he has a corner so to
speak, on the peach business. Some of
his fruit goes to California, there to
po,?e as a native product, but most of
it finds a market at Prescott. Phoenix
and the smaller towns. A few local
Teaches are coming in. but they are
not up to the Verde quality. Apples
are becoming ra'ther plentiful and an
excellent quality retails at 10 cents per
pound. They. come from southern Cal
ifornia, but will soon be succeeded by
the better and cheaper northern fruit.
Grapes .are purchasable in large va
riety and 'the seedles Sultana. Mission,
Lady Downing. Muscat and Zinfandel
sell at from 2U cents to 4 cents pet
pound. A few old fashioned Concords
are coming in from Mesa City. Water
melons and muskmelons are scarce and
high and not very good. The latter
crop, however, promises well. .
The only plums on sale are the Hun
garian prune and the- Tragedy. They
are wonth 25 cents per pjund. There
are a few blackberries, but not many
more are expected. Tomatoes are
plentiful at 5 cents per pound. Or
anges are high and not in brisk de
mand. The Valencia 'is the only va
riety to be found in Phoenix and is
worth 10 cc-nts per dozen. Lemons are
not good and according to Mr. C. E.
Holland, the heavy demand in Califor
nia is causing the. shipping out of the
fruit before it is properly cured. Bart
lett pears will be in before many day,
and the crop Is a large one.
and
pect to see a second Bisbee there
that soon."
Mr. Christ added that on all the
claims that are being developed the ore
shows up in quantity and of unusually
high grade.
Ed. Wilson is in Nogales, says the Vi
dette, from Sonora, where he has been
the past six months prospecting for
gold. He comes direct from the Yaqui
river and says the Yaqui war is a thing
of the past. There are a few Indians
still in the mountains, but these are be
ing rounded up by the Mexican soldiers
under General Torres. Prospectors are
not molested and they come and go as
though a Yaqui had never been heard
of. Ed. says the stories of the fabul
ous richness of the placer gold fields of
the Yaqui river are all tommy-rot.
There is gold, to be sure, but not In
such quantities as recent reports would
indicate.
P. C. Smith arrived at Flagstaff from
Los Angeles Tuesday, and will com
mence the work of repairing the town
reservoir next week, says the Coconino
Sun. Mr. Smith has succeeded in mak
ing three feet of the reservoir hold
water for three months, and the town
council has contracted with him for re
pairing the entire reservoir, and he
says that when he gets through with
his work there will not be a leak in the
big basin. .
o
PERSONAL MENTION
K. G. DeVVitt, who has spent several
months at Cape Nome, is at the Com
mercial hotel.
Mr. Thoma3 E. Farish yesterday
morning returned from a visit to So
nora on mining business.
Charles F. Hoff. Tucson: L. Overlock,
Bisbee, J. T. Cameron, Neuman, Cal.;
and Robert L. Mullen, Tempe, are at
the Commercial hotel.
Ed. Kaufman, St. Louis; L. L. Lyon,
Denver; C. D. Clarke, Peoria; C. P.
Baughman, San Francisco; J. F.
Quinn, St. Joseph, Mo.: Mrs. William
Zent. Kelvin, D. J. Jones, Octave; T. J.
La Mare, wife and son. Congress;
Samuel Huntington, New York; and E.
H. Pattee, Prescott, are at the Hotel
Adams.
and stockings in their hands, as -their
fathers and mothers did years ago.
THE HAY TRADE.
Seventh Annual Convention of
tional .Association.
Na-
TERRIT0RIAL BREVITIES
Helvetia Mines of Great Richness
Yaqui War Ended. t
7
Messrs. George Christ, Jr., Raymond
Satterwhite, Stewart Forbes and Thos.
Armstrong of the surveyor general's of
fice returned to Tucson this morning
from Helvetia, where they spent Sun
day, says the Citizen. It is barely pos
sible that they may all dteide to cast
their fortunes with that camp, for cer
tainly a more enthusiastic set of men
it -would 'be hard to find.
"We were all astonished," said Mr.
Christ this morning, "at the size and
prosperity of the camp. Really it is
surprising the progress they have made
and are making. The buildings are sub
stantial and -the men all satisfied and
work is going on with a rush. In the
Isle Royal they are down 300 feet and
have drifted on the -'00-foot level into
a large body of high-grade ore and
commenced stoping. They have 30,000
tons in sight on that level and the prop
erty, as a whole, is a bonanza. I ex-
0000000000000
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REMEMBER
the
STRAW HAT
SALE
H Off
At L L. PLANK
Successor to
R. H. Greene
Theres" coolness and com
fort in our fine Straw Hats
and Night Robes. .We must
dispose of them to make
room for our fall stock
which is fast arriving.
Remember
the
Night Shirt
and
Pajama Sale
Off
At L. L. PLANK
Successor to
R. H. Greene
FLEMING BL'K.
G
O
o
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ADDITIONAL LOCAL
A CHAIR THEFT. Some time after
midnight Night Clerk Charles Ander
son of the Hotel Adams saw a man
pick up one of the chairs which had
been left on the sidewalk and hasten
around the corner of Center street with
it. Mr. Anderson hurried through the
hotel and met the thief at the Center
street entrance. He invited him to do
posit the furniture. The thief complied
and pursued his unincumbered way up
the street.
THE POSSIBLE MURDERER Gen
eral Agent Gillett of the S. F. P. & P.
yesterday received a telegram from the
agent at Congress junction saying that
a teamster had arrived there from
Cuilen's Wells with information which
might have an important bearing on
the hunt for the murderer of W. S.
Moft'att at Harrisburg. The teamster
said that he was at the wells on the day
following the murder, which had not
then been heard of there. A Mexican,
heavily armed, approached the wells
from the direction of Harrisburg, but
before he reached them turned aside.
That was in itself a suspicious circum
stance, for all honest travelers In this
country go out of their way to stop at
wells, which are far enough apart to be
novelties. Harrisburg is about sixteen
miles west of Cuilen's wells, so
that the Mexican, if he was the mur
derer, was not. as would have been sup
posed, making his way into the Weaver
country. He might naturally have
concluded not to lead the chase in that
direction and afterward reach his ren
dezvous by a circuitous and hidden
route. A fugitive has a great advantage
in all that country. There is plenty of
water in the Hargua Holas so that one
could linger there as long as he chooses.
Water facilities are equally good in the
Braashaws. whither the' Mexican re
ported by the teamster seemed to be
going.
Baltimore. Md., Aug. 14. Delegates
from many parts of the country are at
tending the seventh annual convention
of the National Hay association, which
began a three days' session in this city
today. The officers of the association
are: President. James W. Sale. Bluff
ton, Ind.; vice-president. John G. Cars
sallon, Jersey City: ' secretary and
treasurer, F. F. Collins, Cincinnati.
The purpose of the gathering is to
form business acquaintanceship and to
discuss matters of interest to those en
gaged In the hay trade. Reports to be
submitted to the convention show that
the hay crop promises well throughout
the west, especially In the far north
west. In New England the outlook is
not so encouraging owing to unfavor
able weather conditions.
SON'S OF ENGLAND.
Twenty-fifth Annual Session at Wind
sor, Canada.
Windsor, Ont.. Aug. 14. The supreme
grand lodge for Canada of the Sons of
England opened its twenty-fifth annual
session in Windsor today with a large
attendance of delegates, from all parts
of the Dominion. The opening session
was occupied with addresses of wel
come from representatives of the local
lodge of the order, the city council and
fraternal societies. The meeting, which
will continue several days, promises to
be of great interest to members of the
order. Several proposed changes to
the constitution are slated for consid
eration. At present there is much dis
satisfaction over the insurance and sick
benefit funds. They are not on a pay
ing basis and it is proposed to raise the
dues In order to provide for the annual
deficit.
Camden, Me., Aug. 14. This has been
made a historical day for , Camden.
This forenoon the Hrst and only six
masted schooner ever built was
launched from the shipyard of H. M.
Bean of this city. Thousands of peo
ple watched the proceedings, which
were uninterrupted by mishap. The
schooner has been christened George
W. Wells, and her dimensions are as
follows: Keel, 302 feet 11 inches: beam,
4 feet 6 inches; depth of hold, 23 feet. A
four-foot poop deck will extend forward
to the fourth hatch. The length of the
lower masts 119 feet, topmast 58 feet,
jibboom 75 feet, driver boom, 72 feet.
The vessel is built of yellow pine and
oak.
FLYING IN TRADITION S FACE.
"Does Kitty enjoy the art galleries
abroad?" '
"It seems not: she writes that all the
famous Venuses she has seen are as
ugly as a mud fence." Detroit Free
Press.
o
BAD BLOOD is a bad thing. It is
responsible for scrofula, salt rheum,
humors and many other diseases, in
cluding rheumatism and that tired feel
ing. Bad blood is made good blood by
Hood's Sarsaparilla.
by Hood's
Sick headache it cured
Pills. 25c. , '
o
OXYGENOR cures all kinds of fever.
OXYGENOR CO., 41 West Adams St.
PRESBYTERIAN REVISION.
A Most Important Work to be Shortly-Begun.
Cattle Wanted to Pasture.
1,000 head of cattle wan ted to pasture either
by the month or on shares for one year or a
lt-rm of years, fine feed and plenty of water,
all umler fen.'e. first-class reeoiiicndatious
furnished. Write or cnll nn
J. F. WARREN,
Laton, Fresno County, Clifornia.
Abundance of Water.
Saratoga, N. Y., Aug. II. -'-The com-i
mittee on revision appointed by the last
Presbyterian general assembly willj
spend the next two weeks In Saratoga
considering the important work it has
in hand. The first meeting of the com
mittee was 'held today, but little in the
way of actual work was accomplished
and an early adjournment was taken
until tomorrow to alluw for the arrival
of some tardy members.
The committee includes Rev. Dr. Her
rick Johnson of McCormick Theological
Seminary, Chicago; the Rev. Dr. Daniel
W. Fisher, president of Haniver Col
lege, Indiana; the Rev. Dr. McKibben,
Cincinnati; ex-President Benjamin
Harrison, Indianapolis; Justice John M.
Harlan of the United States supreme
court, and Elisha A. Fraser of Detroit.
NEW YORK RED MEN.
TO GO TO CHURCH BAREFOOTED.
0OOOO
Novel Feature Promised for "Old Home
Week" in New Hampshire.
North Woodstock. N. H., Aug 14.
The citizens of the Granite state do not
propose to be outdone by the Pine Tree
staters in their celebration of "Old
Home Week." Next Saturday evening
bonfires blazing from the tops of hills
and mountains throughout New Hamp
shire will announce the beginning of
the seven days' festivities. On Sunday
in every town the local clergymen will
preach sermons appropriate to the
homecoming of the children of the
children of the Granite state, and in
some places these ehilddren have pre
pared to renew their youth and tak?
their dinner with them to the meeting
house, where services will be held both
forenoon and afternoon. In town the
younger people, in their enthusiasm,
have gone still further, and it is said
that the girls and boys will go to
church barefooted, carrying their shoes
Syracuse, Aug. 14. The great chiefs
of the Imperial Order of Red Men are
holding a great council of the tribes of
New York state here today. They are
being given a rousing reception by the
Syracuse tribes in their hunting
grounds.
AMERICAN OPTICIANS.
Detroit, Mich., Aug. 14. The annual
convention of the American Associa
tion of Opticians began at the Hotel
Cadillac today and will continue sev
eral days. Nearly 200 delegates, emi
nent in the profession, from all parts
of the United States and Canada, are
in attendance. A method of testing the
The Imperial Land Company
0! California.
s tpciiinp for settlement 100.0"3 acre" to be ir
rigated from the Colorado river in
San Diego County.
GOVERNMENT LAND
subject to entry". Prospective settlers may
learn full particulars by addressing
or calling oil
B. E. RICE, F. LEI8HTON, Agents
No. SO North 2nd Ave, Phoenix, Ariz.
Just a Little
Scorched.
by the big fire; that's all. It didn't
prevent us from opening up our new
store Monday morning with a full line
of merchandise, and we have been do
ing business without interruption ever
since. Our stock is brand new, not
damaged by fire or water, and we are
prepared to fill your orders for:
GROCERIES, HAY AND GRAIN,
HARDWARE, STUDEBAKER WAG
ONS, MINING SUPPLIES, DRUGS,
POWDER, CAPS, FUSE, CROCK
ERY, BEDDING AND BLANKETS,
BAR SUPPLIES, TENTS, at our usual
low prices.
The BasMord-Barmister Co.,
PRESCOTT.
YOUR MONEY'S "WORTH
EVERY TIME
lu what you get when purchasing yor
foods at this store. Good weight, high
quality and low prices has made F.
Grlebel's the purchasing center for the
thrifty and for those who appreciate
superior grades of coffees, teas, canned
goods, cereals, flour and meats. "Lire
and let live" is our motto nd we 11t
p to It.
FRANK GRIEBEL,
Tel. 43. 218-220 W. Washington St.
PLUMBINfi
AT
SUMMER
RATES
Of course. We have closed out all
the old stock which was bought when
iron and pipe were high. Prices of
everything in the plumbing line are
now much lower than a few weeks ago.
Our customers shall have the ad van-,
tage of the falling market. Our stock
is new and we know the plumbing
business. It will pay you to have us do
your work at summer rates.
The Scoville Plumbing Co.,
114 WEST ADAMS STREET.
Q0OQ&00
I CHAMPION CUT
PRICE
SA HIS
O
Men's and Beys' High-Grade Clothing and Furnishings. Price cutting at Gold
berg's means cutting prices down, actually reducing our regular prices and
filling our guaranteed clothing at the special prices named. We offer none of
the usual absurd reasons for this sale, because there is no fake about the mat
ter, is our way to keep from having old goods on hand. Just Plain Business.
a
Q
$10.00 Men's Suits cut to
$5.75
Men's Plain, Fancy Mixture Cassi
mere and Cheviots. Strictly
all Wool.
$13.50to$16.50Suitscutto
$8.65
Men's Plain and Fancy Casssimere,
Cheviots, Blue Serges and
Striped Worsteds.
$5.00 Trousers Cut to
$3,75
These are Royal Values at the prfces quo
ted, and means a clean sweep of our
$5.06 Trousers, all sizes, all pat
terns, Cassimere or worsteds.
AGAIN SHIRTS
o
e
o
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$4.00 Men's Trousers Cut to
$2.75
The very newest effects in plain and
fancy patterns Cheviots, Cas
simere or Worsteds.
$2 00 Men's Trousers Reduced to
$1.25
All Cassimere, Hair-Lined Stripes.
SHOES SHOES
Summer Canvas Shoes, White,
Browns, Tan and Gray. Just
what you want at prices
cut almost in two.
Q
Q
Q
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Did you see the line of Negligee
and Golf Shirts we are
selling for
50c,
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Goldberg Bros' Shoe end Qiothing House i
A New Arrival of the Cele
brated Line of Eagle
Shirts, Negligee and
Golf Styles.
Summer Underwear
See the Bargains in
our Middle Window.
Sold almost at Half
Price.
REMEMBER OUR PREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE.
Q
Remedies that CURE 2
prevailing diseases. "Th? hcuted weather aggravates one's
TARKH. PEHL'NA will cura you.
CA-
This alkali water irritates ones KIDNEYS and LIVER. SWAMP
ROOT is a succ2ful remedy. BEAR keeps and sells all up-to-da'.e
y -w-wr'rt , medicines. Keep your EYES o n our WINDOWS.
Yon Get What You n. i,,- justcppohtc
Aslc fot? at Jlcuv's
CITY HALL.
THE APPETIZING KIND
is the only sort of meat worth buying
during the Summer solstice the only
kind we sell. Fresh meats of all kinds,
well kept and cared for" from the time
they leave the stockyards to the time
they Uave our ice box. There's a lot in
the "cutting up," too, and our people
in the store know their business.
P. T. HURLEY,
3 Veal Washington St., 'Phone 12
I will pay 15 cents each
FOR
Battle Ax Soao Boxes
THE CLUB STABLES
North Center Street.
Handsome Turnouts. ,1K"i;"!',ck
Horses boHrdeu by the
fnr drivinp or riding
lny week or month.
HENRY OE3BQE, Prop.
m&m& Tim, fiftcrcss
RANCHERS, FRUIT GROWERS!
WA"
PIT SOME
ON YOUR
FRUIT and ALFALFA.
t
A representative of the HOWE-CURRY CO. of Los
Angeles is in the City and will give estimates on wells and
pumping plants for irrigating purposes. Address,
FRANK H. HOWE,
General Delivery, City.
5;
mm,
4.53 W.WA3HIN&TON
If you are going to the coast or are i
packing up to go anywhere, don't place j
your effects in that old battered and I
worn out trunk. You need a new one. i
We have what you want. If not, we !
will make what you want either in '
trunks or valises.
Patters
just received
A few of the newest styles in
Windsors, used mostly as hat
bands, they are the latest craze
in the east and are worn by both
Ladies and Gents.
40c. Price to All 40c.
Wfh
To. of ' Si
TELEPHONE U.
Telephone 229,
S.J. DOSTER, Prop. viiBiiillisilf IIXS1B1III lIllIlMllIIIIIIBlllfll iltt
us w, Washington. TTmrrtfvmrrkT tfwru YWtnrrinmn nrr

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