OCR Interpretation


Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, August 08, 1904, Image 2

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020558/1904-08-08/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 2

fir
THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN, 3IONDAY MORNING, AUGOST 8, 1904
THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN
: "" rtTBLISHEDBT THB
"Arizona Publishing Co.
GEO. W. VtCKERi. Pres. and Oen. Mgr.
Exclusive Morning Associated Trm
Xlspatcris. .
The only Perfecting Pre In Arieona.
The only battery of Linotypes In Art
Publication offlcar M-JS East Adams
Street. Telephone ro. 11
Kntered at the postofflce at Pnoealx.
Artsona, as mall matter of tha second
Class.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE8.
By mall, dally, one year
Weekly, one year
Cash In advance.
n mi
LOO
BT CARRIER.
Dally, par month 75 et"-
Arlrona visitors to the Coaat will find
The Dally Republican on sale at the fol
lowing places In Los Antrelea: Hollen
beck hotel news stand, and B. F. Gard
ner, 906 South Sprint- street.
PHOENIX, ARIZ., AUGUST. 8. 1904.
DON'T FORGET YOUR PAPER.
Every year scores of Arizonlans re
luming; from their vacations express
regret that they failed to order The
Republican sent to them during their
absence. They did not appreciate
What they were missing until they were
a ay. and then they neglected to send
In their orders. Most of the people who
leave for the summer talcs the necessary
precaution to provide themselves with
air favorite paper, however. We de
tire to remind all our readers that The
Jtfublican will be sent by mall to any
address In this country or abroad, and
address changed as often as desired.
Subscriptions may be given to your re
gular newsdealer beforo leaving, or,
IS more convenient, orders may be sent
T telephone or malL A postal card
will do the business and you will bs
teppy. ,
from 1831 to 1904 and Onward.
A lomantic story comes to the "New
Yark Sun" about General Kuroki. the
officer who led the Japanese advance
Into Manchuria. It appears that a
tvephew of General Kuroki named Oshl
' ma. who Is now a student In the Uni
versity of Berlin, has written o the
"Tageblatt" of that city that his uncle
i not of French descent on ithe father's
side, as has been stated, but is the son
of a Polish nobleman named Kurowski,
a ho fled Russia after the Polish revo
lution of 1 S3 1, and went to Japan and
marrieda Japanese. The student says
Hat General Kuroki's father, when
on his deathbed, made the remark thiat
fcls son might some day be able to
lage revenge on Russia for crushing
Poland.
Jihel Hashiguchl says that General
Itei Kuroki was born tin 1S45, in the
trovince of Satsuma. 'and that he has
always been in the army. In 1871 he
ras made captain in the Imperial
guard division. In the Satsuma re
txiiion of 1ST7 he fought on the side
f the mikado. He became lieuterant
gvneral in IS92, and after the war wfith
China, in which .he rendered his most
Blcient service at the capture of Wei-Hal-Wei.
he was made general, to
gether with Oku and Xodzu, at the
feme time when Generals Tamagata
and Oyama were made field marshals.
Nvv. after this long training and ser
tlce. the whirligig of politics has
brought him face to faice, in the neigh
borhood of the Mo-Tien Pass, with
Central Kuropatkin, the most capable
military man Russia possesses. If In
4eA, this is the realization of a dying
father's wish a father who had felt
fie ruthless might of Russian adminis
tration in Poland under Nicholas I.
it Is almost poetic Justice that more
than seventy years later the Bon, him
self one of the most capable military
men in the world, and a thorough Jap
anese, should be standing over against
he Manchurian army of Nicholas IL
In desperate remonstrance against the
quality of Russian policy and adminis
tration in the far east.
This story, if It Is true and It Is
not improbable goes to show that it
hs pretty much the same thing In his
tory jll along. The men change the
tronjr men of one generation give way
t the strong men of (another genera-ti-i;
but an unjust policy and the op
fMaitlon to that policy are, historically,
ry nearly immortal. The struggle
! and falls, now apparently dis
appearing, and again coming out in
Oer.hadoing proportions, but rt is al
ays alive, it is always -doing or
preparing to do, and. If experience can
ht trunted, it will so continue ns long
as the unjust policy exists. Assuming
that Russian administration at home
retains Its present arbitrary qualities
for five hundred yearn longer, that
Ru.-ius foreign policy equally persists
in its aggressiveness and lndifffference
to the rights of others, there is no rea
i to doubt that at the end of that long
peiimi Russia, will be opposed, both at
home and abroad, very much as she is
to-day. Like causes will produce Ilk
Acts. In politics, no mutter what the
ae of the world may be.
If. instead of calling a pretentious
conference at The Hague, Nieh
4 II. had set himself intelligently at
w to establish In Russia little by lit
1fe ft government of law, and had made
mt end of Sclavlc encroachments upou
tim territories and rights of those -who
sir neighbors to Russia, he would real
ly have made a beginning with a peaca
lavement of some substance and some
consequence. All that was done at The
Hague was to set up a formula, excel
lent for those who wllsh to use it, but
of no more effect upon Russian growth
and Russian politics than a dose of
laudanum upon the rheumatism. The
proof of this Is the continued authority
In Russia, of such men ais the dead
Bobrlkoff. the living Obalensky, the
dead Plehve, the living Alexieff, and
the eagerness or blindness vvtirh which
Nicholas II. backs up the rule of men
of this backward type. One Russia on
the map, with her Cossack Ignorance,
her Cossack brutality, and her Cossack
greed, would make half a hundred
peace conferences 'look very sick, let
alone only one. It is because Ru.ssla in
1904 stands where she did In 1895 and in
18S1 that it is 'possible to believe that
to-day General Kuroki, up among the
mountain passes of Manchuria, is car
rying forwurd the same -work as that
undertaken by Kurowski in Poland al
most a century ago. If what has been
will be this being a tolerably accurate
rule of thumb for conjectures as to the
future this same work 'Willi go .on. In
one form or another, so long as great
Russia remains an instrument for law
less injustice at home and lawless en
croachments abroad.
Abolishing the lackey.
Andrew Carnegie, promoter of cul
ture and exploiter of heroes, now ap
pears before the public In a new guise,
that of reformer. lie has abolished at
Skibo castle the custom of tipping.
Whether Mr. Oarnegle'a determined
opposition to it 'Will ' result In doing
away with the custom of feeing re
mains to be seen; but ut any rate peo
ple over on this side will appreciate
the appropriateness of such an effort
being made by an American. To be
sure Mr. Carnegie is fond of empha
sizing" the fact of his Scotch ancestry,
but he does n boasting at the ex
pense of America: and In u most sub
stantial fashion he has evinced his
pride in the country that gave him his
opportunity.
And this latest social departure of
his is distinctly American. Over here
we fee, but most of us still do it
shamefacedly. If not apologetically;
for it is difficult to get a'way from the
Idea that the man is as self-respecting
as his master. Perhaps It was with
no Idea of conserving the self-respect
of the man that Mr. Curnegie mads
his new ruling in Skibo castle. It is
possible that his only thought was the
Bavlng that would result to the pockets
of his friends. But he deserves the
benefit of the doubt; and until he gives
some assurance that the contrary Is
true. It is permlssable to regard the
multimillionaire's action as an expres
sion of sturdy Americanism.
The fee Is the perquisite of the lack
ey, and therefore it should not be ac
cepted by any American, no matter
what his line of work. It -would be
pleasant to feel that it Is not accepted
by him. but. unfortunately, the travel
ing public over here bus no such con
solation. In fact, in one of the current
magazines an American young woman
who worked her way through college
explains that she was able to do this
by 'working as a waitress in the hotels
and restaurants in the summer time
and that the tips she received enabled
her to provide herself with many small
luxuries. ' Why should she take money
from the guests if she was paid for her
services, and how could she do It with
out loss of self-respect?
The custom of feeing is a dishonest
one, and deserves to be strongly con
demned. But Its abolishment is the
prerogative of the very -wealthy; for
people wluh little money seldom have
the coumge of their soMal convictions.
It is to be hoped that other multimil
lionaires will follow Mr. Carnegie's ex
ample. A prominent physician in France
paints a gloomy picture of the preva
lence of certain forms of disease in
that country. He writes that alchohol-
ism is making deplorable ravages.
while tuberculoma carries off more than
150,000 victims every year, and sapa the
strength of 00,000 in addition. He de
clares also that, whereas In other civil
ized lands smallpox Is not prevalent,
in France there are still many cases,
while typhoid fever, dysentery and oth
er maladies are distressingly frequent.
Traditions have been widely accepted
that the excellence of Gallic cookery
lessened the multitudes of the sick in
our sister republic in comparison with
those of other nations.
SOME EMINENT DEGENERATES.
Professor Stiarr of the University of
Chicago is credited "with finding evi
dences of a degenerate race In parting
the hair in the middle or on the right
side, baldness, gray hair before the
age of 45, a snub nose, small ears, big
lips, left-handedness, red hair, teetJh set
wid apart and pigeon toes. A Chicago
contemporary jeeiingly remarks that
this is the most sensational announce
ment wiileh has come from the univer
sity, "which is saying a good deal."
Our contemporary finds solid comfort
In the fact that Socrates belonged to
the baldheaded class; that Milton part
ed his hear In the middle, and that the
revered Thomas Jefferson had red hair.
This is a suggestive theme. Examples
could be multiplied. Judge Alton B.
could be multiplied. The mighty Caesar
was bald Judge Alton B. Parker, the
Denrocratlc candidate fro the presi
dency, has a suspiciously high forehead.
Robert Louis Stevenson parted his hair
In the middle, fc'o did the illustrious
Thomas Jefferson, James Russel Lowell
und George William Curtis. The por
trait of Premier. Arthur J. Balfour be
fore us shows the fatal part in the mid
dle. Incredible as It may seem, Ralph
Waldo Emerson parted his hair on the
TARTAR IS A TARTAR
Soft, spongy, sensitive gums result from
tartar accumulation. 11 should be removed
at ones by your dentist and thereafter pre
vented by the use of
SOZODOIMT
TOOTH POWDER
and its complement, SOZODONT Liquid.
The Powder is slightly ar-asive, is abso
lutely free from grit arid acid, and Is just
the thing for those who have an Inclination
for the niceties of every-day life.
3 FORMS: LIQUID, POWDER. PASTE.
right side. It is believed that a search
of the list of American worthies will
show tlhat miny of therm are "hopelessly
bald, have red 'hair, part their half
frankly in the middle and walk with a
pigeon-toed step. If these be signs of
degeneracy, there are some illustrious
exceptions. Professor Starr must have
been joking. Philadelphia Public Led
ger. THINGS AND THE MAN.
"And Joseph dreamed a dream, and
he told it to his brethren: and they
hated him yet the more." Genesis
xxxvl., 5.
Oh, ye who hold the written clue
To all save all unwritten things.
And half u league behind pursue
The accomplished fact with flout i
:lings,
Look, to your knee your baby brings.
The oldest tale since earth began.
The answer to your worryings
Once on a time there was a man.
He single-handed met and threw
Magicians, armies, ogres, kings;
He, lonely mid his doubting crew.
In all the loneliness of wings;
He fad the tlame. he filled the springs.
He locked the ranks, 'he launched the
van
Straight at the grinning teeth of
things.
dnce on a time there was a man.
The peace of shocked foundations flew
Before his ribald questionings.
He broke the oracles in two
And bared the riultry wires and
things.
He headed desert wanderings;
He led his soul, his cause, ihis clan,
A 'ittle from the ruck of things.
Once on a time there was a man.
Thrones, powers, dominions block the
view
With episodes and underlings;
The meek historian deems them true.
Nor heeds the song that Clio sings, .
The simple central truEh that stings
The mob to boo, the priest to ban.
Things never yet created things.
Once on a time there was a man.
A bolt is fallen from the blue,
A wakened realm full circle swings
Where Dothan's dreumer dreams anew
Of vast and forborne harvestings;
And unto him an empire cllrvgs
That grips the purpose of his plan.
My lords, wihat think ye of these
things?
On?e -in our time is t'here a man?
Rudyard Kipling
(Copyright by Collier's Weekly),
o
PARKER DOCKS HIS HORSES.
A half-tone picture of Judge Parker
sitting astride of a Jitorse adorns the
art supplement of Sunday's Buffalo
Courier. The Judge looks well on
horseback, and the animal bears its
distinguished burden with ease und
dignity. But the effect of the picture,
while pleasing in a general way, is
marred by a revolting-disclosure. The
ihorse is docked. In place of the flow
ing tail provided by nature is a mis
erable apology for a tail In the form
of u short-haired rtump. It is not to
the credit of Judge Parker that he fa
vors this abominable mutilation. Presi
dent Roosevelt recently issued a right
eous pronouncement against dockin?
horsep. The operation is horribly cruel
and the result is bobli a deformity and
ii robbery of the liorse of his defense
against flies. Man's Inhumanity .o
beast makes countless thousands mourn
and it is to be regretted that a candi
date for president of the United States
should be numbered i.imong the up
holders of an inexcusable form of tor
ture. Rochester Democrat and Chron
icle. THANK HEAVEN
There are still a few million citizens
-!ho are too busy to throw up thelr Jobs
and ask the president of the United
States to do something about it.
Brooklyn Standard-Union.
Thousands of
sickly people
'have been re
st ored to
health and
strength by
the use of the
Bitters. Many
of them volun-
tartly testify
mai ii cureu
y them of
Indigestion,
Dyspepsia,
Constipation,
Biliousness,
Kidnev
Troubles or Malaria.
It wHl cure you. too. Try it today.
LLST YOUR
For sale or rent with me and
I will find you a customer.
I will also look after your
insurance and collect your
rent.
Sitters
R. H. GREENE,
42 N. Center St.
I
"He
Ours is the "Road that has no
turning' Because its Direct and
Shortest to all points East, to say
nothing about being the "Dustless
Way1' to .'.California. 'at erf ' al
Among our Summer Special Excursions are:
San Francisco Cfe
and return - - - mJ3SJ
On accouut Tri-ennial Conclave Knights Templar.
On sal? Sept. 1st to 15th and 15th to 19th.
Only One Night on the Road.
Chicago and return -St.
Louis and return
San Diego and return -Santa
Barbara and return
Grand Canyon and return -
Y
WORLD'S FAIR PULLMAN-Santa Fe Route
Through Pullman leaves Phoenix for World's Fair, St. Louis, Monday, Aug. 8th.
All tickets "permit of stop over for
side rides to that Greatest of Natural
Wonders, '
Tine
- j
Kindly note our new line to
Globe, Ariz, fare J9.55
route via rail to Kelvin, thence via an
easy riding stage over one of Ari
zona's best and most attractive Moun
tain roads. Try this route and save
Money. You will be interested in a
ride over the new Phoenix & Eastern
R. R. Steel Bridges No Dust See
"Postons Butte" "The Sleeping Sun
Worshipper Maiden"0nce tried you
will come again. '
1.
flfledJ Somite
f -Arizona.
LANDIS, General
PHOENIX, ARIZ.
99
n
$63.60
- $57-90
$25.95 j
- $25-95
- - $19.60
Agent.
: 1
J
PRESCOTT BUSINESS FIRMS.
Hotc?l Burke
AMERICAN PLAN.
' PRESCOTT. ARIZONA.
105 rooms. All modern convenience.
A strictly first -class and modern hot!.
Sample rooms for commercial men.
Th.
Bashfoid - Burmister I
Company
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL Z
DEALERS IN
CSoneral
Merchandise
Prsicott, Arizona. '
f VE CARRY FULL LINES OF
t EVERYTHING. WE HAVE A T
t BIG STORE, WE DO A HO T
I BUSINESS, BUT CAN DO I
MORE.
t Whsn in Prascott it will pUas f
f us to havs you eall and get
W . . - J
acquainuu.
44mMHh!H I 'M"l I I t I I M"
THE PALACE
PRESCOTT. ARIZONA.
atrittiv nn th TCiirone&n clan. Rooms
tw h Av week or month. Finest
(ar and club rooms In the southwest.
BROW, SMITH & BELCHER,
Proprietors.
You Must vStop
for a cool room and
quiet night's rest...
rhe Williams House,
Maricooa. Arizona.
..... THE HOFFMAN
fVFRYTKlNG flRST CLASS
Micholob Beer
on IDrattagnt
HIRSCHITLO. PERKINS ft GIBSON
Proprietors
THE CLUB STABLES
On Hock north of Hotel Adams on
North Center street. Nobby turnouts.
Safe and speedy stock.
W. L. GEORGE & CO.
Granite Gravel
furnished for grading walks and yards.
Hauling, grading and excavating- done
to order. Address E. Pennington, P.
O. box. 723 or 'Phone Red 513.
G..d Tora.au. C..a Saddle B.r.n.
DUBLIN CORRAL.
LIVERY AND SALE STABLE.
A. V. VAN D0REN, Proprietor.
Tel. Black 513. 19 IE. Tefferson St.
Scott's Sanial-Pepsln Capsules
APOSITIVECURE
For Inflammation r Catarrh
of the Bladder and Diseased
Kidneys. No cure do par.
Cares quickly and Perma
nently the worst ease of
Gonorrhoea and Gleet, no
mat'er ot how long stand
Ins. Absolutely harmless.
Bold by druggists. 1'rle.
11.00. or by Diail. DOStDald.
,,tl 00, S boxes ri.75.
THE SANTAL-PEFSIR C0-
BalkEFONTAiNC, OM'O.
ELVET & HTJL.ETT. AGENTS.
VV. J, MURPHY
, Real Estate, Insurance,
Loans.
I02 West Adams Street.
Fifield & Gallagher
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
AND SUPERINTENDENTS
estimates Furnished Booms II-12-11
O'Neill Building F. O. Box 671
Phoenix, Arlsona.
Joe rifleld Qo. H. GalUs-her.
"Just as Easy"
xf -
COPlGrtfXi I'M
to cook over gas as over coal or ker
osenemuch easier In fact. But you
ought to think, too, of the freedom from
lust and ashes, the Immediate produc
tion of heat, the saving of temper of
tvlfe, cook .or housekeepers. No delay
ed breakfasts wten you uss gas. Ask
is all about It.
Phoenix Light & Fuel Co.,
Cor. 1st Avs. and Jefferson. Tel 2401
t
A

xml | txt