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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, December 06, 1908, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020558/1908-12-06/ed-1/seq-1/

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FOR SALE.
Five acres In grapes and alfalfa, near
Phoenix.
E. E. PASCO E, 110 North Center St.
S3000 to loan on Real Estate.
S2000 to loan on Real Estate.
S150O to ln on Real Estate.
SIOOO to lan on Real Estate.
S50O to on Real Estate.
E. E. PASCO E, 110 No. Center St.
ARIZONA REPTJBL
NINETEENTH YEAR.
18 PAGES.
PHOENIX, ARIZONA, SUNDAY 3IOKMXG, DECE3IHKU G,
1J08.
18 PAGES.
VOL. XIX. NO. 209.
THE
ICAN
nil ASYLUM
FOR TURFMEN
Mexican Government is Invit
ing American Racing
LIBERAL CONCESSIONS
A Quarter of a Million Dol
lars In Ten Years, Ground
for a Race Track and
Racing Privileges for
Twenty Years.
Louisville. Ky., Doc. j. Proposi
tions to race American horses in
Mexico have recently been made to
Oilman J. Wynn of this city, presi
dent of the American Turf Associa
tion. Within a few weeks Col. Wynn,
accompanied by Algernon Daingerficld.
secretary of the Eastern Jockey club,
and Mr. Davis, secretary of the Iuis
ville Jockey club, will go to Mexico
to look over the field. If plans de
velop as expected, the work of es
tablishing American racing in Mexico
vi!I continue and the first season will
open in January, 1910. with the run
ning of a $J5,onO Mexican derby as
the opening event. Some time this
month a meeting will be held in New
York City with those interested in
the project.
Col. Wynn said today that he be
lieves that the outlook for racing in
Mexico is most encouraging and he
thinks it will afford a fine field for
American horsemen and breeders and
one that will in part compensate for
the reverses they have recently met.
He says the Mexican Jockey club,
which will have supervision and fed
eral control of racing in Mexico, has
already been formed with many of
the most prominent American turf
men and breeders interested in it.
A i ng theiti are Messrs. Keene, Hag
l:ti. Whitney. Dwyer. Butler, Follans-i-ee
and Macky.
Ground for a race track at the
City of Mexico has already been se
( u red. It is near the Castle of Cha
I'lltepec, within fifteen minutes ride
by street car from the heart of the
city. There are 30" acres in the site.
ELECTRIC
Signs and
Ornamental
Brass and
Iron Work
of all kinds.
E. THOMA MFG. CO.
Phone Main 212.
You Build A House In Tempe
I'll Give You The Lot
and loan you part of
the money
W. J. KINGSBURY
4I '"M"I"H 1 I 1 11 I H 1 1 I I 1 11 1 1 1 H i I I t 11 1 I 1 I 1 I M"H"M t 1 1 1
3. We are paying
Highest Market Price for Butter Fat
and you need not He awake nights wondering how you will be able
to collect your money. Just join the successful and satisfied peo
ple, and come with the crowd to
The Maricopa Creamery
J P. o. TH IS
4. F. M. MOGNETT, Pres.
31 1 It HI 1 11 1 MI I 1 1 1-1-H ! 1
PHOENIX NATIONAL BANE
PHOENIX, ARIZONA
CAPITAL S100.000.00
SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFIT - S150.000.00
X. B. GAGE, President.
H. J. McCLUNO. Vice President
R. B. BURMISTER, Cashier.
If. M. GALLTVER, Asst. Cashier.
DIRECTORS.
H B. Gage W. A. Drake I H. Chalmers
F. M. Murpby Geo. N. Gage F. T. Alkire
D. M. Fenr W. F. Staunton B. J. licOmnc
8fe Deposit Boxes For Rent.
The Prescott National Bank, Prescott, Ariz.
Capital paid In ..... $100,000
Surplus and Undivided Profits ... 155,000
F. II. MURPHY, President MORRIS GOLDWATER, Vlce-Prea't
R. N. FREDERICKS, Cashier.
H. A. CHEVERTON, G. E. MEANT,
Assistant Cashiers.
Come and See Our Money Saving Display of
JEWELRY, WATCHES AND DIAMONDS
Special Reduced Prices on JEWELRY AND
WATCH REPAIRING.
N. FRIEDMAN MMJrtor
and the jockey club Is ready to spend
$300,000 on the plant. It is proposed
to have a circuit of Mexican cities.
Beside the City of Mexico, it is prac
tically certain that Monterey and
Juarez will be in this circuit.
The Mexican government has agreed
to give the jockey club "$25,000 a year
for ten years. It provides the ground
on which the plajit at the City of
Mexico will be built and concedes
racing privileges for twenty years.
SEIZURE OF BULL BUTTER
Internal Revenue Officers Raiding
Denver Creameries.
Denver, Dee. 5. What Is said to be
the biggest raid on manufacturers of
imitation butter ever attempted is be
ing conducted In Denver by deputies of
the internal revenue office. The most
important seizure so far is a thousand
pounds belonging to the Star creamery
of which former State Senator Button
is president. Several other places
have been raided and 2.000 pounds have
been confiscated.
o
MANUFACTURER'S VIEW
OF TARIFF REVISION
Rate; Are Already Higher Than They
Need Be T0 Protect Labor.
Washington. Dec. 5. Although he is
chairman of the tariff commission of
the National Association of Manufac
turers. Herbert E. Niles, of Racine
Wisconsin, manufacturer of agricul
tural implements, wagons and carriages
made it plain today to the ways and
means committee of the house that he
was not leaking for the association.
"A stone labeled as bread" is what he
said the farmer Is given through the
Dingley tariff. Mr. Niles said the
Stnadard Oil company benefitted most
from the duty on oil. The Standard's
wage cost was six per cent of the price
to the consumer and the tariff offered
a protection of 99 per cent of the price.
"The tariff rates on steel and Its
products, he said, were all in excess of
the wage cost. He declared that 95
er cent of the steel output is controlled
by the United States Stoel company,
Jones and Laughlin, the Republic Iron
and Steel company, the Colorado Fuel
and Iron company, and the Lackawan
na and Pennsylvania Steel company.
f n Mr. Dalzell's suggestion he includ
es the Cambria steel company. He
said that these and several others are
"in a commercial sense practically one
concern."
Niles recommended a maximum
duty of fifteen ier cent on banvy
steel products and as a minimum no
duty. This reduction from the sched
ule, he explained, might result in a
material reduction In the cost of agrl-
. cultural implements and wagons to
the farmer, and he advocated putting
nails and some machinery on the free
list. He admitted later that the steel
schedule for rolling mill productions
should be reduced 15 or 20 per cent.
TEMPE, ARIZONA
MfcANS YOU.
- - E. KAYS, Mgr. 4.
11 I 111 t I 1 111 1 1 1 11 Mil Hit 1 1
EXPLOSIONS
NO MYSTERY
One of the Conclusions of the
American Mining Congress
END OF THE
A Message From Mr. Taft
Commending Aim of the
Congress-In Absence of
Any Action Headquarters
Will Remain at Denver.
Pittsburg, Doc. 5. VYJien the fourth
and last day's session of the eleventh
annual convention of the American
Mining Congress opened here today.
It was apparent that the unfinished
business would be cleaned up by this
afternoon, and the meeting, which is
pronounced the most successful in the
life of the organization, would ad
journ. A telegram from President-elect
Taft was read before the convention
this morning. The following Is the
message: "1 am glad of the opor
tunity to express my Interest In the
Important work which the American
Mining Congress is doing in behalf of
the mining industry ami I desire to
encourage and co-owrate in this work
In every possible way.
"The mining industry of this coun
try, which is second only to agri
culture in its contribution to national
wealth, which furnishes more than
66 per cent of the total freight traf
fic, of the country, and employes more
.than a million men in its difficult
and dangerous tasks, deserves all the
assistance which this government can
render it.
"No country Is so rich in those re
sources which make foi great and
permanent wealth as is the I'nited
States, but this condition of affairs
has helped to develop the national
habit of waste in the use of our for
ests, our oils, minerals and other re
sources. Fortunately, however, the
public conscience of the country is
awakening to both the loss of life
and the waste of materials in all of
our industries, and we must see to
it that the movement is guided wisely
and carried forward to success."
The report of the committees on
mineral conditions in Utah, Virginia,
Arkansas, Missouri and Colorado and
on resolutions were among the Im
portant matters considered at the
morning session.
That the average mine explosion
is not a mystery Is the opinion of
fifty mine operators, including the
chief mine inspectors of Pennsylvania,
West Virginia, Ohio. Illinois and sev
eral other coTil mining states, who
presented the following address to the
convention: "The state mine in
spectors present at this meeting de
sire to assert their belief that the
causes of mine disasters are for the
most art known and that it will
le possible by the united effort of
all persons interested to greatly re
duce the liabilities of explosions. It
would be a grave error to allow the
statement made in this congress, that
the general causes of these disasters
are unknown, to go unrebuked. There
is no hidden mystery in these hap
penings as some of the addresses
BOOKKEEPING,
8H0RTHAND AND TYPEWRITING
are thoroughly taught at
The Lamson Business College
PHOENIX. ARIZONA.
We have 40 acres 2
miles from the sugar
factory at a
big bargain
Come in and let us tell
you about it
PHOENIX TRUST COMPANY
16 W. Adams. Phone Main 194.
heard at the convention would lead
the average listener to believe. At
the recent explosions, with the ex
ception of the last at Mariana, the
causes have been speedily ascertained
and remedial measures recommended."
The national headquarters of the
American Mining Congress will be
retained at Denvef as no action was
taken on the question of removal at
today's session.
The convention adjourned at noon
but the election of officers and other
routine business was transacted af
an afternoon meeting at the Colonial
Annex hotel. The officers elected
were: J. H. Richards of Boise, Idaho,
president; Dr. E. R. Buckley of Flat
River, Mo., first vice president; John
Dern of Salt Lake, Utah, second vice
president; W. F. R. Mills of Denver,
third vice president; J. F. Gallbraith
at Denver, secretary-
The directors elected are: F. G.
Bromley of Denver, II. lister Bain
of Urbana, III., and Samuel A. Tay
lor of Pittsburg.
o
TA
ONLY NAVAL MANEUVERS
The Dutch Government's Definition of
Movements of Warships Along the
Venezuelan Coast.
The Hague, Dec. 5. The government
of the Netherlands has declined to dig
nify the movements of the Dutch war
ships, the battleship Jacob Van Heem
skerk and the cruisers Kriesland and
Gelderland, along the coast of Vene
zuela from Puerto Cabello to La Guai
ra, as a naval demonstration. It as
serts that this maneuver was only the
ordinary exercise of the cruisers.
The government received no inform
ation concerning the statement that
four American warships are expected
at Curacao at the beginning of January
but it is thought here that, now that
that the presidential election is over,
the United States may possibly lend
Holland more effective assistance than
tho moral support already promised.
OF
CONCLUDE THEIR SESSIONS
Globe is Chosen as the Association's
Next Meeting Place.
'lisbeo, Ariz., Dec. 5. (Special.)
T.'.'- Arizona Bankers association chose
Globe as the next mcoting place at Its
closing session today and elected M. J.
Cunningham of Blsbee, president; C.
A. Vandorn of Clifton, vice president:
Morris Goldwater of Prescott, secretary
and L. B. Christy of Phoenix, treasurer.
One feature of today was an address
by James K. Lynch of the First Na
tional bank of San Francisco, advocat
ing the establishment of a central gov
ernment bank stating that the aboli
tion of Jackson's bank was a punish
ment to Jackson only and not a con
demnation of the principle.
A paper by Hon. Sims Ely, territorial
auditor and bank comptroller, was
read by John G. Spangler of Mesa and
heartily received.
H..H"M"M"S' i"l"M 1 1 1 11 1 1 I1 1
The Racycle
Is the largest selling, easiest
running, strongest and fastest
bicycle In the world. Sold only T
by Grlswold, the Bicycle man.
25-27 East Adams St.
i
1 HI 1 1 M-V M MnM"H"M""M"H
What Does A Business
Education Mean to You?
IT MAY MEAN THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN
RICHES AND POVERTY
a'co.MFORTABLE HOME AND A SHANTY; A GOOD LIVING AND
A BARE EXISTENCE; A SALARY OF $100 PER MONTH AND M0
PERMONTII, OR A SALARY OF $200 PER MONTH AND $60 PER
MONTH. HOW MAY A BUSINESS EDUCATION BE ACQUIRED?
In two ways. By going into a store or an office and "working" your
way up, learning your business by experience. But this takes years of
hard work at low wages. The sensible way is to take a thorough
course In an "up-to-date" school that makes a specialty of training
young people for business. The young man or the young woman
who is prepared to do the work required "right and quickly" is al
ways in demand. During the past two years, we could have placed
in good positions double the number we did, if we could have per
suaded double the number of students to take a thorough business
course. So far as we know, every student who completed the course
we recommended is now employed at a satisfactory salary or is In
business for himself. What others have done you can do if you will.
For full information call at the office or write to
FLORA J. LAMSON, Principal, ' ,
Phoenix Academy and Business College
5th Avenue and Adams, Phoenix, Arizona.
PEOPLE'S THEATRE
ELITE OF THE TOWN. CHANGE OP PROGRAM NIGHTLY.
SPECIAL SATURDAY MATINEE 3:00 p. m.
T
OF
Worst Thing at Last Happened
to the Cruiser
THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA
Where the Ill-Fated Vessel
Rests Again After Having
Just Been Removed From
the Rock-There is Hope
of Raising it
New I'.edford, Mass., Dec. 5. The
cruiser Yankee, which had been raised
after going on Spindle Rock, sunk at
the entrance of the harbor while being
towed to this port. The cause of the
accident, a culmination of a series of
misfortunes, which had befallen the
Yankee, was an unusually heavy sea
kicked up by a high northwest gale.
The Yankee, in -the tow of the tugs
John Harlan and Powhattan and con
voyed by the naval colder, Lebanon,
was proceeding slowly from Spindle
Rock to this port.
In the gale and heavy seas the haw
sers parted for the tenth time and the
tug John Harlan was trying to con
nect another tow line when she was
lifted on a wave and slammed against
the side of the cruiser. The impact
smashed in a port compartment where
three air compressors were at work.
The water which poured through the
open port disabled the air pump, after
which the compartment filled rapidly.
The cruiser did not sink at once.
Captain J. T. McAllister who was in
charge of the marine engines of the
wrecking work, in view of the danger
warned the members of the wricking
crew to leave the ship. All but six of
the ninety-two men left the Yankee
itnd. Khe was then, straightened as well
as the wreckers could do it and an at
tempt was made to drag her to Penlk's
Island and beach her. This plan seem
ed likely to succeed, when not far from
the island, the cruiser reeled suddenly
and sank in forty-two feet of water.
Commander Marsh, of the Yankee,
Captain McAllister. Engineer Wether
spoon and six men of the wrecking
crew who were on board ran up the
rigging and later jumped safely on
I board the Powhattan. The Yankee
went down in a sheltered position and
'took bottom on an even keel, resting on
the sand. Her forward deck, spars and
the top of her funnels are above the
surface of the water.
The officers plan to return to the
' f Mill t"H H"M"M' V M-H-H-H
Say, Tom
What iln von want for Xmas?
j X Well. I would like to have my X
i Bike repaired. That proposition T
jT of Lane's looks good to me. Ij
; ree winuow 01
I Phoenix Cycle Company t
133 N. Center. Phone Main 84.
ll,..i..t..H..H..M-I"H"H"'l"l"H'H"H"ll
YANKEE
wreck later with a diver, as they be
lieve the cruiser can be refloated. The
tug John Harlan suffered somehat from
her impact against the Yankee.
SPECIAL S. P. RATE
Assures the Holding of a Live Stock
Convention at Los Angeles.
Los Angeles, Cal., Dec. 5. The
chamber of commerce is in receipt
of information that the Southern Pa
cific will make a one and one-third
rate for a live stock convention to
be held in Los Angeles on January
26-28, inclusive, from El Paso and
all points west. This opens up all the
cattle raising country and insures a
good attendance.
This action on the part of the rail
road has assured the holding of a
convention, The live stock associa
tion will open offices for business in
the chamber of commerce on Decem
ber 10.
AN OFFICIAL STATEMENT
OF PRESIDENTS TRIP
He Will Start For Africa Two Weeks
After His Retirement.
Washington, Dec. 5. President
Roosevelt, in a statement prepared by
Secretary Walcott. of the Smithsonian
Institution made his first official an
nouncement today regarding his hunt
ing trip to Africa on which he will
start within two weeks after he retires
from the presidency. The expedition
is to be outfitted by the Smithsonian
Institution, the president defraying his
own expenses, and he will gather na
tural history materials for the new
natural museum.
Alombassa, will be reached in April
of next year, but no detailed itinerary
beyond that place has been made ex
cept the, general route to Victoria Ny
ansea and thence down the Nile to
Khurtoum. where it is expected the
party will arrive about about April.
1910.
Resides the president and his son,
Kermit, the personnel of the party, on
leaving New York will consist of three
representatives of the Smithsonian In
stitution: Major Edgard M. M earns,
of the medical corps of the U. S. A.,
retired; Edmund Heller anil J. Alden
Loring. On arriving in Africa the
party will be enlarged by the addition
of R. G. Cunningham, now in Africa
preparing the president's outfit. He
will have charge of a number of na
tive porters, who. with the necessary
animals will be formed into a small
caravan. Mr. Roosevelt and his son
will kill the big game, the skins and
skeletons of which will be prepared
and shipped to the United States by
the other members of the party.
Real Estate
BARGAINS
New 5-room brick bungalow,
with screen room, bath, and all
other modern conveniences. Lo
cated on corner lot. in 101)0
block, on N. Center street.
New 4 -room modern cottage,
with bath and 5 acres of land
in alfalfa, not far from car line.
Price S2350 lalf cash, bal
ance monthly.
Beautiful country home, mod
ern 6-room house, with 6i
acres land; wind mill, carriage
house and all other modern con
veniences; on car line. Price
S7500 nalf cash, , balance
monthly.
Nice 5-acre tract in alfalfa,
not far from car line. 1500
Beautiful lS'i-acre ranch in
alfalfa, with good 4-rooiu house,
with screen room; good well.
5 chicken houses with wire runs,
lots of fruit and shade trees.
An ideal home place. Price
S450O half cash, balance to
suit.
Beautiful 40-acre tract, all in
alfalfa, modern 6-room house,
wind mill, etc. Right on the
car line and fronts on 3 streets.
Not a finer tract in the valley
for subdivision.
For particulars regarding any
of the above, see
Harry C. Thomas
End of Indian car line
Phone County 19.
GILA MONSTERS j
Will pay $1.00 each, for good size, live Gila Monsters '
R. L. BALKE,
U. & INDIAN TRADER
i Proprietor of the Curio
THE RIOTOUS
SIST
Difference Between Suffra
gists and Suffragettes
A IB OF THE LATTER
Nearly Broke Up a Suffrage
Meeting In London Ad
dressed by Chancellor of
Exchequer Who Was Try
ing to Make a Promise.
London. Dec. 5. The Gulf between
the suffragists and suffragettes, thi;
latter being the term generally used to
describe the militant women agitators
who believe in street riots and attacks
on cabinet ministers as the quickest
means attaining the ballot for their sex
was further widened this afternoon
through a fierce demonstration by the
suffragettes at Albert Hall against
David Llody-George, chancellor of the
exchequer.
The chancellor was addressing a suf
frage meeting under the auspices of
the women's liberal association. He
had hardly got beyond annftuncing that
he was present to make known the
government's Intention regarding the
problem of woman suffrage when a
great uproar broke out. Strident voices
from all parts of the hall shrieked "We
want deeds, not words."
There were fierce tussles every few
minutes in different parts of the hall
and every time Llloyd-George made an
attempt to speak his voice drowned by
mingled groans and cheers. Finally the
chancellor sat down and the organist
tried to soothe the sisterhood by play
ing "What can the matter bee" but the
pandemonium continued.
The- uproar as at Its height when a
dozen suffragettes who had been re
leased recently from prison divested
themselves of their outer wraps and
appeared in their Jail garments. The
I exhibition acted on the sisterhood like
ja red rag on a bull. Megaphones and
l bells were brought into use and the
I noise became deafening.
The stewards lost their tempers and
'as they continued the work of throwing
out the demonstrants, the clothing of
many women was torn off their backs.
At the end of a half hour of oppo
sition they became worn out and Llloyd
George was able to continue his speech.
: o
CANDIDATE SMITH.
Carson City, Nov.. Dec. 5. Charles
Moyer. president of the Western Fed
eration of Miners, is spending several
days in this city in the interest of
Preston Smith, the man convicted of
1 the murder of John Silva, a restaur
ant keeper at Goldfield during the
labor troubles there.
Moyer will be joined in the city by
James Rurns, also a prominent West
ern ' Federation official, and the two
will do considerable work while in
this city in behalf of the convicted
WtHMMMIMMMMM
i A Home Fori
YOU!!
40 acres of deep, mealy loam,
S miles from Mesa. Just right
for gardening or sugar beets.
27 acres In alfalfa; j 6-room t
frame house; good shade, $?.600
buys it If deal Is. closed by De
cember 10th. $2000 down.
ii Dwight B. Heard j
Cor. Adams and Center Sts.
Plumbers for Par
ticular People
D. H. BURTIS
-f
Store on Adams Street

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