OCR Interpretation


Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, August 11, 1911, Image 2

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020558/1911-08-11/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for PAGE TWO

' PAGE TWO - I
THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN, FRIDAY MORNING, AUGUST 11, 1911. " 7
f
THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN
Published Every Day in the Tear By
THE
ARIZONA PUBLISHING COMPANY.
S. VT. HIGL.EY,
President.
SIMS ELY,
Secretary-Treasurer and General
Manager.
Exclusive Morning Associated Press
TlisnntnViPH
Publication office: Corner 'Second
and Adams Sts.
Entered at the Postoffice at Phoe
nix, Arizona, as mail matter of the
second class.
Address all communications to The
Republican, Phoenix, Arizona.
TELEPHONES:
Consolidated Main 47
Overland, Business Office 422
Overland, City Editor 432
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:'
Bv mall, daily, one year $9.00
Tiv onrrlor. dailv. ner month 75
Sundays only, one year 2.50
PHOENIX, ARIZONA, AUG. 11, 1911.
The Same Roosevelt.
Te are not hearing so much now
as we were a fortnight ago concern
ing the "hole" into which Theodore
Roosevelt was to be "put" by the
congressional investigating of his
dealings with the steel trust. The
country was invited to expect revela
tions which would place the former
president in a discreditable light as
soon as the probe was inserted into
the question of the illegal absorp
tion of the Tennessee Coal & Iron
Co. Mr. Roosevelt did not wait for
a subpoena from the committee. He
jauntily appeared before the Investl
' gators, shook hands all around, asked
permission to testify, and plunged
into a statement of the reasons why
his administration decided to Inter
pose no objection to the proposed pur
chase of the southern steel concern
by the steel trust. His reasons were,
briefly: (1) That it was doubtful, at
best, whether the deal could be con
strued to be a violation of the anti
trust law; (2) that the panic of 1907
had already reached such proportions
that a country-wide crash was prob
able if the administration did not do
its utmost to support the great banks
which were trying to avert the crash;
(S) that Mr. Roosevelt 'was led to be
lieve and he believes yet, that if the
Tennessee Coal & Iron Co. had not
beenjlaken over promptly there would
have been stupendous failures in New
York.
And the history of that time, as
chronicled in the news of the day,
bears out Mr. Roosevelt's conclusions.
The newspapers of November 7, 1907,
printed the following dispatch from
New York:
"The anxiety over the trust com
pany situation has subsided. The pur
chase by the United States Steel Cor
poration of the Tennessee Coal and
Iron Company was confirmed by the
directors this afternoon, thus remov
ing a large amount of securities hav
ing a. comparatively narrow market,
from the collateral held by trust com
panies for loans. Bankers believe the
situation is now under control and
Nthat steady improvement will con
, tinue."
From a recital of the facts, Mr.
Roosevelt passed to a discussion of
his policies generally as a man of
practical sense while he was In the
White House, and to Illustrate his at
titude in the matter of the panic, he
made this illuminating statement:
"In my judgment I would have been
derelict in my duties, I would have
shown myself a timid and unworthy
public officer if In that extraordinary
crisis I had not acted as I did act.
In every such crisis the temptation
to indecision, to nonaction, is great,
for excuses can always be found for
non-action and action means risk and
the certainty of blame to the man
who acts. But if the man is worth
his salt he will do his duty, he will
give the people the benefit of the
doubt, and act in any way which
their interests demand and which is
not affirmatively prohibited by law,
unheeding the likelihood that he him
self, when the crisis Is over and the
danger passed, will be assailed for
what he has done.
"If I were on a sail boat, I should
not ordinarily meddle with any of the
gear; but if a sudden squall struck
us, and the main sheet jammed so that
the boat threatened to capsize, I
would unhesitatingly cut the main
sheet, even though I were sure that
the owner, no matter how grateful to
me at the moment for having saved
his life;? would a few weeks later,
when he had forgotten his danger and
his fear, decide, to sue me for the
value of the cut rope."
Mr. Roosevelt reveals himself here,
as always, impatient if technicalities
interfere with the performance of a
necessary action. But the really In
tertalnlng feature of the whole inci
dent of the investigation is the ex
ample thus furnished of the former
president's style of fighting. He
knew that his enemies in both parties
were hoping that he would evade and
deny and minimize. Instead, he car
ried the war into Africa, as he al
ways does. From him it was: "Take
that, and that! Biff! Swat! Have you
had enough?' Good day!" And thus
once more we have a good flash
light on the reasons why the Amerl
(can people are fond of Theodore
Rooseyelt. They like a fighter, .and
, Jhis style of fighting suits them. Com-
he did as president in the panic of
1907. At that time everybody felt
grateful to him and approved what
ho had done. But public gratitude
Is of short life, and it would not
have been difficult at this late day
to make a large proportion of the
public believe that what he did was
reprehensible If the investigating
committee had found him timid and
apologetic. As 'it is, if anybody was
"put into a hole" it was not the ex
president. Tough on the King.
King George V must feel otherwise
than flattered by the speeches made
during, the last week in the house of
lords on the government's veto bill.
To use an Arizona expression, the
liberal government has the lords "over
a barrel" through having secured from
the king a promise to "raise" a suf
ficient number of liberals to the peer
age to overcome the conservative
majority in the house of lords the
program being to create some five
hundred new peers. Should it be
come necessary to carry out this pro
gram, the whole fabric of British
aristocracy would receive a jolt little
short of fatal. The prestige which
goes with being a lord would disap
pear to a large extent, if lords were
to become as numerous as green gro
cers.
The grieved and shocked lords, in
their speeches on the subject, have
deplored the success of Premier As
quith in working a bunco game on
the young king. Granting that It is
the constitutional duty of the mon
arch to do whatsoever the cabinet
requests, the lords intimate that a
more experienced king would have
been able to hold his own In the Im
perial council and would have dis
suaded the "government" from pressing
him to taking a ridiculous step.
The "young" king is forty-five years
old, or thereabouts. The gradual en
croachments of democracy have left
practically nothing for the sovereign
to do except to look wise, be digni
fied, and personally represent the
glory and majesty of the British em
pire. All this King George fully
knows, but he has no Inclination to be
proclaimed a ninny. And no doubt It
is especially exasperating to him to
have the lords charge their ill luck
to his incompetence.
BIG DEAL IN GLOBE
MINING DISTRICT
Seventeen Claims Change for a Con
sideration of $150,000.
One of the largest mining sales
made in the Globe mining district for
some time was consummated last
Monday when Joseph C. Erman, for
mer manager of the Live Oak Min
ing company who opened up that
property and was also manager of the
Keystone company, bought the 17
claims which are known as the Cole
and Goodwin group. Mr. Erman said
that he had bought the claims lor
clients of his but that at this time
he could not divulge their Identity.
These claims were bought from I . J.
Cole and the price paid was 5150,000.
oonie development work has Been
done on these claims which Includes
a 400 foot shaft and a 450 foot cross
cut tunnel.
The contract calls for the com
mencement of work In 15 days when
the new owners will begin sinking
shafts.
INDIANS DECIMATED
BY DREADED SMALLPOX
Distinguished Men Will Defer Visit to
Moqui Village.
Fred. Volz, an Ildlan trader at Can
yon Diablo, while on a visit to Pres-
cott last Tuesday, spread the start
ling report that smallpox Is declm
inatlng the Navajo Indians In his dis
trict, and that the dread disease has
spread to the Moqui villages. In
almost every case the disease has been
fatal to the Navajos, said Mr. Volz,
and scores of Moqui have already suc
cumbed, although the disease made
it's appearance In the villages less
than a week ago.
As a result of the visits of former
President Roosevelt and Postmaster
General Hitchcock, two princes of
the royal blood of Germany. . and
many other notables to the annual
ceremonies of the Moquis to be held
next week have been cancelled and It
is believed that the festivities will be
cancelled by the tribe tills year.
Attorney and Mrs. E. S. Clark and
two sons, who left Prescott Tuesday
for the Grand Canyon and to attend
the Moqui dances will return from the
canyon and Reese M. Ling, who also
Intended to be present at the cere
monies will also cancel his visit.
Fred Volz is the oldest Indian trader
in Arizona. He has seen these tribes
deciminated by disease in past years
and says that the epidemic of this
year is the worst in the memory of the
oldest Indians.
Fourteen years ago two hundred
and eighty-six Moquis succumed to
smallpox, reducing the tribe to less
than six hundred members. It Is
feared that the tribe will be almost
annihilated this year if medical aid is
not promptly furnished by the gov
ernment. The Indians have no cure
for the disease and are loath to submit
to treatment of physicians.
WEATHER RECORD.
Record of temperature, rainfall and
state of weather as made by the U. S.
weather bureau, at C a. m., mountain
time, yesterday:
Stations Temp. Rainfall Weather
Abilene 74 1 ... Clear
Atlantic City ..'...7G .. Clear
Boise 52 ,t. Clear
Boston 7S ... Clear
Buffalo 74 ... Clear
Calgary 38 ... Clear
Chicago 72 T Rain
Corpus Chrlst!t"..74 ... Clear
Denver 70 ... PtCIdy
Des Moines 72 ... Cloudy
Dodge City 72 ... Clear
Durango ....72 .12 Cloudy
Eastport 64 .... Cloudy
Flagstaff "...50 ... PtChly
Galveston S2 Clear
Havre 50 .14 Cloudy
Jacksonville SO Clear
Kansas City S2 .. Clear
Knoxvllle 74 ... Clear
Louisville 74 PtCIdy
Memphis S2 ... Clear
Montgomery 76 .24 Clear
Montreal 72 ... Clear
Moorhead 56 .20 Cloudy
New Orleans 80 .14 Clear
New York City ...74 .01 Clear
Oklahoma 76 ... Clear
PHOENIX 72 .12 Cloudy
Portland, Ore. ....56 ... Cloudy
Raleigh 74 .34 Clear
Roseburg 50 ... Clear
Roswell 60 ... Clear
St Louis 74 ... PtCIdy
Salt Lake City ...68 ... Clear
San Diego ...60 ... Clear
San Francisco ...50 Clear
Sheridan 56 .02 Cloudy
Spokane 50 ... Clear
Tampa 76 .10 Clear
Washington 76 ..." Clear
WInnemucca 54 ... Clear
Yuma 72 ... Clear
(ball fans gallery
of notables
DUMMY HOY
A Proof of the "Silence-is-GoIden"
Theory.
Our old pal, W. E. Hoy, of the
Washington and other big League
teams though why Washington
should be included is honestly beyond
our limited Hoy, then, was one man
who never sassed an umpire, never
indulged In verbal taunts at members
of rival teams and never- hurled
bitter remarks at the bleacherites of
a foreign field. In a plain way of
speaking Hoy was a deaf mute, and
answered (In the sign language) to
the name of Dummy.
Hoy came out of the West in re
sponse to the beckon of rare old Ted
Sullivan He had been filling in his
time around FInlay, Ohio, where he
figured as considerable outfielder,
being given to the admirable prac
tice of putting the gray-hound to the
blush when It came to running the
length or breadth of the sward, and
carrying a concealed weapon up his
right sleeve in the shape of an arm
which was capable of shoot'ng the
pill from deep center to the plate
without a relay. These attributes
caught the critical eye of Mr. Sul
livan and he opened negotiations
looking to Hoy's1 association with the
fearful and wonderful Senators.
The dumb gentleman made the
sign of the dollar mark on his, nlm
blo fingers, followed by several fig
ures which caused Sullivan to Indulge
in violent, but eminently safe re
marks. However, In the end, the
manager acceded and decided to ship
Hoy to the D. of C. And there Hoy
justified the price he had put upon
his head and his hands, for never
had the townfolk seen such slam
ming. Mr. Hoy became a prime fa
vorite, which Is the best kind of
favorite to become, and his hitting
his base and field running and his
long throws from the far away sta
tion made him as famous as John
Chamberlins, Old Boy Shoomaker
and the Washington monument
He was by all odds the sturdiest
thrower In the neighborhood, and
passionately fond of perfecting him
self In his work. Late at night away
along towards nine o'clock, or a
quarter past when all the villagers
wero a-slumber. Dummy was won't
to gather at the Peace monument at
the foot of the Capital Building, and
heave a regulation League ball to
the Treasury Department, the entire
length .of Pennsylvania Avenue. And
he never hit a soul! Mr. Hoy turn
ed his talent to the best pecunlnry
profit and on his retirement to private
life took with him enough bank
bills of high denomnatlon to paper a
meeting-house.
Tomorrow Curt Welch, the man
with the educated ear.
THE STREAM OF LIFE.
O, stream descending to the sea,
Thy mossy banks between.
The flow'rets blow, the grasses grow,
The leafy trees are green.
In garden plots the children play,
The fields the laborers till.
And houses stand on either hand,
And thou descendest still.
O, life descending into death,
Our waking eyes behold;
Parent and friend thy lapse attend,
Companions young and old.
Strong purposes our mind possess,
Our hearts' affections fill;
We toil and earn; we seek and learn.
And thou descendest stdll.
O, end to which our currents tend,
Inevitable sea.
To which flow, what do wo know.
What shall we gues3 of thee.
A roar we hear upon thy shore,
As we our course fulfill;
Scarce we divine a sun will since
And be above us still
Arthur Hugh' Clough.
THINK OVER
The matter of opening an account with this bank.
We will always try to deal fairly with you.
The Valley Bank of Phoenix
"THE BANk OF SERVICE"
We pay interest at 4 per cent per annum on sav
ings accounts..
c l. eiXm - pure:
FIELD SEEDS
For Summer
Planting
ill's Seed House
Next time you want a good
plain cake we would suggest that
you try our
Butter-Scotch
Cake
You will like it Two eizee: 2E
and 40 cents each.
HOME BAKING CO.
M. J. PETTID, Mgr.
BIGGEST BEST BUSIEST
B
ENNETT
Lumber Co.
We carry everything In the
building line. A complete stock
of fencing material. Our prices
are right, and we make a spe
cialty of aulck and careful de
liveries. WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
Corner Second Avenue and
Jackson Street.
? ?:::Tr;;-:-?
H-M"I' 'M' ! v i 'I' .T-VH-W-H-H-Hi
X T7nt.V.II,)in 1581 J
PHOENIX BAKERY i
EDWARD EISELE, Proprietor.
Wholesale Retail
The Genuine jl
I BUTTERNUT BREAD ?
(In Wrappers Only.) f
7 Wetl Washington St., Phoenix
PHONES:
Overland 234 Con. Main 89
Mosquito
LoliOll and
Prickly Heat
Remedy
We guarantee both
preparations.
A.L. BOEHMER
BUSY DRUa STORE
N.E. Cor. Central Ave.
& Washington St.
H
X
JL
Style, Fit and
High Art in
Workmanship
ARIZONA SCHOOL OF II
MUSIC
MRS, SHIRLEY CHRISTY :
j Director
Overland
TELEPHONE CO.
The Phone of Service
3?
GET GOOD WORK
Arizona
Laundry
WHITE WAGONS
CHIROPODIST
Painless removal of
Corns, 50 cents each.
Bunions, Moles and
Warts removed by
electricity. Ingrow
ing Toenails & spe
cialty. Open from 8 a. m. to 6 p. m.
Between First and Center streets, on
Adams. Phone, Bed 8072.
FRANK SHIRLEY.
We are agents for the
Regal Car
STANDARD AUTO
COMPANY
The Merchants' Cafe
22 S. CENTER ST.
Opposite National Bank of Arizona
building. Open day and night Short
orders and regular meals. Good cook
and best service. Everything new and
first-class. The best the market af
fords always. Chinese noodles. Home
made bakery. Private room for ladles.
Gin Tuck Foo & Co.
Phoenix Arcade
Coolest Place of Amusement in the
City
ICE COLD DRINKS AND
CONES 5c
Opon from 8 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.
Next to Postoffice.
ETERNAL
by the Gas and Electric Company la the prlca of
Satisfactory Service to its patrons.
Whenever anything goes -wrong, this company
wants to know it at once In order that the
trouble may be adjusted.
To that end the company welcomes complaints.
And we get them sometimes a good many, though
their ratio to the total number of customers is
small. A careful analysis of all complaints re
ceived shows that about 99 per cent, of them are
due to the wearing out of some appliance or fixture
long in use, or to the lack of knowledge or careless
ness of the complainant.
Yet, whethor trlavial or serious, every complaint
receives the same prompt, courteous and careful
attention. That is a very Important part of our
Service.
The dominant idea back of this Service is a
greater Phoenix.
Pacific Gas & Electric Company
TELEPHONES Consolidated, Private Ex. 4.
Overland 371.
THE BEST
YET
Business Men's Lunch
35c
liunz Bros, and Messenger
Machinery
Two Blocks South of Court House
Stewart & Templin
Have moved to ADAMS AND SECOND STREETS. Bicycle repairing
Vehicle Tires put on Full Line of Bicycle Sundries and Tires.
Overland 363.
Redewill
"The Firm That Made Arizona Musical"
Phcenlx Cycle Company
3 Doors South of Postoffice
Motorcycles, Bicycles, Sundries and
Repairing
Phones Main 84, Overland 2734
WHITE & WESIEY
Make your Watches
keep time.
INDIAN BASKETS
AND
CURIOS
irizoia Saddlery Ci.
45 N. Center St, Phoenix, Arix.
VIGILANCE
CADILLAC AND STUDEBAKEH
AUTOMOBILE8.
Garage, Supplies and Repairing:
ARIZONA M0T0B COMPANY
36 & 38 E. Adams St.
Both Phones.
AT THE
FORD HOTEL
I
Consolidated, Main 363.
J
Music Co.
For Honest Work
Come and See Us
PHOENIX SHEET METAL
WORKS
Corner Washington and
Third Avenue
;mon sense, to be sure, upholds -what
i "

xml | txt