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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, October 13, 1911, Image 2

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THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN, FRIDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 13, 1911.
THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN
Publlsed Every Day in Uio Year By
THE
"ARIZONA PUBLISHING COMPANY.
S. "W. IHGLEY,
President.
' SIMS ELY.
5 Secretary-Treasurer and General
Manager.
,
C. R. GREEN.
Business Manacer.
Exclusive Morning Associated Press
Dispatches.
Publication office: Corner Second
and Adams Sts.
Entered at the Postoffice at Phoe
nix, Arizona, as mail matter of the
second class.
Address all communications to The
Republican. Phoenix. Arizona.
TELEPHONES:
Consolidated Main 47
Overland. Business Office 422
Overland. City Editor 432
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
By mail, dally, one year $9.00
By carrier, daily, per month 75
Sundays only, one year 2.50
PHOENIX. ARIZONA. OCT. 13, 1911.
The Contract for Electric Power.
While the letter to Mayor Christy
from 'Supervising Engineer Hiil of the
reclamation service finally disposes
of the question so far as the recla
mation service is concerned as to
whether the government can sell
electric jwwer to the city of Plioenix.
the contract between the government
autd the Pacific Gas & Electric com
pany has not yet Jieen passed upon
by the courts; and until there lias
been a Judicial interpretation of the
contract it must lie an open question
as lo whether the city is legally ex
cluded from buying iower directly
from the government.
From every standpoint it is desir
able that there shall be a judicial
determination of the scope and status
of the contract.
The reason why the reclamation
service entered Into a contract with
the local lighting company on the
terms it dkl is perhaps not generally
understood, often as the matter has
len diecti.ed in the papers there
has been more or less effort to con
fuse the public mind as to the facts.
The reclamation service, acting for
the Salt River Valley AVatcr Users'
association, decided to buy all the
irrigating canals in the valley for
the nuritose of merging them with
the Roosevelt reservoir project, so
that when the wlwle project should
be completed and paid for the v.ater
users would own the reservoir and
diversion dams, own the reservoir and
j tower plants, and own the canals.
"When negotiations were taken up for
the purchase of the canals on the
worth side of the river it was found
that the canal company could not
convey a satisfactory title, for the
reason that the company had some
years previously contracted to deliver
to tlti lighting company in perpet
uity a certain quantity of water for
the generation of power. It was
clearly necessary for the reclama
tion service to reach an amicable
agreement with the lighting com
pany, which bad all the advantages of
position. So far as the farmers were
concerned, the reclamation service
made in their behalf a very desir
able contract with the lighting com
iwtny. The contract provided for the
lighting company to step out of the
way and relinquish its righJs to
jMwer under the old arrangement, and
instead required the government to
deliver a certain quantity of power
from tls Roosevelt dam to the light
ing company. The price fixed for
this iMwer was unusually high ap
proximately ninety dollars per horse
IHwer jver year. This contract is
now yielding, for the benefit of the
ranchers, some sixty thousand dol
lars a year; so that, as we have
stated, it was a good contract for the
farmers. They will never be able, it
is presumed, to contract for addi
tional power at such a high price.
But while the contract thus entered
Into letwcen the government and the
lighting company was advantageous
for the farmers the only people who
liad a right to be consulted it was
not a good contract for the people of
Phoenix, who had hoped that the in
stallation of the power plants con
nected with the reservoir project
would bring into the market a large
amount of cheap power. To this ex
tent, therefore, the interests of the
people of Phoenix and the interests
of the ranchers were antagonistic
obviously it was to the interest of
the ranchers, who must ultimately
pay for the project, that the ie ve
nues from power should be as large
as jHwsible.
Th contract was further disad
vantageous for the ieoplc of Phoe
nix we mean the consumers of elec
tric power at retail in that it re
quired the government to refrain
from selling power to any person or
comiwny, other than the lighting com
jwny, for the purposes of retail to
others, during a period of ten years.
That period still has some six :.t-ars
to run. The government did, how
ever reserve the right to sell power
in secified quantities to persons and
companies for their own use in their
business, and reserved the right to
furnish iower for manufacturing
plants, municipal water systems, and
so forth.
The question ariges as to whether
the city of Phoenix is barred, under
this contract, from buying power for
its own use namely the light
ing of the streets. It probably
is lwrred from buying power for
the purpose of retailing it to house
holders for lighting or other purposes,
but it seems to be an cxtrome con
struction that the municipal corpora
tion may not buy power for its own
use.
It is the duty of the city govern
ment, it appears to us, to obtain a
judicial interpretation of the contract.
And in any event the need of a new
city charter, one which will give the
city the power to regulate the charges
of all public utility corporations do
ing business within the city, has be
come apparent.
The Playgrounds.
The action of the Young Men's
Christian Association in backing
the proposition for the establishment
of a playgrounds system in Phoenix
is one of the most commendable steps
that organization could possibly have
taken. And if wisdom le used in the
promotion of this desirable innova
tion there is little question but it will
receive the hearty support of every
public spirited citizen of Phoenix.
The utility and benefit of the play
ground is no longer the subject of
question. It has long ago passed the
experimental stage and in numberless
cities throughout the country play
grounds are now as firmly established
in the civic life as are the public
schools or any other fundamental in
stitution. The playgrounds make for lxHh
the health and the morals of the
children. They mean clean habits
and clean lives; they mean the sub
stitution of clean and healthy sport
for unclean and unhealthy sport:
and they mean the elimination of
vicious companionship.
The exact method of establishing
the playground system here has not
been decided as yet; but it is likely
that matter will be taken up soon. As
The Republican understands it the
beginning will be of a modest na
ture and will not necessitate the ex
penditure of any considerable amount
of money. The experience of many
small towns and cities in the east
where playgrounds have been in suc
cessful operation for some years is
that no large amount of money is
needed. And here with the many
vacant lots that could be rented for
a merely nominal sum and with the
numerous civic bodies that would be
glad to further so luudable a matter,
the success of the playgrounds move
ment should be assured from the be
ginning. It is quite certain, therefore, that
the the plan of the Y. M. C. A. can
be carried through without difficulty.
It is a movement in which everybody
will be glad to help and in which
everybody will take a lasting interest.
THE SHEPHERD BOY.
Like some vision olden
Of far other time.
When the age wn golden.
In the young world's prime
Is by soft pipe ringing,
O. lonely shepherd boy;
What song are thou singing.
In thy youth and joy?
Or art thou complaining
Of thy lowly lot.
And thine own disdaining.
Does ask what thou hast not?
Of the future dreaming,
Weary of the past.
For the present scheming.
All but what thou hast.
No. thou art delighting
In thy summer home.
Whore the flowers inviting
Tempt the bee to roam:
Where the cowslip bending
With its golden bells.
Of each glad hour's ending
With a sweet chime tells.
All wild creatures love him
AVhen he tis alone.
Every bird above him
Sings its softest tone.
Thankful to high Heaven,
Humble in thy joy.
Much to thee is given.
Lowly shepherd boy.
Lotltia E. Landon.
Current Comment
WINFIELD S. SCHLEY.
Winfield Scott Schley, who died
yesterday in this city, had an excep
tionally active and diversified career
as an officer of the United States
navy. Had the battle of Santiago
de Cuba never been fought and the
controversy following it never arisen
Rear Admiral Schley would still have
been a figure of importance in naval
records. He served efficiently in the
Civil war, took part in the attack
on the Coram forts on the Yalu
river in 1S71, had charge of the suc
cessful Greely relief expedition to
Cape Sabine, Greenland, receiving a
gold medal from congress for that
rescue; was in command of the
cruiser Baltimore in the harbor of
Valparaiso when American sailors
were stoned by a mob in that city
and hostilities with Chili were with
difficulty averted, and had filled
conspicuous administrative iosts in
the navy department with credit. Had
his retirement occurred before the
outbreak of the Spanish war he would
have been remembered as a naval of
ficer who had won distinction and
made the most of several rather un
usual opportunities.
The naval campaign of 1S9S made
Admiral Schley's name familiar the
world over, but that access of fume
also had its drawbacks. The bitter
ness of the dispute into which he was
drawn and the charges and counter
charges made by partisans on loth
sides form a highly regrettable
chapter in oin naval history. We do
not wish lo revive the controversy
as to Admiral Schley's activities off
Santiago. Yet it must be evident
that as the happenings there drop
Kick into a. better persKctive and
the intense' prejudice and personal
bitterness of those -days cease to dis
turb the judgment, public opinion is
inclined to accept the view that he
suffered not altogether justly from
the obvious.. hostility of most of his
brother officers. The shortcomings
at Santiago which a naval inquiry
fixed 'upon him were negative rather
than jKtsitive, and under ordinary
circumstances would have been more
or less negligible. Yet so great was
the factional feeling of tliat day that
instead of recognizing that there was
honor enough to go around the ex
treme partisans on loth sides simply
drove congress and the country int i
an attitude of unwillingness to give
anylMvdy sufficient credit for the
destruction of Admiral Cervera's
fleet.
It was a unique victory in that
spokesmen for the victors by their
acrimonious proceedings put the na
tion out of humor to remeinlter their
triumph cither with rewards or with
unmixed gratitude. It is prolwible
that a more discreet attitude all
around would have enabled lxith
Rear Admiral Sampson and Rear Ad
miral Schley to close their service as
vice-admirals. New York Tribune.
o
GOING OVER THE LIMIT.
"Old Bill? Just gone 'omo. rolin
drunk."
"Well, there's some excuse mind
yer. E lost his wife on Monday."
"I know that, but 'e ought ter be
able to celebrate wlvout gettin" right
down blind." London opinion.
o
CASE HAS REACHED
ARGUMENT STAGE
SACRAMENTO. Oct. 12. The train
bearing the president and arty. Gov
ernor Johnson, a number of state of
ficials, and a delegation of officials of
the Panama-Pacific exposition, is
scheduled to arrive at 11 o'clock to
morrow morning. The pilot train, ic
charge of General Superintendent Dav
is, will precede the presidential spe
cial by ten minutes. The pilot engine
was run out of the roundhouse today,
given a jiew glossy coat of paint and
liberally decorated with flags and bunt
ing. Just below the headlight is a
large sized .piuture of the president.
The party will panicle through the
streets here with military escort. Af
ter delivering his address the presi
dent will proceed toSim Francisco anil
officially complete the first half of his
swing around the circle.
JOHNSON AT RED BLUFF.
RED BLUFF. Cal., Oct. 12. Gover
nor Johnson and party arrived tonight
fer the (purpose of welcoming President
Taft into California tomorrow. Three
automobiles mot the train and Geiv
ernor Johnson, together with a dozen
members of his party was taken to a
hotel. Later the governor and a few
friends visited a motion picture show.
The party will meet Taft soon after
his arrival at 0:20 tomorrow morn
ing. Their private car will be at
tached to the president's special. The
first stop of the train will be made at
Marysville. where the president will
deliver a short address.
o
CASE HAS REACHED.
MILWAUKEE. Oct. 12. Argument
as to whether largeness of candidates
expenses for nomination to congros.s
was to 1)0 taken as an indication that
money was spent wrongfully, occu
pieel the greater portion of today's in
vestigation by the federal senate com
mittee of charges that Senator Isaac
Stophonson's election was secured by
bribery. After it has been testified
thnt $107,793 had been spent, but that
Stephenson might well have spent
$220,000 at the primaries, Charles E.
Littlefield. counsel for the accused sen
ator, raised the question whether the
amount was to be considered evidence
of guilt on the part of a senator
charged witli bribery.
"Congress says senators' expenses
shall not exceed $10,000; but there is
no logic in the world to show just be
cause he spent more than that that
the money was tised corruptly, he said.
Senator He-yburn snid he would in
quire into tlie facts of expenditures re
gardless of what they aggregated.
COURT LANDS
v
National Electric is Dissolv
ed and Court Holds Man
ufacturer Has No Control
Over Retail and Jobbing
Prices.
WASHINGTON. D. C. Oct. 12. By
a sweeping decree entered in the
United States circuit court at Toledo
today, the backbone of the so-called
electrical trust was broken and in the
judgment of Attorney General Wick
ersham, the government is equipped
with precedents of genuine value in
its prosecution of commercial com
binations forbidden by the .Sherman
anti -trust law. Meeting the govern
ment's charges that the trust con
trolled the electric lamp business of
the country, regii'ating by agreement
the priees tinder which all lamps are
sold, the decree severs all relation
ship between the General Electric
comiHiny and the National Electric
eomiwuiy. The latter concern and srll
its subsidiaries are ordered dissolved.
The imirtant principle is laid down,
according to the attorney general,
that once a lamp is sold by a man
ufacturer the price at which it is to
be resold by the jobber and retailer
must be open to free competition.
The decree is acquiesced in by the
Independent comKinies. After the
supreme court's decision in the Stan
dard Oil and Tobacco cases. Wicker
sham said, the electrical companies
vounteered to withdraw their original
answers and submit to the decree.
The matter was considered by the
department of justice and attorneys
for the defendants throughout the
summer. The decree. which was
filed today, being adopted as satis
factory to the government. Speaking
of the investigation out of which the
suit grew, the attorney general ssiid:
"It disclosed even other parent
pools nf a simil.ir nature- But since
the i ii 1 1 1 n 1 1 - ii of this suit all tlu-se
pools h.ie bun .Iuntarilv dissolved.
ij
ACCUSED MAN MAKES
BRIBERY CHARGE
Dr. Hyde, Accused of Murder, Says
Deputy Marshal, Declared He
Could Fix Jury.
KANSAS CITY, Oct. 12. "There's a
fellow em that jury that can bo
bought. Leave it to me, I'll fix it."
The. foregoing worels, according te
an affielavit filed today b.v Dr. 15
Clark Hyde were spoken by Harry
Hoffman, deputy county marshal who
sought a bribe freem the physician
May f.th. JS10. during Hyde's first
trial for the murder of Col. Thomas
W. Sweie. Affielavit was introduceel
in til' criminal court here during the
bearing em an application of Hyde's
attorneys for the appedntment ef
elisors to take- charge of the jury at
the- second trial. Dr. Hyde saiel the
attempt te get a bribe from him was
made while he was being taken freem
the- criminal cotirt reom tet his ce'll in
the jail. Hoffman declared the
charge-s untrue.
o
HE JUST WOULD SMOKE.
Willie, after iassiiig through a se
vere course, had mastereel the art ef
smoking, and had become hardy
oneiugh to get through a cigar witli
eut experiencing anything more than
a little seiueamishne-ss. But ins Un
cle George elidn't favor the young
man's .smoking so early in ids bright
young life', so he was prepared for
the request for a cigar which came
on a Sunday afternoon.
The uncle demurred, but finally
handed over a cigar. Willie happen
ed to be a fair story teller, and was
soon regiiiing his uncle with a wreck
which had eccurreel on a recent trip,
in winch a bank overhanging the
track In a ravine had given way with
a crash just after his train bad
passed.
"Wo heard something rumble," said
Willie, between puffs, "and tlie-n.
just as we jHissed, came a loud
noise "
Bing! Willie's half consumcel ci
gar emitted a cloud ef smoky flame
llko a horizontal Ve'suvian eruption.
Tlie story was unfinished, and it will
be several days befetre the young
man musters up courage enough to
sk his Uncle George fer a cigar.
New York Herald.
o
BY THE FIRE.
I heard an old man
They were talking, two old friends
of youth
Who met but seldom now.
By a quiet little fire at tlie close of day
I heard an old man say.
As tlie clouds fell on his brow,
"Sure I dread to ask for the old
friends.
For the word is always now
"Dead, these three' years dead, dead
this many a day!"
All have gone to their ends.
All have passed away.
White thin hairs to each brow,
And a chair in the corner each day.
And time to remember and pray.
And one by one to eur ends!
I heard an old man say.
"Don't speak of the old friends.
They have passed away
These long years since, this many a
day;
We are left lonely now
By the fire, to remember and ipray!"
Sliaemas O'Slieel, In Harper's Weekly.
BLOW
DEVELOPING
Strange to think that in the darkness
of this little, silent roe)in.
Where the lantern's steady crimson
gleams a red eye; in the gloom,
I can watch imprisoned sunbeams
weaving pictures in their loom.
Just one flash of Time's swift shuttle
so! that made them! There they
creep
Slowly out upon the plate here, as a
dream creeps out on sleep
When the awakening soul remembers
longlost thoughts from out the
deep.
There they come then, streets and
cities, fields and orcltards far
away
I can almost smell the blossoms, hear
the children at play
I alone thus vainly watching the re
birth of yesterday.
So sometimes, when I am weary, out
upon my mind's blank .plate
Creep slow pictures that were graved
there long ago by cureless Fate,
Hidden deep in Memory's elark-room
they like buried sunbeams wait
Strange old pictures, long forgotten,
left unrecked ef in my brain.
Till comes Memory with her lantern,
pours senile scent, some old re
frain. Like a liijuid spell upon them, and, be
hold, all's clear again!
Isabel W. Hutchinson in Cliambtr'o
Journal.
o
CANDIDATES, NOTICE.
Phoenix Trades Council urges use
of nomination blanks bearing union
label.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
For Corporation Commissioner.
I hearby announce myself as a can
didate for the' re-publican nomination
for Corioration Commissioner subject
to the primary. October 21.
W. S. STURGIS.
For Corporation Commissioner.
I hereby announce myself as a
candidate for the republican nomina
tion for Corjtoraitoii Commissioner
subject to the primary. Oct. 24.
F. M. POOL.
For County Superintendent.
I hereby announce myself as a can
didate for county superintendent of
schools, subject to the Republican
primary.
tf HOMER DAVIS.
For Superior Judge.
I hereby announce myself as n can
didate for the Republican nomination
for ludire of the Sunerior court of
Maricopa county, subject to the pri
mary, October 21, 1911.
P. II. HAYES.
For Clerk Superior Court.
I hereby announce my candidacy
for the Republican nomination for
Clerk of the Superior Court of Mari
copa County, subject to the primary,
October 24. 1911.
E. S. CURTIS.
For County Attorney.
I hereby announce my candidacy for
the Republican nomination for County
Attorney of Maricopa county, subject
to the primary October 24. 1911.
BARNETT E. MARKS.
For Superior Judge.
I hereby announce my candidacy for
tlie Republican nomination for Supe
rior Judge of Maricopa county subject
to the primary October 24, 1911.
J. C. PHILLIPS.
For Supervisor.
I hereby announce myself as a can
didate for Supervisor of Maricopa
county subject to the republican pri
mary. PHIL. C. ENSIGN.
For Supervisor.
I hereby announce myself as a
candidate for Supervisor of Maricopa
county subject tee tlie republican
primary Oct. 24. 1911.
ilk C. C GREEN.
"COR a delicious
dainty confec
tion that satisfies
buy a box of
Maillard's
Famous
Chocolates
Nothing to equal
this candy
A L. Boehmer
Busy Drug Store
N. E. Cor. Central Ave.
& Washington St.
You Must Stop
FOR A COOL ROOM AND
A QUIET NIGHT8 REST.
THE WILLIAMS HOUSE
MARICOPA. ARIZONA.
iummmmmimmiimmimiiminiiimiiimmiimmmimmmmmimmiimimijj
I "Save when you can so that you may spend
when you must"
Interest at 4 Per Cent
on Savings Accounts E
I THE VALLEY BANK 1
I OF PHOENIX
fiiiinniiiiiinniiiHiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiF
DON'T WAIT
Have your bicycle repaired now ready for school as tha
rush will soon be on. Our tires and sundries are of the
besL All work guaranteed.
STEWART & TEMPLIN
Cons. Main 363. Overland 363
Pacific Gas (X
Electric Co
130
Overland 371
K-M-
THE FORD HOTEL
THE LOGICAL PLACE
TO EAT
ONCE TRIED ALWAYS
Kunz Bros, and Messenger
fahinery
Two Blocks South of Court House
1!
WHITE & WESLEY
Make your Watches
keep time.
ii
White Star Laundry
HAND WORK, REASONABLE
CHARGE.
16 South Third Avenue.
Best Hand Work in the City.
Phone, Overland 780.
MOHN & DRISOOLL
FUNERAL
DIRECTORS
IS
REUTER-ELWELL
COMPANY
FANCY GROCERS
Fresh fruits and vegetables
received every morning. Your
phone orders will receivo
attention.
Main 3230 E. Wash. Ovid. 714
The Merchants' Cafe
22 S. CENTER ST.
Opposite National Bank of Arizona
building. Open day and night. Short
orders and regular meals. Good cook
and best service. Everything new and
first-class. The best the market af
fords always. Chinese noodles. Home
made bakery. Private room for ladles.
Gin Tuck Foo & Co.
W. WASHINGTON
STREET
Cons. Exchange 4
CADILLAC AND STUDEBAKER
AUTOMOBILES.
Garage, Supplies and Repairing:
ARIZONA MOTOB COMPANY
36 & 33 E. Adam St.
Both Phonss.
About Good
LAUNDRIES
The Saturday Evening Post told
you in the Aug. 5th Issue about
the service of good laundries,
their responsibility and their
equipment to do really good
work.
Just remember that there Is one
such laundry in Phoenix.
Arizona Laundry
WHITE WAGONS
J
BIGGEST BEST BUSIEST
BENNETT
Lumber Co.
"We carry everything In the
building line, A complete atock
of fencing material. Our prlcea
are right, and we make a spe
cialty of Quick and careful de
liveries. WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
Corner Second Avenue and
Jackson Street.
ForBargains
SEE
Collings Vehicle &
Harness Co.
East Adams Strsst
Frank Connelley's Place
Serves
HAIG & HAIG SCOTCH WHISKEY
Millionaire Cordial.
Arizona Gleaning Works
Satisfaction Guaranteed
Both phones. Mrs. L. Wilson

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