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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, November 02, 1911, Image 1

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FOR SALE New 4-room bricfc
modern, $2250, near school and cat
line, $250 cash, balance $25.00
motnh. B. E. Fascoe, owner, 111
North Center street.
FOR SALE Nearly new 5 -room
modern cottage on North First street,
$3150 $500 cash, balance easy terms.
E. E. Pascoe. 110 North Center St
THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN
TWENTY-SECOND YEAR
12 PAGES
PHOENIX, ARIZONA, THURSDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 2, 1911.
12 PAGES
VOL. XXII. NO. 166.
GREAT FLEET REVIEW
KEEP WATCH
HOW D'YE DO
ORATORY WERE IN
. ' I
WAS PERFECT SUCCESS
AT THE MEETING
Naval Ceremony Went Along Without
a Single Hitch and Strictly Ac
cording to Schedule.
WIT AND
EVIDENCE
FOR 6IRDMAN
AND 60 -
K
Third Avenue Theatre Was
Crowded Last Night to
Hear the Exposition of
Republican Party's Principles.
ALL ISSUES WERE
ABLY DISCUSSED
Wells, Sturges, Cameron,
Williams and Smith
Spoke on Issues of Cam
paign in Logical and Con
vincing Way.
The largest, the most enthusiastic,
and by all odds, the -best political
meeting that has assembled in Phoe
nix this year was the republican
gathering at the Third Avenue the
aler last night, which was addressed
by Judge Wells. Colonel Sturges,
Ralph Cameron. Hoval A. Smith, and
John S. Williams.
It was one of those meetings
where there was no necessity to man
ufacture enthusiasm. The crowd
seemed to have plenty of it and the
telling points made by the speakers
were received with spontaneous ap
plause. And there was a splendid
thing about this the speaking there
was such a variety that the particular
taste of every one must have been
met.
For instance, there was the care
ful. Instructive, and well considered
address of Judge Wells; the brief and
witty speech of Colonel Sturges, that
was replete with catchy epigrams and
toUd sense; the enthusiastic, hammer-and-tongs
style of Ralph Cameron,
the convincing argument of Hoval
Smith, and the composite of wit and
oratory, delivered by Jack Williams,
that brought laughter and applause
at the end of eveij' other sentence.
The meeting r wasT presided over by
P. II. Hayes, chairman of the central
committee, who introduced the speak
ers in turn. On the platform were
a number of distinguished republi
cans, candidates and others.
The speech of Judge Wells was a
dignified, scholarly, and unassuming
presentation of his claims upon the
people of Arizona as the republican
candidate for governor. There were
many important things discussed by
the judge, which won the approval
of his audience. But probably the
most important was that part of his
speech which dealt with his course
In the constitutional convention.
"I opposed the insertion of the re
call and the initiative and referendum
sections in that instrument." said
Judge Wells, "because I knew they
were opposed by President Taft and
because I knew they, therefore, en
dangered statehood. The facts have
shown that we who took that position
were right. The president did reject
the statehood bill, with the judiciary
recall In it; and the reason why he
did not irclude the Initiative and the
referendum in his veto message was
because these matters are Involved in
the Oregon case and will soon be
passed upon by the supreme court.
But I will say this the constitution
has been adopted and it is my con
situation just as it is yours and just
as it is the constitution of every
good citizen. And I will say further
that if I am elected to the office of
governor otie of my first official acts
will be to recommend to the legisla
ture the re-submisslon of the judicial
recall to the people of the new state."
"It has been charged that I was
opposed to statehood. That is both
untrue and absurd, and I will tell
you why. Do you know that by the
enabling act the state of Arizona is
granted 4.000,000 acres of land, worth
at least $12,000,000? That the pro
ceeds from that land are to be ap
plied to the endowment of various In
stitutions, and that $2,000,000 of it
will go to the payment of the bonds
and accrued interest charged against
several of the counties? As a prop
erty owner and a taxpayer do you
suppose for a moment that I "would
oppose statehood when it meant so
much to me and so much to every
other property owner in Arizona?"
It is impossible here to give even
an outline of all of Judge Wells
speech. But among other things it
may be mentioned that he vpoke in
favor of the establishment of an Im
migration and publicity bureau, to
which he proposes to give his atten
tion, and which shall work for the
upbuilding of the new state. The re
marks of the judge were given close
attention and he was frequently ap
plauded. Ralph Cameron went at his sub
ject from shoulder to shoulder. That
subject dealt with his record in con
gress and with his plans for the fu
ture with reference to the enactment
of laws for the good of the people
of the new state. He said he was
not In the habit of making promises
that could not be fulfilled and he
said that if the people of this state
elect the republican ticket he is con
fident that within five years there
will be evidence of such growth in
(Continued on Page 2)
THEY ARE ALL 0. K.,
DECLARES SECRETARY
Meyer Thinks Uncle Sam's Fighting
Ships Are in Condition to Meet
All Requirements.
NEW YORK, Nov. 1. Informa
demonstrated its preparedness for any
emergency and has shown the effect
iveness of the present organization."
George Von L. Meyer, secretary of the
navy, made this statement today on
board the president's yacht after an
inspection of the 99 fighting ships of
the Atlantic fleet, assembled in the
Hudson river for the greatest mobili
zation in the history of the American
navy. President Taft will review the
fleet tomorrow as it passes out to sea.
Standing erect in a speedy launch, silk
hatted, his frock coat flapping in a
twenty mile wind, the secretary sped
from ship to ship during the inspec
tion. Each flagship saluted with nine
teen guns as he passed. Members of
the house committee on naval affairs,
who followed the secretary on his
visits to each flagship, were honored
with a salute of seventeen guns. Be
sides the secretary, congressmen, for
eign sea fighters, prominent officials of
New York and others witnessed the
inspection. About two hundred thou
sand people witnessed the scene from
the shore.
o
ITS FIRST DEGREE.
Second Jury in Celebrated Harry
Thome Case Has Found the De
fendant Guilty.
SALT LAKE CITY. Nov. 1. The
second trial of Harry Thome, charged
with murder in connection with the
killing of George W. Fassell, a gro
ceryman, resulted in a second ver
dict of cuiltv here tonight. The
Salt Lake statutes provide for death
by hanging or shooting for first degree
murder. Fassell was killed by one
bandit of a pair, who robbed his store
In March. 1910. They were discovered
rifling the cash drawer by the owner.
Thomns Rilev. Thome s accomplice, ai
so was sentenced to death. An appeal
was taken to the supreme court, wnicn
granted a retrial in Thome s case
Thome will be sentenced November 10
o
CAUSED AN AVALANCHE.
Awful Explosion of Powder Magazine
Changes the Topography of an
Entire Mountain.
SAN BERNARDINO. Nov. 1. Bring
ing his brother. Harold Holbrook, who
was injured under an avalanche of
earth, William L. Holbrook, a miner
employed at the New Jersey mine on
top of Copper mountain, arrived here
tod.iv. tellinr of an explosion or dyna
mite that changed the whole topogra-
nhv of the mountain. It occurred our
Ing an electrical storm when lightning
tmirhpri off the nowder magazine, 10
cated in an abandoned tunnel of the
mine. The shock caused thousands or
tons of earth to shift, opened a ns-,,-
in tho crround and tumbled the
superintendent's office and cabin into
it. Harold was almost uuneu. uui ao
rescued alive.
o
PULITZER FUNERAL.
Obsequies Held at St. Thomas Church,
Which Was Filled With Friends
and Relations.
XEW YORK. Nov. 1. The Episco
pal church performed the last rites
this afternoon over the body or jo
sflih Pulitzer, the newspaper pub
lisher. Interment was in Woodlawn
cemetery. The choir of St. Thomas
Jmrfh sane music of which Mr. l'ulit
zer, in his life time, was fond. The
mourners included so many relatives,
personal friends and employes of the
former publisher that there was little
room in the church for the public.
Tho lmnorarv nail bearers were Nlcn
olas Mucray Butler. Lewis L. Clarke,
Colonel George B. Harvey. Frederick
vt .Tiirlsnn. General John B. Henderson,
Seth Low, St. Clair McKelway, George
L. Rives, Dr. James W. Mciane, J.
Agnes Shaw.
o-
THEY'RE IN THE TOILS.
Prominent Democratic Politicians of
New York Charged With oom
mission of Serious Offense.
viTTtr -vrTfK 'nv. 1. An informa
tlon charging criminal conspiracy
against four persons, amuns
democratic leaders in two
, , i.nm,,riie nf New York, and one
.inmnn.-otin r.mrildate lor me ui"-""-
court bench, was filed late today by
t nictrlrt Attorney William A.
Aatoiuiib " -
DeFord of New York county. Con-
t ic .lifirtrAii in connecuun
the nomination of William Willet as
democratic candidate for supreme cum..
justice.
o
CRUSHED TO DEATH.
EUREKA. Utah. Nov. 1. Caught
bv a cave-in which occurred today
ni 4h CUM Consolidated mine. Wal
ter Ferguson and William Allen were
crushed to death. Jonn .ioiin
tained serious injury.
LOS ANGELES. Nov. 1. In perfect
fighting trim the Pacific fleet under
went, off this port, the first naval
review ever held In southern Cali
fornia waters, when 26 vessels, with
out exception, passed a close scrutiny
this afternoon by Rear Admiral
Thomas, the reviewing officer. The
review was so satisfactory that even
tho lawmakers who are active in try
ing to secure additional men-of-war
in the Pacific, can not kick except
possibly on numbers. The review was
:eld outside the breakwater, where
the vessels cast anchor this morning
after steaming slowly up last night
from San Diego. Admiral Thomas,
temporarily passing his flag
from the flagship California
to the gunboat Vicksburg, re
ceived civilians on board during the
forenoon. In the afternoon he drew
all the vessels of his command in an
octangular position. With the Iro
quois as tender, the Vicksburg steam
ed slowly down the column of vessels.
each, of which fired the admiral's
salute of thirteen guns as he passed.
After the review Thomas escorted
his guests to the battleship Oregon,
from the deck of which they wit
ressed a diving exhibition by the sub
marines, Pike and Grampus.
o
THERE MAY RE A
TRIAL SOME TIME
If McNamara Lives Long Enough He
May Finally be Tried on
Murder Charge.
LOS ANGELES, Nov. 1. With thir
teen months today elapsed since 21
persons lost their lives in the explo
sion and fire which destroyed the Los
Angeles Times, hardly a beginning of
the jury has been secured tonight in
the trial of James B. McNamara. ac
cused of the murder of Charles J.
Haggerty, a machinist, one of the vic
tims. Counsel for the state estimated
In two months more a jury may be
secured. Today's efforts did nothing
In the direction of securing u juror
for the case. In tliebeginnlng of the
day the state withdrew its opposition
to the challenge of one talesman and
the examination of another, who it is
certain can never reach the jury and
to two others, released before court
closed. There are still nine talesmen
in the box. and the last two days no
accessions to their number has been
made. Of these nine, perhaps two
may be on the final jury.
o
FOUND BIG BUNCH OF
COUNTERFEIT BILLS
Notes Hidden in Jackson Park, Chi
cago, Hhave Been Recovered
by the Police Officers.
CHICAGO, Nov. 1. A package con
taining 143 counterfeit ten-dollar notes
was found burled beneath a tree In
Jackson Park today by Captain Thos.
L. Porter, of the federal secret ser
vice. The bills were recovered after
a confession by Albert Leon, who
was arrested two weeks ago in New
York and brought here. Leon said he
was at the head of a successful
counterfeit gang and is a Russian
political refugee. For months notes
of this kind have circulated in the
middle and far west. They were
made, according to officers. In a log
cabin in Nootka. an Island off the
coast of British Columbia. The notes
were made on many banks of this
country and foreign lands. Some of
them are on the El Centro National,
of El Centro, California, the First
National, of Yuma, the First National,
cf Orange. California, and the First
National, of Riverside, California.
o
HAS APPEARANCE OF
MORE REBATE TROUBLE
Several Prominent Railroads are Un
der Investigation by the Interstate
Commerce Commission.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 1. It became
known today that the Interstate Com
merce commission has been conductlnj
an extended investigation into dls
criminations and sjecial privileges
which aro said to have been made prin
cipally In favor of the United States
Steel corporation, and some of It's sub
sldiarles by railroads which transport
iron ore from points on the great lakes.
Officials of a dozen railroads are here
for a conference with Commissioner
Lane, who is conducting the inquiry
The government's investigators allege
that certain practices and customs in
handling iron ore at the docks have the
appearance of discrimination in favor
of large shippers. Officials declare If
any violations occurred they were
technical and unintentional. The Penn
sylvania, Bessemer and Lake Erie, New
York, Chicago and St. Louis; and the
Lake Shore and Michigan Southern
are the principal roads affected.
Aviator Rodgers is at Mari
copa and is Scheduled to
Arrive in Phoenix Per
haps Before the Noon
Hour Today.
WILL LAND AT
TAYLOR STREET
Daring Aeroplanist Reached
Tucson Yesterday About
Noon and After Brief
Stop Continued Toward
This City.
MARICOPA, Ariz., Nov. 1. (Special.)
Rodgers arrived here from Tucson at
five o'clock this evening on his trans
continental trip. He made a successful
and safe landing. He leaves at S A.
M. for Phoenix.
MARICOPA. Nov. 1. Aviator C. P.
Rodgers, flying west on his transcon
tinental flight, arrived in Maricopa at
five this afternoon, having made the
flight from Willcox today, a distsance
of about ISO miles. He left Willcox at
11:03 this morning and reached Tuc
son at one P. M., after exchanging
greetings with Aviator Robert G. Fowl
er who Is eastbound on the same kind
of voyage. He left for Phoenix at 2:45
P. M. but came down here on account
of darkness. He will resume his flight
to Phoenix tomorrow. He hopes to
reach Yuma tomorrow night.
TUSCON. Nov. 1. C. P. Rogers, the
westward bound transcontinental avi
this afternoon at Tucson at one o'clock
thl afternoon. He was sighted at 12:50
high above. the city. After making
several circles over the University of
Arizona campus, he found he could not
affect a landing and alighted in an
open field adjacent. He left Willcox at
ll:0ilhis morning and made the trip
of S7 miles to Tucson in 115 minutes,
He proceeds westward tomorrow
morning, the first stop being at Phoe
nix. Fowler, who arrived Monday was
still here fixing his machine. He says
he will start east tomorrow at the
same time Rodgers starts west. The
two aviators exchanged greetings this
afternoon. Rodgers stated today he
did not break the American record for
sustained flight yesterday as reported,
as ht stopped in both Doming and
Lordsburg for gasoline.
Rodgers should arrive In this city not
later than 11 o'clock Phoenix time. H
iplans to make a landing at the circus
grounds between Fifth and Seventh
streets north of Tavlor.
o
THEY'RE QUITE SERIOUS.
Women are not Sure What is Wrong
Wsth Currency But Want a
Change.
SAN FRANCISCO. Nov. 1. Califor
nia's newly enfranchised feminine vot
ers are taking their duties of citizen
ship seriously, not overlooking even the
proposed reorganization of the coun -
try's financial system tinder the Ald-
rlch plan. When the sub-committee
of the national monetary commission.
headed by Vice Chairman Edward B.
Vreeland, of the commission, began to
day it's sittings in ths city, two of the
state's prominent suffragists, Mrs.
Mary Demage, president and Miss
Helen Moore, organizer of the state
equal suffrage league, attended a por
tion of the session. Both agreed they
do not know much of the subject but
were sure there Is need for financial
reform, so they came to the meeting In
order to learn. Tho committee ques
tioned seven local business men on
their views of the Aldrich plan. Only
one of the seven offered any criticism.
o
GOT ANDY'S PICTURE.
NEW YORK, Nov. 1. United States
Marshal Henkel was In a cheerful
mood tonight after his round of sub
poena serving today upon prominent
financiers and men of affairs, named
as defendants in the government's
suit against the United States Steel
corporation. The marshal seemed par
ticularly pleased as he exhibited a
trophy in the shape of an autograph
ed photo bearing the words: "Com
pliments of Andrew Carnegie." Ho
said Mr. Carnegie gave It to him to
day when he called to serve a copy
of the dissolution petition filed against
the Steel trust. The marshal com
municated with J. Plerpont Morgan
and served Morgan In the latter's
library.
o
SUBPOENAES ARE SERVED.
NEW YORK. Nov. 1. Subpoenaes
In the government dissolution suit
against the United States Steel cor
poration have now been served on J.
P. Morgan, Charles Steele, Andrew
Carnegie, James Gayley. E. C. Con
verse. D. G. Reld, N. B. Ream. J. D.
Rockefeller, Sr. and Jr., J. J. Hill, E.
H. Gary of the United States Steel
corporation, the Federal steel com
pany, the Lake Superior Consolidated
Iron Mines, and the Union Steel com
pany.
Judge Ed W. Wells, of Yavapai County, republican candidate for gov
ernor and one of the speakers at the great meeting last night.
WAS AN ACCIDENT IS
VERDICT OF THE JURY
Jury Passes en the Cause of Death of
One of Country's Noted
Aeroplanists.
SAN JOSE. Nov. 1. Death caused
by Injuries received In an accident
while operating an aeroplane was the
verdict of the coroner's jury today in
tho inquest over Prof. J. J. Montgom
ery, of Santa Clara colleze, who was
kiiled while experimenting with a mo
torless aeroplane in the foothills near
here. Montgomery's death informed
the public for the first time that he
was working on a new type machine,
although ex-periments had' been sec
retly carried on in an obscure part of
the hills for some time. J. C. Vlerra.
Montgomery's assistant, testified that
Montgomery was able to rise, descend
and rise again at will on his glider.
He said fifty previous flights had all
been successful.
o
WAR IS DECLARED.
But It Is Against Mosquitos Which
Have Caused Yellow Fever
Epidemic.
HONOLULU. Nov. 1 It is likely
an extra session of the legislature
will be called to deal with the yellow
fever situation here. A meeting of
citizens was held today and a com
mittee named to cooperate with the
health board in a campaign for the
extermination of all mosquitoes. For
this purpose the entire Islands will
be districted. Forty non-commissioned
officers of the army and navy have
volunteered as commanders of the
various squads of workers. All stag
nant pools and swamps will be drain
ed. The fact that the disease is now
prevalent in the Polynesians, has
caused tho health board to Issue a
warping to the people to take all
precautions for if tho disease once
gets a start here a large death rate
may result.
o
HE GOT DRUNK
But Juror Slept Off His Jag and
Then Was Reprimanded by
the Court.
REDDING. Nov. 1. The trial of
Daniel Fleming, the railroad police
man accused of murdering George
Villicr. a Tacoma bov, whom he
caught stealing a ride, "was rudely
interrupted today when, on opening
court. Juror Herman RIckard gave
unmistakable signs of intoxication.
Tho court Immediately adjourned in
the midst of the opening statement
by the prosecution, to allow RIckard
to "sleep it off." Court reconvened
at noon, when RIckard seemed fully
recovered. RIckard was reprimanded.
THERE WAS NO PRESSURE.
CHICAGO. Nov. 1. Attorneys A
M. Fitzgerald and George B. GillespK
of Springfield, who acted as counsel
for former State Senator Holstlaw.
today told the committee of United
States senators, investigating the
Lorimer case, that llolstlaw's confes
sion of corruption was made, without
pressure, suggestion' or intimation.
Counsel for Lorimer failed in thier
efforts to show that either attorney
was actuated by other than proper
motives.
o
KING WINTER ARRIVES.
KANSAS CITY. Nov. 1. Real win
ter, bearing snow and freezing tem
perature, swept the Missouri valley
today. From zero at BIsmark. the
thermometer graded to 2S above in
northern Kansas and Missouri. Sioux
City reported zero, Huron six above.
Good snow fell throughout central
Kansas. Iowa, Nebraska and South Dakota.
MUSSELMAN SAYS HE
WILL TAKE TRIPOLI
Receipt of Warlike Message Revives
the Drooping Spirits of the War
Ridden Turks.
CONSTANTINOPLE, Nov. 1. The
chnmber of commerce today loudly
cheered the reading of. a telegram dat
ed at Tripoli from Suleiman EI Bar
uni, commanding the Arab volunteers.
The telegram is dated October 28, and
reads:
"Reached the coast, accompanied by
volunteers, October 26, and delivered
a formidable assault upon the enemy,
whom we drove out of their entrench
ments. Today am inarching on Trip
oli. Thanks to divine assistance I
shall enter the town."
ROME, Nov. 1. Rumors of a mas
sacre by the Italians has caused In
tense indignation throughout Italy. Is
suing a denial, Premier Giolittl said:
"If any reproach is admissable it is
because of the excess of humanitar
ianism. We have, perhaps, through
exaggerated scruples, spared the lives
and property of the enemy and in so
doing exposed ourselves to great risk.
The Italian troops faced treachery on
all sides when they landed. Anyone
saying the Italian troops are not hu
mane shows poor knowledge of the
Italian race."
o
ANOTHER CHINESE WAR.
SAN FRANCISCO. Nov. 1. A hint
of civil war among the local Chinese
was forthcoming today In the declar
ation of the Chinese empire that the
association which represents the con
stitutional party in the disrupted mon
archy that it proposed to hold a coun
ter celebration next Sunday to that of
the Young China association, which
plans to celebrate the recent rebel vic
tories in China. The constitutionalists
are of the opinion that the surrender
of the imperial government and its
promises to reform, backed by tne
return of Yuan Shi Kai to almost
complete power, realizes all they have
striven for.
o
REPORTS ARE DENIED.
ROME, Nov. 1. Dispatches received
here describe the difficulties attending
the use of an aeroplane in scouting
service at Tripoli. Flying obove the
fog. the enemy Is hidden from view,
while If the aviator seeks a lower level
he makes an excellent mark for sharp
shooters, of which the tribesmen are
quick to take advantage. Reports that
Italians have mercilessly massacred
unarmed Arabs, women and children,
wore officially denied today.
o
IN BLIZZARD'S GRIP.
SOUTH HAVEN. Mich., Nov. 1.
South Haven tonight Is in the grip, of
the worst early season blizzard in
years. No serious damage has yet
been reported.
o
POLO PLAYER DIES.
SANTA BARBARA, Nov. 1. John
Cross, a prominent polo player, while
playing yesterday with Dr. E. J. Boese
ke. a local physician, fell with his horse
and received injuriess from which he
died today.
Watches, Diamonds
Sold and exchanged. Highest cash
and precious stones.
N. FRIEDMAN
Overland
8493
M'fg. Jeweler and Watch Repairing. 33 W. Wash. St., Phoenix, Ariz.
President Arrives in Wash
ington, Stops a Couple of
Hours, and Then Boards
the Train Again for New
York.
WILL REVIEW THE
ATLANTIC FLEET
Afterwards Will Spend Few
Days in Maine, Then He
Will Take the Road for
a Journey to Southern
States.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 1. Presi
dent Taft got back to Washington to
night after an absence of more than
two months. His stay In the city wa3
brief, however, for just two hours after
he concluded his "voyage" of nearly
la.OOO miles by alighting at the Union
station, he was again aboard his special
train, bound for New York, wherse ear
ly tomorrow he will review the Atlan
tic fleet, assembled in New York har
bor.
Immediately after his arrival, accom
panied by Secretary Hilles asnd Major
Butts, he went to the White House, in
stead of remaining In his car as plan
ned. In the exedutive offices he was
welcomed by Secretary Knox and Sec
retary Stlmson with whom he con
ferred. The conference lasted until
fifteen minutes before train time. At
its conclusion both secretaries an
nounced there was nothincr to be riv
en out. It is understood, however, the
arbitration treaties and the Chinese
troubles were discussed.
It was just seventy-one days aco that
Taft started. He came to Washington
today from Morgantown, where he as
sisted in the inauguration of Thomas
Hodges, president of the University of
West Virginia. He made several
speeches during the day.
From New York the president goes
to Hot Springs. Maine for a four days
rest, after which he will again "take
the road" for a trip to Cincinnati anl
several cities in Kentucky and Tennes
see. The trip will finally end in Wash
ington November 12.
o
ATHLETE GETS DISCHARGE.
NEW YORK. Nov. 1. Melville W.
Shepard, the world's greatest distance
runner, was today dishonorably dis
charged from the 22nd regiment of
the state guards, for failure to at
tend drills and pay fines. Shepard
said work of the customs service kent
him from attending to military duty.
The discharge may prevent him from
competing in the Olympic champion
ships at Stockholm next year.
o
THAT'S SOME RIDING.
BURLING AME, Nov. 1. Tired but
victorious, Percy Selby, a clubman,
galloped into the Country club here to
night with five hundred miles hard
horseback work behind him, which he
covered in nine days. Selby rode to
San Luis Obispo and back on a wager
that he could accomplish it within ten
days. He wins the wager by more
than twenty-four hours. He said he
felt fine.
o
DEMURRER OVERRULED.
SAN FRANCISCO. Nov. 1. The
technical demurrer of Dr. John Grant
Lyman, the Los Angeles land (promo
ter, to the indictment charging con
spiracy to escape custody of the federal
authorities, was overruled today by
Judge DeHaven. Lyman will plead to
morrow. o
NO POST SEASON GAMES.
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 1. In an
Interview today Al T. Baum, newly
elected president of the Pacific coast
league, declared he would discounten
ance the post season games in the fu
ture on the grounds that they are an
imposition on the public and a bad
thing for baseball In generaL
o
HE SUCCEEDS BUTLER.
NEW YORK. Nov. 1. William
Shcimpf was appointed today chair
man of the American Automobile as
sociation to fill the vacancy caused
by the recent death of Samuel M7
Butler killed in an auto accident
during the Glidden tour.
DIMON WINS.
INDIANAPOLIS, Nov. 1. Jack Di
mon of Indianapolis earned a clean
cut decision over Eddy McGrorty of
Oshkosh tonight in ten rounds.
and Jewelry Bought
price paid for Old Gold, Silver
Overland
8493

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