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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, February 08, 1915, Image 2

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020558/1915-02-08/ed-1/seq-2/

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V
PAGE TWO
THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN, MONDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 8, 1915
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MOTORCYCLE LOOP K IS
IE SPORT
PLANNED; SOU
Press Agent is Sure Busy
(in Jess "Willavd; Base
liall and Bowling Sclied
ules Please Fans; Smiley
is Back
by SCOOP
What do you- think the Arizona
Booster's Association is planning
now? Give you a round dozen
guesses, and then beat you easy by
about Nix lengths.
It is a 92 mile loop race, with
Tempe and Phoenix on opposite ends
of a four lap course. The date has
been set for the enil of this month,
or thereabout, and tile JImi Ca.za
zafi, who is John Thooiokins and
Tommy Hold incorporated, will at
tnce begin raising a lot f money
mid the. speed limit.
There will be a lot of plans pre
pared later in the month such as
concern prize money, routs and
guarding the course.
Meitzler, A. E. Truberg
Breunigger, Ed. Thomas,
lfodge and Ben Spalding.
George
A. C
Henry Davis Ross, Jr., who used
to write football games for this paper
has Just informed ns that he is now
one of the. reportoriul staff of the
El Paso Times, and we remark that
i there is a large sporting event
scheduled for Juarez in March.
Joe Konoqui lias come back from
the cold and blizzerdy mining camp
with his mind made up to stick
around until baseball opens up here.
"It was so blame cold and wet and
discouraging up there that you
couldn't get a charlie-horse," and
thai is pretty cold and wet and dis
couraging. Smiley will be here until
Herb Hall and the rest of the base
ballists organize something, or until
Pep Cook writes that the eastern
job has got ripe for that good Salt
River Valley battery.
U. S. OFFICIAL
AGAINST OPEN
SEASON BILL
! CALLAGHAN IMPALED
ON FENCE BOARD
LOS ANGELES, Feb. 7. Jack
Callaghan, a race driver, was im
i paled on a fence board, when
his machine skidded through the
fence at the twelfth mile of a
100 mile sanctioned automobile
race. Two ribs were broken and
a large hole torn in his left chest
exposing his lung. He is reported
to have ah even chance for his
life.
Mechanician Victor Wells was
unhurt and steered the car to
safety. Eddie 'Donnell and Tom
Alley, Callaghan's teammates fin
ished first and second. Times:
1:41:15 2-5; 1:41:31.
-o-
MOTORCYCLISTS MUST
CUT DOWN SPEED
Who did Jess Willard ever lick?
We-e-1-1!
Apparently, Jess need never have
walloped anybody, to hear. Mon
sieur Press Agent tell it. Just come
off the farm, spit on his hands and
sail in and lick the spots off the
fellow who has been mowing 'em
down for these four oars past.
But, in support of,, his idea, the
sire han.lit . v. thi.t fW iv.ou r.f i more attention to the capturing of
nA:tuiio man 10 uiuiiiance
I violating motorcyclists, riders of the
Chief Brawner Issues Order That Or
dinance Violators Be Arrested
Probably because they believed the
motorcycle policemen were devoting
Wellington never licked anybody be
lore he cleaned Napoleon at Water
loo, and Geo. Dewey was an untried
fighter when he got the decision over
the Spaniards at Manila Bay, and
then he goes right down the line,
and talks scandalous about all those
famous old pugilists, James J. Cor
foett. Bob Fitzsimmons, Ad. Wolgast,
Jim Jeffries, and finally, this Johnson
fellow, his own self.
We reckon that this thing has gone
pretty far. and that somebody wants
somebody to bet a sum of money on
Alister Willard.
Did you read the baseball schedule
carefully yesterday? It is an annual
leature of The Republican, and is al
ways seized with gratitude by the
fans who want to know who's playing
what any day during the season.
in a short time, when the commit
tee gets through revising th
lional League schedule, we will pres
ent it to our bast-ball readers with
compliments and wishes for a high
ly pop-bottled season of 1915.
And also, the bowling schedule.
That was of interest to a lesser num
ber of fans., but- was another ex
simple of printing: the right thing at
the right time. Tonight, the Pacific
1.I41 b team will meet the Union Oil
team, and if there are any sparks
but that would be a bum joke, any
how. The Gas team consists of Frank
two-wheeled "go-devils" have become
quite flagrant in their ignoring of the
speed laws of this city. However, an
nouncement has been made by Chief
of Police Walter F. Brawner that mo
torcyclists will be brought into city
police court just as readily as are the
autojnobilists and an order has been
issued that the same attention be
given speeders on motorcyclists as is
given drivers of cars.
No less than six or seven motorcy
clists have been haled into court the
past two or three days. Policeman
Hunt had two or three on the carpet
on Friday and each was assessed a
fine of ten dollars. Policeman Gulley
had Peter Morales, J. M. Shink, W. S.
Eeyerles and Fred Buck before Ma
gistrate McBride on Saturday charged
with driving twenty-five miles or
more- an hour and each of these was
Nft -risRc.atsert fin rf tun rtnllura
! Yesterday Gulley made a "cavass"
of the situation and while he refrain
ed from making any arrests of motor
cyclists, he issued warnings to more
than forty who were dangerously near
the point where he would have been
compelled to make arrests. From this
time on it will be Quite the commoti
thing to see upon the police docket the
name of one or more speeding mo
torcyclist unless there is a sudden
cessation of the speeding practice.
Pat. Nelson is still shouting for
chance at Freddie Welch.
He Will Train A Bit For
Row With Jess Willard
Assistant Chief of Biologi
cal Survey Protests Ag
ainst Measure that AVould
Open Season on Antelope
and Mountain Sheep
That the proposed game law estab
lishing on open season on antelope and
mountain sheep, and lengthening the
deer season would result in the exterm
ination of these animals in a short
time, and should have the active oppo
sition of every citizen of the state, is
the statement of E. W. Nelson, assist
ant chief of the United States biological
survey, in a letter of protest to Gov.
Hunt. Nelson, who has spent much
time in Arizona, is familiar with game
conditions in this state. His letter fol
lows: United States Department of Agricul
ture, Bureau of Biological Survey.
Washington, D. C.
January 30, 1915.
Hon. George W. P. Hunt,
Governor of Arizona,
Phoenix, Arizona.
My dear Governor Hunt:
I am appalled to learn that there is
a proposal on foot to have an open sea
son for mountain sheep and antelope
and an extension of the season for deer
in Arizona. This effort must come from
people who have a commercial Inter
est in the present exploitation of the
game resources of the state, without
any regard for the future. I am great
ly disappointed that such an effort gets
any backing in Arizona, as I hoped
public sentiment had reached a point
there where the necessity for game pro
tection was more dully appreciated. To
have an open season, even a short one,
for mountain sheep and antelope would
mean the extermination of these ani
mals within a ery short period. The
antelope are decreasing steadily,- even
with the present closed season. I am
informed by people who have been on
th antelope ranges that, owing to their
protection, they have become very tame
and unsuspicious, and this of course
means that an open season would re
sult in their slaughter and almost in
their extermination before they would"
have opportunity to learn, their danger
and become sufficiently shy to in part
protect themselves.
I am writing yon because I know how
Interested you are in game protection
fuid feel sure that you will oppose any
such movement. I am aware how any
interference from the federal depart
ment is resented in some of the states.
but if there is any information or oth
er assistance that can be given you
from this office in helping protect the
rapidly decreasing game of Arizona, I
trust you will feel free to call upon us.
We are greatly interested in the mat
ter of game protection throughout the
country, for without the greatest care
all our game resources will become a
matter of the' past within a very few
years. V
Many of the states are appreciating
this and are having their game laws
revised at the present session of the
legislatures to coincide with the federal
migratory bird bill in the matter of
open seasons for shooting migratory
wild fowl. I hope Arizona may come
Into line in this regard. My interest in
Arizona game is not only due to my
official connection with federal game
preservoton, but is the active Interest
of a citizen of the state.
Sincerely yours,
E. W. NELSON,
Assistant Chief, Biological Survey.
Not Game Warden's Bill
The bill referred to in Nelson's let
ter Is not the one prepared by the state
same uepartment, and now in h
hands of the house committee on fish
and game, but is a measure recently
drawn up by some Tucson sportsmen.
warden illard's bill would shorten
the game season from sixty to fifteen
days, and reduces the hag limit from
two males in a season to one. It makes
the open season on migratory wild fowl
conform to the federal season, closes
the season on wild turkev entir-rt.
shortens the quail and white wing sea
sons ano reduces the bag limit on these
birds considerably.
CALENDAR OF SPORTING
EVENTS FOfl NEXT WEEK
Monday, February 8th.
Auto Annual Motor show at
City opens; closes 14th.
Kan
Auto
continues
BORDERLAND
ONLY ROUTE
THAT'S OPEN
Transcontinental Roads will
he Much Used This Year
on Account of Exposi
tions; Snows Still Heavy
in North
mmm www ---irimnnru-innnnri.aan
sag
mobile show at Louisvi
all week.
Horse Juarez, Mexico, racing all
week. New Orleans, I-a., Business
Men's Meet, all week. Havana, Cubi:
Cuban-American Jockey club meet, ai
week.
Tennis Handicap tournament opens
at Aiken, S. C.
Golf South Florida championship
tournament opens at Palm Beach.
Skating Naticnal roller skatim
meet, at .Charleston, W. V'a.
Boxing George Chaney vs Johnny
Dundee, 10 rounds. at Cincinnati.
Leo Roux vs Alvie Miller, 10 roends,
at Lorain, Ohio. Bat Levinsky vs
Kid Kennets, al New Orleans. Ad
Wolgast vs Cy Smith, 10 rounds, at
Columbus, Ohio. t
Tuesday, February 9th.
Boxing Freddie Welch vs Joe Shu-
ghrue, 10 rounda, at New York. Gil
bert Gallant vs Phil Bloom, 10 rounds
at Brooklyn. George Chip vs Buck
Crouse, 10 rounds at Pittsburg.
Wednesday, February 10tj
Boxing Phil Brock vs Patsy Drouil
lard, H rounds at Akron, Ohio.
Golf Annual St. Valentine tourna
ment for women, at Pinehurst, N. C.
Thursday, February 11th
Dog Kennel club of Philadelphia,
annual show opens.
Boxing Frankie Callahan vs Sain
Rohideau, 8 rounds at New- York.
Friday, February 12th.
Squash racquets Individual cham
pionships of the V. S, at Boston.
Wrestling Carnival of European
stars, at Boston.
Boxing Tommy Gary vs Joe Sher
man, 10 rounds at Kenosha, Wis.
Kid Williams vs Frank Conlev. 10
rounds at Kenosha, Wis.
Saturday, February 13th.
Boxing Arthur Simons vs Frankie
Burns, 10 rounds at1 New Orleana.
Sam I-angfor.i vs Sam McVea, 10
rounds at Havana, Cuba
(Special to The Republican)
SAN DIEGO, Cal., Feb. 7 Although
the great influx is not expected until
warmer weather opens up the roads
throughout the east and middle west,
hundreds of automobile parties already
have made the transcontinental trip
over the Southern National Highway to
the San Diego exposition: and before
the end of 191 S, it is believed that a
total of 25,000 automobiles will cross
the continent with visitors to the two
California expositions. One large party
of tourists already is being organized
by J. J. Cole, president of the Cole Mo
tor Car company, and several others
are being planned by automobile own
ers in all parts of the country.
Of the four recognized transcontinen
tal routes, only one, that through the
southwest is in satisfactory condition
during the winter months. The others,
the northern trail from Chicago
through St. Pt.ul to Seattle, the Over
land trail over the Lincoln National
Hignway from Chicago through Omaha.
Cheyenne and Ogden to San Francisco,
and the Midland trail from Chicago
through Denver and Salt Lake to Los
Angeles, are buried under heavy falls
of Snow. For this reason, almost all
the automobile parties so far have fol
lowed the southern route along the
border through Phoenix and into San
Diego. After visiting the San Diego
exposition, they will go northward
through Southern California to Los An
geles and then on to San Francisco to
attend the opening of the exposition in
that city on February 20.
When the other three trails open for
travel in the course of the next few
months, the great influx of automobile
parties will begin with streams of mo
tor cats making their way to the Pa
cific over all foilr highways.
Last year the three Pacific coast
Mates expended huge sums in putting
finishing touches to their elaborate
system of state highways: and as a re
sult, the roads are in first class condi
tion. States, counties, and towns along
the four main transcontinental high
ways also have worked faithfully to
get the various routes into the best
possible shape.
Panama-Pacific Exposition
San Francisco
via
SOUTHERN PACIFIC
Special Limited Round Trip s
Tickets on Sale
Feb. 18th, 19th and 20th
Return Limit March 1st, 1915
Also on Sale
Feb. 27th, 28th and
March 8th, 16th and 24th
Return Limit 15 days
$39.00
The great exposition opens Feb. 20th
and the best time to see it is before
the big summer crowds arrive. ,
ASK THE AGENT. Trains depart 6:20 p. m. and 8:50 a. m.
Phone
1615
SOUTHERN PACIFIC
PHOENIX, ARIZONA
.Phone
474
rival companies ai i
war over nogales!
GLENDALE
EPWORTH LEAGUE MEETS
The Methodist Epworth league met
Saturday evening and elected offi-
EXPERIENCES OF
ROXER III WAR ZONE
International Gas Co. Secures Tempo
rary Restraining Order Against
Competitor in Border City
Now that the Mexican trouble as for
jceis. .vuss taun Moel,
' -Miss Eleanor Roberts and
president ;
Miss Dor-
ris Otte, first and second vice presi
dents; Joe Grassie, and Lloyd Pitts,
third and fourth vice president:
Charles Clifford, secretary; Mrs. J. W.
Robinson. sunerintendenl of tho
the nonce subsided, Nogales has a real juriim. i.1I?11p Mi(,a R,h tf.,,.0'
war on its hands. For, with the disap
pearance of opposing factions of the
republic on the south rival corporations
are engaged in battle for the opportun
ity to make of the border city one great
white way. '
Formal complaint was filed with the
corporation commission last week by
the International Gas company, recent
ly organized for the purpose of fur
nishing light and power to the resi
dents of the line town and vicinity,
against t?ie Nogales Klectric Light, Ice
and Water company. The new com
pany alleges that since it was granted
a franchise, and received permission to
transact business in the state, its com
petitor has begun work on a new power
plant, und the construction of a new
system, which will seriously
organist,
after the
Refreshments were served
business meeting.
RETURNS FROM SAN DIEGO
Harry More returned Sunday morn
ing from : business trip to San Diego
where he took a shipment of three
carloads of hogs the past week.
IMPROVEMENTS AT HIGH SCHOOL
The trustees of the Glendale high
school have ordered the purchase of
an Agricultural library, also a soil
tester for the use of the students.
CZAR ANO KAISER
(Continued from Page One)
PHOENIX-TUCSON ROAD
REPORTED IN BULLETIN
State Engineering Department Issues
Statement of Interest to Motor
ists on Route to Old Pueblo
the discontinuance of requisitioning
food and levying penalties on regions
occupied. The American Red Cross
and the Rockefeller foundation say
relief in Poland is as essential as that
of . Pelgium.
This Is a recent likeness of John
Allhur Johnson, who meets Jess Wil
lard at the Juarez Bull Ring on March
6 for the heavyweight fighting cham
pionship of the world. Johnson, who
has not dared to enter the United
States, for fear of being arrested by the
federal authorities on that old bond
Jumping charge, will come to Juarez
via Vera Cruz.
It is understood that he will estab
lish a training camp below the line
somewheie possibly near the scene of
his coming encounter with Willard.
Johnson's physical condition is a
matter of mystery to all e'xeept his
trainers. The predominating Idea
seems to be that he will need a great
deal of that rope-skipping thing to
make him fit to stand a forty-five
round fight.
Road conditions between Phoenix
and Tucson, and directions to motor
ists are set forth in a bulletin issued
last evening by State Engineer Lamar
Cobb on advice from W. B. Twitchell,
assistant in field work, who has Just
arrived in the Pima county capital
after a trip overland.
"From Florence to Olesen's ranch,"
says the bulletin, "the road is very
bad. Olesen's to Oracle road, 30 miles,
fair. Oracle road to Tucson, bad.
Water in Canado de Oro, and Rillito.
Team at house west of Canado de Oro
crossing. Turn east for one mile at
Rillito crossing, get team at Langford
ranch. AH other washes dry. Sand
bad but can be pulled without assist
ance," The Phoenix-Florence state highway
is in fair condition, . and while there
are one or two washed places, these
fAKSOCIATEn PRESS DISPATCHl
LONDON, Feb. ".Private Harry
Jones, the well known Cardiff boxer,
lias returned home to recuperate from
wounds received in the battle on the
Meuse, where he underwent many ad
ventures as a member of the South
Wales Border regiment.
After passing unhurt through the re
treat from Mons, in which his battalion
was badly cut up, Jones's Jaw, broken
last spring in his ring contest with Dal
Roberts, was rebroken by the recoil of
his rifle. This laid him up for a few
weeks, although he lost no time getting
back to the front. One of the incidents
of the retreat was this. Jones was
holding an off'cer's horse, when a shell
carried away the animals hindquarters,
leaving the head and forelegs in his
possession.
"1 knew after that I wasn't to he
killed", said the boxer.
His most surprising adventure was
his escape from German captors.
While fighting on the Meuse, Jones
got lost and fell into the hands of five
Germans. It chanced that all the five
had lived in London and spoke English
well, and one had an English wife and
seven children in Kngland. Jones'
ability to make himself entertaining at
least procured him good treatment. The
captors kept a close watch on him until
late that night, but grew drowsy Just
as a thick fog came on, which enabled
Jones to make a dash after he had
wriggled away a few yards. Running
into the French lines, Jones there
chanced upon Tiger Smith, a famous
boxer in his day who defeated Gunner
Moir for the championship of England.
Hearing from the French that two
German spies had been seen in a wood
nearby, the two veterans of the prize
ring started out after them. They
bagged the two spies and brought them
to camp.
Jones was later wounded in the knee
by a rifle ball, and Invalided to Eng
land. He intends to return to the front
as soon as cured..
Fighting blood runs in Jones' veins,
for he met in the trenches along the
Meuse his two brothers for the first
time since the South African war. One
of the brothers is the champion middle
weight boxer of the British army and
navv. a much coveted honor in the box
ing world.
o
PRINTERS ANNUAL BALL At
the regular meeting of Phoenix TyO'
graphical Union yesterday a commit
tee was appointed to make arrange
ments for the union's fourth annual
hall which will he given, aR usual, on
Easter Monday, April S. The dances
given by the printers in past years
have been among the most enloyahle
of the season and it is the Intention
of the committee that the coming one
will even surpass the others. The
proceeds will be pkced In the fitter
May Use Neutral Flag
LONDON, Feb. T. The British for
eign office in a statement regarding
the flying of the American fig hw, the
Lusitania declares the use of neutral
flags within certain limitations is
well established practice. The gov
ernment says it has not objected to
the use of the British flag by foreign
merchant vessels as a ruse for evad
ing capture by a belligerent.
FATE OF BILL UNCERTAIN
Only Twenty-One Working Days Left
for Work of Congress
rASSOOI.VEn PRESS DISPATCHl
WASHINGTON. Feb. 7. The fate of
the government ship purchase bill
whith is obstructing the progress of
the senate is still uncertain with twenty-one
working days remaining in the
life of the sixty-third congress. The
president and administration leaders
must decide whether the fight for It
will continue until passed or congress
adjourns on March 4, because republi
cans and insurgent democrats soy they
are prepared to talk indefinitely.
The present situation centers nn the
pending motion of Senator Clarke, an
opponent to the bill, to recommit with
out instructions. Administration forces
expect to lose this fight forty-seven to
forty-eight. If this happens Monday
or Tuesday they plan a motion by Sen
ator Gore to discharge the commerce
committee from consideration of Gore's
amended ship bill similar to the origin
al. This motion being debatable will
operate to force the republicans to con
tinue the fight on it. The administra
tion is confident it can carry this mo
tion which will bring the bill to the
senate, but the republicans are on the
defensive.
BABY BOY
Mr. and Mrs. Guy T. McGill are re
joicing over the arrival of a ten
pound boy at their home four miles
west of Glendale. Mother and child
nterfereiare getting along nicely.
with th installation of the Interna-
tional company's lines. SUNDAY EXCURSION
The old enmpanv, comp-.-ilnant avers. Several auto parties took in the
is doing business without authority of .Sunday afternoon concert held at
law and without a certificate from the Camel I,ark Sunday afternoon.
eonmrat ion oommtKKion Tn nrlilitinn ti I
its old plant, which was run by steam j
the new company alleges, it is now jn-
stalling an oil burning generator, and '
erecting a hew; distributing system.
with thirty-foot poles, which, with i
those already lining the streets of the
LOCAL THESPIANS ENTERTAIN
The girl members of the "Who Is
It" cast, entertained the men mem
bers Saturday evening They attend
ed "The Barrier" at the Columbia
later enjoying a supper.
border metropolis constitute a serious
hindrance to the entrance of the new
company into the field. The Interna
tiona! Gas company, therefore, has pe
titioned the commission for a tempo"
rary restraining order and that defen
dant be required to answer or satisfy
complaint within three days. Com
plainant further states that certificate
of convenience and necessity was
granted it by the corporation commis
sion September 12. 1914, and that it is
now ready to proceed with the instal
lation of its plant and system. The
commission late Saturday granted the
restrainina order and eave the defen
dant company five days in which to ap- : Pressive sight
pear and show cause why it should not surrounded by-
be mai'e permanent.
o
J. W. JOHNSON HERE
J. W. Johnson is here for a
days coming to meet his wife
babv boy who recently arrived
from Washington to make their home
in Glendale.
few
and
here
Mrs.
Teager
son.
MRS. YEAGER ILL
Yeager, mother of Ben II.
is sick at the home of her
Cash prizes to offset the worlds
series coin have been hung up by
The Federals. The plums will go to St.
the leading cltrbs, to he split
the players. To
POPE MAKES PEACE PRAYER
I ASSOCIATED PRRSS DISPATCHl
R(MH, Feb. 7. There was an im-
when Pope Benedict
twenty-two cardinals
intoned bis peace prayer addressed
to the "God of all mercies, the King
of Peace." Bells in four hundred
churches here called the people to a
special service of sixty thousand at
Peter's. The pope intoned the
among J prayer which was repeated by the
kneeling multitudes.
SHIP WHICH MET THE HIDDEN DEATH
K. C. FEDS GOING EAST
ASSOCIATED PRK8S DISPATCHl
NEW YORK, Feb. 7. Patrick T.
Powers, former president of the East
ern league, now the International,
announced he has acquired the fran
chise of the Kansas City Federal club,
and would transfer it to either New
York or Newark.
DECLINES PEACE OVERTURES
f ASSOCIATED PRESS DISPATCHl
SAN ANTONIO, Feb. 7. Gen. Alva
ro Obregon declined the peace over
tures by the Mexican convention here
yesterday which asked the warring
leaders to consider a peace plan. Ob
regon, who holds Mexico City for Car
ranza, was the first to reply.
George Tuohey has another wrestling
carnival for Boston on Friday night
next.
According to the Wards, the Wal
ter Jolfnson case precipitated the
gency fund of thetunion and will be I Chicago proceedings, u was decided
can be pulled through without trouble, applied to caring for sick members, ta have a show-down.
( 1 iE 7: r
fecial '
-1 l
V , , ,. , 1 . . ' ",
This English steamer was struck by a German mine in the North sea,
and a hole approximately twelve feet square made in her bows. It was
through the resourcefulness of the captain in quickly beaching the vessel
that a total loss was prevented. The floating mines with which the Ger
mans filled the seas around the British Isles at the beginning of the war
have dune as much damage to merchantmen, fishing boats and warships as
a tooa-sizeu uerman neet couiu uo.
4
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