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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, March 05, 1915, Image 4

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TAUti FOUR
THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN, FRIDAY MORNING, MARCH 5, 1915
1 1 . " i
t - . . . ,. . .
Arizona Republican's Editorial Page firiiZIZJll
The Arizona Republican
Published by
AltlZONA I'lTRLISHING COMTANT.
Iwtght H. Heard
Clmrle A. Staulfer
Garth W. Cate
3. W. Spear
President and Manager
Business Manager
...Assistant Business Manager
Editor
The only Morning paper Published in Phoenix.
Kxclusive Morning Associated l'ress Dispatches.
Of five. Corner Second and Adams Streets.
Entered at the lostolfice at l'hoenix. Arizona, as Mall
Matter of the Second Class.
llobt. K. Ward. Representative, New York office.
Brunswick building. Chicago Office, Advertising ,
Building. . '
Address all communications to TUB AKIJJtlNA RE
PUBLICAN. Phoenix, Arizona.
Business Office
City Kdltor
TELEPHONES:
...422
...3
SI : INSCRIPTION KATES:
Pally, one montli, in advance
Dally, three months, in advance
Daily, six months, in advance
Daily, one year, in advance
Sundays only, by mad .,
. .75
. 2.00
. 4 00
, 8.00
. 2.60
Kill DAY All IhXIM.l, MARCH 5, 1!15
Soivice is one of the ways by
which a tiny insert like one of us
can u;et a purchase on the whole uni
verse. If he finds the job where he
can be of use, he is hitched to the star
of tlie world, and moves with it.
Richard ( Cabot.
Turn On the Light
The statement of Mayor Young at the close if
the Parish hearing, that he could have asked five
questions which would have cleared the murky at
mosphere in which the case was bathed, Ui-jcloses
a failure of duty on the part of a high official.
Why were not these- clarifying Interrogations' pro
pounded in the beginning? They would have saved
the time of the commission, the manager, the many
city officials, whose attendance upon the hearing
lay afler day was compelled. They would have
. cried great wear and tear upon learned counsel,
but at the same time they would have averted their
lees.
Perhaps the mayor spoke loosely when he said
that he could have asked five 'ir.estions which
would have opened the' door of information and
have Hooded the situation with light. A mere ques
tion is not clarifying. It is only a sin that a prob
lem exists. What the mayor doubtless meant w;i?
that answers to five itiestions, concealed in his
breast, would have cleared up the situation. Out
with the questions even at this late day, that jus
tice may be done and that the people may know
that it has been done. Let us blunder, along no
longer in the dark when the light is trying to break
through the thinks.
The mayor further staled that lie knew of a
mysterious movement which had long been in .prog
ress leading up to this denoument. We are all en
titled to know. Turn on the light, that we may
bask in its rays.
Speaking of questions, we could ask one which.
If responsively and truthfully answered, would af
ford as much light as the quintette of questions
which the mayor has so artfully concealed. Wc
would ask only, who is behind this expensive prose
cution of the city manager, who is so much inter
ested in the case that he Is putting up money for
expensive cmtnsel, what interest has the unknown
angel" in the displacement of the manager? Ah,
but here we have three questions instead of one,
und perhaps they are three of the mayor's five.
The answers to this triple question would do
more than throw light upon the present situation.
They would make less likely the recurrence of secret
plots against officials. The most hated and feared
institution of Venice under Ihe Doges was the
"Lion's .Mouth," into which any unknown assailant
f a citizen might deposit charges that would put
his property, bis liberty and his life in peril. Many
-a Venetian dragged his life away in a dungeon or
lost it more expeditiously in flames or on the scaf
fold, still wondering wi.om he had offended and why
peiad been sacrificed.
Let the "Lion's Mouth" of Phoenix be abolished
by the answers to '-he questions which we hope the
mayor may be prevailed upon to ask. Let us d-j-Ptroy
this institution or the middle ages which has
been set up in Phoenix ami which the commission
lias momentarily encouraged.
Worrying the Insects .
The department of agriculture in a recent bul
lctin'disclijses the fact that it has found a new and
deadly insecticide. The poison belongs to the fumi
' gant class. Apparently it has been named after a
town in Russian-Poland, as it is called "para-dich-ioroben.ene."
The .thief advantages of the new
substance may be briefly Hummed up as follows: It
isn't necessary to sprinkle it all over the house; it
. is sufficient "merely to expose a sufficient quantity
ill one or two open or partially open receptacles."
It is not. finder ordinary circumstances, harmful to
human beings. Its odor does not cling to fabrics.
It is comparatively cheap.
So much may be said in favor of para-diuhloro-benzene.
There is, unfortunately, another and sin
ister side of its character. This insidious substance
does not destroy insects by asphyxiation or swift
Internal disturbance. It works upon their nervous
systems. It produces a most violent form of neuras
thenia. In the cold, scientific language of the gov
ernment experts, a moth when exposed l the deadly
vapors "first displays great excitement and uneasi
ness, followed closely by spasmodic convulsions, am!
finally turns over on its back. When in this posi
tion violent nervous and reflex action is noticed until
life is extinct."
Now 'neurasthenia Is a terrible disease. A suf
ferer from it is likely to imagine that he has the
symptoms of almost every known ailment. Insects,
on account of their happy-go-lucky diSKsitior's, have
generally escaped the dreaded nervous prostration.
Is it not, then, an underhanded trick for a govern
ment chemist deliberately to invent a drug that is
going to produce in insects that very disease which
nature meant them to escape?
Perhaps no one will pleat! very eagerly for 'the
li'es of the beetles, weevils, aphides, etc., to be
spared. But it is one' thing to slay an Insect and
quite another to make It so worried and excited that
it topples over and dies in a nervous spasm. Is the
beetle to be deprived of the one advantage of his
lowly state, which is to live and die untroubled by
worry and excitement? If American insects present
a united and vigorous protest to the government no
reasonable person will be able to criticise their action.
Kvelyn Nesbit has at least a glimmering of sense.
She refused to appear at a theater where she had
neen billed as Mrs. Harry Thaw, until the "paper"
hail been reconstructed.
Philadelphia has maintained its reputation for
slowness. It took Dr. Sunday eleven weeks to save
the town, instead of the usual nine weeks of the
Sunday campaigns.
Texas people are reasonably liberal, but they
draw the line at wearing pistols to church and shoot
ing the chimneys from kerosene lamps. A, bill to
prohibit attending church armed is pending in the
legislature of the Lone St?.r state.
UTILIZATION OF SPANISH POTASH DEPOSITS
Consul General Hurst writes from Barcelona,
under date of October 61 h, that up to the present
potash has not been extracted in Spiin in commer
cial quantities. It has been proved, however, that
potash does exist near Barcelona, that it is fairly
amenable to refining, and that the deposits may
become a tiasis of a world trade, with Barcelona as
an export center. Examination and tests thus far
have indicated only enough po'ash for consumption
in Spain, but they have been so limited that it is
impossible to estimite the quantity and grade of
the deposits and the difficulties that may have to
be undertaken in mining for this sale.
It is presumed from the varied data gathered
that the potash beds are extensive and rich, and
likely to have an imimrlant bearing on agriculture
and certain highly important manufacturing .in
dustries, both in the peninsula and abroad. What
is now needed is a scientific and extensive survey
of the regions in that part of Spain where marked
traces of potassium salts have been found. For Io-
cal consumption it is now probably possible to put
certain quantities of potash on the market. As an
article for export in regular and unfailing ship
ments, present indications do not point to a de
finite or even early conclusion.
The tracts of C.italuna in yhiih beds of po
tassium sails exist are chiefly in the two provinces
of Barcelona and Iorida, particularly in lie; latter
near the towns of .Suria and t'anlona, on the Car
doncr riven At present, concessions do not go be
yond Kolsona on the north and the towns of Tar
retra, Servera and Manresa on the south, the entire
district being practically confined between the S-'cg-re"
ami Llobregat rivers. Jn this delimited region a
number of these claims for mining concessions has
been made on lands where there is no conclusive
proof that potash exists in commercial quantities
although it is possible that these lands eontain
potash and that the potash-producing area may ex
tend considerably beyond the confines mentioned.
Thus far the prospecting has been satisfactory at
and near Suria, but a thorough investigation must
be made at Cardona and Callus, nearly midway be
tween which Suria is situated.
NAUGHTY, NAUGHTY, LOS ANGELES
When the first furtive damn was uttered by
feminine lips it created a furore I think it must
have been a duchess. None less could have sin -vived
the innovation. A stage duchess, of course.
.Most of our really piquant fashions come via that
channel. It was so terrible; so very, very awful;
so piquant, so fascinating. It received almost in
stant recognition among the elect, those courageous
few who accept and propagate our modes. It was
about nine or ten years ago that I heard a very high
society dame, indeed who was a partner in un im
portant society journal in London, say, "Oh, dam
nation, who would think she would kick up such a
dust about a little paragraph like that?" and I
knew that damn was receiving it:, first series of
Introductory parties as a guest of hmor.
But now it's a passe friend of the family, a
shade the worse for wear. Its friends are not leav
ing it with indecent haste, to be sure, but there
are signs of other verbal explosives vying with it
for favor.
1 heard a society leader (and she is a society
leader, you ask the society editor:) declare emphat
ically that she had played a "perfectly hellish round
of golf, not a single damn thing went right." That
was last week. Which would indicate tha. "hellish '
takes at least a certain precedence over damn, when
it does not supplant it altogether. Hell has not
been fashionable ouitc so long as 'damn, so its vogue
will "possibly outlast damn for a year or two. Alma
Whitaker in Los Angeles Times.
' FUNCTION OF A NEWSPAPER
But some may ask how they can obtain public
ity for their views, if the newspapers will not print
their letters. In reply we may say, first, that the
instances where letters of general interest are not
printed are very rare, as far as our txjiericnce
- goes; hut, secondly, and chiefly, the function of a,
newspaper is to print the news, und what one per
son may think about another is jiot news; neither
are mere statements of i opinion" Wc suppose it
will be admitted that an editor has belter oppor-.
tunitics than other men of knowing how newspa
pers are conducted. He certainly sees more of tilem.
Our observations lead us to think that the Victoria
daily papers give their correspondents more space
and greater latitude than any other dailies In Can
ada, or the United States. No newspaper editor
takes any pretensions to infallibility. He doubtless
makes many errors in Judgment, but ho has to ex
ercise his discretion in the lifcht of his experience,
and if he makes an enor and prints what he ought
not to have printed, he cannot escape responsibility
by throwing it upon the shoulders of someone else.
Moreover, it is. the rule almost everywhere for
editors to J decline to give reason, for not giving
i publicity to contributions. Victoria Colonist.
DIET OF ANCIENT ATHLETES .
The actual diet used by the ancient Greek ath
letes consisted of a certain kind of cheese, specially
prepared from goats' milk. Later on a flesh diet
was introduced. Tlie Romans, in tiie early stages
of training, utilized a vegetarian form of diet, con
sisting of dried figs, new cheese and boiled grain.
Later on, again, meat was lu'.dert to the list, but
only on-? sort of flesh was thought suitable, and
that, curiously enough, was pork, an edible abso
lutely banned by most modern trainers. Galen
most firmly maintained that pork contains far more
nutriment than any other flesh food. It certainly
is a very significant fact that the ancient athletes
complajned that if they were forced, when in
training, to live upon anything else but lsirk for
any one meal their mental and physical forces alike
were seriously impaired. Webster in Strand Magazine.
FAR13H GETS OVATION
Continued From Page One
and advances the money for paving,
and, in order to do this, they must
whack the price up about ten per
cent for their trouble in handling the
bonds.
"Then there is another thing the
town ditch. It will have to be moved.
The q-jestion is. where will the money
come from? Suppose the taxpayers
who are alfected should build a con
crete syphon under Van Huren street.
That would take up some of the se
ntent from Mr. Fuller's mill and give
employment to the men Judge Lewis
says are out of work.
"Storm sewers will be an absolute
necessity if paving is to continue. It
will cost from $:MMiumi to :mi,(mio to
build an adequate system. For this, 1
believe, no bonds should be issued, but
the work should be done by direct as
sessment on the lands that are to be
drained.
"Phoenix certainly needs paving.
We don't often Jinve such rainy sea
son's as we have just passed through.
when the streets are converted into
seas of mud. If we have another next
year, Phoenix people will grow web
feet like the citizens of Oregon."
. It seemed that the momlicrs of the
chamber of commerce were determined
to hear about paving. President l-'eii-neinore
got up as the Phoenix -made
1 La Comfort cigars were being passed
around and said something about it.
Then Judge Lewis tolti tlie crowd the
astonishing fact that one out of every
five able-bodied men in Phoenix was
out of work. He. too, suggested pav
ing as the remedy.
"Start paving, and you will bring
about the prosjerity that belongs to
Phoenix. Why is this condition'.' Be
cause we hav? been retrenchinp;. It is
not because our confidence in the ulti
mate prosperity of ihe Salt River val
ley is one whit disturbed. Paving
will not onlv bring in outside capital,
but it will lurnish work for thousands
who now need it." r
In closing. Judge Lewis announced
the entertainment for the Associated
Charities at the KIks' theater.
Paul Edwin Fuller of Mesa followed
the first speaker with an eloquent ap
peal to the merchants of Phoenix to
aid in starting Ihe Phoenix Portland
cement mill. The galley has agri
culture and nearby is mining,''and the
only great fundamental industry that
is lacking is manufacturing.
He told how much the manufacture
of a local cement would (save in cost
on future great construction w-orks,
and he mentioned as users of im
mense quantities of cement the lining
of canals, tiie building of the Verde
dam and paving.
Jl. D. .Marshall, who called himself
a loafer at the lngleside club, told ho".v
winter visitors ought to be enter
tained. There are ' but three play
grounds lngleside. Chandler and Cas
tle Hot Springs. Climate and Mir,
shine are alreadv here in great abund
ance, but accommodations are yet lim
ited. He mentioned golf as one of the
chief requisites of a proper resort
hotel. In his attack upon present-conditions.
In took in everything that
holds off winter visitors from the in
convenience of railroad accommoda
tions, the utterly impossible railroad
stations, the lack of rial publicity, the
scarcity of real hotels. He suggested
a hotel that would hold r.no to lO(ii)
guests a sort of combination plan,
built In connection with the railroads.
The fair fields near the Country club
would do, he said.. In passing, he paid
an eloquent tribute to V. J. Murphy
who has done so much for the tourists
by maintaining his part of their ac
commodations in the face of many dif
ficulties.
A. A. Betts, subbing for F. A. Jones
on rates, shared with Senatress F. W.
Munds the subject of cans. Betts
came right out in meeting and said
that there ought to be a canning facT
tory here, but Mrs. Munds, depend
ing on a slip of paper and some type
writing, conveyed these thoughts to
the members:
"Mr. Chairman: I notice in glancing
over your program for this evening
that the first sieaker proposes to
"pack the house and establish a can
nery here in Phoenix." Now, Mr.
Chairman, we have lieen canning
things out in the legislature this
week. We canned the land commis
sion, the tax commission, and someone
wanted to can the governor. This is
to say that I hope you will not let
this tannery process go any further
and whatever you do, please do not
can the legislature.
FRANCIS W. MIWDS.
Senator Stapley urged assistance
for. the cement mill, spoke of economy
in the state administration, and gave
a few ideas on getting together.
Rudolph Kuchler of Glendale pre
sented a very eloquent address on the
assistance the chamber of commerce
can render the community from the
farmer's point of view.
J. H. Mulholland brought a message
from the board of trade at Wicken-
burg, urging mining development and
good roads.
; C. H. Fitch reminded himself of
the story aliout the easterner who
came into the reclamation office with
questions about irrigation in terms of
gallons. Then, just out of curiosity,
the project manager figured some
gallons. An acre foot of water, he
said, contained 445,334,705,000 gallons
of water. The Roosevelt dam, when
full, contains thirty billion billion
gallons, or enough to cover filie square
miles a foot deep. This would flood
the state of Maryland a foot under
water.
The entertainment ended with a
program rendered by members of the
Ellis Musical comedy company from
the Coliseum. Frank Vack, Marjorie
Ehaw, Earl Caldwell, Mr. Young, Kei
na Vivienne, the prima donna; Babe
Lewis, the soubrette; Karl Hall and
Miss Barker rendered solos and Mrs.
Hall assisted at the piano.
President Fennemore then
the members to go home and
It with their wives."
MISSIONARY 10 TELL
OF FROZEN NORTHLAND
;il vised
"square
HIGH SCHOOL NOTES
GLEANED BY TIE COB
G. J. Carter, missionary to the Es
kimo along the coasts of Labrador and
Greenland, ' w ill speak on Ihe Perils
of , seal hunting and whaling at Ihe
Isaac school house next Sunday at
o'clock. i
Mr, Carter, who is a native of
Newfoundland, spent twelve years as
a seal hunter and whaler in the far
north before becoming a "fisher of
men," and will give a vivid descrip
tion' of human and animal life in Ihe
frozen regions. In connection with
his adventures he will also
missionary work among tlie pe
Greenland and Labrador. Tlie
is cordially invited to alien
lecture, which is free to all.
tell of
1 'I f
public
d Ibis
Save the expense
and delay of pro
bate proceedings
by laciiio' your cstalc in
our hands for administra
tion. Phoenix Title and
Trust Co.
18 N. Fiit Ave.
By THE CUB.
The Cub was criticized by soim
for saying what he did about' school
spirit, but the majority seemed . to
take it in the way it was meant. The
truth- hurts sometimes, as in this case.
The spirit of the school, which was
said to be defunct, has been discov
ered to have been only sound asleep i
and j.ist needed awakening. I
Tin' Coyotes were Healed w ith a
double program at the assembly held ;
in the Auditorium yesterday morning. 1
The Coyote band, under the direction 1
of Mrs. Williams, rendered several '
musical numbers of high m"rit. It
was very noticeable what great im-
provcmenl the band has made in the 1
last few months under this compe-
tent 'instructress. j
The second part of the program
consisted of a demonstration of the ;
typewriting department of the school. j
C. L. Michael had charge and gave
an interesting talk on the business I
of stenography and its value. He gave ;
the average wage of the typists in :
the different degrees of proficiency, i
The Phoenix high school ranks sec- j
ond to but very few schools in the
first and second places and some
times . both . in the high school con
tests of the country. Several pro
ficiency medals were awarded at this
assembly. The Underwood gold med
als for eighty words or over a min
ute were awarded to Felix Rosas, who
w rote S.'i words in the test ; la'.ward
Haley, 84, and Arthur Sutherland,
who reached the speer' of eighty
1 words. The Itcimngtoii gold nicitai
. was awarded to Alerander Rosas for j
1 writing 4 chords per minute IV. r leu
i consecutive minutes. An exhibition
of speed was :;i',n by si staii'llts of
the department, the speed ran;:ipy l
from Nil to itai words a mit.ute. The
program was full of inleic.-'t a!! the",
way through. !
Coa-.'h Geary
Iraek events to
noon between
school.. The
projrram is a
loams of four
sand yard run
The program
sharp. Kveryhc
ed a few j
his afi.-r- i
of lhe
of the!
bet ween
The Ihou-
(I.
h 'S arran;;
lake p!a"c :
the classes
main featur
rrlay race
men each.
wii! illf.o be featur
will start at I o. 1,
tdy is wclt nmc
The Coyote cairiva! is goirg l
sonic stunt. It s well inn!
and before the end of the wee!,
will begin to take form. It u ill
privon on Friday, the IJlh, at tht
ditorium.
The Coyote baseball team is goir.;
over to Gh ndale on Saturday 1o win
a baseball game from thosos ugar
ikngs.
There was a meeting of the Booh
be
v. a y
Aii-
afternoon ii
very inter
given. Mr
1'nited Slates, for the output or pro- ii und Pen lub yesterday
ficient typists. For instance, a Mr. Colodny's room. A
pupil of the high school for three : teres! ing program was
years. Samuel Holsinger. holds the .Colodny's tricks with words showing
championship for the west as the Ihe way they grew were exception
fastest operator in the hish schools, i ally interesting as well as instruc
The Coyote typists eontinuallv take tire. '
Dddge Brothers,
M DTD R CAR
Beauty plays a large
part in the owner's
pride of possession.
One reason why this
car has appealed
strongly to the pub
lic is that its appear
ance invariably in
spires admiration.
McARTEiUR
$395.00
BROTHERS
liarber Hair pretty in. sir. Re-n
ta:'i way long?
.Man in Chair-- I. or.;:? 1 was b,ni
that way. It i-' true that subsequent
ly 1 enjoyed a period of hirsute ef
florescent., but it did h endure.
l'oston Trnnsciipt.
Kvervhody attend IT. Conner's
auction sale uf ealtlc today. miles
i-or!hwe;t of ' Phoenix. Adv. It
I Ladies' Aid Society !
The Ladles' Aid society of Grace
Kvangelical Lutheran church met yes
terday afternoon with Mrs. - C. I).
Reed, 806 North Fourth avenue. This
being the first anniversary of the
society, the election of officers was
held. The following persons were
re-elected: Mrs. C. E. Newcomer,
president: Mrs. E. Hanson, vice-president;
Mrs. P. I Zimmerman, secre
tary; Mrs. J. F. Westberg, treasurer.
Refreshments were served at the
close of the business meeting and a
pleasant social hour was enjoyed by
the large number present. Miss Irene
Jacobson rendered several fine selec
tions on the piano. Asa hostess, Mrs.
Reed did her full share in making
this anniversary meeting a success in
every va y.
- 1 . s' wmm
KSw .? your system" 1 - ! pT V 1
" j': i IS ALL RUN DOWN, - , . A
A ; : BUT THIS HOME- "
' TRADE. TONIC 'l ! - .HW I
1 WILL PUT YOU fj : ' 4 J
" THE .-WRONG MEDICINE
THIS COMMUNITY is no better thai, the men and women who live in it.
If YOU and I do wrong, our Community SUFFERS.. .Hut" it is useless to
look outside of Arizona for the remedy. The REAL REMEDY is near at
hand. It is WE who are able to KILL or CURE. The WRONG MEDICINE
kills the medicine that bears the out-of-town label, the "mail order" label.
But the TONIC that cures is the PRACTICE of "trade-at-home." Let u
all each one of us from this day on practice and preach, "TRADE AT
HOME." ; The Republican Ad-Men-

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